Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Increase

Increase Quotes (107 quotes)

1122 … Thereafter there were many sailors on the sea and on inland water who said that they had seen a great and extensive fire near the ground in the northeast which continuously increased in width as it mounted to the sky. And the heavens opened into four parts and fought against it as if determined to put it out, and the fire stopped rising upwards. They saw that fire at the first streak of dawn, and it lasted until full daylight: this happened on 7 December.
From the 'Peterborough Chronicle (Laud Manuscript)', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as translated in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Issue 1624 (1975), 250. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  Continuously (7)  |  Dawn (10)  |  Daylight (7)  |  Determined (8)  |  Extensive (10)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fire (117)  |  First (174)  |  Great (300)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heavens (16)  |  Meteorology (29)  |  Open (38)  |  Part (146)  |  Rise (51)  |  Sailor (9)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sky (68)  |  Stop (56)  |  Upwards (4)

À mesure que la science rabaisse ainsi notre orgueil, elle augmente notre puissance.
Science increases our power in proportion as it lowers our pride.
Original French quote from Introduction à l’étude de la médecine expérimentale (1865), 141. As translated in Fielding H. Garrison, 'Medical Proverbs, Aphorisms and Epigrams', Bulletin of New York Academy of Medicine (Oct 1928), 4, No. 10, 997. The translation above is literal. For a clearer interpretation, see another version on this web page: “But by a marvellous compensation, science, in humbling our pride, proportionately increases our power.”
Science quotes on:  |  Humble (23)  |  Power (273)  |  Pride (45)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Science (1699)

Combination does not produce though mergers and combinations are still the accepted panacea. In Big business there appears to be increasing aridity, bureaucracy, and stultifying sacrifice of initiative and above all fear.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 55, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Bureaucracy (5)  |  Combination (69)  |  Fear (113)  |  Initiative (12)  |  Panacea (2)  |  Production (105)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Stultify (4)

Les hommes ne sont pas faits pour savoir; les hommes ne sont pas faits pour comprendre … et nos illusions croissent avec nos connaissances.
Men are not created to know, men are not created to understand … and our illusions increase with our knowledge.
From the fictional Dr. Trublet in Histoire Comique (1900), 212. As translated in Lewis P. Shanks, Anatole France (1919), 165. Shanks comments that Anatole France was writing, not as “an idealist of science, but as a skeptic content to accept truths merely pragmatic. … Trublet has lost faith in absolute truth.”
Science quotes on:  |  Created (5)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Understanding (317)

Mais, par une merveilleuse compensation, à mesure que la science rabaisse ainsi notre orgueil, elle augmente notre puissance.
But by a marvellous compensation, science, in humbling our pride, proportionately increases our power.
Original French quote from Introduction à l’étude de la médecine expérimentale (1865), 141. As translated by H.C. Greene in An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1949), 82. Most often seen quoted in a shorter, more literal translation as “Science increases our power in proportion as it lowers our pride” (detailed elsewhere on this web page).
Science quotes on:  |  Compensation (6)  |  Marvellous (5)  |  Power (273)  |  Pride (45)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Science (1699)

Question: State the relations existing between the pressure, temperature, and density of a given gas. How is it proved that when a gas expands its temperature is diminished?
Answer: Now the answer to the first part of this question is, that the square root of the pressure increases, the square root of the density decreases, and the absolute temperature remains about the same; but as to the last part of the question about a gas expanding when its temperature is diminished, I expect I am intended to say I don't believe a word of it, for a bladder in front of a fire expands, but its temperature is not at all diminished.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175, Question 1. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Bladder (2)  |  Density (11)  |  Diminution (4)  |  Examination (60)  |  Existence (254)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Fire (117)  |  Gas (46)  |  Howler (15)  |  Intention (25)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Proof (192)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Square Root (5)  |  State (96)  |  Temperature (42)

[On the propulsive force of rockets] One part of fire takes up as much space as ten parts of air, and one part of air takes up the space of ten parts of water, and one part of water as much as ten parts of earth. Now powder is earth, consisting of the four elementary principles, and when the sulfur conducts the fire into the dryest part of the powder, fire, and air increase … the other elements also gird themselves for battle with each other and the rage of battle is changed by their heat and moisture into a strong wind.
In De La Pirotechnia (1540). From the 1943 English translation, as given in Willy Ley, Rockets: The Future of Travel Beyond the Stratosphere (1944), 64. Though Birinuccio provided the first insight into what propels a rocket, the “strong wind” blowing downward, he did not explain why that should cause the rocket to rise upward, as Issac Newton would do with his Third Law of Motion, nearly a century and a half later.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Battle (30)  |  Change (291)  |  Earth (487)  |  Element (129)  |  Elementary (30)  |  Fire (117)  |  Force (194)  |  Heat (90)  |  Moisture (10)  |  Powder (4)  |  Principle (228)  |  Propulsion (8)  |  Rage (4)  |  Rocket (29)  |  Strong (47)  |  Water (244)  |  Wind (52)

A premature attempt to explain something that thrills you will destroy your perceptivity rather than increase it, because your tendency will be to explain away rather than seek out.
Victor K. McElhenty, Insisting on the Impossible, 245.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Premature (17)  |  Seek (57)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Thrill (14)

A science or an art may be said to be “useful” if its development increases, even indirectly, the material well-being and comfort of men, it promotes happiness, using that word in a crude and commonplace way.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Comfort (42)  |  Commonplace (10)  |  Crude (14)  |  Development (228)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Indirectly (5)  |  Material (124)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Usefulness (70)  |  Using (6)  |  Well-Being (4)  |  Word (221)

All science is concerned with the relationship of cause and effect. Each scientific discovery increases man’s ability to predict the consequences of his actions and thus his ability to control future events.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Action (151)  |  Cause And Effect (11)  |  Concern (76)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Control (93)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Event (97)  |  Future (229)  |  Predict (12)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)

An increase in knowledge acquired too quickly and with too little participation on one’s own part is not very fruitful: erudition can produce foliage without bearing fruit.
Aphorism 26 in Notebook C (1772-1773), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Bearing (8)  |  Erudition (4)  |  Foliage (4)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Fruitful (31)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Participation (7)  |  Quickly (9)

Any increase in knowledge anywhere helps pave the way for an increase in knowledge everywhere.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1128)

As agonizing a disease as cancer is, I do not think it can be said that our civilization is threatened by it. … But a very plausible case can be made that our civilization is fundamentally threatened by the lack of adequate fertility control. Exponential increases of population will dominate any arithmetic increases, even those brought about by heroic technological initiatives, in the availability of food and resources, as Malthus long ago realized.
From 'In Praise of Science and Technology', in Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science (1975, 2011), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (18)  |  Arithmetic (68)  |  Availability (10)  |  Cancer (44)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Control (93)  |  Disease (257)  |  Domination (12)  |  Exponential (3)  |  Fertility (11)  |  Food (139)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Initiative (12)  |  Lack (52)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (12)  |  Population (71)  |  Realization (33)  |  Resource (47)  |  Technological (15)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Threat (24)

As nuclear and other technological achievements continue to mount, the normal life span will continue to climb. The hourly productivity of the worker will increase.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Climb (14)  |  Continue (38)  |  Life (917)  |  Mount (7)  |  Normal (21)  |  Nuclear (24)  |  Productivity (13)  |  Span (4)  |  Technological (15)  |  Worker (23)

At the end of the book [Zoonomia] he sums up his [Erasmus Darwin] views in the following sentences: “The world has been evolved, not created: it has arisen little by little from a small beginning, and has increased through the activity of the elemental forces embodied in itself, and so has rather grown than come into being at an almighty word.” “What a sublime idea of the infinite might of the great Architect, the Cause of all causes, the Father of all fathers, the Ens Entium! For if we would compare the Infinite, it would surely require a greater Infinite to cause the causes of effects than to produce the effects themselves.”
[This is a restatement, not a verbatim quote of the original words of Erasmus Darwin, who attributed the idea he summarized to David Hume.]
In August Weismann, John Arthur Thomson (trans.), Margaret R. Thomson (trans.) The Evolution Theory (1904), Vol. 1, 17-18. The verbatim form of the quote from Zoonomia, in context, can be seen on the webpage here for Erasmus Darwin. Later authors have quoted from Weismann's translated book, and given the reworded passage as a direct quote by Erasmus Darwin. Webmaster has found a verbatim form in Zoonomia (1794), but has been unable to find the wording used by Weismann in any primary source by Erasmus Darwin. The rewording is perhaps due to the translation of the quote into German for Weismann's original book, Vorträge über Descendenztheorie (1902) followed by another translation for the English edition.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Almighty (8)  |  Architect (15)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Cause (231)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Creation (211)  |  Erasmus Darwin (39)  |  Effect (133)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Father (44)  |  Force (194)  |  Growth (111)  |  Idea (440)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Sublime (18)

