Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Habit

Habit Quotes (168 quotes)

... If I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself credulous. The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it must sink back into savagery.
The Scientific Basis of Morals (1884), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Danger (115)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Sink (37)  |  Society (326)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wrong (234)

Die Gewohnheit einer Meinung erzeugt oft völlige Ueberzeugung von ihrer Richtigkeit, sie verbirgt die schwächeren Theile davon, und macht uns unfähig, die Beweise dagegen anzunehmen.
The habit of an opinion often leads to the complete conviction of its truth, it hides the weaker parts of it, and makes us incapable of accepting the proofs against it.
(1827). German text in Ira Freund, The Study of Chemical Composition (1904), 31. Translated form in Carl Schorlemmer, The Rise and Development of Organic Chemistry (1894), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Against (332)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Hide (69)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Lead (384)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Proof (287)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Weakness (48)

The classification of facts, the recognition of their sequence and relative significance is the function of science, and the habit of forming a judgment upon these facts unbiassed by personal feeling is characteristic of what may be termed the scientific frame of mind.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Classification (97)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Formation (96)  |  Forming (42)  |  Frame Of Mind (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Personal (67)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relative (39)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significance (113)  |  Term (349)

A first step in the study of civilization is to dissect it into details, and to classify these in their proper groups. Thus, in examining weapons, they are to be classed under spear, club, sling, bow and arrow, and so forth; among textile arts are to be ranged matting, netting, and several grades of making and weaving threads; myths are divided under such headings as myths of sunrise and sunset, eclipse-myths, earthquake-myths, local myths which account for the names of places by some fanciful tale, eponymic myths which account for the parentage of a tribe by turning its name into the name of an imaginary ancestor; under rites and ceremonies occur such practices as the various kinds of sacrifice to the ghosts of the dead and to other spiritual beings, the turning to the east in worship, the purification of ceremonial or moral uncleanness by means of water or fire. Such are a few miscellaneous examples from a list of hundreds … To the ethnographer, the bow and arrow is the species, the habit of flattening children’s skulls is a species, the practice of reckoning numbers by tens is a species. The geographical distribution of these things, and their transmission from region to region, have to be studied as the naturalist studies the geography of his botanical and zoological species.
In Primitive Culture (1871), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Arrow (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Being (1278)  |  Botany (57)  |  Bow (14)  |  Ceremony (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Club (4)  |  Death (388)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Divided (50)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Geography (36)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Myth (56)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Practice (204)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purification (7)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Rite (3)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Skull (5)  |  Sling (4)  |  Spear (6)  |  Species (401)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Tale (16)  |  Textile (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Worship (32)  |  Zoological (5)

A habit of basing convictions upon evidence, and of giving to them only that degree or certainty which the evidence warrants, would, if it became general, cure most of the ills from which the world suffers.
In Bertrand Russell and Paul Edwards (ed.), 'Preface', Why I Am Not a Christian: And Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects (1957), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cure (122)  |  Degree (276)  |  Evidence (248)  |  General (511)  |  Most (1731)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Warrant (8)  |  World (1774)

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustable source of pure and exciting contemplations:— One would think that Shakespeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man as finding
    “Tongues in trees—books in running brooks—
    Sermons in stones—and good in everything.”
Accustomed to trace the operations of general causes and the exemplification of general laws, in circumstances where the uninformed and uninquiring eye, perceives neither novelty nor beauty, he walks in the midst of wonders; every object which falls in his way elucidates some principle, affords some instruction and impresses him with a sense of harmony and order. Nor is it a mere passive pleasure which is thus communicated. A thousand questions are continually arising in his mind, a thousand objects of enquiry presenting themselves, which keep his faculties in constant exercise, and his thoughts perpetually on the wing, so that lassitude is excluded from his life, and that craving after artificial excitement and dissipation of the mind, which leads so many into frivolous, unworthy, and destructive pursuits, is altogether eradicated from his bosom.
In Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Arising (22)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Describe (128)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Running (61)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Stone (162)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unworthy (18)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wonder (236)

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustible source of pure and exciting contemplations.
In Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occur (150)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pure (291)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Taste (90)

A precisian professor had the habit of saying: “… quartic polynomial ax4+bx3+cx2+dx+e, where e need not be the base of the natural logarithms.”
Given, without citation, in A Mathematician’s Miscellany (1953), reissued as Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 60. [Note: a precisian is a rigidly precise or punctilious person. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Natural (796)  |  Polynomial (2)  |  Precise (68)  |  Professor (128)  |  Say (984)

According to my derivative hypothesis, a change takes place first in the structure of the animal, and this, when sufficiently advanced, may lead to modifications of habits… . “Derivation” holds that every species changes, in time, by virtue of inherent tendencies thereto. “Natural Selection” holds that no such change can take place without the influence of altered external circumstances educing or selecting such change… . The hypothesis of “natural selection” totters on the extension of a conjectural condition, explanatory of extinction to the majority of organisms, and not known or observed to apply to the origin of any species.
In On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1868), Vol. 3, 808.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extension (59)  |  External (57)  |  Extinction (74)  |  First (1283)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Majority (66)  |  Modification (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Virtue (109)

Activity bears fruit in habit, and the kind of activity determines the quality of the habit.
As quoted in William W. Speer, Primary Arithmetic: First Year, for the Use of Teachers (1902), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Bear (159)  |  Determine (144)  |  Education (378)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Kind (557)  |  Quality (135)

ADDER, n. A species of snake. So called from its habit of adding funeral outlays to the other expenses of living.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  19.
Science quotes on:  |  Adder (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Funeral (5)  |  Humour (116)  |  Living (491)  |  Other (2236)  |  Snake (26)  |  Species (401)

After having produced aquatic animals of all ranks and having caused extensive variations in them by the different environments provided by the waters, nature led them little by little to the habit of living in the air, first by the water's edge and afterwards on all the dry parts of the globe. These animals have in course of time been profoundly altered by such novel conditions; which so greatly influenced their habits and organs that the regular gradation which they should have exhibited in complexity of organisation is often scarcely recognisable.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 69-70.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Different (577)  |  Dry (57)  |  Edge (47)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extensive (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Novel (32)  |  Organ (115)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rank (67)  |  Regular (46)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Water (481)

Alcoholism, the opium habit and tobaccoism are a trio of poison habits which have been weighty handicaps to human progress during the last three centuries. In the United States, the subtle spell of opium has been broken by restrictive legislation; the grip of the rum demon has been loosened by the Prohibition Amendment to the Constitution, but the tobacco habit still maintains its strangle-hold and more than one hundred million victims of tobaccoism daily burn incense to the smoke god.
In Tobaccoism: or, How Tobacco Kills (1922), Preface, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Amendment (2)  |  Broken (56)  |  Burn (87)  |  Century (310)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Daily (87)  |  Demon (8)  |  God (757)  |  Grip (9)  |  Handicap (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Last (426)  |  Legislation (10)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Opium (7)  |  Poison (40)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prohibition (3)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Rum (3)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Spell (9)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Stranglehold (2)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  United States (31)  |  Victim (35)

An essential [of an inventor] is a logical mind that sees analogies. No! No! not mathematical. No man of a mathematical habit of mind ever invented anything that amounted to much. He hasn’t the imagination to do it. He sticks too close to the rules, and to the things he is mathematically sure he knows, to create anything new.
As quoted in French Strother, 'The Modern Profession of Inventing', World's Work and Play (Jul 1905), 6, No. 32, 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Invent (51)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logical (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)

And so the great truth, now a paradox, may become a commonplace, that man is greater than his surroundings, and that the production of a breed of men and women, even in our great cities, less prone to disease, and pain, more noble in aspect, more rational in habits, more exultant in the pure joy of living, is not only scientifically possible, but that even the partial fulfillment of this dream, if dream it be, is the most worthy object towards which the lover of his kind can devote the best energies of his life.
In 'The Breed of Man', The Nineteenth Century, (Oct 1900), 669, as collected in Martin Polley (ed.), The History of Sport in Britain, 1880-1914: Sport, Education, and Improvement (2004), Vol. 2, 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Joy (107)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Noble (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Pain (136)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Possible (552)  |  Production (183)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rational (90)  |  Truth (1057)

Antiqua consuetudo difficulter relinquitur: & ultra proprium videre nemo libenter ducitur.
Old habits are hard to break: and no one is easily led beyond his own point of view.
In De Imitatione Christi (1709), Book 1, Chap. 14, 23. As translated by William C. Creasy in The Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis: A New Reading of the 1441 Latin Autograph Manuscript (2007), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Break (99)  |  Easily (35)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lead (384)  |  Old (481)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  View (488)

Apart from its healthful mental training as a branch of ordinary education, geology as an open-air pursuit affords an admirable training in habits of observation, furnishes a delightful relief from the cares and routine of everyday life, takes us into the open fields and the free fresh face of nature, leads us into all manner of sequestered nooks, whither hardly any other occupation or interest would be likely to send us, sets before us problems of the highest interest regarding the history of the ground beneath our feet, and thus gives a new charm to scenery which may be already replete with attractions.
Outlines of Field-Geology (1900), 251-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Branch (150)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Education (378)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Free (232)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ground (217)  |  History (673)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mental (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Open (274)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Relief (30)  |  Routine (25)  |  Sequester (2)  |  Set (394)  |  Training (80)  |  Whither (11)

As an answer to those who are in the habit of saying to every new fact, “ What is its use ?” Dr. Franklin says to such, “What is the use of an infant?” The answer of the experimentalist would be, “Endeavour to make it useful.”
From 5th Lecture in 1816, in Bence Jones, The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Infant (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Say (984)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)

As geologists, we learn that it is not only the present condition of the globe that has been suited to the accommodation of myriads of living creatures, but that many former states also have been equally adapted to the organization and habits of prior races of beings. The disposition of the seas, continents, and islands, and the climates have varied; so it appears that the species have been changed, and yet they have all been so modelled, on types analogous to those of existing plants and animals, as to indicate throughout a perfect harmony of design and unity of purpose. To assume that the evidence of the beginning or end of so vast a scheme lies within the reach of our philosophical inquiries, or even of our speculations, appears to us inconsistent with a just estimate of the relations which subsist between the finite powers of man and the attributes of an Infinite and Eternal Being.
Concluding remark, Principles of Geology(1833), Vol. 3, 384-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Disposition (42)  |  End (590)  |  Equally (130)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Finite (59)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Organization (114)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Sea (308)  |  Species (401)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (167)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vast (177)

As physicists have arranged an extensive series of effects under the general term of Heat, so they have named another series Light, and a third they have called Electricity. We find ... that all these principles are capable of being produced through the medium of living bodies, for nearly all animals have the power of evolving heat; many insects, moreover, can voluntarily emit light; and the property of producing electricity is well evinced in the terrible shock of the electric eel, as well as in that of some other creatures. We are indeed in the habit of talking of the Electric fluid, or the Galvanic fluid, but this in reality is nothing but a licence of expression suitable to our finite and material notions.
In the Third Edition of Elements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (1851), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Creature (233)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Emit (15)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Finding (30)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fluid (51)  |  General (511)  |  Heat (174)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insect (77)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Material (353)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Property (168)  |  Reality (261)  |  Series (149)  |  Shock (37)  |  Talking (76)  |  Term (349)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Through (849)

As to diseases, make a habit of two things—to help, or at least to do no harm.
Epidemics, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. I, 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Harm (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

Astronomers and physicists, dealing habitually with objects and quantities far beyond the reach of the senses, even with the aid of the most powerful aids that ingenuity has been able to devise, tend almost inevitably to fall into the ways of thinking of men dealing with objects and quantities that do not exist at all, e.g., theologians and metaphysicians. Thus their speculations tend almost inevitably to depart from the field of true science, which is that of precise observation, and to become mere soaring in the empyrean. The process works backward, too. That is to say, their reports of what they pretend actually to see are often very unreliable. It is thus no wonder that, of all men of science, they are the most given to flirting with theology. Nor is it remarkable that, in the popular belief, most astronomers end by losing their minds.
Minority Report: H. L. Mencken’s Notebooks (1956), Sample 74, 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Backward (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Do (1908)  |  Empyrean (3)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fall (230)  |  Field (364)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Loss (110)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Metaphysician (7)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reach (281)  |  Report (38)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Soaring (9)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thinking (414)  |  True Science (23)  |  Unreliable (3)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)

