Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Contrary

Contrary Quotes (22 quotes)

A world that did not lift a finger when Hitler was wiping out six million Jewish men, women, and children is now saying that the Jewish state of Israel will not survive if it does not come to terms with the Arabs. My feeling is that no one in this universe has the right and the competence to tell Israel what it has to do in order to survive. On the contrary, it is Israel that can tell us what to do. It can tell us that we shall not survive if we do not cultivate and celebrate courage, if we coddle traitors and deserters, bargain with terrorists, court enemies, and scorn friends.
In Before the Sabbath (1979), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Arab (2)  |  Bargain (3)  |  Celebrate (7)  |  Child (189)  |  Competence (6)  |  Courage (39)  |  Court (16)  |  Cultivate (9)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Feel (93)  |  Finger (38)  |  Friend (63)  |  Adolf Hitler (17)  |  Israel (3)  |  Jewish (8)  |  Lift (17)  |  Million (89)  |  Order (167)  |  Right (144)  |  Say (126)  |  Scorn (6)  |  State (96)  |  Survive (28)  |  Tell (67)  |  Term (87)  |  Traitor (3)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Woman (94)  |  World (667)

But having considered everything which has been said, one could by this believe that the earth and not the heavens is so moved, and there is no evidence to the contrary. Nevertheless, this seems prima facie as much, or more, against natural reason as are all or several articles of our faith. Thus, that which I have said by way of diversion (esbatement) in this manner can be valuable to refute and check those who would impugn our faith by argument.
On the Book of the Heavens and the World of Aristotle [1377], bk. II, ch. 25, sect. 10, trans. A. D. Menut and A. J. Denomy, quoted in Marshall Clagett, The Science of Mechanics in the Middle Ages (1959), 606.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (59)  |  Check (16)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Diversion (7)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Faith (131)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Manner (35)  |  Motion (127)  |  Reason (330)  |  Refutation (10)  |  Value (180)

But how is one to determine what is pleasing to God? ... Whatever is unpleasant to man is pleasant to God. The test is the natural instinct of man. If there arises within one’s dark recesses a hot desire to do this or that, then it is the paramount duty of a Christian to avoid doing this or that. And if, on the contrary, one cherishes an abhorrence of the business, then one must tackle it forthwith, all the time shouting ‘Hallelujah!’ A simple enough religion, surely–simple, satisfying and idiotic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Arise (32)  |  Avoid (34)  |  Business (71)  |  Cherish (6)  |  Christian (17)  |  Dark (49)  |  Desire (101)  |  Determine (45)  |  Duty (51)  |  Forthwith (2)  |  God (454)  |  Hot (17)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Natural (128)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Pleasant (16)  |  Please (10)  |  Recess (5)  |  Religion (210)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Shout (9)  |  Simple (111)  |  Surely (13)  |  Tackle (4)  |  Test (96)  |  Time (439)  |  Unpleasant (2)

Consciousness is never experienced in the plural, only in the singular. Not only has none of us ever experienced more than one consciousness, but there is also no trace of circumstantial evidence of this ever happening anywhere in the world. If I say that there cannot be more than one consciousness in the same mind, this seems a blunt tautology–we are quite unable to imagine the contrary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anywhere (11)  |  Blunt (3)  |  Circumstantial (2)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experience (268)  |  Happen (63)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Mind (544)  |  Same (92)  |  Say (126)  |  Seem (89)  |  Singular (3)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Trace (39)  |  Unable (12)  |  World (667)

Contrary to popular parlance, Darwin didn't discover evolution. He uncovered one (most would say the) essential mechanism by which it operates: natural selection. Even then, his brainstorm was incomplete until the Modern Synthesis of the early/mid-20th century when (among other things) the complementary role of genetic heredity was fully realized. Thousands upon thousands of studies have followed, providing millions of data points that support this understanding of how life on Earth has come to be as it is.
In online article, 'The Day That Botany Took on Bobby Jindal by Just Being Itself', Huffington Post (5 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (25)  |  Brainstorm (2)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Data (100)  |  Discover (115)  |  Essential (87)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Genetics (98)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Life On Earth (5)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Popular (21)  |  Study (331)  |  Understanding (317)

Einstein has not ... given the lie to Kant’s deep thoughts on the idealization of space and time; he has, on the contrary, made a large step towards its accomplishment.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Deep (81)  |  Einstein (4)  |  Give (117)  |  Idealization (2)  |  Kants (2)  |  Large (82)  |  Lie (80)  |  Space And Time (6)  |  Step (67)  |  Thought (374)