Augustine's Law XVI: Software is like entropy. It is difficult to grasp, weighs nothing, and obeys the second law of thermodynamics; i.e. it always increases.
In Augustine's Laws (1997), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Obey (13)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (13)  |  Software (11)  |  Weight (61)

Bacteria are highly adaptable. They frequently change both morphologically and functionally. Their virulence is also an essentially fluctuating property, that increases or diminishes according to the conditions to which the pathogenic organism is subjected.
In Studies in Immunity (1909), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptability (4)  |  Bacteria (32)  |  Change (291)  |  Condition (119)  |  Decrease (11)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fluctuation (7)  |  Frequent (10)  |  Function (90)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Organism (126)  |  Pathogen (4)  |  Property (96)  |  Virulence (3)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Accurate (21)  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Audience (13)  |  Back (55)  |  Basket (5)  |  Basketball (2)  |  Battle (30)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (3)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cheer (5)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conference (8)  |  Country (121)  |  Court (16)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Curious (24)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (27)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Emotionally (2)  |  Event (97)  |  Exception (33)  |  First (174)  |  Foot (39)  |  Game (45)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardly (12)  |  High (78)  |  Hook (4)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (170)  |  Involve (27)  |  Jump (13)  |  Leave (63)  |  Local (15)  |  Long (95)  |  March (15)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Military (24)  |  Move (58)  |  Murmur (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Net (10)  |  Night (73)  |  Occur (26)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  People (269)  |  Perform (27)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (60)  |  Player (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (3)  |  Promise (27)  |  Providence (6)  |  Respectively (2)  |  Rest (64)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Right (144)  |  Routine (11)  |  Series (38)  |  Set (56)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Start (68)  |  Steadily (4)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Team (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Unusual (13)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (20)  |  Watch (39)  |  Whirl (2)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (214)

But we must take other steps, such as increasing conservation, developing an ethanol industry, and increasing CAFE standards if we are to make our country safer by cutting our reliance on foreign oil.
Jim Costa
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (139)  |  Country (121)  |  Cut (36)  |  Develop (55)  |  Ethanol (2)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Industry (91)  |  Oil (37)  |  Reliance (9)  |  Safe (15)  |  Standard (41)  |  Step (67)

By encouraging conservation, increasing investments in clean, renewable sources of energy, and promoting increased domestic production of oil and gas, we can build a more secure future for our country.
Ron Lewis
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Build (80)  |  Clean (20)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Country (121)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Encourage (16)  |  Energy (185)  |  Future (229)  |  Gas (46)  |  Investment (8)  |  Oil (37)  |  Production (105)  |  Promote (14)  |  Renewable (5)  |  Secure (13)  |  Source (71)

By the end of the next century, the “greenhouse effect” may increase temperatures worldwide to levels that have not been reached for at least 100,000 years. And the effects on sea level and on agriculture and other human activities are likely to be so profound that we should be planning for them now.
In 'Temperatures Rise in the Global Greenhouse', New Scientist (15 May 1986), 110, No. 1508, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Century (94)  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Greenhouse Effect (3)  |  Human (445)  |  Plan (69)  |  Profound (46)  |  Sea Level (4)  |  Temperature (42)  |  World (667)

Cosmology is a science which has only a few observable facts to work with. The discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation added one—the present radiation temperature of the universe. This, however, was a significant increase in our knowledge since it requires a cosmology with a source for the radiation at an early epoch and is a new probe of that epoch. More sensitive measurements of the background radiation in the future will allow us to discover additional facts about the universe.
'Discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background', in B. Bertotti (ed.) Modern Cosmology in Retrospect (1990), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (24)  |  Cosmology (17)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Fact (609)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Microwave (4)  |  Observation (418)  |  Radiation (22)  |  Temperature (42)  |  Universe (563)

Curves that have no tangents are the rule. … Those who hear of curves without tangents, or of functions without derivatives, often think at first that Nature presents no such complications. … The contrary however is true. … Consider, for instance, one of the white flakes that are obtained by salting a solution of soap. At a distance its contour may appear sharply defined, but as we draw nearer its sharpness disappears. The eye can no longer draw a tangent at any point. … The use of a magnifying glass or microscope leaves us just as uncertain, for fresh irregularities appear every time we increase the magnification. … An essential characteristic of our flake … is that we suspect … that any scale involves details that absolutely prohibit the fixing of a tangent.
(1906). As quoted “in free translation” in Benoit B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Appear (55)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Complication (20)  |  Contour (2)  |  Curve (16)  |  Defined (3)  |  Derivative (4)  |  Detail (65)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Distance (54)  |  Essential (87)  |  Eye (159)  |  Fixing (2)  |  Flake (5)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Involve (27)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Magnification (8)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nearer (8)  |  Rule (135)  |  Scale (49)  |  Sharply (3)  |  Sharpness (4)  |  Soap (11)  |  Solution (168)  |  Suspect (12)  |  Tangent (3)  |  Uncertain (11)

For some years I have been afflicted with the belief that flight is possible to man. My disease has increased in severity and I feel that it will soon cost me an increased amount of money if not my life.
Opening line his first letter (13 May 1900) to Octave Chanute. In Marvin W. McFarland (ed.) The Papers of Wilbur and Orville Wright: 1899-1905 (1953), Vol. 1, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Affliction (6)  |  Belief (400)  |  Cost (31)  |  Disease (257)  |  Flight (45)  |  Life (917)  |  Money (125)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Severity (5)

For those of us who make only a brief study of chemistry, the benefits to be expected are of an indirect nature. Increased capacity for enjoyment, a livelier interest in the world in which we live, a more intelligent attitude toward the great questions of the day—these are the by-products of a well-balanced education, including chemistry in its proper relation to other studies.
In 'Introduction', General Chemistry: An Elementary Survey Emphasizing Industrial Applications of Fundamental Principles (1923), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (47)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Brief (14)  |  Byproduct (3)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Education (280)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Indirect (8)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Interest (170)  |  Life (917)  |  Livelier (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Study (331)  |  Well-Balanced (3)  |  World (667)

From our home on the Earth, we look out into the distances and strive to imagine the sort of world into which we were born. Today, we have reached far into space. Our immediate neighborhood we know rather intimately. But with increasing distance our knowledge fades The search will continue. The urge is older than history. It is not satisfied and will not be suppressed.
In 'From Our Home On The Earth', The Land (1946), 5, 145. As cited on the webpage of the Edwin Powell Hubble Papers.
Science quotes on:  |  Continue (38)  |  Distance (54)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fade (5)  |  History (302)  |  Home (58)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Intimately (4)  |  Know (321)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Neighborhood (7)  |  Old (104)  |  Satisfied (14)  |  Search (85)  |  Urge (10)  |  World (667)

Good methods can teach us to develop and use to better purpose the faculties with which nature has endowed us, while poor methods may prevent us from turning them to good account. Thus the genius of inventiveness, so precious in the sciences, may be diminished or even smothered by a poor method, while a good method may increase and develop it.
Science quotes on:  |  Develop (55)  |  Genius (186)  |  Inventiveness (5)  |  Method (154)  |  Precious (22)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Smother (2)

Having always observed that most of them who constantly took in the weekly Bills of Mortality made little other use of them than to look at the foot how the burials increased or decreased, and among the Casualties what had happened, rare and extraordinary, in the week current; so as they might take the same as a Text to talk upon in the next company, and withal in the Plague-time, how the Sickness increased or decreased, that the Rich might judg of the necessity of their removal, and Trades-men might conjecture what doings they were likely to have in their respective dealings.
From Natural and Political Observations Mentioned in a Following Index and Made upon Bills of Mortality (1662), Preface. Reproduced in Cornelius Walford, The Insurance Cyclopaedia (1871), Vol. 1, 286. Italicizations from another source.
Science quotes on:  |  Burial (7)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Decrease (11)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Mortality (13)  |  Observation (418)  |  Plague (34)  |  Rare (31)  |  Sickness (20)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Talk (61)  |  Use (70)