Behaviorism is the art of pulling habits out of rats.
Anonymous
In Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp and Deborah Fripp, Speaking of Science (2000), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Quip (80)  |  Rat (37)

By considering the embryological structure of man - the homologies which he presents with the lower animals - the rudiments which he retains - and the reversions to which he is liable, we can partly recall in imagination the former condition of our early progenitors; and we can approximately place them in their proper position in the zoological series. We thus learnt that man is descended from a hairy quadruped, furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in its habit, and an inhabitant of the Old World. This creature, if its whole structure had been examined by a naturalist, would have been classed among the Quadrumana, as surely as would be the common and still more ancient progenitor of the Old and New World monkeys.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 389.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Ear (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Former (137)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Old World (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Proper (144)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Series (149)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surely (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Chaos often breeds life when order breeds habit.
The Education of Henry Adams (1907, 1918), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Breed (24)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Life (1795)  |  Order (632)

Communication of science as subject-matter has so far outrun in education the construction of a scientific habit of mind that to some extent the natural common sense of mankind has been interfered with to its detriment.
Address to Section L, Education, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Boston (1909), 'Science as Subject-Matter and as Method'. Published in Science (28 Jan 1910), N.S. Vol. 31, No. 787, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Communication (94)  |  Construction (112)  |  Detriment (3)  |  Education (378)  |  Extent (139)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Outrun (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)

Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 451.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Bundle (7)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fate (72)  |  Good (889)  |  Heed (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Realize (147)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spinning (18)  |  State (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

Curiosity that inborn property of man, daughter of ignorance and mother of knowledge when wonder wakens our minds, has the habit, wherever it sees some extraordinary phenomenon of nature, a comet for example, a sun-dog, or a midday star, of asking straightway what it means.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 189, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Comet (54)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Dog (70)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Midday (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Property (168)  |  See (1081)  |  Star (427)  |  Straightway (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Wonder (236)

During the time that [Karl] Landsteiner gave me an education in the field of imununology, I discovered that he and I were thinking about the serologic problem in very different ways. He would ask, What do these experiments force us to believe about the nature of the world? I would ask, What is the most. simple and general picture of the world that we can formulate that is not ruled by these experiments? I realized that medical and biological investigators were not attacking their problems the same way that theoretical physicists do, the way I had been in the habit of doing.
‘Molecular Disease’, Pfizer Spectrum (1958), 6:9, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Formulation (36)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Karl Landsteiner (8)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realization (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Education should form right ideas and right habits.
As quoted, without citation, in 'What Is Education?', The Journal of Education (28 Sep 1905), 62, No. 13, 354.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Right (452)

Even happiness itself may become habitual. There is a habit of looking at the bright side of things, and also of looking at the dark side. Dr. Johnson has said that the habit of looking at the best side of a thing is worth more to a man than a thousand pounds a year. And we possess the power, to a great extent, of so exercising the will as to direct the thoughts upon objects calculated to yield happiness and improvement rather than their opposites.
In Self-help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1859, 1861), 405-406.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Bright (79)  |  Dark (140)  |  Direct (225)  |  Extent (139)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Samuel Johnson (50)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Side (233)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

Everything's incredible, if you can skin off the crust of obviousness our habits put on it.
Point Counter Point (1928), 407.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Crust (38)  |  Everything (476)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Obviousness (3)  |  Skin (47)

Exercise in the most rigorous thinking that is possible will of its own accord strengthen the sense of truth and right, for each advance in the ability to distinguish between correct and false thoughts, each habit making for rigour in thought development will increase in the sound pupil the ability and the wish to ascertain what is right in life and to defend it.
In Anleitung zum mathematischen Unterricht in den höheren Schulen (1906), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Advance (280)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Correct (86)  |  Defend (30)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Exercise (110)  |  False (100)  |  Increase (210)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sound (183)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

For it may safely be said, not that the habit of ready and correct observation will by itself make us useful nurses, but that without it we shall be useless with all our devotion.
Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not (1860), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Observation (555)  |  Useful (250)  |  Will (2355)

For they are not given to idleness, nor go in a proud habit, or plush and velvet garments, often showing their rings upon their fingers, or wearing swords with silver hilts by their sides, or fine and gay gloves upon their hands, but diligently follow their labours, sweating whole days and nights by their furnaces. They do not spend their time abroad for recreation, but take delight in their laboratory. They wear leather garments with a pouch, and an apron wherewith they wipe their hands. They put their fingers amongst coals, into clay, and filth, not into gold rings. They are sooty and black like smiths and colliers, and do not pride themselves upon clean and beautiful faces.
As translated in Paracelsus and Arthur Edward Waite (ed.), The Hermetic and Alchemical Writings of Paracelsus (1894, 1976), Vol. 1, 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Apron (2)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Clay (9)  |  Clean (50)  |  Coal (57)  |  Day And Night (3)  |  Delight (108)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Face (212)  |  Filth (4)  |  Follow (378)  |  Furnace (12)  |  Garment (13)  |  Glove (4)  |  Gold (97)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Labour (98)  |  Leather (4)  |  Pride (78)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Ring (16)  |  Side (233)  |  Silver (46)  |  Soot (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Sword (15)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Velvet (4)  |  Wear (18)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wipe (6)

For this we must make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague?
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Early (185)  |  Growing (98)  |  Guard (18)  |  Must (1526)  |  Plague (41)  |  Possible (552)  |  Useful (250)  |  Way (1217)

Fortunately, a scientist’s worth is judged on the basis of his accomplishments, not the tidiness of his work habits.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 231.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Basis (173)  |  Fortunately (8)  |  Judge (108)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Tidiness (3)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

From a pragmatic point of view, the difference between living against a background of foreigness (an indifferent Universe) and one of intimacy (a benevolent Universe) means the difference between a general habit of wariness and one of trust.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Background (43)  |  Benevolent (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  General (511)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Intimacy (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Pragmatic (2)  |  Trust (66)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)

Habit is a powerful means of advancement, and the habit of eternal vigilance and diligence, rarely fails to bring a substantial reward.
Quoted, without citation, in front matter to T. A. Edison Foundation, Lewis Howard Latimer: A Black Inventor: a Biography and Related Experiments You Can Do (1973). If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Fail (185)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Reward (68)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Vigilance (5)

Habit is thus the enormous fly-wheel of society, its most precious conservative agent. It alone is what keeps us all within the bounds of ordinance, and saves the children of fortune from the envious uprisings of the poor. It alone prevents the hardest and most repulsive walks of life from being deserted by those brought up to tread therein.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 447.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bound (119)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Conservative (15)  |  Desert (56)  |  Envy (15)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flywheel (2)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Hard (243)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Poor (136)  |  Precious (41)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Repulsive (7)  |  Save (118)  |  Society (326)  |  Tread (17)  |  Walk (124)  |  Walk Of Life (2)  |  Wheel (50)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Build (204)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consist (223)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Dead (59)  |  Direct (225)  |  Elude (10)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extend (128)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ineffable (4)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Memory (134)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Moment (253)  |  Personality (62)  |  Physical (508)  |  Probability (130)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Soft (29)  |  Someday (14)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Will (2355)

I could almost wish, at this point, that I were in the habit of expressing myself in theological terms, for if I were, I might be able to compress my entire thesis into a sentence. All knowledge of every variety (I might say) is in the mind of God—and the human intellect, even the best, in trying to pluck it forth can but “see through a glass, darkly.”
In Asimov on Physics (1976), 146. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Darkly (2)  |  Glass (92)  |  God (757)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Point (580)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Trying (144)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wish (212)

I do not intend to go deeply into the question how far mathematical studies, as the representatives of conscious logical reasoning, should take a more important place in school education. But it is, in reality, one of the questions of the day. In proportion as the range of science extends, its system and organization must be improved, and it must inevitably come about that individual students will find themselves compelled to go through a stricter course of training than grammar is in a position to supply. What strikes me in my own experience with students who pass from our classical schools to scientific and medical studies, is first, a certain laxity in the application of strictly universal laws. The grammatical rules, in which they have been exercised, are for the most part followed by long lists of exceptions; accordingly they are not in the habit of relying implicitly on the certainty of a legitimate deduction from a strictly universal law. Secondly, I find them for the most part too much inclined to trust to authority, even in cases where they might form an independent judgment. In fact, in philological studies, inasmuch as it is seldom possible to take in the whole of the premises at a glance, and inasmuch as the decision of disputed questions often depends on an aesthetic feeling for beauty of expression, or for the genius of the language, attainable only by long training, it must often happen that the student is referred to authorities even by the best teachers. Both faults are traceable to certain indolence and vagueness of thought, the sad effects of which are not confined to subsequent scientific studies. But certainly the best remedy for both is to be found in mathematics, where there is absolute certainty in the reasoning, and no authority is recognized but that of one’s own intelligence.
In 'On the Relation of Natural Science to Science in general', Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects, translated by E. Atkinson (1900), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Application (242)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Authority (95)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Classical (45)  |  Compel (30)  |  Confine (26)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Course (409)  |  Decision (91)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Fault (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glance (34)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Grammatical (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Important (209)  |  Improve (58)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intend (16)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Laxity (2)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  List (10)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medical (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Often (106)  |  Organization (114)  |  Part (222)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philological (3)  |  Place (177)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Refer (14)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sadness (35)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Strict (17)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Supply (93)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Traceable (5)  |  Training (80)  |  Trust (66)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

I have from my childhood, in conformity with the precepts of a mother void of all imaginary fear, been in the constant habit of taking toads in my hand, and applying them to my nose and face as it may happen. My motive for doing this very frequently is to inculcate the opinion I have held, since I was told by my mother, that the toad is actually a harmless animal; and to whose manner of life man is certainly under some obligation as its food is chiefly those insects which devour his crops and annoy him in various ways.
Letter to an unknown correspondent, quoted by Bowdler Sharpe, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1900), Vol. 1, 69. In Averil M. Lysaght, Joseph Banks in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1766: his Diary, Manuscripts, and Collections (1971), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Annoyance (3)  |  Biography (240)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Constant (144)  |  Crop (25)  |  Devour (29)  |  Doing (280)  |  Face (212)  |  Fear (197)  |  Food (199)  |  Happen (274)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mother (114)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nose (11)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Precept (10)  |  Toad (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Void (31)  |  Way (1217)

I have mentioned mathematics as a way to settle in the mind a habit of reasoning closely and in train; not that I think it necessary that all men should be deep mathematicians, but that, having got the way of reasoning which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion. For in all sorts of reasoning, every single argument should be managed as a mathematical demonstration; the connection and dependence of ideas should be followed till the mind is brought to the source on which it bottoms, and observes the coherence all along; …
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bring (90)  |  Closely (12)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Connection (162)  |  Deep (233)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Follow (378)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Settle (19)  |  Single (353)  |  Sort (49)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Train (114)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Way (1217)

I never guess. It is a shocking habit—destructive to the logical faculty.
Spoken by fictitious character Sherlock Holmes in The Sign of Four (1890), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Destructive (8)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Guess (61)  |  Logic (287)  |  Never (1087)  |  Shocking (3)

I suppose I should be run after for a professorship if I had studied at Giessen, as it seems to be a settled point that no young man can be expected to know anything of chemistry unless he has studied with Liebig; while the truth is, that any one who goes there and does not afterwards correct the bad habits acquired there, in some other laboratory, is almost unfitted for doing things in Chemistry. No doubt Liebig is a remarkable man, who has done much for organic Chemistry, not to speak of his having quarreled with all the Chemists in Europe...
Letter to his brother, William Dwight Whitney (25 Apr 1846). In Edwin Tenney Brewster and Josiah Dwight Whitney, Life and Letters of Josiah Dwight Whitney (1909), 79-80.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Doing (280)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Expect (200)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Justus von Liebig (38)  |  Man (2251)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Run (174)  |  Settled (34)  |  Speak (232)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Young (227)

