Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Decomposition

Decomposition Quotes (18 quotes)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composite (4)  |  Contain (68)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reference (33)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)

All that can be said upon the number and nature of elements is, in my opinion, confined to discussions entirely of a metaphysical nature. The subject only furnishes us with indefinite problems, which may be solved in a thousand different ways, not one of which, in all probability, is consistent with nature. I shall therefore only add upon this subject, that if, by the term elements, we mean to express those simple and indivisible atoms of which matter is composed, it is extremely probable we know nothing at all about them; but, if we apply the term elements, or principles of bodies, to express our idea of the last point which analysis is capable of reaching, we must admit, as elements, all the substances into which we are capable, by any means, to reduce bodies by decomposition.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, Preface, xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atom (355)  |  Capable (168)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Different (577)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Element (310)  |  Express (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Way (1217)

Ammonia is furnished from all animal substances by decomposition. The horns of cattle, especially those of deer, yield it in abundance, and it is from this circumstance that a solution of ammonia in water has been termed hartshorn.
From 'Artist and Mechanic', The artist & Tradesman’s Guide: embracing some leading facts & principles of science, and a variety of matter adapted to the wants of the artist, mechanic, manufacturer, and mercantile community (1827), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Animal (617)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Deer (9)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Horn (18)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Solution (267)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Termed (2)  |  Water (481)  |  Yield (81)

But when it has been shown by the researches of Pasteur that the septic property of the atmosphere depended not on the oxygen, or any gaseous constituent, but on minute organisms suspended in it, which owed their energy to their vitality, it occurred to me that decomposition in the injured part might be avoided without excluding the air, by applying as a dressing some material capable of destroying the life of the floating particles. Upon this principle I have based a practice.
'On the Antiseptic Principle in the Practice of Surgery', The British Medical Journal (1867), ii, 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Capable (168)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Decay (53)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dressing (3)  |  Energy (344)  |  Infection (27)  |  Injury (36)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Minute (125)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Particle (194)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitality (23)

Cavendish gave me once some bits of platinum for my experiments, and came to see my results on the decomposition of the alkalis, and seemed to take an interest in them; but he encouraged no intimacy with any one, and received nobody at his own house. … He was acute, sagacious, and profound, and, I think, the most accomplished British philosopher of his time.
As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Acute (7)  |  Alkali (6)  |  British (41)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Give (202)  |  House (140)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimacy (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Platinum (6)  |  Profound (104)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)

Chemistry affords two general methods of determining the constituent principles of bodies, the method of analysis, and that of synthesis. When, for instance, by combining water with alkohol, we form the species of liquor called, in commercial language, brandy or spirit of wine, we certainly have a right to conclude, that brandy, or spirit of wine, is composed of alkohol combined with water. We can produce the same result by the analytical method; and in general it ought to be considered as a principle in chemical science, never to rest satisfied without both these species of proofs. We have this advantage in the analysis of atmospherical air, being able both to decompound it, and to form it a new in the most satisfactory manner.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Brandy (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Language (293)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)  |  Wine (38)

Chymia, or Alchemy and Spagyrism, is the art of resolving compound bodies into their principles and of combining these again.
Fundamenta Chymiae (1720). Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry (1961), Vol. 2, 664.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Principle (507)

I wanted some new names to express my facts in Electrical science without involving more theory than I could help & applied to a friend Dr Nicholl [his doctor], who has given me some that I intend to adopt for instance, a body decomposable by the passage of the Electric current, I call an ‘electrolyte’ and instead of saying that water is electro chemically decomposed I say it is ‘electrolyzed’. The intensity above which a body is decomposed beneath which it conducts without decomposition I call the ‘Electrolyte intensity’ &c &c. What have been called: the poles of the battery I call the electrodes they are not merely surfaces of metal, but even of water & air, to which the term poles could hardly apply without receiving a new sense. Electrolytes must consist of two parts which during the electrolization, are determined the one in the one direction, and the other towards the poles where they are evolved; these evolved substances I call zetodes, which are therefore the direct constituents of electrolites.
Letter to William Whewell (24 Apr 1834). In Frank A. J. L. James (ed.), The Correspondence of Michael Faraday: Volume 2, 1832-1840 (1993), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Battery (12)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Current (118)  |  Direct (225)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electrolysis (7)  |  Electrolyte (4)  |  Express (186)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Friend (168)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Pole (46)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Water (481)