He that increaseth knowledge, increaseth sorrow.
Bible
(circa 725 B.C.)
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Sorrow (8)

He who appropriates land to himself by his labor, does not lessen but increases the common stock of mankind. For the provisions serving to the support of human life, produced by one acre of inclosed and cultivated land, are … ten times more than those which are yielded by an acre of land, of an equal richness lying waste in common. And therefore he that incloses land and has a greater plenty of the conveniences of life from ten acres than he could have from a hundred left to nature, may truly be said to give ninety acres to mankind.
In John Locke and Thomas Preston Peardon (ed.), The Second Treatise of Civil Government: An Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent and End of Civil Government (Dec 1689, 1952), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Cultivate (9)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Labor (53)  |  Land (83)  |  Provision (15)  |  Support (63)  |  Yield (23)

I beg this committee to recognize that knowledge is not simply another commodity. On the contrary. Knowledge is never used up, it increases by diffusion, and grows by dispersion. Knowledge and information cannot be quantitatively assessed, as a percentage of the G.N.P. Any willful cut in our resources of knowledge is an act of self-destruction.
While Librarian of Congress, asking a House Appropriations subcommittee to restore money cut from the library’s budget. As reported in New York Times (23 Feb 1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Commodity (3)  |  Cut (36)  |  Diffusion (7)  |  Grow (66)  |  Information (102)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Quantitative (15)  |  Resource (47)  |  Willful (3)

I came here to help make America more competitive and prosperous by developing an energy policy that increases conservation, promotes cleaner technologies, encourages development of renewables and enhances domestic production of gas and oil.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Clean (20)  |  Competitive (6)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Develop (55)  |  Development (228)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Encourage (16)  |  Energy (185)  |  Enhance (4)  |  Gas (46)  |  Help (68)  |  Oil (37)  |  Policy (23)  |  Production (105)  |  Promote (14)  |  Prosperity (15)  |  Renewable (5)  |  Technology (199)

I do not believe that science per se is an adequate source of happiness, nor do I think that my own scientific outlook has contributed very greatly to my own happiness, which I attribute to defecating twice a day with unfailing regularity. Science in itself appears to me neutral, that is to say, it increases men’s power whether for good or for evil. An appreciation of the ends of life is something which must be superadded to science if it is to bring happiness, but only the kind of society to which science is apt to give rise. I am afraid you may be disappointed that I am not more of an apostle of science, but as I grow older, and no doubt—as a result of the decay of my tissues, I begin to see the good life more and more as a matter of balance and to dread all over-emphasis upon anyone ingredient.
Letter to W. W. Norton, Publisher (27 Jan 1931). In The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell, 1914-1944 (1968), Vol. 2, 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (18)  |  Age (137)  |  Apostle (3)  |  Appreciation (19)  |  Balance (43)  |  Belief (400)  |  Decay (31)  |  Disappointment (11)  |  Dread (10)  |  Emphasis (14)  |  End (141)  |  Evil (67)  |  Good (228)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Ingredient (10)  |  Life (917)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Neutral (7)  |  Power (273)  |  Regularity (24)  |  Society (188)  |  Source (71)

I gang my own gait and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties I have never lost an obstinate sense of detachment, of the need for solitude–a feeling which increases with the years.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (33)  |  Country (121)  |  Detachment (3)  |  Face (69)  |  Family (37)  |  Feel (93)  |  Friend (63)  |  Gang (3)  |  Heart (110)  |  Home (58)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Lose (53)  |  Need (211)  |  Obstinate (4)  |  Sense (240)  |  Solitude (10)  |  Tie (21)  |  Whole (122)  |  Year (214)

I shall devote only a few lines to the expression of my belief in the importance of science ... it is by this daily striving after knowledge that man has raised himself to the unique position he occupies on earth, and that his power and well-being have continually increased.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Continually (14)  |  Daily (19)  |  Devote (23)  |  Earth (487)  |  Expression (82)  |  Importance Of Science (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Line (44)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Position (54)  |  Power (273)  |  Raise (20)  |  Strive (35)  |  Unique (24)  |  Well-Being (4)

I then bequeath the whole of my property … to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
From the will of James Smithson written on 23 Oct 1826. (The amount excluded a modest lifetime annuity to a former faithful servant.) Smithson willed his estate firstly to his nephew, but it was to be bequeathed to the U.S. in the case his nephew died without heir—which did come to pass in 1835. Smithson included no further instructions concerning the Smithsonian Institution.
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Bequeath (2)  |  Diffusion (7)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Property (96)  |  United States (31)  |  Washington (5)  |  Whole (122)

If entropy must constantly and continuously increase, then the universe is remorselessly running down, thus setting a limit (a long one, to be sure) on the existence of humanity. To some human beings, this ultimate end poses itself almost as a threat to their personal immortality, or as a denial of the omnipotence of God. There is, therefore, a strong emotional urge to deny that entropy must increase.
In Asimov on Physics (1976), 141. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Deny (29)  |  Emotion (62)  |  End (141)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Existence (254)  |  God (454)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Immortality (9)  |  Omnipotence (2)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Threat (24)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Universe (563)

If the earth’s population continues to double every 50 years (as it is now doing) then by 2550 A.D. it will have increased 3,000-fold. … by 2800 A.D., it would reach 630,000 billion! Our planet would have standing room only, for there would be only two-and-a-half square feet per person on the entire land surface, including Greenland and Antarctica. In fact, if the human species could be imagined as continuing to multiply further at the same rate, by 4200 A.D. the total mass of human tissue would be equal to the mass of the earth.
In The Intelligent Man's Guide to Science: The Biological Sciences (1960), 117. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Antarctica (6)  |  Billion (52)  |  Double (12)  |  Earth (487)  |  Greenland (2)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Land (83)  |  Mass (61)  |  Multiple (9)  |  Population (71)  |  Reproduction (57)  |  Surface (74)  |  Tissue (24)

If the term education may be understood in so large a sense as to include all that belongs to the improvement of the mind, either by the acquisition of the knowledge of others or by increase of it through its own exertions, we learn by them what is the kind of education science offers to man. It teaches us to be neglectful of nothing — not to despise the small beginnings, for they precede of necessity all great things in the knowledge of science, either pure or applied.
'Science as a Branch of Education', lecture to the Royal Institution, 11 Jun 1858. Reprinted in The Mechanics Magazine (1858), 49, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Applied (15)  |  Education (280)  |  Exertion (8)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Neglect (23)  |  Pure (62)  |  Science (1699)  |  Understanding (317)

If there is technological advance without social advance, there is, almost automatically, an increase in human misery, in impoverishment.
The Other America (1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Automatically (2)  |  Human (445)  |  Misery (19)  |  Social (93)  |  Technological (15)

In addition to the clean coal provisions, the energy conference agreement contains provisions instrumental in helping increase conservation and lowering consumption.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (22)  |  Agreement (29)  |  Clean (20)  |  Coal (41)  |  Conference (8)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Consumption (11)  |  Contain (37)  |  Energy (185)  |  Help (68)  |  Instrumental (3)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Provision (15)

In general … science per se does not increase the destructiveness of war, since, as a rule, it strengthens the defense as much as the attack.
In 'Boredom or Doom in a Scientific World', United Nations World (Sep 1948), Vol. 2, No. 8, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (29)  |  Defense (15)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Strengthen (13)  |  War (144)

In recent years several new particles have been discovered which are currently assumed to be “elementary,” that is, essentially structureless. The probability that all such particles should be really elementary becomes less and less as their number increases. It is by no means certain that nucleons, mesons, electrons, neutrinos are all elementary particles.
Opening statement, Enrico Fermi and C.N. Yang, 'Are Mesons Elementary Particles?', Physical Review (1949), 76, 1739. As cited in James Gleick, Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (1992), 283.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Electron (66)  |  Elementary (30)  |  Meson (2)  |  Neutrino (8)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Particle (90)  |  Probability (83)