I was often humiliated to see men disputing for a piece of bread, just as animals might have done. My feelings on this subject have very much altered since I have been personally exposed to the tortures of hunger. I have discovered, in fact, that a man, whatever may have been his origin, his education, and his habits, is governed, under certain circumstances, much more by his stomach than by his intelligence and his heart.
In François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, 'The History of My Youth: An Autobiography of Francis Arago', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bread (39)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Education (378)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Govern (64)  |  Governed (4)  |  Heart (229)  |  Humiliation (4)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  See (1081)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Subject (521)  |  Torture (29)  |  Whatever (234)

Iamblichus in his treatise On the Arithmetic of Nicomachus observes p. 47- “that certain numbers were called amicable by those who assimilated the virtues and elegant habits to numbers.” He adds, “that 284 and 220 are numbers of this kind; for the parts of each are generative of each other according to the nature of friendship, as was shown by Pythagoras. For some one asking him what a friend was, he answered, another I (ετεϑος εγω) which is demonstrated to take place in these numbers.” [“Friendly” thus: Each number is equal to the sum of the factors of the other.]
In Theoretic Arithmetic (1816), 122. (Factors of 284 are 1, 2, 4 ,71 and 142, which give the sum 220. Reciprocally, factors of 220 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11 ,22, 44, 55 and 110, which give the sum 284.) Note: the expression “alter ego” is Latin for “the other I.”
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Addition (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Asking (73)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Factor (46)  |  Friend (168)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Generative (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Sum (102)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Virtue (109)

If a hundred or a thousand people, all of the same age, of the same constitution and habits, were suddenly seized by the same illness, and one half of them were to place themselves under the care of doctors, such as they are in our time, whilst the other half entrusted themselves to Nature and to their own discretion, I have not the slightest doubt that there would be more cases of death amongst the former, and more cases of recovery among the latter.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Among (3)  |  Care (186)  |  Case (99)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Death (388)  |  Discretion (3)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Entrust (2)  |  Former (137)  |  Half (56)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Illness (34)  |  Latter (21)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Place (177)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Same (157)  |  Seize (15)  |  Slight (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whilst (3)

If I had been taught from my youth all the truths of which I have since sought out demonstrations, and had thus learned them without labour, I should never, perhaps, have known any beyond these; at least, I should never have acquired the habit and the facility which I think I possess in always discovering new truths in proportion as I give myself to the search.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637). In English from John Veitch (trans.), A Discourse on Method (1912), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discover (553)  |  Facility (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Possess (156)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Search (162)  |  Seek (213)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Youth (101)

If in Germany the goddess Justitia had not the unfortunate habit of depositing the ministerial portfolios only in the cradles of her own progeny, who knows how many a German mathematician might not also have made an excellent minister.
In Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 13 (1904), 372.
Science quotes on:  |  Cradle (19)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Excellent (28)  |  German (36)  |  Goddess (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Minister (9)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Unfortunate (19)

If some race of quadrumanous animals, especially one of the most perfect of them, were to lose, by force of circumstances or some other cause, the habit of climbing trees and grasping the branches with its feet in the same way as with its hands, in order to hold on to them; and if the individuals of this race were forced for a series of generations to use their feet only for walking, and to give up using their hands like feet; there is no doubt, according to the observations detailed in the preceding chapter, that these quadrumanous animals would at length be transformed into bimanous, and that the thumbs on their feet would cease to be separated from the other digits, when they only used their feet for walking.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 349, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cease (79)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Climb (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Force (487)  |  Generation (242)  |  Individual (404)  |  Lose (159)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Race (268)  |  Series (149)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tree (246)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

If we range through the whole territory of nature, and endeavour to extract from each department the rich stores of knowledge and pleasure they respectively contain, we shall not find a more refined or purer source of amusement, or a more interesting and unfailing subject for recreation, than that which the observation and examination of the structure, affinities, and habits of plants and vegetables, afford.
In A Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Dahlia (1838), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Botany (57)  |  Containing (4)  |  Department (92)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Examination (98)  |  Extract (40)  |  Extraction (9)  |  Find (998)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Purity (14)  |  Range (99)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Refined (7)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rich (62)  |  Source (93)  |  Store (48)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subject (521)  |  Territory (24)  |  Through (849)  |  Unfailing (5)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Whole (738)

If you have always done it that way, it is probably wrong.
Science quotes on:  |  Way (1217)  |  Wrong (234)

In a Dublin hospital, many years ago, it was noticed that the death-rate was markedly higher in the ground-floor wards than it was in the wards upstairs. This fact was commented on in an official report, and marked down as requiring investigation. Then it was discovered that, when new patients came in, the porter of the hospital was in the habit of putting them upstairs if they could walk by themselves, and downstairs if they could not.
From 'Figures Can Lie', Science Digest (Sep 1951), 30, No. 3, 53. (As condensed from The Listener). Excerpted in Meta Riley Emberger and Marian Ross Hall, Scientific Writing (1955), 407.
Science quotes on:  |  Comment (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Death Rate (2)  |  Discover (553)  |  Down (456)  |  Downstairs (3)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ground Floor (2)  |  Higher (37)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Marked (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Official (6)  |  Patient (199)  |  Porter (2)  |  Report (38)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Upstairs (2)  |  Walk (124)  |  Ward (7)  |  Year (933)

In all works on Natural History, we constantly find details of the marvellous adaptation of animals to their food, their habits, and the localities in which they are found. But naturalists are now beginning to look beyond this, and to see that there must be some other principle regulating the infinitely varied forms of animal life. It must strike every one, that the numbers of birds and insects of different groups having scarcely any resemblance to each other, which yet feed on the same food and inhabit the same localities, cannot have been so differently constructed and adorned for that purpose alone. Thus the goat-suckers, the swallows, the tyrant fly-catchers, and the jacamars, all use the same kind ‘Of food, and procure it in the same manner: they all capture insects on the wing, yet how entirely different is the structure and the whole appearance of these birds!
In A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Rio Negro (1853), 83-84.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bird (149)  |  Capture (10)  |  Constant (144)  |  Construct (124)  |  Constructed (3)  |  Detail (146)  |  Different (577)  |  Feed (27)  |  Find (998)  |  Fly (146)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Goat (7)  |  History (673)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Principle (507)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  See (1081)  |  Strike (68)  |  Structure (344)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Tyrant (9)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  Work (1351)

In mathematics two ends are constantly kept in view: First, stimulation of the inventive faculty, exercise of judgment, development of logical reasoning, and the habit of concise statement; second, the association of the branches of pure mathematics with each other and with applied science, that the pupil may see clearly the true relations of principles and things.
In 'Aim of the Mathematical Instruction', International Commission on Teaching of Mathematics, American Report: United States Bureau of Education: Bulletin 1912, No. 4, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Associate (25)  |  Association (46)  |  Branch (150)  |  Concise (8)  |  Development (422)  |  End (590)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faculty (72)  |  First (1283)  |  Invention (369)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)

In mathematics, … and in natural philosophy since mathematics was applied to it, we see the noblest instance of the force of the human mind, and of the sublime heights to which it may rise by cultivation. An acquaintance with such sciences naturally leads us to think well of our faculties, and to indulge sanguine expectations concerning the improvement of other parts of knowledge. To this I may add, that, as mathematical and physical truths are perfectly uninteresting in their consequences, the understanding readily yields its assent to the evidence which is presented to it; and in this way may be expected to acquire the habit of trusting to its own conclusions, which will contribute to fortify it against the weaknesses of scepticism, in the more interesting inquiries after moral truth in which it may afterwards engage.
In Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind (1827), Vol. 3, Chap. 1, Sec. 3, 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Against (332)  |  Applied (177)  |  Assent (12)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Engage (39)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Force (487)  |  Fortify (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninteresting (9)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

In not a few the [opium-eating] habit has crept upon them almost unconsciously, during the medicinal use of opiates to soothe pain, to remove sleeplessness, or to arrest protracted bowel-complaint. The risk of this evil should therefore be carefully borne in mind, for life-long misery has often been caused by undue laxity in the prescribing of opiates.
In 'Clinical Lecture On The Treatment Of The Habit Of Opium-Eating', The British Medical Journal (15 Feb 1868), 1, No. 372, 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Addiction (5)  |  Arrest (8)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Creep (15)  |  Eating (45)  |  Evil (116)  |  Laxity (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misery (30)  |  Opiate (2)  |  Opium (7)  |  Pain (136)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Prescribing (5)  |  Protracted (2)  |  Remove (45)  |  Risk (61)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Use (766)

In October 1838, that is, fifteen months after I had begun my systematic enquiry, I happened to read for amusement Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be, preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed. The result of this would be the formation of new species. Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work; but I was so anxious to avoid prejudice, that I determined not for some time to write even the briefest sketch of it.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Existence (456)  |  Formation (96)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (13)  |  Month (88)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plant (294)  |  Population (110)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Read (287)  |  Result (677)  |  Species (401)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

In the animal world we have seen that the vast majority of species live in societies, and that they find in association the best arms for the struggle for life: understood, of course, in its wide Darwinian sense—not as a struggle for the sheer means of existence, but as a struggle against all natural conditions unfavourable to the species. The animal species, in which individual struggle has been reduced to its narrowest limits, and the practice of mutual aid has attained the greatest development, are invariably the most numerous, the most prosperous, and the most open to further progress. The mutual protection which is obtained in this case, the possibility of attaining old age and of accumulating experience, the higher intellectual development, and the further growth of sociable habits, secure the maintenance of the species, its extension, and its further progressive evolution. The unsociable species, on the contrary, are doomed to decay.
Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution (1902), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Association (46)  |  Attain (125)  |  Best (459)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Decay (53)  |  Development (422)  |  Doom (32)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extension (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Growth (187)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Open (274)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Practice (204)  |  Progress (465)  |  Protection (36)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)

In the index to the six hundred odd pages of Arnold Toynbee’s A Study of History, abridged version, the names of Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes and Newton do not occur yet their cosmic quest destroyed the medieval vision of an immutable social order in a walled-in universe and transformed the European landscape, society, culture, habits and general outlook, as thoroughly as if a new species had arisen on this planet.
In The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man's Changing Vision of the Universe (1959), Preface, 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arise (158)  |  Copernicus_Nicolaud (2)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Culture (143)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Do (1908)  |  Europe (43)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Medieval (10)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Planet (356)  |  Quest (39)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Arnold J. Toynbee (3)  |  Transform (73)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vision (123)  |  Wall (67)

In the index to the six hundred odd pages of Arnold Toynbee’s A Study of History, abridged version, the names of Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes and Newton do not occur … yet their cosmic quest destroyed the mediaeval vision of an immutable social order in a walled-in universe and transformed the European landscape, society, culture, habits and general outlook, as thoroughly as if a new species had arisen on this planet.
First lines of 'Preface', in The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man’s Changing Vision of the Universe (1959), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arise (158)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Culture (143)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Do (1908)  |  Europe (43)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Mediaeval (3)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Planet (356)  |  Quest (39)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Arnold J. Toynbee (3)  |  Transform (73)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vision (123)  |  Wall (67)

Induction is the process of generalizing from our known and limited experience, and framing wider rules for the future than we have been able to test fully. At its simplest, then, an induction is a habit or an adaptation—the habit of expecting tomorrow’s weather to be like today’s, the adaptation to the unwritten conventions of community life.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Community (104)  |  Experience (467)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Induction (77)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Logic (287)  |  Process (423)  |  Rule (294)  |  Test (211)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Weather (44)

