Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Wholly

Wholly Quotes (88 quotes)

... every chemical combination is wholly and solely dependent on two opposing forces, positive and negative electricity, and every chemical compound must be composed of two parts combined by the agency of their electrochemical reaction, since there is no third force. Hence it follows that every compound body, whatever the number of its constituents, can be divided into two parts, one of which is positively and the other negatively electrical.
Essai sur la théorie des proportions chemiques (1819), 98. Quoted by Henry M. Leicester in article on Bessel in Charles Coulston Gillespie (editor), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1981), Vol. 2, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Divided (50)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrochemical (4)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Ion (21)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Positive (94)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)

A ... hypothesis may be suggested, which supposes the word 'beginning' as applied by Moses in the first of the Book of Genesis, to express an undefined period of time which was antecedent to the last great change that affected the surface of the earth, and to the creation of its present animal and vegetable inhabitants; during which period a long series of operations and revolutions may have been going on, which, as they are wholly unconnected with the history of the human race, are passed over in silence by the sacred historian, whose only concern with them was largely to state, that the matter of the universe is not eternal and self-existent but was originally created by the power of the Almighty.
Vindiciae Geologicae (1820), 31-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (23)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Express (186)  |  First (1283)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Silence (56)  |  State (491)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconnected (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Word (619)

A mind not wholly wishful to reach the truth, or to rest it in or obey it when found, is to that extent a mind impervious to truth an incapable of unbiased belief.
Recent Theistic Discussion: the twentieth series of Croall Lectures (1921), 78. In The Homiletic Review, Vol. 83-84 (1922), Vol. 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Bias (20)  |  Extent (139)  |  Impervious (5)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obey (40)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unbiased (7)  |  Wishful (6)

According to the conclusion of Dr. Hutton, and of many other geologists, our continents are of definite antiquity, they have been peopled we know not how, and mankind are wholly unacquainted with their origin. According to my conclusions drawn from the same source, that of facts, our continents are of such small antiquity, that the memory of the revolution which gave them birth must still be preserved among men; and thus we are led to seek in the book of Genesis the record of the history of the human race from its origin. Can any object of importance superior to this be found throughout the circle of natural science?
An Elementary Treatise on Geology (1809), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Circle (110)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continent (76)  |  Definite (110)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Importance (286)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Memory (134)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Object (422)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Race (268)  |  Record (154)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Small (477)  |  Still (613)  |  Superior (81)  |  Throughout (98)

All the different classes of beings which taken together make up the universe are, in the ideas of God who knows distinctly their essential gradations, only so many ordinates of a single curve so closely united that it would be impossible to place others between any two of them, since that would imply disorder and imperfection. Thus men are linked with the animals, these with the plants and these with the fossils which in turn merge with those bodies which our senses and our imagination represent to us as absolutely inanimate. And, since the law of continuity requires that when the essential attributes of one being approximate those of another all the properties of the one must likewise gradually approximate those of the other, it is necessary that all the orders of natural beings form but a single chain, in which the various classes, like so many rings, are so closely linked one to another that it is impossible for the senses or the imagination to determine precisely the point at which one ends and the next begins?all the species which, so to say, lie near the borderlands being equivocal, at endowed with characters which might equally well be assigned to either of the neighboring species. Thus there is nothing monstrous in the existence zoophytes, or plant-animals, as Budaeus calls them; on the contrary, it is wholly in keeping with the order of nature that they should exist. And so great is the force of the principle of continuity, to my thinking, that not only should I not be surprised to hear that such beings had been discovered?creatures which in some of their properties, such as nutrition or reproduction, might pass equally well for animals or for plants, and which thus overturn the current laws based upon the supposition of a perfect and absolute separation of the different orders of coexistent beings which fill the universe;?not only, I say, should I not be surprised to hear that they had been discovered, but, in fact, I am convinced that there must be such creatures, and that natural history will perhaps some day become acquainted with them, when it has further studied that infinity of living things whose small size conceals them for ordinary observation and which are hidden in the bowels of the earth and the depth of the sea.
Lettre Prétendue de M. De Leibnitz, à M. Hermann dont M. Koenig a Cité le Fragment (1753), cxi-cxii, trans. in A. O. Lovejoy, Great Chain of Being: A Study of the History of an Idea (1936), 144-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Borderland (6)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creature (233)  |  Current (118)  |  Curve (49)  |  Depth (94)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Equally (130)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  God (757)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Principle (507)  |  Represent (155)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Require (219)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separation (57)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