In the years since 1932, the list of known particles has increased rapidly, but not steadily. The growth has instead been concentrated into a series of spurts of activity.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1968). Collected in Yong Zhou (ed.), Nobel Lecture: Physics, 1963-1970 (2013), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Concentrate (11)  |  Growth (111)  |  Known (15)  |  Particle (90)  |  Rapidly (10)  |  Series (38)  |  Steadily (4)

In vertebrate paleontology, increasing knowledge leads to triumphant loss of clarity.
Synapsid Evolution and Dentition, International Colloquium on the Evolution of Mammals, Brussels (1962.)
Science quotes on:  |  Clarity (31)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Loss (62)  |  Paleontology (29)  |  Triumph (33)  |  Vertebrate (13)

Increased knowledge of heredity means increased power of control over the living thing, and as we come to understand more and more the architecture of the plant or animal we realize what can and what cannot be done towards modification or improvement.
Reginald C. Punnett, in article 'Mendelism', from Hugh Chisholm (ed.) The Encyclopædia Britannica (1911), Vol. 18, 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Architecture (35)  |  Control (93)  |  Do (22)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Modification (31)  |  Plant (173)  |  Power (273)  |  Understanding (317)

Increasing knowledge lessens the sphere of the supernatural.
In The Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas (1908), Vol. 2, 746.
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lessen (4)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Supernatural (19)

It has been stated that the research should be discontinued because it involved “meddling with evolution.” Homo sapiens has been meddling with evolution in many ways and for a long time. We started in a big way when we domesticated plants and animals. We continue every time we alter the environment. In general, recombinant DNA research docs not seem to represent a significant increase in the risks associated with such meddling—although it may significantly increase the rate at which we meddle.
In letter to the Board of Directors of Friends of the Earth, published in The Coevolutionary Quarterly (Spring 1978), as abstracted and cited in New Scientist (6 Jul 1978), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Altering (3)  |  Animal (309)  |  DNA (67)  |  Domestication (2)  |  Environment (138)  |  Evolution (482)  |  General (92)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Meddling (2)  |  Plant (173)  |  Rate (22)  |  Research (517)  |  Risk (29)  |  Significant (26)

It is hardly possible to maintain seriously that the evil done by science is not altogether outweighed by the good. For example, if ten million lives were lost in every war, the net effect of science would still have been to increase the average length of life.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (31)  |  Evil (67)  |  Good (228)  |  Life (917)  |  Lifespan (6)  |  Million (89)  |  Net (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  War (144)

It is not always the most brilliant speculations nor the choice of the most exotic materials that is most profitable. I prefer Monsieur de Reaumur busy exterminating moths by means of an oily fleece; or increasing fowl production by making them hatch without the help of their mothers, than Monsieur Bemouilli absorbed in algebra, or Monsieur Leibniz calculating the various advantages and disadvantages of the possible worlds.
Spectacle, 1, 475. Quoted in Camille Limoges, 'Noel-Antoine Pluche', in C. C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974 ), Vol. 11, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Algebra (36)  |  Brilliance (8)  |  Choice (64)  |  Disadvantage (8)  |  Exotic (4)  |  Extermination (10)  |  Fleece (2)  |  Fowl (3)  |  Hatch (2)  |  Help (68)  |  Incubation (2)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (27)  |  Material (124)  |  Moth (3)  |  Mother (59)  |  Oil (37)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Production (105)  |  Profit (28)  |  Speculation (77)  |  World (667)

It is notorious that the desire to live increases as life itself shortens.
In Charlas de Café: pensamientos, anécdotas y confidencias (1920). (Café Chats: Thoughts, Anecdotes and Confidences). As translated in Peter McDonald (ed.) Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Desire (101)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Notorious (6)  |  Shorten (2)

It is of priceless value to the human race to know that the sun will supply the needs of the earth, as to light and heat, for millions of years; that the stars are not lanterns hung out at night, but are suns like our own; and that numbers of them probably have planets revolving around them, perhaps in many cases with inhabitants adapted to the conditions existing there. In a sentence, the main purpose of the science is to learn the truth about the stellar universe; to increase human knowledge concerning our surroundings, and to widen the limits of intellectual life.
In 'The Nature of the Astronomer’s Work', North American Review (Jun 1908), 187, No. 631, 915.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (119)  |  Earth (487)  |  Hang (13)  |  Heat (90)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lantern (5)  |  Learn (160)  |  Life (917)  |  Light (246)  |  Limit (86)  |  Million (89)  |  Need (211)  |  Night (73)  |  Planet (199)  |  Priceless (4)  |  Probability (83)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Research (517)  |  Revolve (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Star (251)  |  Stellar (3)  |  Sun (211)  |  Supply (31)  |  Surrounding (11)  |  Truth (750)  |  Universe (563)  |  Value (180)  |  Widen (3)  |  Year (214)

It is tempting to wonder if our present universe, large as it is and complex though it seems, might not be merely the result of a very slight random increase in order over a very small portion of an unbelievably colossal universe which is virtually entirely in heat-death. Perhaps we are merely sliding down a gentle ripple that has been set up, accidently and very temporarily, in a quiet pond, and it is only the limitation of our own infinitesimal range of viewpoint in space and time that makes it seem to ourselves that we are hurtling down a cosmic waterfall of increasing entropy, a waterfall of colossal size and duration.
(1976). In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Colossal (10)  |  Complex (78)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Order (167)  |  Pond (9)  |  Portion (14)  |  Quiet (12)  |  Random (21)  |  Temporary (13)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Universe (563)  |  Viewpoint (6)  |  Waterfall (3)  |  Wonder (134)

It may be said “In research, if you know what you are doing, then you shouldn't be doing it.” In a sense, if the answer turns out to be exactly what you expected, then you have learned nothing new, although you may have had your confidence increased somewhat.
In Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (1973), 704.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Doing (36)  |  Exactness (18)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  New (340)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Research (517)  |  French Saying (61)

Just as the constant increase of entropy is the basic law of the universe, so it is the basic law of life to be ever more highly structured and to struggle against entropy.
In 'Letter to Dr. Gustáv Husák', Václav Havel: Or Living in Truth (1986), Pt. 1, 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (52)  |  Constant (40)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Law (418)  |  Life (917)  |  Structure (191)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Universe (563)

Knowledge always desires increase; it is like fire which must first be kindled by some external agent, but which will afterward propagate itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afterward (2)  |  Agent (27)  |  Desire (101)  |  External (45)  |  Fire (117)  |  First (174)  |  Kindle (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Propagate (4)

Like taxes, radioactivity has long been with us and in increasing amounts; it is not to be hated and feared, but accepted and controlled. Radiation is dangerous, let there be no mistake about that—but the modern world abounds in dangerous substances and situations too numerous to mention. ... Consider radiation as something to be treated with respect, avoided when practicable, and accepted when inevitable.
Recommending the same view towards radiation as the risks of automobile travel.
While in the Office of Naval Research. In Must we Hide? (1949), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Control (93)  |  Danger (62)  |  Fear (113)  |  Hate (26)  |  Radioactivity (26)  |  Tax (19)

Man is still by instinct a predatory animal given to devilish aggression.
The discoveries of science have immensely increased productivity of material things. They have increased the standards of living and comfort. They have eliminated infinite drudgery. They have increased leisure. But that gives more time for devilment.
The work of science has eliminated much disease and suffering. It has increased the length of life. That, together with increase in productivity, has resulted in vastly increased populations. Also it increased the number of people engaged in devilment.
Address delivered to Annual Meeting of the York Bible Class, Toronto, Canada (22 Nov 1938), 'The Imperative Need for Moral Re-armament', collected in America's Way Forward (1939), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggression (6)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Drudgery (4)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Leisure (11)  |  Life (917)  |  Population (71)  |  Predator (5)  |  Productivity (13)  |  Science (1699)  |  Standard Of Living (3)  |  Suffering (26)  |  Time (439)  |  Work (457)

Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (54)  |  Chance (122)  |  Diet (41)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Health (136)  |  Human (445)  |  Life On Earth (5)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Survival (49)  |  Vegetarian (9)

