Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index U > Category: Undergo

Undergo Quotes (14 quotes)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composite (4)  |  Contain (68)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reference (33)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Use (766)

Considered from the standpoint of chemistry, living bodies appear to us as laboratories of chemical processes, for they undergo perpetual changes in their material substrate. They draw materials from the outside world and combine them with the mass of their liquid and solid parts.
In 'Allgemeine Betrachtungen der orgauischen Korper', Physiologie des Menschen (1830), Vol. 1, 34. Trans. in Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mayer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 7I.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combine (57)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considered (12)  |  Draw (137)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Living (491)  |  Mass (157)  |  Material (353)  |  Outside (141)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Process (423)  |  Solid (116)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Substrate (2)  |  World (1774)

Is man a peculiar organism? Does he originate in a wholly different way from a dog, bird, frog, or fish? and does he thereby justify those who assert that he has no place in nature, and no real relationship with the lower world of animal life? Or does he develop from a similar embryo, and undergo the same slow and gradual progressive modifications? The answer is not for an instant doubtful, and has not been doubtful for the last thirty years. The mode of man’s origin and the earlier stages of his development are undoubtedly identical with those of the animals standing directly below him in the scale; without the slightest doubt, he stands in this respect nearer the ape than the ape does to the dog. (1863)
As quoted in Ernst Haeckel and E. Ray Lankester (trans.) as epigraph for Chap. 12, The History of Creation (1886), Vol. 1, 364.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ape (53)  |  Assert (66)  |  Bird (149)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Dog (70)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fish (120)  |  Frog (38)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Identical (53)  |  Instant (45)  |  Justify (24)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lower (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Originate (36)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Place (177)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Respect (207)  |  Scale (121)  |  Similar (36)  |  Slow (101)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stand (274)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Man has undergone agonizing decentralization. He has waged a steady struggle against decentralization , but at the same time—paradoxically—his accumulated knowledge has gradually forced him to abandon all illusions about his centrality.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Against (332)  |  Agonizing (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Centrality (2)  |  Force (487)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Same (157)  |  Steady (44)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wage (5)

Men in general are very slow to enter into what is reckoned a new thing; and there seems to be a very universal as well as great reluctance to undergo the drudgery of acquiring information that seems not to be absolutely necessary.
In The Commercial and Political Atlas: Representing, by Means of Stained Copper Charts, the Progress of the Commerce, Revenues, Expenditure and Debts of England During the Whole of the Eighteenth Century (1786, 1801), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Acquiring (5)  |  Drudgery (6)  |  Enter (141)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Information (166)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Slow (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)

Science, especially natural and medical science, is always undergoing evolution, and one can never hope to have said the last word upon any branch of it.
From Introduction to Alphonse Laveran and Felix Etienne Pierre Mesnil Trypanosomes and Trypanosomiasis (1904). English edition translated and much enlarged by David Nabarro, (1907), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (150)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Hope (299)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Word (10)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Never (1087)  |  Science (3879)  |  Word (619)

So there he is at last. Man on the moon. The poor magnificent bungler! He can't even get to the office without undergoing the agonies of the damned, but give him a little metal, a few chemicals, some wire and twenty or thirty billion dollars and, vroom! there he is, up on a rock a quarter of a million miles up in the sky.
[Written when the first manned mission to the Moon, Apollo 11, landed (20 Jul 1969).]
'Why on Earth Are We There? Because It's Impossible', New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Agony (7)  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bungler (2)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Damned (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mission (21)  |  Money (170)  |  Moon (237)  |  Office (71)  |  Poor (136)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Sky (161)  |  Wire (35)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Act (272)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Badly (32)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Country (251)  |  Curve (49)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deep (233)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (40)  |  Enter (141)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expect (200)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Follower (11)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inference (45)  |  Instance (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Least (75)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (76)  |  Political (121)  |  Portal (7)  |  Premise (37)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Topic (21)  |  Training (80)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (121)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Variation (90)  |  Want (497)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

The facts proved by geology are briefly these: that during an immense, but unknown period, the surface of the earth has undergone successive changes; land has sunk beneath the ocean, while fresh land has risen up from it; mountain chains have been elevated; islands have been formed into continents, and continents submerged till they have become islands; and these changes have taken place, not once merely, but perhaps hundreds, perhaps thousands of times.
In 'On the Law which has regulated the Introduction of New Species', The Annals and Magazine of Natural History (1855), 16, No. 93, 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Chain (50)  |  Change (593)  |  Continent (76)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immense (86)  |  Island (46)  |  Land (115)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Period (198)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sink (37)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)