Is it not evident, that if the child is at any epoch of his long period of helplessness inured into any habit or fixed form of activity belonging to a lower stage of development, the tendency will be to arrest growth at that standpoint and make it difficult or next to impossible to continue the growth of the child?
In 'The Old Psychology vs. the New', Journal of Pedagogy (1894), 8, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Arrest (8)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Child (307)  |  Continue (165)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Education (378)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Growth (187)  |  Helpless (11)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Long (790)  |  Next (236)  |  Period (198)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Will (2355)

It hath been an old remark, that Geometry is an excellent Logic. And it must be owned that when the definitions are clear; when the postulata cannot be refused, nor the axioms denied; when from the distinct contemplation and comparison of figures, their properties are derived, by a perpetual well-connected chain of consequences, the objects being still kept in view, and the attention ever fixed upon them; there is acquired a habit of reasoning, close and exact and methodical; which habit strengthens and sharpens the mind, and being transferred to other subjects is of general use in the inquiry after truth.
In 'The Analyst', in The Works of George Berkeley (1898), Vol. 3, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Attention (190)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Definition (221)  |  Deny (66)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Exact (68)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Figure (160)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Logic (287)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Still (613)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)

It is a fair question whether the results of these things have induced among us in a large class of well-to-do people, with little muscular activity, a habit of excessive eating [particularly fats and sweets] and may be responsible for great damage to health, to say nothing of the purse.
L.A. Maynard citing Wilbur O. Atwater in a biographical sketch, Journal of Nutrition (1962) 78, 3. Quoted in Ira Wolinsky, Nutrition in Exercise and Sport (1998), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Class (164)  |  Damage (34)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eating (45)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Health (193)  |  Large (394)  |  Little (707)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Thing (1915)

It is a profoundly erroneous truism, repeated by all copy-books and eminent people when they are speeches, that we should cultivate habit of thinking of what we are do The precise opposite is the case. Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them. Operations of thought are like cavalry charges in a battle—they are strictly limited in number, they require fresh horses, and must only be made at decisive moments.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Battle (34)  |  Book (392)  |  Cavalry (2)  |  Charge (59)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Copy (33)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Horse (74)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opposite (104)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Precise (68)  |  Require (219)  |  Speech (61)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truism (4)

It is interesting to observe the result of habit in the peculiar shape and size of the giraffe (Camelo-pardalis): this animal, the largest of the mammals, is known to live in the interior of Africa in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, so that it is obliged to browse on the leaves on the trees and to make constant efforts to reach them. From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is lengthened to such a degree that the giraffe, without standing up on its hind legs, attains a height of six metres (nearly 20 feet).
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 256, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 122.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arid (6)  |  Attain (125)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Constant (144)  |  Degree (276)  |  Effort (227)  |  Giraffe (4)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Interior (32)  |  Known (454)  |  Largest (39)  |  Leg (34)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Neck (15)  |  Observe (168)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Soil (86)  |  Tree (246)

It is not of the essence of mathematics to be conversant with the ideas of number and quantity. Whether as a general habit of mind it would be desirable to apply symbolic processes to moral argument, is another question.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Conversant (6)  |  Desirability (2)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Essence (82)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Number (699)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Symbolic (15)

It is not the organs—that is, the character and form of the animal's bodily parts—that have given rise to its habits and particular structures. It is the habits and manner of life and the conditions in which its ancestors lived that have in the course of time fashioned its bodily form, its organs and qualities.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Animal (617)  |  Body (537)  |  Character (243)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Environment (216)  |  Form (959)  |  Life (1795)  |  Organ (115)  |  Rise (166)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)

It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth and wisdom.
Aristotle
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Health (193)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Wisdom (221)

It is well-known that both rude and civilized peoples are capable of showing unspeakable, and as it is erroneously termed, inhuman cruelty towards each other. These acts of cruelty, murder and rapine are often the result of the inexorable logic of national characteristics, and are unhappily truly human, since nothing like them can be traced in the animal world. It would, for instance, be a grave mistake to compare a tiger with the bloodthirsty exectioner of the Reign of Terror, since the former only satisfies his natural appetite in preying on other mammals. The atrocities of the trials for witchcraft, the indiscriminate slaughter committed by the negroes on the coast of Guinea, the sacrifice of human victims made by the Khonds, the dismemberment of living men by the Battas, find no parallel in the habits of animals in their savage state. And such a comparision is, above all, impossible in the case of anthropoids, which display no hostility towards men or other animals unless they are first attacked. In this respect the anthropid ape stands on a higher plane than many men.
Robert Hartmann, Anthropoid Apes, 294-295.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Attack (84)  |  Both (493)  |  Capable (168)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Compare (69)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Display (56)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Known (454)  |  Living (491)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  People (1005)  |  Reign (23)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Terror (30)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truly (116)  |  Victim (35)  |  Witchcraft (6)  |  World (1774)

It was his [Leibnitz’s] love of method and order, and the conviction that such order and harmony existed in the real world, and that our success in understanding it depended upon the degree and order which we could attain in our own thoughts, that originally was probably nothing more than a habit which by degrees grew into a formal rule. This habit was acquired by early occupation with legal and mathematical questions. We have seen how the theory of combinations and arrangements of elements had a special interest for him. We also saw how mathematical calculations served him as a type and model of clear and orderly reasoning, and how he tried to introduce method and system into logical discussions, by reducing to a small number of terms the multitude of compound notions he had to deal with. This tendency increased in strength, and even in those early years he elaborated the idea of a general arithmetic, with a universal language of symbols, or a characteristic which would be applicable to all reasoning processes, and reduce philosophical investigations to that simplicity and certainty which the use of algebraic symbols had introduced into mathematics.
A mental attitude such as this is always highly favorable for mathematical as well as for philosophical investigations. Wherever progress depends upon precision and clearness of thought, and wherever such can be gained by reducing a variety of investigations to a general method, by bringing a multitude of notions under a common term or symbol, it proves inestimable. It necessarily imports the special qualities of number—viz., their continuity, infinity and infinite divisibility—like mathematical quantities—and destroys the notion that irreconcilable contrasts exist in nature, or gaps which cannot be bridged over. Thus, in his letter to Arnaud, Leibnitz expresses it as his opinion that geometry, or the philosophy of space, forms a step to the philosophy of motion—i.e., of corporeal things—and the philosophy of motion a step to the philosophy of mind.
In Leibnitz (1884), 44-45. [The first sentence is reworded to better introduce the quotation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Algebraic (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bring (90)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corporeal (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grow (238)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Highly (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Import (5)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Legal (8)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Original (58)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precision (68)  |  Probable (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Real World (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Step (231)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Type (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It would be an easy task to show that the characteristics in the organization of man, on account of which the human species and races are grouped as a distinct family, are all results of former changes of occupation, and of acquired habits, which have come to be distinctive of individuals of his kind. When, compelled by circumstances, the most highly developed apes accustomed themselves to walking erect, they gained the ascendant over the other animals. The absolute advantage they enjoyed, and the new requirements imposed on them, made them change their mode of life, which resulted in the gradual modification of their organization, and in their acquiring many new qualities, and among them the wonderful power of speech.
Quoted in Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel The Evolution of Man (1897), Vol. 1, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Account (192)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Easy (204)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Family (94)  |  Former (137)  |  Gain (145)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  Speech (61)  |  Task (147)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Wonderful (149)

Language is a guide to 'social reality.' Though language is not ordinarily thought of as essential interest to the students of social science, it powerfully conditions all our thinking about social problems and processes. Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. It is quite an illusion to imagine that one adjusts to reality essentially without the use of language and that language is merely an incidental means of solving specific problems of communication or reflection. The fact of the matter is that the 'real world' is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group. No two languages are ever sufficiently similar to be considered as representing the same social reality. The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached.
'The Status of Linguistics as a Science', Language (1929), 5, 207-14. In David Mandelbaum (ed.), Selected Writings of Edward Sapir in Language, Culture, and Personality (1949), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Interest (386)  |  Label (11)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Live (628)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Objective (91)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Solution (267)  |  Specific (95)  |  Student (300)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  World (1774)

Let people who have to observe sickness and death look back and try to register in their observation the appearances which have preceded relapse, attack or death, and not assert that there were none, or that there were not the right ones. A want of the habit of observing conditions and an inveterate habit of taking averages are each of them often equally misleading.
Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attack (84)  |  Average (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Condition (356)  |  Death (388)  |  Equally (130)  |  Look (582)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  People (1005)  |  Register (21)  |  Relapse (5)  |  Right (452)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Try (283)  |  Want (497)

Mathematics may, like poetry or music, “promote and sustain a lofty habit of mind.”
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Lofty (13)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Music (129)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Promote (29)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Sustain (46)

Medals are great encouragement to young men and lead them to feel their work is of value, I remember how keenly I felt this when in the 1890s. I received the Darwin Medal and the Huxley Medal. When one is old, one wants no encouragement and one goes on with one's work to the extent of one's power, because it has become habitual.
Letter to Major Greenwood (8 Dec 1933). Quoted in M. E. Magnello, 'Karl Pearson', in P. Armitage and T. Colton (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (1998), Vol. 4, 3314.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Extent (139)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lead (384)  |  Medal (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Power (746)  |  Receive (114)  |  Remember (179)  |  Value (365)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth more than ruin more even than death. Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid. Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (21)  |  Chief (97)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Death (388)  |  Destructive (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Establish (57)  |  Fear (197)  |  Free (232)  |  Glory (58)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hell (32)  |  Institution (69)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merciless (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pit (19)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Subversive (2)  |  Swift (12)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thought (953)  |  World (1774)

Men ought to know that from the brain, and from the brain only, arise our pleasures, joys, laughter and jests, as well as our sorrows, pains, griefs and tears. Through it, in particular, we think, see, hear, and distinguish the ugly from the beautiful, the bad from the good, the pleasant from the unpleasant, in some cases using custom as a test, in others perceiving them from their utility. It is the same thing which makes us mad or delirious, inspires us with dread or fear, whether by night or by day, brings sleeplessness, inopportune mistakes, aimless anxieties, absent-mindedness, and acts that are contrary to habit. These things that we suffer all come from the brain, when it is not healthy, but becomes abnormally hot, cold, moist, or dry, or suffers any other unnatural affection to which it was not accustomed. Madness comes from its moistness.
The Sacred Disease, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 2, 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Act (272)  |  Affection (43)  |  Aimless (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cold (112)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Custom (42)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Dry (57)  |  Fear (197)  |  Good (889)  |  Grief (18)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hot (60)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Moist (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  See (1081)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Tear (42)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Utility (49)

Moral education is impossible apart from the habitual vision of greatness.
In 'The Place of Classics in Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (378)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Vision (123)

More discoveries have arisen from intense observation of very limited material than from statistics applied to large groups. The value of the latter lies mainly in testing hypotheses arising from the former. While observing one should cultivate a speculative, contemplative attitude of mind and search for clues to be followed up. Training in observation follows the same principles as training in any activity. At first one must do things consciously and laboriously, but with practice the activities gradually become automatic and unconscious and a habit is established. Effective scientific observation also requires a good background, for only by being familiar with the usual can we notice something as being unusual or unexplained.
The Art of Scientific Investigation (1950), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Applied (177)  |  Arising (22)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Background (43)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Good (889)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Material (353)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observation (555)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Training (80)  |  Unexplained (8)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Value (365)

Moreover I can assure you that the misuse word “national” by our rulers has thoroughly broken me of the habit of national feeling that was pronounced in my case. I would now be willing see Germany disappear as a power and merge into a pacified Europe.
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 529. Cited from Armin Herman (ed.), Albert Einstein/Arnold Sommerfeld. Briefwechsel: Sechzig Briefe aus dem goldenen Zeitalter der modernen Physik (1968, German), 114-115.
Science quotes on:  |  Assure (15)  |  Broken (56)  |  Case (99)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Europe (43)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Germany (13)  |  Merge (3)  |  Misuse (13)  |  National (26)  |  Power (746)  |  Ruler (21)  |  See (1081)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Willing (44)  |  Word (619)