An inventor is an opportunist, one who takes occasion by the hand; who, having seen where some want exists, successfully applies the right means to attain the desired end. The means may be largely, or even wholly, something already known, or there may be a certain originality or discovery in the means employed. But in every case the inventor uses the work of others. If I may use a metaphor, I should liken him to the man who essays the conquest of some virgin alp. At the outset he uses the beaten track, and, as he progresses in the ascent, he uses the steps made by those who have preceded him, whenever they lead in the right direction; and it is only after the last footprints have died out that he takes ice-axe in hand and cuts the remaining steps, few or many, that lift him to the crowning height which is his goal.
In Kenneth Raydon Swan, Sir Joseph Swan (1946), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Alp (9)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Crown (38)  |  Cut (114)  |  Death (388)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Essay (27)  |  Exist (443)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  Height (32)  |  Ice (54)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leading (17)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Originality (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outset (7)  |  Preceded (2)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Right (452)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Success (302)  |  Track (38)  |  Use (766)  |  Virgin (9)  |  Want (497)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Work (1351)

And for rejecting such a Medium, we have the Authority of those the oldest and most celebrated Philosophers of Greece and Phoenicia, who made a Vacuum, and Atoms, and the Gravity of Atoms, the first Principles of their Philosophy; tacitly attributing Gravity to some other Cause than dense Matter. Later Philosophers banish the Consideration of such a Cause out of natural Philosophy, feigning Hypotheses for explaining all things mechanically, and referring other Causes to Metaphysicks: Whereas the main Business of natural Philosophy is to argue from Phaenomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects, till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these and such like Questions. What is there in places almost empty of Matter, and whence is it that the Sun and Planets gravitate towards one another, without dense Matter between them? Whence is it that Nature doth nothing in vain; and whence arises all that Order and Beauty which we see in the World? ... does it not appear from phaenomena that there is a Being incorporeal, living, intelligent, omnipresent, who in infinite space, as it were in his Sensory, sees the things themselves intimately, and thoroughly perceives them, and comprehends them wholly by their immediate presence to himself.
In Opticks, (1704, 2nd. Ed. 1718), Book 3, Query 28, 343-5. Newton’s reference to “Nature does nothing in vain” recalls the axiom from Aristotle, which may be seen as “Natura nihil agit frustra” in the Aristotle Quotes on this web site.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Atom (355)  |  Authority (95)  |  Banish (11)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Business (149)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greek (107)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Omnipresent (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Planet (356)  |  Presence (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Resolve (40)  |  See (1081)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Space (500)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Vain (83)  |  World (1774)

Any one who has studied the history of science knows that almost every great step therein has been made by the “anticipation of Nature,” that is, by the invention of hypotheses, which, though verifiable, often had very little foundation to start with; and, not unfrequently, in spite of a long career of usefulness, turned out to be wholly erroneous in the long run.
In 'The Progress of Science 1837-1887' (1887), Collected Essays (1901), Vol. 1, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Career (75)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Progress (465)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spite (55)  |  Start (221)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Turn (447)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Verification (31)

At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable. Heaven forfend me from Lamarck nonsense of a “tendency to progression”, “adaptations from the slow willing of animals”, &c! But the conclusions I am led to are not widely different from his; though the means of change are wholly so. I think I have found out (here’s presumption!) the simple way by which species become exquisitely adapted to various ends.
Letter to Sir Joseph Hooker (11 Jan 1844). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 173-174.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Different (577)  |  End (590)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (24)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Progression (23)  |  Simple (406)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Start (221)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Willing (44)