One of the greatest gifts science has brought to the world is continuing elimination of the supernatural, and it was a lesson that my father passed on to me, that knowledge liberates mankind from superstition. We can live our lives without the constant fear that we have offended this or that deity who must be placated by incantation or sacrifice, or that we are at the mercy of devils or the Fates. With increasing knowledge, the intellectual darkness that surrounds us is illuminated and we learn more of the beauty and wonder of the natural world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Bring (53)  |  Constant (40)  |  Continue (38)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Deity (11)  |  Devil (18)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Fate (38)  |  Father (44)  |  Fear (113)  |  Gift (47)  |  Great (300)  |  Illuminate (12)  |  Incantation (4)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Live (186)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mercy (9)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Offend (4)  |  Pass (60)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Supernatural (19)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Surround (17)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)

One of the principal results of civilization is to reduce more and more the limits within which the different elements of society fluctuate. The more intelligence increases the more these limits are reduced, and the nearer we approach the beautiful and the good. The perfectibility of the human species results as a necessary consequence of all our researches. Physical defects and monstrosities are gradually disappearing; the frequency and severity of diseases are resisted more successfully by the progress of modern science; the moral qualities of man are proving themselves not less capable of improvement; and the more we advance, the less we shall have need to fear those great political convulsions and wars and their attendant results, which are the scourges of mankind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Approach (33)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Capable (26)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Defect (14)  |  Different (110)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Disease (257)  |  Element (129)  |  Fear (113)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Good (228)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Great (300)  |  Human Species (6)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Less (54)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Modern Science (10)  |  Monstrosity (3)  |  Moral (100)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Need (211)  |  Perfectibility (2)  |  Physical (94)  |  Political (31)  |  Principal (15)  |  Progress (317)  |  Prove (60)  |  Quality (65)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Research (517)  |  Resist (10)  |  Result (250)  |  Scourge (3)  |  Severity (5)  |  Society (188)  |  Successfully (2)  |  Themselves (45)  |  War (144)

Population, when unchecked, goes on doubling itself every twenty-five years, or increases in a geometrical ratio. … The means of subsistence, under circumstances the most favorable to human industry, could not possibly be made to increase faster than in an arithmetical ratio.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population: (new ed. 1803), Vol. 1, 5 and 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetical (3)  |  Double (12)  |  Food (139)  |  Geometric (2)  |  Industry (91)  |  Population (71)  |  Ratio (15)  |  Subsistence (5)  |  Unchecked (3)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Population…increases in a geometrical ratio
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Population, when unchecked, increases in a geometrical ratio. Subsistence increases only in an arithmetical ratio. A slight acquaintance with numbers will show the immensity of the first power in comparison of the second.
An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 1st edition, 14. As cited in James Bonar, Parson Malthus (1881), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Check (16)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Immensity (17)  |  Number (179)  |  Population (71)  |  Power (273)  |  Subsistence (5)

Presumably, technology has made man increasingly independent of his environment. But, in fact, technology has merely substituted nonrenewable resources for renewables, which is more an increase than a decrease in dependence.
Steady-State Economics (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  Decrease (11)  |  Dependence (32)  |  Environment (138)  |  Fact (609)  |  Increasingly (3)  |  Independent (41)  |  Merely (35)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Renewable (5)  |  Substitute (23)  |  Technology (199)

Red is the color in which the interior of the body is painted. If an operation be thought of as a painting in progress, and blood red the color on the brush, it must be suitably restrained and attract no undue attention; yet any insufficiency of it will increase the perishability of the canvas.
In 'Letter to a Young Surgeon II', Letters to a Young Doctor (1996), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (76)  |  Attraction (32)  |  Blood (95)  |  Brush (4)  |  Canvas (2)  |  Color (78)  |  Operation (96)  |  Painting (24)  |  Progress (317)  |  Red (25)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Thought (374)  |  Undue (3)

Science and technology multiply around us. To an increasing extent they dictate the languages in which we speak and think. Either we use those languages, or we remain mute.
In the Introduction to the French edition (1984) of Crash (1974),
Science quotes on:  |  Dictate (9)  |  Extent (30)  |  Language (155)  |  Multiply (10)  |  Mute (4)  |  Remain (77)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Technology (20)  |  Speak (49)  |  Technology (199)  |  Think (205)

Scientific studies on marine reserves around the world show that if you close a place to fishing, the number of species increases 20 percent, the average size of a fish increases by a third, and the total weight of fish per hectare increases almost five times—in less than a decade.
From interview with Terry Waghorn, 'Can We Eat Our Fish and Protect Them Too?', Forbes (21 Feb 2012)
Science quotes on:  |  Average (31)  |  Close (40)  |  Decade (19)  |  Fish (85)  |  Fishing (12)  |  Marine (7)  |  Number (179)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Size (47)  |  Species (181)  |  Study (331)  |  Total (29)  |  Weight (61)  |  World (667)

Sir Edward Bullard maintains that the recent upsurge of keenness in oceanography is correlated with the development of modern sea-sick remedies.
In 'Man Explores the Sea', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (Sep 1963), 111, No. 5086, Footnote, 786.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Edward Bullard (6)  |  Correlate (3)  |  Development (228)  |  Interest (170)  |  Modern (104)  |  Oceanography (16)  |  Remedy (46)

So long as the fur of the beaver was extensively employed as a material for fine hats, it bore a very high price, and the chase of this quadruped was so keen that naturalists feared its speedy consideration. When a Parisian manufacturer invented the silk hat, which soon came into almost universal use, the demand for beavers' fur fell off, and this animal–whose habits, as we have seen, are an important agency in the formation of bogs and other modifications of forest nature–immediately began to increase, reappeared in haunts which we had long abandoned, and can no longer be regarded as rare enough to be in immediate danger of extirpation. Thus the convenience or the caprice of Parisian fashion has unconsciously exercised an influence which may sensibly affect the physical geography of a distant continent.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Beaver (6)  |  Bog (5)  |  Chase (11)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Extirpation (2)  |  Forest (88)  |  Fur (6)  |  Geography (25)  |  Hat (8)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Paris (9)  |  Price (26)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (31)

Something to remember. If you have remembered every word in this article, your memory will have recorded about 150 000 bits of information. Thus, the order in your brain will have increased by about 150 000 units. However, while you have been reading the article, you will have converted about 300 000 joules of ordered energy, in the form of food, into disordered energy, in the form of heat which you lose to the air around you by convection and sweat. This will increase the disorder of the Universe by about 3 x 1024 units, about 20 million million million times the increase in order because you remember my article.
An afterword to his three-page article discussing thermodynamics and entropy, in 'The Direction of Time', New Scientist (9 Jul 1987), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (15)  |  Bit (13)  |  Brain (181)  |  Convection (2)  |  Convert (15)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Energy (185)  |  Food (139)  |  Heat (90)  |  Information (102)  |  Joule (2)  |  Memory (81)  |  Million (89)  |  Order (167)  |  Record (56)  |  Remember (53)  |  Sweat (12)  |  Time (439)  |  Universe (563)  |  Word (221)

Statisticians tell us that for many years the death-rate from cancer has been slowly but steadily rising: and not unnaturally, many people conclude from this that for some reason or other we are becoming more susceptible to cancer. Actually, that conclusion does not follow at all. The rise in the cancer death-rate is probably due entirely to the fact that other causes of death have been reduced. Numbers of people who, if they had been born a century earlier, would have died in their twenties of typhoid or smallpox, say, are now living on into their seventies and dying of cancer.
From 'Figures Can Lie', Science Digest (Sep 1951), 30, No. 3, 53. (As condensed from The Listener). Excerpted in Meta Riley Emberger and Marian Ross Hall, Scientific Writing (1955), 407.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (44)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Death Rate (2)  |  Fact (609)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Smallpox (12)  |  Statistician (16)  |  Typhoid (6)

The age of the earth was thus increased from a mere score of millions [of years] to a thousand millions and more, and the geologist who had before been bankrupt in time now found himself suddenly transformed into a capitalist with more millions in the bank than he knew how to dispose of ... More cautious people, like myself, too cautious, perhaps, are anxious first of all to make sure that the new [radioactive] clock is not as much too fast as Lord Kelvin's was too slow.
1921 British Association for the Advancement of Science symposium on 'The Age of the Earth'. In Nature (1921), 108, 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Age Of The Earth (10)  |  Anxiety (15)  |  Bankrupt (2)  |  Capitalist (6)  |  Caution (15)  |  Clock (26)  |  Fast (24)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (50)  |  Radioactivity (26)  |  Slow (36)  |  Time (439)  |  Transformation (47)