Muscles are in a most intimate and peculiar sense the organs of the will. They have built all the roads, cities and machines in the world, written all the books, spoken all the words, and, in fact done everything that man has accomplished with matter. Character might be a sense defined as a plexus of motor habits.
Youth, Its Education, Regimen and Hygiene (1907), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Character (243)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motor (23)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Organ (115)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Sense (770)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Mutations and chromosomal changes arise in every sufficiently studied organism with a certain finite frequency, and thus constantly and unremittingly supply the raw materials for evolution. But evolution involves something more than origin of mutations. Mutations and chromosomal changes are only the first stage, or level, of the evolutionary process, governed entirely by the laws of the physiology of individuals. Once produced, mutations are injected in the genetic composition of the population, where their further fate is determined by the dynamic regularities of the physiology of populations. A mutation may be lost or increased in frequency in generations immediately following its origin, and this (in the case of recessive mutations) without regard to the beneficial or deleterious effects of the mutation. The influences of selection, migration, and geographical isolation then mold the genetic structure of populations into new shapes, in conformity with the secular environment and the ecology, especially the breeding habits, of the species. This is the second level of the evolutionary process, on which the impact of the environment produces historical changes in the living population.
Genetics and Origin of Species (1937), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Composition (84)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Effect (393)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fate (72)  |  Finite (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Govern (64)  |  Historical (70)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impact (42)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Injection (9)  |  Involve (90)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Migration (11)  |  Mold (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutation (37)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Population (110)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Raw (28)  |  Recessive (6)  |  Regard (305)  |  Secular (11)  |  Selection (128)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (401)  |  Stage (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Supply (93)

My imagination would never have served me as it has, but for the habit of commonplace, humble, patient, daily, toiling, drudging attention
The Homiletic Review, Vol. 83-84 (1922), Vol. 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Daily (87)  |  Humble (50)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Never (1087)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)

Nature does nothing without a purpose. In children may be observed the traces and seeds of what will one day be settled psychological habits, though psychologically a child hardly differs for the time being from an animal.
Aristotle
In D. W. Thompson (trans.), Historia Animalium, VIII, 1. Another translation of the first sentence is, “Nature does nothing uselessly.”
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Differ (85)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observed (149)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Seed (93)  |  Settled (34)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Will (2355)

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.
In 'The Epistle Dedicatory', Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), second unnumbered page.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Common (436)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Usually (176)

Newton could not admit that there was any difference between him and other men, except in the possession of such habits as … perseverance and vigilance. When he was asked how he made his discoveries, he answered, “by always thinking about them;” and at another time he declared that if he had done anything, it was due to nothing but industry and patient thought: “I keep the subject of my inquiry constantly before me, and wait till the first dawning opens gradually, by little and little, into a full and clear light.”
In History of the Inductive Sciences, Bk. 7, chap, 1, sect. 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Clear (100)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Due (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Full (66)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Industry (137)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Keep (101)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Possession (65)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vigilance (5)  |  Wait (58)

No occupation is more worthy of an intelligent and enlightened mind, than the study of Nature and natural objects; and whether we labour to investigate the structure and function of the human system, whether we direct our attention to the classification and habits of the animal kingdom, or prosecute our researches in the more pleasing and varied field of vegetable life, we shall constantly find some new object to attract our attention, some fresh beauties to excite our imagination, and some previously undiscovered source of gratification and delight.
In A Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Dahlia (1838), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Classification (97)  |  Delight (108)  |  Direct (225)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Function (228)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Prosecute (3)  |  Research (664)  |  Source (93)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  System (537)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Worthy (34)

Nothing is more detestable to the physical anthropologist than... [the] wretched habit of cremating the dead. It involves not only a prodigal waste of costly fuel and excellent fertilizer, but also the complete destruction of physical historical data. On the other hand, the custom of embalming and mummification is most praiseworthy and highly to be recommended.
Up From the Ape (1931), 531.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cremation (2)  |  Custom (42)  |  Data (156)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Embalming (2)  |  Fertilizer (12)  |  Historical (70)  |  Involve (90)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wretched (8)

Now this is the peculiarity of scientific method, that when once it has become a habit of mind, that mind converts all facts whatsoever into science.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Convert (22)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Whatsoever (41)

Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes, and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that they are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species. The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Class (164)  |  Close (69)  |  Common (436)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Descend (47)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Observe (168)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Race (268)  |  Same (157)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Taste (90)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

Of these austerer virtues the love of truth is the chief, and in mathematics, more than elsewhere, the love of truth may find encouragement for waning faith. Every great study is not only an end in itself, but also a means of creating and sustaining a lofty habit of mind; and this purpose should be kept always in view throughout the teaching and learning of mathematics.
Essay, 'The Study of Mathematics' (1902), collected in Philosophical Essays (1910), 73-74. Also collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1919), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Chief (97)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  End (590)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Learning (274)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Study (653)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Virtue (109)

On Breaking Habits. To begin knocking off the habit in the evening, then the afternoon as well and, finally, the morning too is better than to begin cutting it off in the morning and then go on to the afternoon and evening. I speak from experience as regards smoking and can say that when one comes to within an hour or two of smoke-time one begins to be impatient for it, whereas there will be no impatience after the time for knocking off has been confirmed as a habit.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Cut Off (2)  |  Evening (12)  |  Experience (467)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Morning (94)  |  Regard (305)  |  Say (984)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Speak (232)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

One of the gladdest moments of human life, methinks, is the departure upon a distant journey into unknown lands. Shaking off with one mighty effort the fetters of habit, the leaden weight of routine, the cloak of many cares and the slavery of home, man feel once more happy.
In Zanzibar: City, Island, and Coast (1872), Vol. 1, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Cloak (5)  |  Departure (9)  |  Distant (33)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Happy (105)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Journey (42)  |  Land (115)  |  Leaden (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Routine (25)  |  Shake (41)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Weight (134)

One rarely hears of the mathematical recitation as a preparation for public speaking. Yet mathematics shares with these studies [foreign languages, drawing and natural science] their advantages, and has another in a higher degree than either of them.
Most readers will agree that a prime requisite for healthful experience in public speaking is that the attention of the speaker and hearers alike be drawn wholly away from the speaker and concentrated upon the thought. In perhaps no other classroom is this so easy as in the mathematical, where the close reasoning, the rigorous demonstration, the tracing of necessary conclusions from given hypotheses, commands and secures the entire mental power of the student who is explaining, and of his classmates. In what other circumstances do students feel so instinctively that manner counts for so little and mind for so much? In what other circumstances, therefore, is a simple, unaffected, easy, graceful manner so naturally and so healthfully cultivated? Mannerisms that are mere affectation or the result of bad literary habit recede to the background and finally disappear, while those peculiarities that are the expression of personality and are inseparable from its activity continually develop, where the student frequently presents, to an audience of his intellectual peers, a connected train of reasoning. …
One would almost wish that our institutions of the science and art of public speaking would put over their doors the motto that Plato had over the entrance to his school of philosophy: “Let no one who is unacquainted with geometry enter here.”
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alike (60)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Audience (26)  |  Background (43)  |  Bad (180)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Command (58)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Connect (125)  |  Count (105)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hear (139)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Institution (69)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peer (12)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recede (11)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Share (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (300)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Unaffected (6)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Owing to the imperfection of language the offspring is termed a new animal, but it is in truth a branch or elongation of the parent; since a part of the embryon-animal is, or was, a part of the parent; and therefore in strict language it cannot be said to be entirely new at the time of its production; and therefore it may retain some of the habits of the parent-system. (1794)
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Branch (150)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Language (293)  |  New (1216)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Owing (39)  |  Parent (76)  |  Production (183)  |  Retain (56)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)

People are very open-minded about new things - as long as they're exactly like the old ones.
Science quotes on:  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Open (274)  |  People (1005)  |  Thing (1915)

People make the mistake of talking about ‘natural laws’. There are no natural laws. There are only temporary habits of nature.
In Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead, as recorded by Lucien Price (1954), 367. As cited in G. Debrock (ed.), Process Pragmatism: Essays on a Quiet Philosophical Revolution (2003), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Law (894)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nature (1926)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Talking (76)  |  Temporary (23)

People make the mistake of talking about “natural laws.” There are no natural laws. There are only temporary habits of nature.
In Alfred North Whitehead and ‎Lucien Price (ed.), Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead (1954), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Law (894)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nature (1926)  |  People (1005)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Temporary (23)

Philosophers and psychiatrists should explain why it is that we mathematicians are in the habit of systematically erasing our footsteps. Scientists have always looked askance at this strange habit of mathematicians, which has changed little from Pythagoras to our day.
From the second Fubini Lecture, delivered at the Villa Gualino, Torino (2 Jun 1998), 'What is Invariant Theory, Really?' Collected in Henry H. Crapo and D. Senato (eds.), Algebraic Combinatorics and Computer Science: A Tribute to Gian-Carlo Rota (2001), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Askance (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Erase (6)  |  Explain (322)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Psychiatrist (15)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Strange (157)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Why (491)

Plasticity, then, in the wide sense of the word, means the possession of a structure weak enough to yield to an influence, but strong enough not to yield all at once. Each relatively stable phase of equilibrium in such a structure is marked by what we may call a new set of habits. Organic matter, especially nervous tissue, seems endowed with a very extraordinary degree of plasticity of this sort ; so that we may without hesitation lay down as our first proposition the following, that the phenomena of habit in living beings are due to plasticity of the organic materials of which their bodies are composed.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Composition (84)  |  Degree (276)  |  Down (456)  |  Due (141)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  First (1283)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Influence (222)  |  Living (491)  |  Marked (55)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nerve (79)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Organic (158)  |  Phase (36)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plasticity (7)  |  Possession (65)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Stable (30)  |  Strong (174)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Weak (71)  |  Wide (96)  |  Word (619)  |  Yield (81)

Probably among all the pursuits of the University, mathematics pre-eminently demand self-denial, patience, and perseverance from youth, precisely at that period when they have liberty to act for themselves, and when on account of obvious temptations, habits of restraint and application are peculiarly valuable.
In The Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Demand (123)  |  Denial (17)  |  Liberty (25)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Patience (56)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Period (198)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Preeminent (5)  |  Probably (49)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Restraint (13)  |  Self (267)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  University (121)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Youth (101)

Probably the simple facts about health are that all of us form bad dietary habits when we have young stomachs, and continue in them when our stomachs show the natural wear of long use. Stomachs weaken, as do eyes; but we cannot buy spectacles for our stomachs.
In Sinner Sermons: A Selection of the Best Paragraphs of E. W. Howe (1926), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Buy (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Health (193)  |  Long (790)  |  Natural (796)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Use (766)  |  Weaken (4)  |  Wear (18)  |  Young (227)

Prolonged commitment to mathematical exercises in economics can be damaging. It leads to the atrophy of judgement and intuition which are indispensable for real solutions and, on occasion, leads also to a habit of mind which simply excludes the mathematically inconvenient factors from consideration.
In Economics, Peace, and Laughter (1981), 41, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Damage (34)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Factor (46)  |  Inconvenient (4)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Judgement (7)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prolonged (6)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)

Psychology … tells us that we rarely work through reasons and evidence in a systematic way; weighing information carefully and suspending the impulse to draw conclusions. Instead, much of the time we use mental shortcuts or rules of thumb that save us mental effort. These habits often work reasonably well, but they also can lead us to conclusions we might dismiss if we applied more thought.
As co-author with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, in unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation (2007), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Careful (24)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Information (166)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mental (177)  |  More (2559)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Rule Of Thumb (3)  |  Save (118)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Brain (270)  |  Certain (550)  |  Creative (137)  |  Divert (3)  |  Fall (230)  |  Lazy (9)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)

Rising before daylight is also to be commended; it is a healthy habit, and gives more time for the management of the household as well as for liberal studies.
Aristotle
Economics, I.
Science quotes on:  |  Commend (7)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Management (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Rising (44)  |  Time (1877)