But Chinese civilization has the overpowering beauty of the wholly other, and only the wholly other can inspire the deepest love and the profoundest desire to learn.
The Grand Titration (1969), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  China (23)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Desire (204)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Love (309)  |  Other (2236)

Christian Science … is the direct denial both of science and of Christianity, for Science rests wholly on the recognition of truth and Christianity on the recognition of pain.
From The Illustrated London News (1 Nov 1930), 177, Part 2, 750. In 'More on American Optimism', Collected Works (1990), Vol. 35, 406-407.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Christian (43)  |  Christian Science (3)  |  Christianity (11)  |  Denial (17)  |  Direct (225)  |  Pain (136)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Truth (1057)

Consciousness is not wholly, nor even primarily a device for receiving sense-impressions. …there is another outlook than the scientific one, because in practice a more transcendental outlook is almost universally admitted. …who does not prize these moments that reveal to us the poetry of existence?
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Device (70)  |  Existence (456)  |  Impression (114)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Practice (204)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Transcendental (10)

Doubtless it is true that while consciousness is occupied in the scientific interpretation of a thing, which is now and again “a thing of beauty,” it is not occupied in the aesthetic appreciation of it. But it is no less true that the same consciousness may at another time be so wholly possessed by the aesthetic appreciation as to exclude all thought of the scientific interpretation. The inability of a man of science to take the poetic view simply shows his mental limitation; as the mental limitation of a poet is shown by his inability to take the scientific view. The broader mind can take both.
In An Autobiography (1904), Vol. 1, 485.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Both (493)  |  Broader (3)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Inability (10)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Poet (83)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possession (65)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)

Every proposition which we can understand must be composed wholly of constituents with which we are acquainted.
From 'Knowledge by Acquaintance', in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1918), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Composed (3)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Understand (606)

Every utterance from government - from justifying 90-day detention to invading other countries [and] to curtailing civil liberties - is about the dangers of religious division and fundamentalism. Yet New Labour is approving new faith schools hand over fist. We have had the grotesque spectacle of a British prime minister, on the floor of the House of Commons, defending - like some medieval crusader - the teaching of creationism in the science curriculum at a sponsor-run school whose running costs are wholly met from the public purse.
In The Guardian (10 Apr 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (10)  |  Britain (24)  |  British (41)  |  Civil (26)  |  Common (436)  |  Cost (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Danger (115)  |  Defense (23)  |  Detention (2)  |  Division (65)  |  Faith (203)  |  Floor (20)  |  Fundamentalism (4)  |  Government (110)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  House (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Justification (48)  |  Labour (98)  |  Medieval (10)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Public (96)  |  Purse (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Sponsor (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Utterance (10)

Few will deny that even in the first scientific instruction in mathematics the most rigorous method is to be given preference over all others. Especially will every teacher prefer a consistent proof to one which is based on fallacies or proceeds in a vicious circle, indeed it will be morally impossible for the teacher to present a proof of the latter kind consciously and thus in a sense deceive his pupils. Notwithstanding these objectionable so-called proofs, so far as the foundation and the development of the system is concerned, predominate in our textbooks to the present time. Perhaps it will be answered, that rigorous proof is found too difficult for the pupil’s power of comprehension. Should this be anywhere the case,—which would only indicate some defect in the plan or treatment of the whole,—the only remedy would be to merely state the theorem in a historic way, and forego a proof with the frank confession that no proof has been found which could be comprehended by the pupil; a remedy which is ever doubtful and should only be applied in the case of extreme necessity. But this remedy is to be preferred to a proof which is no proof, and is therefore either wholly unintelligible to the pupil, or deceives him with an appearance of knowledge which opens the door to all superficiality and lack of scientific method.
In 'Stücke aus dem Lehrbuche der Arithmetik', Werke, Bd. 2 (1904), 296.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Base (117)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Circle (110)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concern (228)  |  Confession (8)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Defect (31)  |  Deny (66)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Door (93)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Especially (31)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Forego (4)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Frank (4)  |  Give (202)  |  Historic (7)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Latter (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Morally (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Power (746)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Preference (28)  |  Present (619)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sense (770)  |  So-Called (71)  |  State (491)  |  Superficiality (4)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Unintelligible (15)  |  Vicious Circle (2)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