The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation cannot for a moment entertain the idea of a being who interferes in the course of events–provided, of course, that he takes the hypothesis of causality really seriously. He has no use for the religion of fear and equally little for social or moral religion. A God who rewards and punishes is inconceivable to him for the simple reason that a man’s actions are determined by necessity, external and internal, so that in God’s eyes he cannot be responsible, any more than an inanimate object is responsible for the motions it undergoes. Science has therefore been charged with undermining morality, but the charge is unjust. A man’s ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hopes of reward after death.
From 'Religion And Science', as collected in Ideas And Opinions (1954), 39, given its source as: “Written expressly for the New York Times Magazine. Appeared there November 9, 1930 (pp. 1-4). The German text was published in the Berliner Tageblatt, November 11, 1930.” The NYT Magazine article in full, is reprinted in Edward H. Cotton (ed.), Has Science Discovered God? A Symposium of Modern Scientific Opinion (1931), 101. This original version directly from the magazine has significantly different wording, beginning, “For anyone who is pervaded with the sense of causal law….” See this alternate form on the Albert Einstein Quotes page on this website. As for why the difference, Webmaster speculates the book form editor perhaps used a revised translation from Einstein’s German article.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Causality (11)  |  Causation (14)  |  Charge (59)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Determine (144)  |  Education (378)  |  Effectually (2)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Equally (130)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Event (216)  |  External (57)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Internal (66)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Causation (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Poor (136)  |  Provide (69)  |  Punish (9)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Reward (68)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Tie (38)  |  Undermine (6)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unjust (6)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

The opinion of Bacon on this subject [geometry] was diametrically opposed to that of the ancient philosophers. He valued geometry chiefly, if not solely, on account of those uses, which to Plato appeared so base. And it is remarkable that the longer Bacon lived the stronger this feeling became. When in 1605 he wrote the two books on the Advancement of Learning, he dwelt on the advantages which mankind derived from mixed mathematics; but he at the same time admitted that the beneficial effect produced by mathematical study on the intellect, though a collateral advantage, was “no less worthy than that which was principal and intended.” But it is evident that his views underwent a change. When near twenty years later, he published the De Augmentis, which is the Treatise on the Advancement of Learning, greatly expanded and carefully corrected, he made important alterations in the part which related to mathematics. He condemned with severity the pretensions of the mathematicians, “delidas et faslum mathematicorum.” Assuming the well-being of the human race to be the end of knowledge, he pronounced that mathematical science could claim no higher rank than that of an appendage or an auxiliary to other sciences. Mathematical science, he says, is the handmaid of natural philosophy; she ought to demean herself as such; and he declares that he cannot conceive by what ill chance it has happened that she presumes to claim precedence over her mistress.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appendage (2)  |  Assume (38)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Base (117)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Book (392)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Chance (239)  |  Change (593)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Claim (146)  |  Collateral (4)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Correct (86)  |  De (3)  |  Declare (45)  |  Derive (65)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Evident (91)  |  Expand (53)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Handmaid (6)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Important (209)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intend (16)  |  It Is Evident (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Less (103)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Mix (19)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Precedence (4)  |  Presume (9)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Principal (63)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Pronounce (10)  |  Publish (36)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Relate (21)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Severity (6)  |  Solely (9)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

The present state of the earth and of the organisms now inhabiting it, is but the last stage of a long and uninterrupted series of changes which it has undergone, and consequently, that to endeavour to explain and account for its present condition without any reference to those changes (as has frequently been done) must lead to very imperfect and erroneous conclusions.
In 'On the Law which has regulated the Introduction of New Species', The Annals and Magazine of Natural History (1855), 16, No. 93, 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequent (19)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Explain (322)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Organism (220)  |  Present (619)  |  Reference (33)  |  Series (149)  |  Stage (143)  |  State (491)  |  Uninterrupted (7)

Whoever has undergone the intense experience of successful advances made in [science], is moved by profound reverence for the rationality made manifest in existence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Intense (20)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Profound (104)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Successful (123)  |  Whoever (42)

Why it is that animals, instead of developing in a simple and straightforward way, undergo in the course of their growth a series of complicated changes, during which they often acquire organs which have no function, and which, after remaining visible for a short time, disappear without leaving a trace ... To the Darwinian, the explanation of such facts is obvious. The stage when the tadpole breathes by gills is a repetition of the stage when the ancestors of the frog had not advanced in the scale of development beyond a fish.
In The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour (1885), Vol. 1, 702.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Advance (280)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Change (593)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Course (409)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Development (422)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fish (120)  |  Frog (38)  |  Function (228)  |  Gill (3)  |  Growth (187)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Organ (115)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Scale (121)  |  Series (149)  |  Short (197)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Stage (143)  |  Straightforward (10)  |  Tadpole (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Visible (84)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.