Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Departure

Departure Quotes (9 quotes)

All that we can hope from these inspirations, which are the fruits of unconscious work, is to obtain points of departure for such calculations. As for the calculations themselves, they must be made in the second period of conscious work which follows the inspiration, and in which the results of the inspiration are verified and the consequences deduced.
Science and Method (1914, 2003), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Calculation (128)  |  Consequence (207)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Follow (379)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Hope (299)  |  Inspiration (76)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Period (198)  |  Point (580)  |  Result (678)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Verification (31)  |  Work (1351)

An involuntary return to the point of departure is, without doubt, the most disturbing of all journeys.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Doubt (305)  |  Involuntary (4)  |  Journey (42)  |  Most (1729)  |  Point (580)  |  Return (125)

Conventional people are roused to fury by departures from convention, largely because they regard such departures as a criticism of themselves.
In The Conquest of Happiness (3rd Ed. 1930), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Convention (14)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Fury (6)  |  Largely (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Regard (304)  |  Rouse (3)  |  Themselves (433)

Either one or the other [analysis or synthesis] may be direct or indirect. The direct procedure is when the point of departure is known-direct synthesis in the elements of geometry. By combining at random simple truths with each other, more complicated ones are deduced from them. This is the method of discovery, the special method of inventions, contrary to popular opinion.
Ampère gives this example drawn from geometry to illustrate his meaning for “direct synthesis” when deductions following from more simple, already-known theorems leads to a new discovery. In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 159. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (234)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Contrary (142)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (785)  |  Element (310)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Invention (377)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Known (454)  |  Method (506)  |  More (2559)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Popular (29)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Random (41)  |  Simple (406)  |  Special (184)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Truth (1062)

It needs scarcely be pointed out that in placing Mathematics at the head of Positive Philosophy, we are only extending the application of the principle which has governed our whole Classification. We are simply carrying back our principle to its first manifestation. Geometrical and Mechanical phenomena are the most general, the most simple, the most abstract of all,— the most irreducible to others, the most independent of them; serving, in fact, as a basis to all others. It follows that the study of them is an indispensable preliminary to that of all others. Therefore must Mathematics hold the first place in the hierarchy of the sciences, and be the point of departure of all Education whether general or special.
In Auguste Comte and Harriet Martineau (trans.), The Positive Philosophy (1858), Introduction, Chap. 2, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (126)  |  All (4107)  |  Application (242)  |  Back (391)  |  Basis (173)  |  Carry (127)  |  Classification (97)  |  Education (379)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1212)  |  First (1284)  |  Follow (379)  |  General (511)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Govern (65)  |  Head (81)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Hold (95)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1729)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (319)  |  Philosophy (382)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Positive (94)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Principle (510)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3880)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simply (53)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (656)  |  Whole (738)

Mathematics, among all school subjects, is especially adapted to further clearness, definite brevity and precision in expression, although it offers no exercise in flights of rhetoric. This is due in the first place to the logical rigour with which it develops thought, avoiding every departure from the shortest, most direct way, never allowing empty phrases to enter. Other subjects excel in the development of expression in other respects: translation from foreign languages into the mother tongue gives exercise in finding the proper word for the given foreign word and gives knowledge of laws of syntax, the study of poetry and prose furnish fit patterns for connected presentation and elegant form of expression, composition is to exercise the pupil in a like presentation of his own or borrowed thoughtsand their development, the natural sciences teach description of natural objects, apparatus and processes, as well as the statement of laws on the grounds of immediate sense-perception. But all these aids for exercise in the use of the mother tongue, each in its way valuable and indispensable, do not guarantee, in the same manner as mathematical training, the exclusion of words whose concepts, if not entirely wanting, are not sufficiently clear. They do not furnish in the same measure that which the mathematician demands particularly as regards precision of expression.
In Anleitung zum mathematischen Unterricht in höheren Schulen (1906), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4107)  |  Allow (45)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Clear (100)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connect (125)  |  Definite (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Description (84)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (424)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enter (142)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Excel (4)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expression (176)  |  Find (999)  |  First (1284)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flight (98)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Form (960)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Give (202)  |  Ground (218)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (895)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Measure (233)  |  Most (1729)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perception (97)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Place (177)  |  Poetry (144)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Process (423)  |  Proper (145)  |  Prose (11)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Regard (304)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Same (157)  |  School (220)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (656)  |  Subject (522)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Syntax (2)  |  Teach (278)  |  Thought (954)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Training (80)  |  Translation (21)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (368)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1216)  |  Word (622)

One of the gladdest moments of human life, methinks, is the departure upon a distant journey into unknown lands. Shaking off with one mighty effort the fetters of habit, the leaden weight of routine, the cloak of many cares and the slavery of home, man feel once more happy.
In Zanzibar: City, Island, and Coast (1872), Vol. 1, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Cloak (5)  |  Distant (33)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exploration (135)  |  Feel (366)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Habit (168)  |  Happy (105)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Journey (42)  |  Land (115)  |  Leaden (2)  |  Life (1799)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Moment (254)  |  More (2559)  |  Routine (25)  |  Shake (41)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Weight (136)

Science sees the process of evolution from the outside, as one might a train of cars going by, and resolves it into the physical and mechanical elements, without getting any nearer the reason of its going by, or the point of its departure or destination.
From Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (71)  |  Destination (14)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (593)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (41)  |  Science (3880)  |  See (1082)  |  Train (114)

The great artifice of regarding small deviations from the truth as being the truth itself is at the same time the foundation of wit, where the whole thing would often collapse if we were to regard these deviations in a spirit of philosophical rigor.
Aphorism from Georg Christoph Lichtenberg and R.J. Hollingdale (trans.) 'Notebook A: 1765-1770', The Waste Books (1990), 4. Also seen translated as, “The great trick of regarding small departures from the truth as the truth itself—on which is founded the entire integral calculus—is also the basis of our witty speculations, where the whole thing would often collapse if we considered the departures with philosophical rigour,” for example, as quoted in FractalVision: Put Fractals to Work For You (1992), 5, citing Aphorisms: 1764-1799.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Entire (47)  |  Foundation (173)  |  Great (1575)  |  Integral Calculus (7)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Regard (304)  |  Rigor (28)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Small (479)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trick (35)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wit (59)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.