For the little that one has reflected on the origin of our knowledge, it is easy to perceive that we can acquire it only by means of comparison. That which is absolutely incomparable is wholly incomprehensible. God is the only example that we could give here. He cannot be comprehended, because he cannot be compared. But all which is susceptible of comparison, everything that we can perceive by different aspects, all that we can consider relatively, can always be judged according to our knowledge.
'Histoire naturelle de l'Homme', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. 2, 431. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Consider (416)  |  Different (577)  |  Easy (204)  |  Everything (476)  |  God (757)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Observation (555)  |  Origin (239)

Four elements, Hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, also provide an example of the astonishing togetherness of our universe. They make up the “organic” molecules that constitute living organisms on a planet, and the nuclei of these same elements interact to generate the light of its star. Then the organisms on the planet come to depend wholly on that starlight, as they must if life is to persist. So it is that all life on the Earth runs on sunlight. [Referring to photosynthesis]
In lecture, 'Life and Mind in the Universe', versions of which George Wald delivered throughout the 1980s. On the website of his son, Elijah Wald, who states it was the last of his father's major lectures.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Planet (356)  |  Run (174)  |  Star (427)  |  Starlight (5)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Universe (857)

Further, it will not be amiss to distinguish the three kinds and, as it were, grades of ambition in mankind. The first is of those who desire to extend their own power in their native country, a vulgar and degenerate kind. The second is of those who labor to extend the power and dominion of their country among men. This certainly has more dignity, though not less covetousness. But if a man endeavor to establish and extend the power and dominion of the human race itself over the universe, his ambition (if ambition it can be called) is without doubt both a more wholesome and a more noble thing than the other two. Now the empire of man over things depends wholly on the arts and sciences. For we cannot command nature except by obeying her.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 129. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (43)  |  Art (657)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Command (58)  |  Country (251)  |  Depend (228)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Kind (557)  |  Labor (107)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Native (38)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Will (2355)

Here I am at the limit which God and nature has assigned to my individuality. I am compelled to depend upon word, language and image in the most precise sense, and am wholly unable to operate in any manner whatever with symbols and numbers which are easily intelligible to the most highly gifted minds.
In Letter to Naumann (1826), in Vogel, Goethe's Selbstzeugnisse (1903), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Assign (13)  |  Compel (30)  |  Depend (228)  |  Easily (35)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  God (757)  |  Highly (16)  |  Image (96)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Language (293)  |  Limit (280)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Operate (17)  |  Precise (68)  |  Sense (770)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Unable (24)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Word (619)

How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people–first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Brief (36)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Exert (39)  |  Exist (443)  |  First (1283)  |  Give In (3)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Inner (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lot (151)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remind (13)  |  Same (157)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Still (613)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tie (38)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Well-Being (5)

I am one of those philosophers who have held that that “the Common Sense view of the world” is in certain fundamental features, wholly true.
In 'A Defence of Common Sense', J.H. Muirhead (ed.), Contemporary British Philosophy (1925). Reprinted in Philosophical Papers of George Edward Moore (1959), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Feature (44)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hold (95)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Sense (770)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