Either one or the other [analysis or synthesis] may be direct or indirect. The direct procedure is when the point of departure is known-direct synthesis in the elements of geometry. By combining at random simple truths with each other, more complicated ones are deduced from them. This is the method of discovery, the special method of inventions, contrary to popular opinion.
Ampère gives this example drawn from geometry to illustrate his meaning for “direct synthesis” when deductions following from more simple, already-known theorems leads to a new discovery. In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 159. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Combination (69)  |  Complication (20)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Departure (4)  |  Direct (44)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Element (129)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Indirect (8)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Method (154)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Point (72)  |  Popular (21)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Random (21)  |  Simple (111)  |  Special (51)  |  Synthesis (38)  |  Truth (750)

Everything around us is filled with mystery and magic. I find this no cause for despair, no reason to turn for solace to esoteric formulae or chariots of gods. On the contrary, our inability to find easy answers fills me with a fierce pride in our ambivalent biology ... with a constant sense of wonder and delight that we should be part of anything so profound.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Biology (150)  |  Cause (231)  |  Chariot (3)  |  Constant (40)  |  Delight (51)  |  Despair (25)  |  Easy (56)  |  Esoteric (2)  |  Everything (120)  |  Fierce (4)  |  Fill (35)  |  Find (248)  |  Formula (51)  |  God (454)  |  Inability (4)  |  Magic (67)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Part (146)  |  Pride (45)  |  Profound (46)  |  Reason (330)  |  Sense (240)  |  Solace (5)  |  Turn (72)  |  Wonder (134)

I claim that relativity and the rest of modern physics is not complicated. It can be explained very simply. It is only unusual or, put another way, it is contrary to common sense.
In Edward Teller, Wendy Teller and Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2013), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (52)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Modern Physics (12)  |  Relativity (50)  |  Simple (111)  |  Unusual (13)

I do not think evolution is supremely important because it is my specialty. On the contrary, it is my specialty because I think it is supremely important.
This View of Life: the World of an Evolutionist (1964), 27-28.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (482)  |  Important (124)  |  Specialty (8)

In the social production of their life, men enter into definite relations that are indispensable and independent of their will; these relations of production correspond to a definite stage of development of their material forces of production. The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society - the real foundation, on which rises a legal and political superstructure and to which correspond definite forms of social consciousness. The mode of production of material life determines the social, political and intellectual life process in general. It is not the consciousness of men that determines their being, but, on the contrary, their social being that determines their consciousness. At a certain stage of their development, the material productive forces in society come in conflict with the existing relations of production, or - what is but a legal expression for the same thing - with the property relations within which they have been at work before. From forms of development of the productive forces these relations turn into fetters. Then begins an epoch of social revolution. With the change of the economic foundation the entire immense superstructure is more or less rapidly transformed. In considering such transformations a distinction should always be made between the material transformation of the economic conditions of production, which can be determined with the precision of natural science, and the legal, political, religious, aesthetic or philosophic - in short, ideological forms in which men become conscious of this conflict and fight it out. Just as our opinion of an individual is not based on what he thinks of himself, so we can not judge of such a period of transformation by its own consciousness; on the contrary, this consciousness must be explained rather from the contradictions of material life, from the existing conflict between the social productive forces and the relations of production. No social order ever disappears before all the productive forces for which there is room in it have been developed; and new, higher relations of production never appear before the material conditions of their existence have matured in the womb of the old society itself. Therefore, mankind always sets itself only such tasks as it can solve; since, looking at the matter more closely, we will always find that the task itself arises only when the material conditions necessary for its solution already exist or are at least in the process of formation. In broad outlines we can designate the Asiatic, the ancient, the feudal, and the modern bourgeois modes of production as so many progressive epochs in the economic formation of society. The bourgeois relations of production are the last antagonistic form of the social process of production - antagonistic not in the sense of individual antagonism, but of one arising from the social conditions of life of the individuals; at the same time the productive forces developing in the womb of bourgeois society create the material conditions for the solution of that antagonism. This social formation constitutes, therefore, the closing chapter of the prehistoric stage of human society.
Karl Marx
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Already (16)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Antagonism (5)  |  Antagonistic (2)  |  Appear (55)  |  Arise (32)  |  Base (43)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bourgeois (2)  |  Broad (18)  |  Certain (84)  |  Change (291)  |  Chapter (7)  |  Close (40)  |  Closely (8)  |  Condition (119)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Consider (45)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Correspond (5)  |  Create (98)  |  Definite (27)  |  Designation (10)  |  Determine (45)  |  Develop (55)  |  Development (228)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Economic (21)  |  Enter (20)  |  Entire (29)  |  Epoch (12)  |  Exist (89)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fetter (3)  |  Fight (37)  |  Find (248)  |  Force (194)  |  Form (210)  |  Formation (54)  |  Foundation (75)  |  General (92)  |  High (78)  |  Human Society (6)  |  Ideological (3)  |  Immense (28)  |  Independent (41)  |  Indispensable (8)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Judge (43)  |  Least (43)  |  Legal (6)  |  Life (917)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Material (124)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mature (7)  |  Mode (29)  |  Modern (104)  |  More Or Less (4)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Necessary (89)  |  New (340)  |  Old (104)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Outline (6)  |  Period (49)  |  Philosophic (3)  |  Political (31)  |  Precision (38)  |  Prehistoric (5)  |  Process (201)  |  Production (105)  |  Productive (10)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Property (96)  |  Rapidly (10)  |  Real (95)  |  Relation (96)  |  Religious (44)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Rise (51)  |  Room (29)  |  Same (92)  |  Sense (240)  |  Set (56)  |  Short (31)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (188)  |  Solution (168)  |  Solve (41)  |  Stage (39)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sum (30)  |  Task (68)  |  Think (205)  |  Time (439)  |  Total (29)  |  Transform (20)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Turn (72)  |  Womb (13)  |  Work (457)