Science and technology revolutionize our lives, but memory, tradition and myth frame our response. Expelled from individual consciousness by the rush of change, history finds its revenge by stamping the collective unconsciousness with habits, values, expectations, dreams. The dialectic between past and future will continue to form our lives.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Collective (24)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dialectic (5)  |  Dream (208)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Expel (4)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Frame (26)  |  Future (429)  |  History (673)  |  Individual (404)  |  Live (628)  |  Memory (134)  |  Myth (56)  |  Past (337)  |  Response (53)  |  Revenge (10)  |  Revolutionize (8)  |  Rush (18)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Technology (257)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Unconsciousness (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Science and technology were developing at a prodigious speed, and it seemed natural to assume that they would go on developing. This failed to happen, partly because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly regimented society.
In 1984 (1949), Book 2, Chapter 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Cause (541)  |  Depend (228)  |  Develop (268)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Fail (185)  |  Happen (274)  |  Impoverish (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Natural (796)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Progress (465)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Series (149)  |  Society (326)  |  Speed (65)  |  Survive (79)  |  Technical (43)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  War (225)

Science quickens and cultivates directly the faculty of observation, which in very many persons lies almost dormant through life, the power of accurate and rapid generalizations, and the mental habit of method and arrangement; it accustoms young persons to trace the sequence of cause and effect; it familiarizes then with a kind of reasoning which interests them, and which they can promptly comprehend; and it is perhaps the best corrective for that indolence which is the vice of half-awakened minds, and which shrinks from any exertion that is not, like an effort of memory, merely mechanical.
Anonymous
Report of the Royal Commission on Education (1861), Parliamentary Papers (1864), Vol 20, 32-33, as cited in Paul White, Thomas Huxley: Making the "Man of Science" (2003), 77, footnote. Also quoted in John Lubbock, The Pleasures of Life (1887, 2007), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Best (459)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Corrective (2)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Familiarization (2)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observation (555)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Promptness (2)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vice (40)  |  Young (227)

Scientists and Drapers. Why should the botanist, geologist or other-ist give himself such airs over the draper’s assistant? Is it because he names his plants or specimens with Latin names and divides them into genera and species, whereas the draper does not formulate his classifications, or at any rate only uses his mother tongue when he does? Yet how like the sub-divisions of textile life are to those of the animal and vegetable kingdoms! A few great families—cotton, linen, hempen, woollen, silk, mohair, alpaca—into what an infinite variety of genera and species do not these great families subdivide themselves? And does it take less labour, with less intelligence, to master all these and to acquire familiarity with their various habits, habitats and prices than it does to master the details of any other great branch of science? I do not know. But when I think of Shoolbred’s on the one hand and, say, the ornithological collections of the British Museum upon the other, I feel as though it would take me less trouble to master the second than the first.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 218.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Assistant (6)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Branch (150)  |  British (41)  |  Classification (97)  |  Collection (64)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Detail (146)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Family (94)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Genus (25)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Himself (461)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labour (98)  |  Latin (38)  |  Life (1795)  |  Linen (8)  |  Master (178)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Museum (31)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Price (51)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Silk (13)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Textile (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Why (491)  |  Wool (4)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Color (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Omit (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Show (346)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (653)  |  Summary (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

So in regard to mental qualities, their transmission is manifest in our dogs, horses and other domestic animals. Besides special tastes and habits, general intelligence, courage, bad and good tempers. etc., are certainly transmitted.
The Descent of Man
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Bad (180)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Courage (69)  |  Dog (70)  |  Domestic (26)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Horse (74)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Mental (177)  |  Other (2236)  |  Regard (305)  |  Special (184)  |  Taste (90)  |  Transmission (34)

So long as the fur of the beaver was extensively employed as a material for fine hats, it bore a very high price, and the chase of this quadruped was so keen that naturalists feared its speedy consideration. When a Parisian manufacturer invented the silk hat, which soon came into almost universal use, the demand for beavers' fur fell off, and this animal–whose habits, as we have seen, are an important agency in the formation of bogs and other modifications of forest nature–immediately began to increase, reappeared in haunts which we had long abandoned, and can no longer be regarded as rare enough to be in immediate danger of extirpation. Thus the convenience or the caprice of Parisian fashion has unconsciously exercised an influence which may sensibly affect the physical geography of a distant continent.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Bog (5)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Chase (14)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Continent (76)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Danger (115)  |  Demand (123)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Extirpation (2)  |  Fear (197)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formation (96)  |  Fur (6)  |  Geography (36)  |  Hat (9)  |  High (362)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Increase (210)  |  Influence (222)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Modification (55)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paris (11)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Geography (3)  |  Price (51)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (89)  |  Regard (305)  |  Silk (13)  |  Soon (186)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)

Society exists through a process of transmission quite as much as biological life. This transmission occurs by means of communication of habits of doing, thinking, and feeling from the older to the younger.
Democracy and Education: an Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Biological (137)  |  Communication (94)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Occur (150)  |  Process (423)  |  Society (326)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Younger (21)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Act (272)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Badly (32)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Country (251)  |  Curve (49)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deep (233)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (40)  |  Enter (141)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expect (200)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Follower (11)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inference (45)  |  Instance (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Least (75)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (76)  |  Political (121)  |  Portal (7)  |  Premise (37)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Topic (21)  |  Training (80)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (121)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Variation (90)  |  Want (497)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

Take care of your health. ... Imagine Hercules as oarsman in a rotten boat; what can he do there but by the very force of his stroke expedite the ruin of his craft. Take care of the timbers of your boat. ... The formation of right habits is essential to your permanent security. They diminish your chance of falling when assaulted, and they augment your chance of recovery when overthrown.
Concluding remark from 'An Address to Students of University College, London' (1869), in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People (1871), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Assault (12)  |  Augment (12)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Boat (16)  |  Care (186)  |  Chance (239)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Health (193)  |  Hercules (9)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Rot (9)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Security (47)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Timber (7)

That alone is worthy to be called Natural History, which investigates and records the condition of living things, of things in a state of nature; if animals, of living animals:— which tells of their 'sayings and doings,' their varied notes and utterances, songs and cries; their actions, in ease and under the pressure of circumstances; their affections and passions, towards their young, towards each other, towards other animals, towards man: their various arts and devices, to protect their progeny, to procure food, to escape from their enemies, to defend themselves from attacks; their ingenious resources for concealment; their stratagems to overcome their victims; their modes of bringing forth, of feeding, and of training, their offspring; the relations of their structure to their wants and habits; the countries in which they dwell; their connexion with the intimate world around them, mountain or plain, forest or field, barren heath or bushy dell, open savanna or wild hidden glen, river, lake, or sea:— this would be indeed zoology, i.e. the science of living creatures.
A Naturalist's Sojourn in Jamaica (1851), vi-vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Affection (43)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Attack (84)  |  Barren (30)  |  Call (769)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concealment (10)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Doing (280)  |  Escape (80)  |  Field (364)  |  Food (199)  |  Forest (150)  |  History (673)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Protect (58)  |  Record (154)  |  River (119)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Song (37)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Training (80)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Victim (35)  |  Want (497)  |  Wild (87)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)  |  Zoology (36)

The analysis of Nature into its individual parts, the grouping of the different natural processes and natural objects in definite classes, the study of the internal anatomy of organic bodies in their manifold forms—these were the fundamental conditions of the gigantic strides in our knowledge of Nature which have been made during the last four hundred years. But this method of investigation has also left us as a legacy the habit of observing natural objects and natural processes in their isolation, detached from the whole vast interconnection of things; and therefore not in their motion, but in their repose; not as essentially changing, but fixed constants; not in their life, but in their death.
Herr Eugen Dühring's Revolution in Science (Anti-Dühring), First Publication (1878). Trans. Emile Burns and ed. C.P. Dutt (1935), 27-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Death (388)  |  Definite (110)  |  Different (577)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Method (505)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organic (158)  |  Stride (15)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

The ancients devoted a lifetime to the study of arithmetic; it required days to extract a square root or to multiply two numbers together. Is there any harm in skipping all that, in letting the school boy learn multiplication sums, and in starting his more abstract reasoning at a more advanced point? Where would be the harm in letting the boy assume the truth of many propositions of the first four books of Euclid, letting him assume their truth partly by faith, partly by trial? Giving him the whole fifth book of Euclid by simple algebra? Letting him assume the sixth as axiomatic? Letting him, in fact, begin his severer studies where he is now in the habit of leaving off? We do much less orthodox things. Every here and there in one’s mathematical studies one makes exceedingly large assumptions, because the methodical study would be ridiculous even in the eyes of the most pedantic of teachers. I can imagine a whole year devoted to the philosophical study of many things that a student now takes in his stride without trouble. The present method of training the mind of a mathematical teacher causes it to strain at gnats and to swallow camels. Such gnats are most of the propositions of the sixth book of Euclid; propositions generally about incommensurables; the use of arithmetic in geometry; the parallelogram of forces, etc., decimals.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Assume (38)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Camel (11)  |  Cause (541)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Extract (40)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Generally (15)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Harm (39)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Incommensurable (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Parallelogram (3)  |  Partly (5)  |  Pedantic (4)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Root (120)  |  School (219)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Severe (16)  |  Simple (406)  |  Skip (4)  |  Square (70)  |  Square Root (12)  |  Start (221)  |  Strain (11)  |  Stride (15)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Sum (102)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Training (80)  |  Trial (57)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

The bird which is drawn to the water by its need of finding there the prey on which it lives, separates the digits of its feet in trying to strike the water and move about on the surface. The skin which unites these digits at their base acquires the habit of being stretched by these continually repeated separations of the digits; thus in course of time there are formed large webs which unite the digits of ducks, geese, etc., as we actually find them. In the same way efforts to swim, that is to push against the water so as to move about in it, have stretched the membranes between the digits of frogs, sea-tortoises, the otter, beaver, etc.
On the other hand, a bird which is accustomed to perch on trees and which springs from individuals all of whom had acquired this habit, necessarily has longer digits on its feet and differently shaped from those of the aquatic animals that I have just named. Its claws in time become lengthened, sharpened and curved into hooks, to clasp the branches on which the animal so often rests.
We find in the same way that the bird of the water-side which does not like swimming and yet is in need of going to the water's edge to secure its prey, is continually liable to sink into the mud. Now this bird tries to act in such a way that its body should not be immersed in the liquid, and hence makes its best efforts to stretch and lengthen its legs. The long-established habit acquired by this bird and all its race of continually stretching and lengthening its legs, results in the individuals of this race becoming raised as though on stilts, and gradually obtaining long, bare legs, denuded of feathers up to the thighs and often higher still.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 249-50, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Bare (33)  |  Base (117)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Claw (8)  |  Course (409)  |  Duck (3)  |  Edge (47)  |  Effort (227)  |  Find (998)  |  Foot (60)  |  Form (959)  |  Frog (38)  |  Goose (12)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Individual (404)  |  Large (394)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otter (2)  |  Perch (7)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Skin (47)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strike (68)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

The child asks, “What is the moon, and why does it shine?” “What is this water and where does it run?” “What is this wind?” “What makes the waves of the sea?” “Where does this animal live, and what is the use of this plant?” And if not snubbed and stunted by being told not to ask foolish questions, there is no limit to the intellectual craving of a young child; nor any bounds to the slow, but solid, accretion of knowledge and development of the thinking faculty in this way. To all such questions, answers which are necessarily incomplete, though true as far as they go, may be given by any teacher whose ideas represent real knowledge and not mere book learning; and a panoramic view of Nature, accompanied by a strong infusion of the scientific habit of mind, may thus be placed within the reach of every child of nine or ten.
In 'Scientific Education', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 71. https://books.google.com/books?id=13cJAAAAIAAJ Thomas Henry Huxley - 1870
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Accretion (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Child (307)  |  Crave (9)  |  Development (422)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Infusion (4)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Plant (294)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Real (149)  |  Represent (155)  |  Run (174)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solid (116)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thinking (414)  |  True (212)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wind (128)  |  Young (227)