I call this Spirit, unknown hitherto, by the new name of Gas, which can neither be constrained by Vessels, nor reduced into a visible body, unless the feed being first extinguished. But Bodies do contain this Spirit, and do sometimes wholly depart into such a Spirit, not indeed, because it is actually in those very bodies (for truly it could not be detained, yea the whole composed body should I lie away at once) but it is a Spirit grown together, coagulated after the manner of a body, and is stirred up by an attained ferment, as in Wine, the juyce of unripe Grapes, bread, hydromel or water and Honey.
Oriatrike: Or, Physick Refined, trans. John Chandler (1662), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Bread (39)  |  Call (769)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Gas (83)  |  Honey (15)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Lie (364)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wine (38)

I do not think that G. H. Hardy was talking nonsense when he insisted that the mathematician was discovering rather than creating, nor was it wholly nonsense for Kepler to exult that he was thinking God's thoughts after him. The world for me is a necessary system, and in the degree to which the thinker can surrender his thought to that system and follow it, he is in a sense participating in that which is timeless or eternal.
'Reply to Lewis Edwin Hahn', The Philosophy of Brand Blanshard (1980), 901.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  G. H. Hardy (71)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Sense (770)  |  Surrender (20)  |  System (537)  |  Talking (76)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Timeless (8)  |  World (1774)

I have always supported women’s rights. I moved the admission of women to my college, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. The results were wholly good.
From TV show interview with Piers Morgan, on ITV, 'Good Morning Britain'. As quoted in Sarah Knapton, 'Five Most Powerful People in Britain are Women, says Prof Stephen Hawking', Daily Telegraph (20 Mar 2017).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admission (17)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  College (66)  |  Good (889)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Support (147)  |  Woman (151)  |  Women’s Rights (2)

I have no patience with attempts to identify science with measurement, which is but one of its tools, or with any definition of the scientist which would exclude a Darwin, a Pasteur or a Kekulé. The scientist is a practical man and his are practical aims. He does not seek the ultimate but the proximate. He does not speak of the last analysis but rather of the next approximation. His are not those beautiful structures so delicately designed that a single flaw may cause the collapse of the whole. The scientist builds slowly and with a gross but solid kind of masonry. If dissatisfied with any of his work, even if it be near the very foundations, he can replace that part without damage to the remainder. On the whole, he is satisfied with his work, for while science may never be wholly right it certainly is never wholly wrong; and it seems to be improving from decade to decade.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Build (204)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Damage (34)  |  Decade (59)  |  Definition (221)  |  Design (195)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Improvement (108)  |  August Kekulé (13)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Masonry (4)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Next (236)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Patience (56)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proximate (4)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Right (452)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Single (353)  |  Solid (116)  |  Speak (232)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tool (117)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

I know well there are those who would have the Study of Nature restrained wholly to Observations; without ever proceeding further. But due Consideration, and a deeper Insight into Things, would soon have undeceived and made them sensible of their error. Assuredly, that man who should spend his whole life in amassing together stone, timber, and other materials for building, without ever at the making any use, or raising any fabrick out of them, might well be reputed very fantastic and extravagant. And a like censure would be his due, who should be perpetually heaping up of natural collections without design. building a structure of philosophy out of them, or advancing some propositions that might turn to the benefit and advantage of the world. This is in reality the true and only proper end of collections, of observations, and natural history: and they are of no manner of use or value without it.
In An Attempt Toward a Natural History of the Fossils of England (1729), xiii-xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Building (156)  |  Censure (5)  |  Collection (64)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Design (195)  |  Due (141)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  History (673)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reality (261)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stone (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Timber (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

I like a deep and difficult investigation when I happen to have made it easy to myself, if not to all others; and there is a spirit of gambling in this, whether, as by the cast of a die, a calculation è perte de vue shall bring out a beautiful and perfect result or shall be wholly thrown away. Scientific investigations are a sort of warfare carried on in the closet or on the couch against all one's contemporaries and predecessors; I have often gained a signal victory when I have been half asleep, but more frequently have found, upon being thoroughly awake, that the enemy had still the advantage of me, when I thought I had him fast in a corner, and all this you see keeps me alive.
Letter to Hudson Gurney, quoted in George Peacock, The Life of Thomas Young (1855), 239.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Against (332)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Asleep (3)  |  Awake (19)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cast (66)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Corner (57)  |  Couch (2)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dice (21)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Gain (145)  |  Happen (274)  |  Investigation (230)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Signal (27)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Still (613)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throw Away (4)  |  Victory (39)  |  Warfare (11)