It is often claimed that knowledge multiplies so rapidly that nobody can follow it. I believe this is incorrect. At least in science it is not true. The main purpose of science is simplicity and as we understand more things, everything is becoming simpler. This, of course, goes contrary to what everyone accepts.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Becoming (13)  |  Belief (400)  |  Claim (52)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Everything (120)  |  Following (16)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Main (16)  |  Multiplication (14)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simpler (5)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Thing (37)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understanding (317)

Let us now recapitulate all that has been said, and let us conclude that by hermetically sealing the vials, one is not always sure to prevent the birth of the animals in the infusions, boiled or done at room temperature, if the air inside has not felt the ravages of fire. If, on the contrary, this air has been powerfully heated, it will never allow the animals to be born, unless new air penetrates from outside into the vials. This means that it is indispensable for the production of the animals that they be provided with air which has not felt the action of fire. And as it would not be easy to prove that there were no tiny eggs disseminated and floating in the volume of air that the vials contain, it seems to me that suspicion regarding these eggs continues, and that trial by fire has not entirely done away with fears of their existence in the infusions. The partisans of the theory of ovaries will always have these fears and will not easily suffer anyone's undertaking to demolish them.
Nouvelles Recherches sur les Découvertes Microscopiques, et la Génération des Corps Organisés (1769), 134-5. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 510-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Air (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Birth (81)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Demolition (4)  |  Dissemination (2)  |  Ease (29)  |  Egg (41)  |  Fear (113)  |  Fire (117)  |  Float (12)  |  Heat (90)  |  Hermetic (2)  |  Infusion (3)  |  Outside (37)  |  Partisan (4)  |  Pentration (2)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Production (105)  |  Proof (192)  |  Provision (15)  |  Ravage (6)  |  Recapitulation (2)  |  Seal (10)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Theory (582)  |  Undertaking (7)  |  Vial (3)

Not a single visible phenomenon of cell­division gives even a remote suggestion of qualitative division. All the facts, on the contrary, indicate that the division of the chromatin is carried out with the most exact equality.
The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1896), 306.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell Division (4)  |  Chromatin (4)  |  Equality (21)  |  Fact (609)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Qualitative (12)  |  Remote (27)  |  Suggestion (24)

The best class of scientific mind is the same as the best class of business mind. The great desideratum in either case is to know how much evidence is enough to warrant action. It is as unbusiness-like to want too much evidence before buying or selling as to be content with too little. The same kind of qualities are wanted in either case. The difference is that if the business man makes a mistake, he commonly has to suffer for it, whereas it is rarely that scientific blundering, so long as it is confined to theory, entails loss on the blunderer. On the contrary it very often brings him fame, money and a pension. Hence the business man, if he is a good one, will take greater care not to overdo or underdo things than the scientific man can reasonably be expected to take.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Blunder (13)  |  Business (71)  |  Contentment (10)  |  Desideratum (2)  |  Difference (208)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Fame (30)  |  Little (126)  |  Loss (62)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Money (125)  |  Pension (2)  |  Quality (65)  |  Rare (31)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Selling (2)  |  Suffering (26)  |  Theory (582)  |  Warrant (2)