The development of habits is necessary for the individual, and hence for the race, but it stops development along new lines.
From 'Helmholtz Memorial Lecture' (Jan 1896), printed in Journal of the Chemistry Society (1896), 886.
Science quotes on:  |  Development (422)  |  Individual (404)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Race (268)  |  Stop (80)

The dexterous management of terms and being able to fend and prove with them, I know has and does pass in the world for a great part of learning; but it is learning distinct from knowledge, for knowledge consists only in perceiving the habitudes and relations of ideas one to another, which is done without words; the intervention of sounds helps nothing to it. And hence we see that there is least use of distinction where there is most knowledge: I mean in mathematics, where men have determined ideas with known names to them; and so, there being no room for equivocations, there is no need of distinctions.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Consist (223)  |  Determine (144)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Help (105)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Least (75)  |  Management (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Need (290)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Part (222)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Prove (250)  |  Relation (157)  |  Room (40)  |  See (1081)  |  Sound (183)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The distinctive Western character begins with the Greeks, who invented the habit of deductive reasoning and the science of geometry.
In 'Western Civilization', collected in In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays (1935), 161.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Character (243)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greek (107)  |  Invent (51)  |  Logic (287)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Western (45)

The first step in all physical investigations, even in those which admit of the application of mathematical reasoning and the deductive method afterwards, is the observation of natural phenomena; and the smallest error in such observation in the beginning is sufficient to vitiate the whole investigation afterwards. The necessity of strict and minute observation, then, is the first thing which the student of the physical sciences has to learn; and it is easy to see with what great advantage the habit thus acquired may be carried into everything else afterwards.
Presidential Address to Anniversary meeting of the Royal Society (30 Nov 1859), Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (1860), 10, 164-165.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Easy (204)  |  Error (321)  |  Everything (476)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Learn (629)  |  Method (505)  |  Minute (125)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whole (738)

The future of our civilisation depends upon the widening spread and deepening hold of the scientific habit of mind.
Address to Section L, Education, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Boston (1909). Published in Science (1910), N.S. Vol. 31, No. 787, 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Deepening (2)  |  Depend (228)  |  Future (429)  |  Hold (95)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spread (83)  |  Widening (2)

The game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement. Several very valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are to be acquired or strengthened by it so as to become habits ready on all occasions.
In The Morals of Chess. As quoted in The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle (1787), 590.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Become (815)  |  Chess (25)  |  Course (409)  |  Game (101)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Idle (33)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Ready (39)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)

The history of men of science has one peculiar advantage, as it shows the importance of little things in producing great results. Smeaton learned his principle of constructing a lighthouse, by noticing the trunk of a tree to be diminished from a curve to a cyclinder ... and Newton, turning an old box into a water-clock, or the yard of a house into a sundial, are examples of those habits of patient observation which scientific biography attractively recommends.
Pleasures, Objects, and Advantages of Literature (1855), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Biography (240)  |  Box (22)  |  Clock (47)  |  Curve (49)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  House (140)  |  Importance (286)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lighthouse (6)  |  Little (707)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Principle (507)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  John Smeaton (5)  |  Sundial (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Water (481)

The human mind delights in finding pattern–so much so that we often mistake coincidence or forced analogy for profound meaning. No other habit of thought lies so deeply within the soul of a small creature trying to make sense of a complex world not constructed for it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Delight (108)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Profound (104)  |  Sense (770)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  World (1774)

The influence of Association over our Opinions and Affections, and its Use in explaining those Things in an accurate and precise Way, which are commonly referred to the Power of Habit and Custom, is a general and indeterminate one.
Observations on Man, His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations (1749), part 1, 5-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Affection (43)  |  Association (46)  |  Custom (42)  |  General (511)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Influence (222)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Power (746)  |  Precise (68)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

The maladies that affect the clerks aforesaid arise from three causes. First, constant sitting, secondly, the incessant movement of the the hand and always in the same direction, thirdly, the strain on the mind from the effort not to disfigure the books by errors or cause loss to their employers when they add, subtract, or do other sums in arithmetic. The diseases brought about by sitting constantly are easily understood; they are obstructions of the viscera, e.g. the liver and spleen, indigestion in the stomach, numbness of the legs, a considerable hindrance in the circulation of the blood, and an unhealthy habit.
De Morbis Artificum (1713), supplement, ch. 2, translated by W.C. Wright (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Blood (134)  |  Book (392)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constant (144)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Error (321)  |  First (1283)  |  Health (193)  |  Indigestion (5)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liver (19)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Movement (155)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sum (102)  |  Understood (156)  |  Viscera (2)

The mathematics of the twenty-first century may be very different from our own; perhaps the schoolboy will begin algebra with the theory of substitution groups, as he might now but for inherited habits.
From Address before the New York Mathematical Society, Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society (1893), 3, 107. As cited in G.A. Miller, 'Appreciative Remarks on the Theory of Groups', The American Mathematical Monthly (1903), 10, No. 4, 89. https://books.google.com/books?id=hkM0AQAAMAAJ 1903
Science quotes on:  |  21st Century (7)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Begin (260)  |  Century (310)  |  Different (577)  |  First (1283)  |  Group (78)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Theory (970)  |  Will (2355)

The number of humble-bees in any district depends in a great degree on the number of field-mice, which destroy their combs and nests; and Mr. H. Newman, who has long attended to the habits of humble-bees, ... says “Near villages and small towns I have found the nests of humble-bees more numerous than elsewhere, which I attribute to the number of cats that destroy the mice.” Hence it is quite credible that the presence of a feline animal in large numbers in a district might determine, through the intervention first of mice and then of bees, the frequency of certain flowers in that district!
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Bee (40)  |  Cat (47)  |  Certain (550)  |  Credible (3)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Determine (144)  |  District (9)  |  Elsewhere (10)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Found (11)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Great (1574)  |  Humble (50)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Nest (23)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Presence (63)  |  Say (984)  |  Small (477)  |  Through (849)  |  Town (27)  |  Village (7)

The personal adventures of a geologist would form an amusing narrative. He is trudging along, dusty and weather­beaten, with his wallet at his back, and his hammer on his shoulder, and he is taken for a stone-mason travelling in search of work. In mining-countries, he is supposed to be in quest of mines, and receives many tempting offers of shares in the ‘Wheel Dream’, or the ‘Golden Venture’;—he has been watched as a smuggler; it is well if he has not been committed as a vagrant, or apprehended as a spy, for he has been refused admittance to an inn, or has been ushered into the room appropriated to ostlers and postilions. When his fame has spread among the more enlightened part of the community of a district which he has been exploring, and inquiries are made of the peasantry as to the habits and pursuits of the great philosopher who has been among them, and with whom they have become familiar, it is found that the importance attached by him to shells and stones, and such like trumpery, is looked upon as a species of derangement, but they speak with delight of his affability, sprightliness, and good-humour. They respect the strength of his arm, and the weight of his hammer, as they point to marks which he inflicted on the rocks, and they recount with wonder his pedestrian performances, and the voracious appetite with which, at the close of a long day’s work he would devour the coarsest food that was set before him.
In Practical Geology and Mineralogy: With Instructions for the Qualitative Analysis of Minerals (1841), 31-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Affability (2)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Arm (81)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Community (104)  |  Delight (108)  |  Derangement (2)  |  Devour (29)  |  Dream (208)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fame (50)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Golden (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Humour (116)  |  Importance (286)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mining (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Offer (141)  |  Performance (48)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Quest (39)  |  Receive (114)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rock (161)  |  Search (162)  |  Set (394)  |  Share (75)  |  Shell (63)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Spread (83)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strength (126)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Vagrant (5)  |  Venture (18)  |  Watch (109)  |  Weather (44)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)

The philosophic spirit of inquiry may be traced to brute curiosity, and that to the habit of examining all things in search of food. Artistic genius is an expansion of monkey imitativeness.
In The Martyrdom of Man (14th ed., 1892), 392.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Brute (28)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Food (199)  |  Genius (284)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Philosophic (5)  |  Search (162)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote The prodigious waste of human life
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

The prodigious waste of human life occasioned by this perpetual struggle for room and food, was more than supplied by the mighty power of population, acting, in some degree, unshackled, from the constant habit of emigration.
An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Constant (144)  |  Degree (276)  |  Food (199)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Population (110)  |  Power (746)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Room (40)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Supply (93)  |  Unshackled (2)  |  Waste (101)

The spirit of science arises from the habit of seeking food; the spirit of art arises from the habit of imitation, by which the young animal first learns to feed; the spirit of music arises from primeval speech, by means of which males and females are attracted to each other.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Attract (23)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Male (26)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Music (129)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Seek (213)  |  Speech (61)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Young (227)

The student should read his author with the most sustained attention, in order to discover the meaning of every sentence. If the book is well written, it will endure and repay his close attention: the text ought to be fairly intelligible, even without illustrative examples. Often, far too often, a reader hurries over the text without any sincere and vigorous effort to understand it; and rushes to some example to clear up what ought not to have been obscure, if it had been adequately considered. The habit of scrupulously investigating the text seems to me important on several grounds. The close scrutiny of language is a very valuable exercise both for studious and practical life. In the higher departments of mathematics the habit is indispensable: in the long investigations which occur there it would be impossible to interpose illustrative examples at every stage, the student must therefore encounter and master, sentence by sentence, an extensive and complicated argument.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequately (3)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Clear (100)  |  Close (69)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consider (416)  |  Department (92)  |  Discover (553)  |  Effort (227)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Endure (20)  |  Example (94)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fairly (4)  |  Far (154)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Occur (150)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Practical (200)  |  Read (287)  |  Reader (40)  |  Repay (3)  |  Rush (18)  |  Scrupulous (6)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Several (32)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Stage (143)  |  Student (300)  |  Studious (5)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Text (14)  |  Understand (606)  |  Value (365)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

The teaching process, as commonly observed, has nothing to do with the investigation and establishment of facts, assuming that actual facts may ever be determined. Its sole purpose is to cram the pupils, as rapidly and as painlessly as possible, with the largest conceivable outfit of current axioms, in all departments of human thought—to make the pupil a good citizen, which is to say, a citizen differing as little as possible, in positive knowledge and habits of mind, from all other citizens.
From Baltimore Evening Sun (12 Mar 1923). Collected in A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 316.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Cram (5)  |  Current (118)  |  Department (92)  |  Determined (9)  |  Differing (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Thought (7)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Largest (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outfit (2)  |  Painless (2)  |  Positive (94)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Sole (49)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)

The tools we use have a profound (and devious!) influence on our thinking habits, and, therefore, on our thinking abilities.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Devious (2)  |  Influence (222)  |  Profound (104)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tool (117)  |  Use (766)

The universality of parasitism as an offshoot of the predatory habit negatives the position taken by man that it is a pathological phenomenon or a deviation from the normal processes of nature. The pathological manifestations are only incidents in a developing parasitism. As human beings intent on maintaining man's domination over nature we may regard parasitism as pathological insofar as it becomes a drain upon human resources. In our efforts to protect ourselves we may make every kind of sacrifice to limit, reduce, and even eliminate parasitism as a factor in human life. Science attempts to define the terms on which this policy of elimination may or may not succeed. We must first of all thoroughly understand the problem, put ourselves in possession of all the facts in order to estimate the cost. Too often it has been assumed that parasitism was abnormal and that it needed only a slight force to reestablish what was believed to be a normal equilibrium without parasitism. On the contrary, biology teaches us that parasitism is a normal phenomenon and if we accept this view we shall be more ready to pay the price of freedom as a permanent and ever recurring levy of nature for immunity from a condition to which all life is subject. The greatest victory of man over nature in the physical realm would undoubtedly be his own delivery from the heavy encumbrance of parasitism with which all life is burdened.
Parasitism and Disease (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abnormality (2)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Burden (27)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cost (86)  |  Development (422)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Domination (12)  |  Drain (11)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Immunity (8)  |  Incident (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negative (63)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Policy (24)  |  Possession (65)  |  Predator (6)  |  Price (51)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Regard (305)  |  Resource (63)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universality (22)  |  Victory (39)  |  View (488)