I will now direct the attention of scientists to a previously unnoticed cause which brings about the metamorphosis and decomposition phenomena which are usually called decay, putrefaction, rotting, fermentation and moldering. This cause is the ability possessed by a body engaged in decomposition or combination, i.e. in chemical action, to give rise in a body in contact with it the same ability to undergo the same change which it experiences itself.
Annalen der Pharmacie 1839, 30, 262. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Attention (190)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contact (65)  |  Decay (53)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Metamorphosis (5)  |  Mold (33)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possess (156)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rotting (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

In deriving a body from the water type I intend to express that to this body, considered as an oxide, there corresponds a chloride, a bromide, a sulphide, a nitride, etc., susceptible of double compositions, or resulting from double decompositions, analogous to those presented by hydrochloric acid, hydrobromic acid, sulphuretted hydrogen, ammonia etc., or which give rise to the same compounds. The type is thus the unit of comparison for all the bodies which, like it, are susceptible of similar changes or result from similar changes.
Traité de Chimie Organique, 1856, 4, 587. Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, (1970), Vol. 4, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Express (186)  |  Hydrochloric Acid (2)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Present (619)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Type (167)  |  Water (481)

In every combustion there is disengagement of the matter of fire or of light. A body can burn only in pure air [oxygen]. There is no destruction or decomposition of pure air and the increase in weight of the body burnt is exactly equal to the weight of air destroyed or decomposed. The body burnt changes into an acid by addition of the substance that increases its weight. Pure air is a compound of the matter of fire or of light with a base. In combustion the burning body removes the base, which it attracts more strongly than does the matter of heat, which appears as flame, heat and light.
'Memoire sur la combustion en général', Mémoires de l'Académie des Sciences, 1777, 592. Reprinted in Oeuvres de Lavoisier (1864), Vol. 2, 225-33, trans. M. P. Crosland.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Addition (66)  |  Air (347)  |  Base (117)  |  Body (537)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Change (593)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Compound (113)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Heat (174)  |  Increase (210)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Remove (45)  |  Stoichiometry (2)  |  Substance (248)  |  Weight (134)

It would indeed be a great delusion, if we stated that those sports of Nature [we find] enclosed in rocks are there by chance or by some vague creative power. Ah, that would be superficial indeed! In reality, those shells, which once were alive in water and are now dead and decomposed, were made thus by time not Nature; and what we now find as very hard, figured stone, was once soft mud and which received the impression of the shape of a shell, as I have frequently demonstrated.
La vana speculazione disingannata del senso (1670), trans. Ezio Vaccari, 83-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Chance (239)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Dead (59)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Impression (114)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mud (26)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shape (72)  |  Shell (63)  |  Soft (29)  |  Sport (22)  |  Stone (162)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vague (47)  |  Water (481)

Life is the twofold internal movement of composition and decomposition at once general and continuous.
In The American Journal of the Medical Sciences (1858), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Definition (221)  |  General (511)  |  Internal (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Movement (155)

On the whole, I cannot help saying that it appears to me not a little extraordinary, that a theory so new, and of such importance, overturning every thing that was thought to be the best established in chemistry, should rest on so very narrow and precarious a foundation, the experiments adduced in support of it being not only ambiguous or explicable on either hypothesis, but exceedingly few. I think I have recited them all, and that on which the greatest stress is laid, viz. That of the formation of water from the decomposition of the two kinds of air, has not been sufficiently repeated. Indeed it required so difficult and expensive an apparatus, and so many precautions in the use of it, that the frequent repetition of the experiment cannot be expected; and in these circumstances the practised experimenter cannot help suspecting the accuracy of the result and consequently the certainty of the conclusion.
Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston (1796), 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguity (17)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Formation (96)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Narrow (84)  |  New (1216)  |  Precarious (5)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Required (108)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Stress (22)  |  Support (147)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