I shall no doubt be blamed by certain scientists, and, I am afraid, by some philosophers, for having taken serious account of the alleged facts which are investigated by Psychical Researchers. I am wholly impenitent about this. The scientists in question seem to me to confuse the Author of Nature with the Editor of Nature; or at any rate to suppose that there can be no productions of the former which would not be accepted for publication by the latter. And I see no reason to believe this.
The Mind and its Place in Nature (1925), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Account (192)  |  Author (167)  |  Certain (550)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Former (137)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Production (183)  |  Psychical Research (2)  |  Publication (101)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Serious (91)  |  Suppose (156)

I should object to any experimentation which can justly be called painful, for the purpose of elementary instruction ... [but I regret] a condition of the law which permits a boy to troll for pike, or set lines with live frog bait, for idle amusement; and, at the same time, lays the teacher of that boy open to the penalty of fine and imprisonment, if he uses the same animal for the purpose of exhibiting one of the most beautiful and instructive of physiological spectacles, the circulation in the web of the foot. ... [Maybe the frog is] inconvenienced by being wrapped up in a wet rag, and having his toes tied out ... But you must not inflict the least pain on a vertebrated animal for scientific purposes (though you may do a good deal in that way for gain or for sport) without due licence of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, granted under the authority of the Vivisection Act.
... [Yet, in] 1877, two persons may be charged with cruelty to animals. One has impaled a frog, and suffered the creature to writhe about in that condition for hours; the other has pained the animal no more than one of us would be pained by tying strings round his fingers, and keeping him in the position of a hydropathic patient. The first offender says, 'I did it because I find fishing very amusing,' and the magistrate bids him depart in peace; nay, probably wishes him good sport. The second pleads, 'I wanted to impress a scientific truth, with a distinctness attainable in no other way, on the minds of my scholars,' and the magistrate fines him five pounds.
I cannot but think that this is an anomalous and not wholly creditable state of things.
'On Elementary Instruction in Physiology'. Science and Culture (1882), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Animal (617)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bait (2)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boy (94)  |  Call (769)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Creditable (3)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Find (998)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Frog (38)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Home (170)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idle (33)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peace (108)  |  Permit (58)  |  Person (363)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Regret (30)  |  Say (984)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Set (394)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Sport (22)  |  State (491)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vivisection (7)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

I think that the unity we can seek lies really in two things. One is that the knowledge which comes to us at such a terrifyingly, inhumanly rapid rate has some order in it. We are allowed to forget a great deal, as well as to learn. This order is never adequate. The mass of ununderstood things, which cannot be summarized, or wholly ordered, always grows greater; but a great deal does get understood.
The second is simply this: we can have each other to dinner. We ourselves, and with each other by our converse, can create, not an architecture of global scope, but an immense, intricate network of intimacy, illumination, and understanding. Everything cannot be connected with everything in the world we live in. Everything can be connected with anything.
Concluding paragraphs of 'The Growth of Science and the Structure of Culture', Daedalus (Winter 1958), 87, No. 1, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connected (8)  |  Converse (8)  |  Create (235)  |  Deal (188)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Everything (476)  |  Forget (115)  |  Global (35)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Immense (86)  |  Intimacy (6)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Mass (157)  |  Network (21)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rate (29)  |  Scope (45)  |  Seek (213)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unity (78)  |  World (1774)