The worth of a new idea is invariably determined, not by the degree of its intuitiveness—which incidentally, is to a major extent a matter of experience and habit—but by the scope and accuracy of the individual laws to the discovery of which it eventually leads.
In Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (1968), 109-110.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Major (84)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Scope (45)  |  Worth (169)

The “hairy quadruped furnished with a tail and, pointed ears, probably arboreal in his habits,” this good fellow carried hidden in his nature, apparently, something destined to develop into a necessity for humane letters.
'Literature and Science', delivered as a lecture during Arnold's tour of the United States in 1883 and published in Discourses in America (1885). Taken from M. H. Abrams (ed.), The Norton Anthology of English Literature (1993), Vol. 2, 1441.
Science quotes on:  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Destined (42)  |  Develop (268)  |  Ear (68)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Good (889)  |  Humane (18)  |  Letter (109)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Point (580)  |  Something (719)

There is no existing ‘standard of protein intake’ that is based on the sure ground of experimental evidence. ... Between the two extremes of a very high and a very low protein intake it is difficult to prove that one level of intake is preferable to another. ... Physiologists, in drawing up dietary standards, are largely influenced by the dietary habits of their time and country.
Nutrition and Public Health', League of Nations Health Organization Quarterly Bulletin (1935) 4, 323–474. In Kenneth J. Carpenter, 'The Work of Wallace Aykroyd: International Nutritionist and Author', The Journal of Nutrition (2007), 137, 873-878.
Science quotes on:  |  Country (251)  |  Diet (54)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Low (80)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Protein (54)  |  Prove (250)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)

These parsons are so in the habit of dealing with the abstractions of doctrines as if there was no difficulty about them whatever, so confident, from the practice of having the talk all to themselves for an hour at least every week with no one to gainsay a syllable they utter, be it ever so loose or bad, that they gallop over the course when their field is Botany or Geology as if we were in the pews and they in the pulpit ... There is a story somewhere of an Englishman, Frenchman, and German being each called on to describe a camel. The Englishman immediately embarked for Egypt, the Frenchman went to the Jardin des Plantes, and the German shut himself up in his study and thought it out!
Letter to Asa Gray (29 Mar 1857). Quoted in Leonard Huxley, Life and Letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1918), Vol. 1, 477.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Botany (57)  |  Call (769)  |  Camel (11)  |  Confident (25)  |  Course (409)  |  Describe (128)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Field (364)  |  Geology (220)  |  German (36)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (186)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Joke (83)  |  Practice (204)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Story (118)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Week (70)  |  Whatever (234)

They say that habit is second nature. Who knows but nature is only first habit?
As quoted in epigraph in Edward Kasner and James Newman, Mathematics and the Imagination (1940, 1949), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  First (1283)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)

To behold is not necessarily to observe, and the power of comparing and combining is only to be obtained by education. It is much to be regretted that habits of exact observation are not cultivated in our schools; to this deficiency may be traced much of the fallacious reasoning, the false philosophy which prevails.
As quoted in Inaugural Address, Edward C.C. Stanford, 'Glasgow Philosophical Meeting' (8 Dec 1873), The Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science (2 Jan 1874), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Behold (18)  |  Combine (57)  |  Compare (69)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Education (378)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  False (100)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  School (219)  |  Trace (103)

Voluntary attention is … a habit, an imitation of natural attention, which … serves, at the same time, as its point of departure and point of support. … Attention … creates nothing; and if the brain be sterile, if the associations are poor, it will act its part in vain.
As translated in The Psychology of Attention (1890), 45 & 65. Also translated as, “Voluntary attention is a habit, an imitation of natural attention, which is its starting-point and its basis. … Attention creates nothing; and if the brain is barren, if the associations are meagre, it functions in vain”, in William W. Speer, Primary Arithmetic: First Year, for the Use of Teachers (1902), 2-3. By
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Association (46)  |  Attention (190)  |  Basis (173)  |  Brain (270)  |  Create (235)  |  Imitation (24)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Part (222)  |  Point (580)  |  Poor (136)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Support (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vain (83)  |  Voluntary (4)  |  Will (2355)

Watch your thoughts; they become words.
Watch your words; they become actions.
Watch your actions; they become habits.
Watch your habits; they become character.
Watch your character; it becomes your destiny.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Become (815)  |  Character (243)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Thought (953)  |  Watch (109)  |  Word (619)

We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn’t any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work.
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blind Alley (4)  |  Describe (128)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Journal (30)  |  Order (632)  |  Possible (552)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Track (38)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)  |  Wrong (234)

We thus learn that man is descended from a hairy quadruped, furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in its habits, and an inhabitant of the Old World.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 389.
Science quotes on:  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Descend (47)  |  Ear (68)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Old (481)  |  Old World (8)  |  Point (580)  |  World (1774)

What helps luck is a habit of watching for opportunities, of having a patient but restless mind, of sacrificing one’s ease or vanity, or uniting a love of detail to foresight, and of passing through hard times bravely [and cheerfully].
In The Wish of His Life (1878), Vol. 1, 25. The ending "and cheerfully" is not part of the original text, though it is seen added in Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors, Both Ancient and Modern (1891), 320. The original text ends “whistling the air of ‘Marlbrough’.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bravely (3)  |  Detail (146)  |  Ease (35)  |  Foresight (6)  |  Hard (243)  |  Help (105)  |  Love (309)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Patient (199)  |  Restless (11)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unite (42)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Watch (109)

Whatever be the detail with which you cram your student, the chance of his meeting in after life exactly that detail is almost infinitesimal; and if he does meet it, he will probably have forgotten what you taught him about it. The really useful training yields a comprehension of a few general principles with a thorough grounding in the way they apply to a variety of concrete details. In subsequent practice the men will have forgotten your particular details; but they will remember by an unconscious common sense how to apply principles to immediate circumstances. Your learning is useless to you till you have lost your textbooks, burnt your lecture notes, and forgotten the minutiae which you learned by heart for the examination. What, in the way of detail, you continually require will stick in your memory as obvious facts like the sun and the moon; and what you casually require can be looked up in any work of reference. The function of a University is to enable you to shed details in favor of principles. When I speak of principles I am hardly even thinking of verbal formulations. A principle which has thoroughly soaked into you is rather a mental habit than a formal statement. It becomes the way the mind reacts to the appropriate stimulus in the form of illustrative circumstances. Nobody goes about with his knowledge clearly and consciously before him. Mental cultivation is nothing else than the satisfactory way in which the mind will function when it is poked up into activity.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Cram (5)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Favor (63)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Form (959)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minutiae (7)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remember (179)  |  Require (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Student (300)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sun (385)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Training (80)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

When the aggregate amount of solid matter transported by rivers in a given number of centuries from a large continent, shall be reduced to arithmetical computation, the result will appear most astonishing to those...not in the habit of reflecting how many of the mightiest of operations in nature are effected insensibly, without noise or disorder.
Principles of Geology (1837), Vol. 1, 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Amount (151)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Computation (24)  |  Continent (76)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Effect (393)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noise (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Result (677)  |  River (119)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Transport (30)  |  Will (2355)

When the intensity of emotional conviction subsides, a man who is in the habit of reasoning will search for logical grounds in favor of the belief which he finds in himself.
In Mysticism and Logic (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Favor (63)  |  Find (998)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Search (162)  |  Subside (5)  |  Will (2355)

Without theory, practice is but routine born of habit. Theory alone can bring forth and develop the spirit of invention. ... [Do not] share the opinion of those narrow minds who disdain everything in science which has not an immediate application. ... A theoretical discovery has but the merit of its existence: it awakens hope, and that is all. But let it be cultivated, let it grow, and you will see what it will become.
Inaugural Address as newly appointed Professor and Dean (Sep 1854) at the opening of the new Faculté des Sciences at Lille (7 Dec 1854). In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, translated by Mrs. R. L. Devonshire (1919), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Application (242)  |  Become (815)  |  Birth (147)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Existence (456)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hope (299)  |  Immediacy (2)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Invention (369)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Practice (204)  |  Routine (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spirit Of Invention (2)  |  Theory (970)  |  Will (2355)  |  Without (13)

You can send a message around the world in one-fifth of a second, yet it may take years for it to get from the outside of a man's head to the inside.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Man (2251)  |  Message (49)  |  Outside (141)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

[John] Dalton was a man of regular habits. For fifty-seven years he walked out of Manchester every day; he measured the rainfall, the temperature—a singularly monotonous enterprise in this climate. Of all that mass of data, nothing whatever came. But of the one searching, almost childlike question about the weights that enter the construction of these simple molecules—out of that came modern atomic theory. That is the essence of science: ask an impertinent question, and you are on the way to the pertinent answer.
The Ascent of Man (1973), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Climate (97)  |  Construction (112)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Data (156)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Enter (141)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Essence (82)  |  Impertinence (4)  |  Impertinent (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manchester (6)  |  Mass (157)  |  Modern (385)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pertinent (4)  |  Question (621)  |  Regular (46)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weather (44)  |  Weight (134)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Year (933)

[On the 11th day of November 1572], in the evening, after sunset, when, according to my habit, I was contemplating the stars in a clear sky, I noticed that a new and unusual star, surpassing all others in brilliancy, was shining almost directly over my head; and since I had, almost from boyhood, known all the stars of the heavens perfectly (there is no great difficulty in gaining that knowledge), it was quite evident to me that there had never before been any star in that place in the sky, even the smallest, to say nothing of a star so conspicuously bright as this. I was so astonished at this sight that I was not ashamed to doubt the trustworthiness of my own eyes. But when I observed that others, too, on having the place pointed out to them, could see that there was a star there, I had no further doubts. A miracle indeed, either the greatest of all that have occurred in the whole range of nature since the beginning of the world, or one certainly that is to be classed with those attested by the Holy Oracles.
De Stello. Nova (On the New Star) (1573). Quoted in H. Shapley and A. E. Howarth (eds.), Source Book in Astronomy (1929), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bright (79)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Class (164)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Evident (91)  |  Eye (419)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Holy (34)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nova (6)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Range (99)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Shining (35)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

[Smoking is] a dirty habit that should be banned from America by the Government, instead of moderate alcoholic drinking.
As quoted by Gobind Behari Lal, Universal Service Science Editor, as printed in Syracuse Journal (13 Jan 1933), 4. At the time, there was Prohibition of alcoholic drinks in America. Piccard was interviewed in New York on his arrival from Brussels onboard the Champlain by newspaper and motion picture men. Because he was so vigorously opposed to smoking, he required that nobody smoked during the interview in the children’s dining room.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcohol (22)  |  America (127)  |  Ban (9)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Drink (53)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Government (110)  |  Smoking (27)

[Some] philosophers have been of opinion that our immortal part acquires during this life certain habits of action or of sentiment, which become forever indissoluble, continuing after death in a future state of existence ... I would apply this ingenious idea to the generation, or production of the embryon, or new animal, which partakes so much of the form and propensities of the parent.
Zoonomia (1794), Vol. 1, 483-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Become (815)  |  Certain (550)  |  Death (388)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Life (1795)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Parent (76)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Production (183)  |  State (491)

[Theodore Roosevelt] was a naturalist on the broadest grounds, uniting much technical knowledge with knowledge of the daily lives and habits of all forms of wild life. He probably knew tenfold more natural history than all the presidents who had preceded him, and, I think one is safe in saying, more human history also.
In 'Theodore Roosevelt', Natural History (Jan 1919), 19, No.1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Daily (87)  |  Form (959)  |  Ground (217)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  President (31)  |  Theodore Roosevelt (41)  |  Safe (54)  |  Technical (43)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wildlife (14)

[T]he habit of scientific analysis … exhausts the material offered to it…
Entry for 1 Sep 1875 in Amiel’s Journal: The Journal Intime of Henri-Frédéric Amiel, trans. Humphry Ward (1893), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Material (353)  |  Offer (141)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.