Quantum theory thus reveals a basic oneness of the universe. It shows that we cannot decompose the world into independently existing smallest units. As we penetrate into matter, nature does not show us any isolated “building blocks,” but rather appears as a complicated web of relations between the various parts of the whole. These relations always include the observer in an essential way. The human observer constitute the final link in the chain of observational processes, and the properties of any atomic object can be understood only in terms of the object’s interaction with the observer.
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Atom (355)  |  Basic (138)  |  Building (156)  |  Building Block (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Essential (199)  |  Final (118)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Independence (34)  |  Independently (24)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Observational (15)  |  Observer (43)  |  Oneness (6)  |  Part (222)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Process (423)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unit (33)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Web (16)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

The influence of electricity in producing decompositions, although of inestimable value as an instrument of discovery in chemical inquiries, can hardly be said to have been applied to the practical purposes of life, until the same powerful genius [Davy] which detected the principle, applied it, by a singular felicity of reasoning, to arrest the corrosion of the copper-sheathing of vessels. … this was regarded as by Laplace as the greatest of Sir Humphry's discoveries.
Reflections on the Decline of Science in England (1830), 16.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Copper (25)  |  Corrosion (4)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Detect (44)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrolysis (7)  |  Felicity (4)  |  Genius (284)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Influence (222)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Life (1795)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Regard (305)  |  Singular (23)  |  Value (365)  |  Vessel (63)

The sun's rays are the ultimate source of almost every motion which takes place on the surface of the earth. By their heat are produced all winds, and those disturbances in the electric equilibrium of the atmosphere which give rise to the phenomena of terrestrial magnetism. By their vivifying action vegetables are elaborated from inorganic matter, and become in their turn the support of animals and of man, and the sources of those great deposits of dynamical efficiency which are laid up for human use in our coal strata. By them the waters of the sea are made to circulate in vapor through the air, and irrigate the land, producing springs and rivers. By them are produced all disturbances of the chemical equilibrium of the elements of nature which, by a series of compositions and decompositions, give rise to new products, and originate a transfer of materials. Even the slow degradation of the solid constituents of the surface, in which its chief geological changes consist, and their diffusion among the waters of the ocean, are entirely due to the abrasion of the wind, rain, and tides, which latter, however, are only in part the effect of solar influence and the alternate action of the seasons.
from Outlines of Astronomy (1849), 237.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chief (97)  |  Coal (57)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Due (141)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Electric (76)  |  Element (310)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Originate (36)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Produced (187)  |  Product (160)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ray (114)  |  Rise (166)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Season (47)  |  Series (149)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Solid (116)  |  Spring (133)  |  Strata (35)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Turn (447)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Use (766)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Water (481)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)

This new force, which was unknown until now, is common to organic and inorganic nature. I do not believe that this is a force entirely independent of the electrochemical affinities of matter; I believe, on the contrary, that it is only a new manifestation, but since we cannot see their connection and mutual dependence, it will be easier to designate it by a separate name. I will call this force catalytic force. Similarly, I will call the decomposition of bodies by this force catalysis, as one designates the decomposition of bodies by chemical affinity analysis.
In'Some Ideas on a New Force which Acts in Organic Compounds', Annales chimie physiques, 1836, 61, 146. Translated in Henry M. Leicester and Herbert S. Klickstein, A Source Book in Chemistry 1400-1900 (1952), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Call (769)  |  Catalysis (7)  |  Catalyst (7)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easier (53)  |  Electrochemical (4)  |  Force (487)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organic (158)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.