The cancer scare has increased the use of borrowed cigarettes.
Anonymous
In E.C. McKenzie, 14,000 Quips and Quotes for Speakers, Writers, Editors, Preachers, and Teachers (1990), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Borrow (12)  |  Cancer (44)  |  Cigarette (22)  |  Scare (5)

The condensed air becomes attached to [the metallic calx], and adheres little by little to the smallest of its particles: thus its weight increases from the beginning to the end: but when all is saturated, it can take up no more.
Jean Rey
The Increase in Weight of Tin and Lead on Calcination (1630), Alembic Club Reprint (1895), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Adherence (2)  |  Air (151)  |  Attachment (5)  |  Calcination (3)  |  Condensation (8)  |  Lead (101)  |  Little (126)  |  Metal (38)  |  Particle (90)  |  Saturation (5)  |  Small (97)  |  Tin (11)  |  Weight (61)

The crescendo of noise—whether it comes from truck or jackhammer, siren or airplane—is more than an irritating nuisance. It intrudes on privacy, shatters serenity, and can inflict pain. We dare not be complacent about this ever mounting volume of noise. In the years ahead, it can bring even more discomfort—and worse—to the lives of people.
In 'Special Message to the Congress on Conservation: “To Renew a Nation” (8 Mar 1968). Collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Lyndon B. Johnson: 1968-69 (1970), 363. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1623768977 Johnson, Lyndon B. - 1970
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (32)  |  Complacent (4)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Dare (22)  |  Discomfort (2)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Environment (138)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Intrude (2)  |  Life (917)  |  Noise (24)  |  Nuisance (3)  |  Pain (82)  |  People (269)  |  Privacy (6)  |  Serenity (2)  |  Shatter (5)  |  Siren (3)  |  Truck (3)  |  Volume (13)

The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. All through the long history of Earth it has been an area of unrest where waves have broken heavily against the land, where the tides have pressed forward over the continents, receded, and then returned. For no two suc-cessive days is the shore line precisely the same. Not only do the tides advance and retreat in their eternal rhythms, but the level of the sea itself is never at rest. It rises or falls as the glaciers melt or grow, as the floor of the deep ocean basins shifts under its increasing load of sediments, or as the Earth’s crust along the continental margins warps up or down in adjustment to strain and tension. Today a little more land may belong to the sea, tomorrow a little less. Always the edge of the sea remains an elusive and indefinable boundary.
The Edge of the Sea
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (12)  |  Advance (123)  |  Area (18)  |  Basin (2)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Belong (33)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Break (33)  |  Continent (39)  |  Crust (17)  |  Deep (81)  |  Down (44)  |  Earth (487)  |  Edge (16)  |  Elusive (6)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Fall (89)  |  Floor (16)  |  Forward (21)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Grow (66)  |  Heavily (3)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Indefinable (2)  |  Land (83)  |  Less (54)  |  Level (51)  |  Line (44)  |  Little (126)  |  Load (8)  |  Long (95)  |  Margin (5)  |  Melt (15)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Place (111)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Press (16)  |  Recede (2)  |  Remain (77)  |  Rest (64)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Return (35)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Rise (51)  |  Same (92)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sediment (7)  |  Shift (21)  |  Shore (11)  |  Strain (8)  |  Strange (61)  |  Tension (7)  |  Tide (18)  |  Today (86)  |  Tomorrow (29)  |  Unrest (2)  |  Warp (5)  |  Wave (55)

The effort to eliminate synthetic pesticides because of unsubstantiated fears about residues in food will make fruits and vegetables more expensive, decrease consumption, and thus increase cancer rates. The levels of synthetic pesticide residues are trivial in comparison to natural chemicals, and thus their potential for cancer causation is extremely low. [Ames believes that “to eat your veggies” is the best way to prevent cancer.]
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has written a similar sentiment in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (44)  |  Causation (6)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Consumption (11)  |  Decrease (11)  |  Effort (94)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Expense (10)  |  Fear (113)  |  Food (139)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Level (51)  |  Natural (128)  |  Pesticide (4)  |  Potential (34)  |  Rate (22)  |  Residue (6)  |  Synthetic (12)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Vegetable (19)

The energy of a covalent bond is largely the energy of resonance of two electrons between two atoms. The examination of the form of the resonance integral shows that the resonance energy increases in magnitude with increase in the overlapping of the two atomic orbitals involved in the formation of the bond, the word ‘overlapping” signifying the extent to which regions in space in which the two orbital wave functions have large values coincide... Consequently it is expected that of two orbitals in an atom the one which can overlap more with an orbital of another atom will form the stronger bond with that atom, and, moreover, the bond formed by a given orbital will tend to lie in that direction in which the orbital is concentrated.
Nature of the Chemical Bond and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals (1939), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Bond (19)  |  Concentration (14)  |  Conincidence (4)  |  Direction (56)  |  Electron (66)  |  Energy (185)  |  Examination (60)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Extent (30)  |  Formation (54)  |  Integral (6)  |  Magnitude (21)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Orbital (2)  |  Overlap (4)  |  Region (26)  |  Resonance (2)  |  Significance (60)  |  Strength (63)  |  Value (180)  |  Word (221)

The explorations of space end on a note of uncertainty. And necessarily so. … We know our immediate neighborhood rather intimately. With increasing distance our knowledge fades, and fades rapidly. Eventually, we reach the dim boundary—the utmost limits of our telescopes. There, we measure shadows, and we search among ghostly errors of measurement for landmarks that are scarcely more substantial.
In Realm of the Nebulae: The Silliman Memorial Lectures Series (1936), 201-202. The lecture series was delivered at Yale University in Fall 1935.
Science quotes on:  |  Boundary (27)  |  Dim (4)  |  Distance (54)  |  End (141)  |  Error (230)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Fade (5)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Intimately (4)  |  Know (321)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Landmark (6)  |  Limit (86)  |  Measure (70)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Neighborhood (7)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Space (154)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Uncertainty (37)  |  Utmost (8)

The explosive component in the contemporary scene is not the clamor of the masses but the self-righteous claims of a multitude of graduates from schools and universities. This army of scribes is clamoring for a society in which planning, regulation, and supervision are paramount and the prerogative of the educated. They hanker for the scribe’s golden age, for a return to something like the scribe-dominated societies of ancient Egypt, China, and Europe of the Middle Ages. There is little doubt that the present trend in the new and renovated countries toward social regimentation stems partly from the need to create adequate employment for a large number of scribes. And since the tempo of the production of the literate is continually increasing, the prospect is of ever-swelling bureaucracies.
In 'Scribe, Writer, and Rebel', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (18)  |  Ancient Egypt (3)  |  Army (22)  |  Bureaucracy (5)  |  China (17)  |  Claim (52)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Component (14)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Continually (14)  |  Country (121)  |  Create (98)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Educate (7)  |  Employment (22)  |  Europe (32)  |  Explosive (16)  |  Golden Age (5)  |  Graduate (9)  |  Large (82)  |  Little (126)  |  Mass (61)  |  Middle Ages (7)  |  Multitude (14)  |  Need (211)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Partly (3)  |  Plan (69)  |  Prerogative (2)  |  Present (103)  |  Production (105)  |  Prospect (19)  |  Regimentation (2)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Renovate (3)  |  Return (35)  |  Scene (10)  |  School (87)  |  Scribe (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)  |  Stem (11)  |  Supervision (3)  |  Tempo (2)  |  Toward (29)  |  Trend (16)  |  University (51)

The fact that death from cancer is on the increase is not only a problem of medicine, but its at the same time testifies to the wonderful efficiency of medical science... [as it] enables more persons top live long enough to develop some kind of cancer in old and less resistant tissues.
Charles H. Mayo and William A. Hendricks, 'Carcinoma of the Right Segment of the Colon', presented to Southern Surgical Assoc. (15 Dec 1925). In Annals of Surgery (Mar 1926), 83, 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (44)  |  Death (270)  |  Development (228)  |  Efficiency (25)  |  Life (917)  |  Medical Science (4)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Old Age (18)  |  Problem (362)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Testimony (10)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Wonder (134)