I went to the trash pile at Tuskegee Institute and started my laboratory with bottles, old fruit jars and any other thing I found I could use. ... [The early efforts were] worked out almost wholly on top of my flat topped writing desk and with teacups, glasses, bottles and reagents I made myself.
Manuscript fragment, no date, Box 1, George Washington Carver Papers. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottle (15)  |  Desk (13)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Flat (33)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Jar (9)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Made (14)  |  Myself (212)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Start (221)  |  Teacup (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Top (96)  |  Trash (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

If it were always necessary to reduce everything to intuitive knowledge, demonstration would often be insufferably prolix. This is why mathematicians have had the cleverness to divide the difficulties and to demonstrate separately the intervening propositions. And there is art also in this; for as the mediate truths (which are called lemmas, since they appear to be a digression) may be assigned in many ways, it is well, in order to aid the understanding and memory, to choose of them those which greatly shorten the process, and appear memorable and worthy in themselves of being demonstrated. But there is another obstacle, viz.: that it is not easy to demonstrate all the axioms, and to reduce demonstrations wholly to intuitive knowledge. And if we had chosen to wait for that, perhaps we should not yet have the science of geometry.
In Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz and Alfred Gideon Langley (trans.), New Essays Concerning Human Understanding (1896), 413-414.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Art (657)  |  Assign (13)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Choose (112)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Cleverness (15)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Digression (3)  |  Divide (75)  |  Easy (204)  |  Everything (476)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Insufferable (2)  |  Intervene (8)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lemma (2)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mediate (4)  |  Memorable (4)  |  Memory (134)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Process (423)  |  Prolix (2)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Shorten (5)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wait (58)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Worthy (34)

If one were to define chance as the outcome of a random movement which interlocks with no causes, I should maintain that it does not exist at all, that it is a wholly empty term denoting nothing substantial.
The Consolation of Philosophy [before 524], Book V, trans. P. G. Walsh (1999), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chance (239)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Random (41)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Term (349)

In the school of political projectors, I was but ill entertained, the professors appearing, in my judgment, wholly out of their senses; which is a scene that never fails to make me melancholy. These unhappy people were proposing schemes for persuading monarchs to choose favourites upon the score of their wisdom, capacity, and virtue; of teaching ministers to consult the public good; of rewarding merit, great abilities, and eminent services; of instructing princes to know their true interest, by placing it on the same foundation with that of their people; of choosing for employment persons qualified to exercise them; with many other wild impossible chimeras, that never entered before into the heart of man to conceive, and confirmed in me the old observation, that there is nothing so extravagant and irrational which some philosophers have not maintained for truth.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 6, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chimera (9)  |  Choose (112)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Employment (32)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extravagance (3)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fail (185)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interest (386)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Merit (50)  |  Minister (9)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Political (121)  |  Prince (13)  |  Professor (128)  |  Projector (3)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Scene (36)  |  Scheme (57)  |  School (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Service (110)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wisdom (221)

Industrial Society is not merely one containing 'industry,' large-scale productive units capable of supplying man's material needs in a way which can eliminate poverty: it is also a society in which knowledge plays a part wholly different from that which it played in earlier social forms, and which indeed possesses a quite different type of knowledge. Modern science is inconceivable outside an industrial society: but modern industrial society is equally inconceivable without modern science. Roughly, science is the mode of cognition of industrial society, and industry is the ecology of science.
Thought and Change (1965), 179.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cognition (7)  |  Different (577)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Equally (130)  |  Form (959)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Industry (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Outside (141)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Productive (32)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Type (167)  |  Way (1217)

Inventive genius requires pleasurable mental activity as a condition for its vigorous exercise. “Necessity is the mother of invention” is a silly proverb. “Necessity is the mother of futile dodges” is much closer to the truth. The basis of growth of modern invention is science, and science is almost wholly the outgrowth of pleasurable intellectual curiosity.
In 'Technical Education and Its Relation to Science and Literature', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1917), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Basis (173)  |  Closer (43)  |  Condition (356)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dodge (3)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Futile (11)  |  Genius (284)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mental (177)  |  Modern (385)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Of Invention (6)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silly (17)  |  Truth (1057)