The kinetic concept of motion in classical theory will have to undergo profound modifications. (That is why I also avoided the term “orbit” in my paper throughout.) … We must not bind the atoms in the chains of our prejudices—to which, in my opinion, also belongs the assumption that electron orbits exist in the sense of ordinary mechanics—but we must, on the contrary, adapt our concepts to experience.
Letter to Niels Bohr (12 Dec 1924), in K. von Meyenn (ed.), Wolfgang Pauli - Wissenschaftliche Korrespondenz (1979), Vol. 1, 188. Quoted and cited in Daniel Greenberger, ‎Klaus Hentschel and ‎Friedel Weinert, Compendium of Quantum Physics: Concepts, Experiments, History and Philosophy (2009), 615.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Chain (38)  |  Concept (102)  |  Electron (66)  |  Experience (268)  |  Kinetic (2)  |  Mechanics (44)  |  Model (64)  |  Modification (31)  |  Motion (127)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Profound (46)

There are two possible outcomes: If the result confirms the hypothesis, then you've made a measurement. If the result is contrary to the hypothesis, then you've made a discovery.
Found in various sources, but without citation, for example in Nancy Trautmann, Assessing Toxic Risk: Teacher Edition (2001), 29. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Confirm (12)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Outcome (10)  |  Possible (100)  |  Result (250)

Things may be opposite without being contrary.
Opposite, though one could not exist without the other. The North Pole is opposite to the South, but there could be no North Pole without a South.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Exist (89)  |  North Pole (3)  |  Opposite (39)  |  South Pole (2)

Two contrary laws seem to be wrestling with each other nowadays: the one, a law of blood and of death, ever imagining new means of destruction and forcing nations to be constantly ready for the battlefield—the other, a law of peace, work and health, ever evolving new means for delivering man from he scourges which beset him. The one seeks violent conquests, the other the relief of humanity. The latter places one human life above any victory: while the former would sacrifice hundreds and thousands of lives to the ambition of one.
Address at the Inauguration of the Pasteur Institute. In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, translated by Mrs. R. L. Devonshire (1919), 444.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (25)  |  Battlefield (5)  |  Blood (95)  |  Conquest (13)  |  Death (270)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Health (136)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Law (418)  |  Nation (111)  |  Peace (58)  |  Relief (13)  |  Scourge (3)  |  Victory (24)  |  Violent (15)  |  Work (457)

When an hypothesis has come to birth in the mind, or gained footing there, it leads a life so far comparable with the life of an organism, as that it assimilates matter from the outside world only when it is like in kind with it and beneficial; and when contrarily, such matter is not like in kind but hurtful, the hypothesis, equally with the organism, throws it off, or, if forced to take it, gets rid of it again entirely.
In Arthur Schopenhauer and T. Bailey Saunders (ed., trans), The Art of Literature: A Series of Essays (1891), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Assimilate (6)  |  Beneficial (10)  |  Equally (18)  |  Hurtful (3)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Mind (544)  |  Organism (126)  |  Outside (37)  |  Rid (10)  |  World (667)

When you believe you have found an important scientific fact, and are feverishly curious to publish it, constrain yourself for days, weeks, years sometimes, fight yourself, try and ruin your own experiments, and only proclaim your discovery after having exhausted all contrary hypotheses. But when, after so many efforts you have at last arrived at a certainty, your joy is one of the greatest which can be felt by a human soul.
From Speech (14 Nov 1888) at the Inauguration of the Pasteur Institute, as translated in René Vallery-Radot and Mrs R.L. Devonshire (trans.), The Life of Pasteur (1915), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (17)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Constrain (6)  |  Curious (24)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Effort (94)  |  Exhaust (12)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Important (124)  |  Joy (61)  |  Proclaim (12)  |  Publish (18)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Science And Journalism (3)  |  Soul (139)

When … a large number of renegade specialists and amateurs believe contrary to the most prestigious experts, the latter say, well science is not democratic, it is what the people who know the most say—that is what counts!
In Seeing Red: Redshifts, Cosmology and Academic Science (1998), 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (18)  |  Belief (400)  |  Democratic (7)  |  Expert (42)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  People (269)  |  Science (1699)  |  Specialist (20)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.