The good news is that Americans will, in increasing numbers, begin to value and protect the vast American Landscape. The bad news is that they may love it to death.
The American Land
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Bad (78)  |  Begin (52)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Death (270)  |  Good News (2)  |  Landscape (23)  |  Love (164)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Protect (26)  |  Value (180)  |  Vast (56)

The greatest inventions are those inquiries which tend to increase the power of man over matter.
Unverified. If you know a primary source for this quote, please contact Webmaster who searched and, as yet, found none.
Science quotes on:  |  Great (300)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Invention (283)  |  Man (345)  |  Matter (270)  |  Power (273)

The law that entropy increases—the Second Law of Thermodynamics—holds, I think, the supreme position among the laws of Nature.
Gifford Lectures (1927), The Nature of the Physical World (1928), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Entropy (40)  |  Law (418)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (13)  |  Supreme (24)

The major gift of science to the world is a mighty increase of power. Did science then create that power? Not a bit of it! Science discovered that power in the universe and set it free. Science found out the conditions, fulfilling which, the endless dynamic forces of the cosmos are liberated. Electricity is none of man’s making, but man has learned how to fulfill the conditions that release it. Atomic energy is a force that man did not create, but that some day man may liberate. Man by himself is still a puny animal; a gorilla is much the stronger. Man's significance lies in another realm—he knows how to fulfill conditions so that universal power not his own is set free. The whole universe as man now sees it is essentially a vast system of power waiting to be released.
In 'When Prayer Means Power', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 78-79.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Atomic Energy (21)  |  Condition (119)  |  Cosmos (39)  |  Create (98)  |  Discover (115)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Endless (20)  |  Energy (185)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Force (194)  |  Free (59)  |  Fulfill (11)  |  Gift (47)  |  Gorilla (16)  |  Know (321)  |  Learned (20)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Major (24)  |  Making (26)  |  Man (345)  |  Power (273)  |  Puny (5)  |  Realm (40)  |  Release (15)  |  Science (1699)  |  Significance (60)  |  Stronger (4)  |  System (141)  |  Universal (70)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vast (56)  |  Waiting (9)

The most ominous conflict of our time is the difference of opinion, of outlook, between men of letters, historians, philosophers, the so-called humanists, on the one side and scientists on the other. The gap cannot but increase because of the intolerance of both and the fact that science is growing by leaps and bounds.
The History of Science and the New Humanism (1931), 69.Omnious;Conflict;Difference;Opinion;Outlook;Men OfLetters;Historian;Philosopher;Humanist;So-Called;Scientist;Gap;Intolerance;Fact;Growth;Leap;Bound
Science quotes on:  |  Bound (12)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Difference (208)  |  Fact (609)  |  Gap (20)  |  Growth (111)  |  Historian (30)  |  Humanist (4)  |  Intolerance (7)  |  Leap (23)  |  Man Of Letters (2)  |  Ominous (3)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Outlook (12)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Side (36)  |  So-Called (18)

The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in the United States is closely connected with this.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Closely (8)  |  Connect (15)  |  Crime (20)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Destructive (7)  |  Enforce (5)  |  Government (85)  |  Land (83)  |  Law (418)  |  Lowered (2)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Open (38)  |  Pass (60)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Prohibition (3)  |  Respect (57)  |  Secret (98)  |  Undoubtedly (2)  |  Usa (6)

The rapid growth of industry, the ever increasing population and the imperative need for more varied, wholesome and nourishing foodstuff makes it all the more necessary to exhaust every means at our command to fill the empty dinner pail, enrich our soils, bring greater wealth and influence to our beautiful South land, which is synonymous to a healthy, happy and contented people.
Letter to Marlin E. Penn (18 Jun 1927), Box 17, George Washington Carver Papers. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 264-5. Smith's book is about his recollections of G.W. Carver's Sunday School classes at Tuskegee, some 40 years earlier. Webmaster, who has not yet been able to see the original book, cautions this quote may be the gist of Carver's words, rather than an exact quote.
Science quotes on:  |  Contentment (10)  |  Dinner (9)  |  Enrichment (8)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Fill (35)  |  Food (139)  |  Growth (111)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Health (136)  |  Imperative (8)  |  Industry (91)  |  Influence (110)  |  Means (109)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Need (211)  |  Nourishment (16)  |  Pail (2)  |  Population (71)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Soil (51)  |  Variation (50)  |  Wealth (50)  |  Wholesome (6)

The study of fish in the sea may be the most necessary of all our oceanographic researches because we shall increasingly be made to turn to the sea as a vast food producer by the increase in the population of the world.
In 'Man Explores the Sea', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (Sep 1963), 111, No. 5086, 787.
Science quotes on:  |  Aquaculture (5)  |  Fish (85)  |  Food (139)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Oceanography (16)  |  Population (71)  |  Producer (3)  |  Sea (143)  |  Study (331)  |  World (667)

The unavoidable conclusion is that the unprecedented meekness of the majority is responsible for the increase in violence. Social stability is the product of an equilibrium between a vigorous majority and violent minorities. Disorder does not come from an increased inner pressure or from the interaction of explosive ingredients. There is no reason to believe that the nature of the violent minorities is now greatly different from what it was in the past. What has changed is the will and ability of the majority to react.
In 'Thoughts on the Present', First Things, Last Things (1971), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Belief (400)  |  Change (291)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Different (110)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Equilibrium (16)  |  Explosive (16)  |  Greatly (7)  |  Ingredient (10)  |  Inner (27)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Majority (32)  |  Meekness (2)  |  Minority (16)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Past (109)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Product (72)  |  React (6)  |  Reason (330)  |  Responsible (11)  |  Social (93)  |  Stability (17)  |  Unavoidable (2)  |  Unprecedented (7)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  Violence (20)  |  Violent (15)

The world's forests need to be seen for what they are—giant global utilities, providing essential public services to humanity on a vast scale. They store carbon, which is lost to the atmosphere when they burn, increasing global warming. The life they support cleans the atmosphere of pollutants and feeds it with moisture. They act as a natural thermostat, helping to regulate our climate and sustain the lives of 1.4 billion of the poorest people on this Earth. And they do these things to a degree that is all but impossible to imagine.
Speech (25 Oct 2007) at the World Wildlife Fund gala dinner, Hampton Court Palace, announcing the Prince's Rainforests Project. On the Prince of Wales website.
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Burn (29)  |  Carbon (48)  |  Carbon Cycle (5)  |  Clean (20)  |  Climate (38)  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Essential (87)  |  Forest (88)  |  Giant (28)  |  Global (14)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Life (917)  |  Loss (62)  |  Moisture (10)  |  Natural (128)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Public Service (3)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Store (17)  |  Support (63)  |  Sustain (13)  |  Thermostat (2)  |  Utility (23)  |  Vast (56)  |  Warming (3)

There are two kinds of physician - those who work for love, and those who work for their own profit. They are both known by their works; the true and just physician is known by his love and by his unfailing love for his neighbor. The unjust physicians are known for their transgressions against the commandment; for they reap, although they have not sown, and they are like ravening wolves; they reap because they want to reap, in order to increase their profit, and they are heedless of the commandment of love.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Both (52)  |  Commandment (6)  |  Kind (99)  |  Know (321)  |  Love (164)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Neighbor (10)  |  Order (167)  |  Physician (232)  |  Profit (28)  |  Raven (2)  |  Reap (6)  |  Sow (10)  |  Transgression (2)  |  True (120)  |  Unfailing (3)  |  Unjust (5)  |  Want (120)  |  Wolf (6)  |  Work (457)

There seem to be but three ways for a nation to acquire wealth: the first is by war, as the Romans did, in plundering their conquered neighbors—this is robbery; the second by commerce, which is generally cheating; the third by agriculture, the only honest way, wherein man receives a real increase of the seed thrown into the ground, in a kind of continual miracle, wrought by the hand of God in his favor, as a reward for his innocent life and his virtuous industry.
In 'Positions to be Examined', The Works of Benjamin Franklin Consisting of Essays, Humorous, Moral and Literary (1824), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (19)  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Cheat (5)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Conquer (12)  |  Ground (63)  |  Honest (26)  |  Industry (91)  |  Innocent (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Miracle (55)  |  Plunder (5)  |  Real (95)  |  Receive (39)  |  Reward (38)  |  Robbery (5)  |  Roman (16)  |  Seed (52)  |  Throw (31)  |  Virtuous (3)  |  War (144)  |  Wealth (50)

Those of us who make only a brief study of chemistry, the benefits to be expected are of an indirect nature. Increased capacity for enjoyment, a livelier interest in the world in which we live, a more intelligent attitude toward the great questions of the day—these are the by-products of a well-balanced education, including chemistry in its proper relation to other studies.
In Fundamental Chemistry, and Elementary Textbook for College Classes (1947), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (47)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Brief (14)  |  Byproduct (3)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Education (280)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Great (300)  |  Indirect (8)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interest (170)  |  Life (917)  |  Livelier (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Proper (27)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Study (331)  |  Well-Balanced (3)  |  World (667)

Thus, we have three principles for increasing adequacy of data: if you must work with a single object, look for imperfections that record historical descent; if several objects are available, try to render them as stages of a single historical process; if processes can be directly observed, sum up their effects through time. One may discuss these principles directly or recognize the ‘little problems’ that Darwin used to exemplify them: orchids, coral reefs, and worms–the middle book, the first, and the last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (6)  |  Available (18)  |  Book (181)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Data (100)  |  Descent (14)  |  Directly (15)  |  Discuss (14)  |  Effect (133)  |  Exemplify (2)  |  First (174)  |  Historical (10)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Little (126)  |  Middle (10)  |  Object (110)  |  Observe (48)  |  Orchid (2)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Record (56)  |  Render (17)  |  Several (14)  |  Single (72)  |  Stage (39)  |  Sum Up (2)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Work (457)  |  Worm (25)

To him who devotes his life to science, nothing can give more happiness than increasing the number of discoveries, but his cup of joy is full when the results of his studies immediately find practical applications.
As quoted in René J. Dubos, Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science (1960, 1986), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Devote (23)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Find (248)  |  Full (38)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Joy (61)  |  Life (917)  |  Practical (93)  |  Result (250)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Study (331)

To what part of electrical science are we not indebted to Faraday? He has increased our knowledge of the hidden and unknown to such an extent, that all subsequent writers are compelled so frequently to mention his name and quote his papers, that the very repetition becomes monotonous. [How] humiliating it may be to acknowledge so great a share of successful investigation to one man...
In the Second Edition ofElements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (143), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (10)  |  Compulsion (11)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Extent (30)  |  Michael Faraday (74)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Humiliation (3)  |  Indebtedness (3)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mention (12)  |  Name (118)  |  Paper (52)  |  Quote (13)  |  Repetition (21)  |  Share (30)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  Success (202)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Writer (35)

We do not ask what hope of gain makes a little bird warble, since we know that it takes delight in singing because it is for that very singing that the bird was made, so there is no need to ask why the human mind undertakes such toil in seeking out these secrets of the heavens. ... And just as other animals, and the human body, are sustained by food and drink, so the very spirit of Man, which is something distinct from Man, is nourished, is increased, and in a sense grows up on this diet of knowledge, and is more like the dead than the living if it is touched by no desire for these things.
Mysterium Cosmographicum. Translated by A. M. Duncan in The Secret of the Universe (1981), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Asking (23)  |  Bird (96)  |  Dead (45)  |  Delight (51)  |  Desire (101)  |  Diet (41)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Drink (27)  |  Food (139)  |  Gain (48)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Hope (129)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Little (126)  |  Living (44)  |  Made (14)  |  Need (211)  |  Nourishment (16)  |  Secret (98)  |  Seeking (30)  |  Sense (240)  |  Singing (6)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Sustenance (3)  |  Toil (10)  |  Touch (48)  |  Undertaking (7)

We have increased conservation spending, enacted legislation that enables us to clean up and redevelop abandoned brownfields sites across the country, and implemented new clean water standards that will protect us from arsenic.
Sue Kelly
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Across (9)  |  Arsenic (8)  |  Clean (20)  |  Clean Up (3)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Country (121)  |  Enable (25)  |  Implement (5)  |  Legislation (8)  |  New (340)  |  Protect (26)  |  Site (11)  |  Spend (24)  |  Standard (41)  |  Water (244)

We have vastly increased the amount of funding that is available for conservation partnerships.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Available (18)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Fund (12)  |  Partnership (4)  |  Vastly (5)

We must have a relentless commitment to producing a meaningful, comprehensive energy package aimed at conservation, alleviating the burden of energy prices on consumers, decreasing our country’s dependency on foreign oil, and increasing electricity grid reliability.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Alleviate (4)  |  Burden (23)  |  Commitment (11)  |  Comprehensive (7)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Consumer (6)  |  Country (121)  |  Decrease (11)  |  Dependency (3)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Energy (185)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Meaningful (14)  |  Oil (37)  |  Package (5)  |  Price (26)  |  Produce (63)  |  Relentless (5)  |  Reliability (14)

We must therefore bear the undoubtedly bad effect s of the weak surviving and propagating their kind; but there appears to be at least one check in steady action, namely that the weaker and inferior members of society do not marry so freely as the sound; and this check might be indefinitely increased by the weak in body or mind refraining from marriage, though this is more to be hoped for than expected.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Appear (55)  |  Bad (78)  |  Bear (28)  |  Body (193)  |  Check (16)  |  Effect (133)  |  Expect (27)  |  Freely (7)  |  Hope (129)  |  Indefinitely (9)  |  Inferior (14)  |  Kind (99)  |  Least (43)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Marry (6)  |  Member (27)  |  Mind (544)  |  Namely (10)  |  Propagate (4)  |  Refrain (6)  |  Society (188)  |  Sound (59)  |  Steady (12)  |  Survive (28)  |  Undoubtedly (2)  |  Weak (36)

When not protected by law, by popular favor or superstition, or by other special circumstances, [birds] yield very readily to the influences of civilization, and, though the first operations of the settler are favorable to the increase of many species, the great extension of rural and of mechanical industry is, in a variety of ways, destructive even to tribes not directly warred upon by man.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 93-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Bird (96)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Extension (20)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Favor (22)  |  Favorable (7)  |  First (174)  |  Great (300)  |  Industry (91)  |  Influence (110)  |  Law (418)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Operation (96)  |  Popular (21)  |  Protection (23)  |  Rural (5)  |  Special (51)  |  Species (181)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Tribe (10)  |  Variety (53)  |  War (144)  |  Way (36)  |  Yield (23)

When physiologists revealed the existence and functions of hormones they not only gave increased opportunities for the activities of biochemists but in particular gave a new charter to biochemical thought, and with the discovery of vitamins that charter was extended.
'Biological Thought and Chemical Thought: A Plea for Unification', Linacre Lecture, Cambridge (6 May 1938), published in Lancet (1938),2, 1201.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Biochemist (4)  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Charter (4)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Existence (254)  |  Extension (20)  |  Function (90)  |  Hormone (7)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Physiologist (12)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Thought (374)  |  Vitamin (11)

Will power is only the tensile strength of one’s own disposition. One cannot increase it by a single ounce.
In The Burning Brand: Diaries 1935-1950 (1961), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Disposition (14)  |  Ounce (5)  |  Power (273)  |  Strength (63)

Without an acquaintance with chemistry, the statesman must remain a stranger to the true vital interests of the state, to the means of its organic development and improvement; ... The highest economic or material interests of a country, the increased and more profitable production of food for man and animals, ... are most closely linked with the advancement and diffusion of the natural sciences, especially of chemistry.
Familiar Letters on Chemistry (1851), 3rd edn., 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Country (121)  |  Development (228)  |  Economics (30)  |  Food (139)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nation (111)  |  Production (105)  |  Profit (28)  |  Science (1699)  |  Statesman (10)  |  Stranger (9)

Young writers find out what kinds of writers they are by experiment. If they choose from the outset to practice exclusively a form of writing because it is praised in the classroom or otherwise carries appealing prestige, they are vastly increasing the risk inherent in taking up writing in the first place.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (30)  |  Carry (35)  |  Choose (35)  |  Classroom (5)  |  Exclusively (8)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Find Out (12)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Kind (99)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Outset (4)  |  Place (111)  |  Practice (67)  |  Praise (17)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Risk (29)  |  Vastly (5)  |  Write (87)  |  Writer (35)  |  Young (72)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.