Is man a peculiar organism? Does he originate in a wholly different way from a dog, bird, frog, or fish? and does he thereby justify those who assert that he has no place in nature, and no real relationship with the lower world of animal life? Or does he develop from a similar embryo, and undergo the same slow and gradual progressive modifications? The answer is not for an instant doubtful, and has not been doubtful for the last thirty years. The mode of man’s origin and the earlier stages of his development are undoubtedly identical with those of the animals standing directly below him in the scale; without the slightest doubt, he stands in this respect nearer the ape than the ape does to the dog. (1863)
As quoted in Ernst Haeckel and E. Ray Lankester (trans.) as epigraph for Chap. 12, The History of Creation (1886), Vol. 1, 364.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ape (53)  |  Assert (66)  |  Bird (149)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Dog (70)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fish (120)  |  Frog (38)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Identical (53)  |  Instant (45)  |  Justify (24)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lower (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Originate (36)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Place (177)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Respect (207)  |  Scale (121)  |  Similar (36)  |  Slow (101)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stand (274)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It is an old saying, abundantly justified, that where sciences meet there growth occurs. It is true moreover to say that in scientific borderlands not only are facts gathered that [are] often new in kind, but it is in these regions that wholly new concepts arise. It is my own faith that just as the older biology from its faithful studies of external forms provided a new concept in the doctrine of evolution, so the new biology is yet fated to furnish entirely new fundamental concepts of science, at which physics and chemistry when concerned with the non-living alone could never arrive.
'Biological Thought and Chemical Thought: A Plea for Unification', Linacre Lecture, Cambridge (6 May 1938), published in Lancet (1938),2, 1204.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Arise (158)  |  Biology (216)  |  Borderland (6)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Gather (72)  |  Growth (187)  |  Kind (557)  |  Living (491)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Old (481)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)

It may very properly be asked whether the attempt to define distinct species, of a more or less permanent nature, such as we are accustomed to deal with amongst the higher plants and animals, is not altogether illusory amongst such lowly organised forms of life as the bacteria. No biologist nowadays believes in the absolute fixity of species … but there are two circumstances which here render the problem of specificity even more difficult of solution. The bacteriologist is deprived of the test of mutual fertility or sterility, so valuable in determining specific limits amongst organisms in which sexual reproduction prevails. Further, the extreme rapidity with which generation succeeds generation amongst bacteria offers to the forces of variation and natural selection a field for their operation wholly unparalleled amongst higher forms of life.
'The Evolution of the Streptococci', The Lancet, 1906, 2, 1415-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacteriologist (5)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Deal (188)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Operation (213)  |  Organism (220)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Plant (294)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Render (93)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Solution (267)  |  Species (401)  |  Specific (95)  |  Sterility (10)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Test (211)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)

It remains a real world if there is a background to the symbols—an unknown quantity which the mathematical symbol x stands for. We think we are not wholly cut off from this background. It is to this background that our own personality and consciousness belong, and those spiritual aspects of our nature not to be described by any symbolism… to which mathematical physics has hitherto restricted itself.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 37-38.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Background (43)  |  Belong (162)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cut (114)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Personality (62)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Remain (349)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stand (274)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unknown (182)  |  World (1774)

It will be noticed that the fundamental theorem proved above bears some remarkable resemblances to the second law of thermodynamics. Both are properties of populations, or aggregates, true irrespective of the nature of the units which compose them; both are statistical laws; each requires the constant increase of a measurable quantity, in the one case the entropy of a physical system and in the other the fitness, measured by m, of a biological population. As in the physical world we can conceive the theoretical systems in which dissipative forces are wholly absent, and in which the entropy consequently remains constant, so we can conceive, though we need not expect to find, biological populations in which the genetic variance is absolutely zero, and in which fitness does not increase. Professor Eddington has recently remarked that “The law that entropy always increases—the second law of thermodynamics—holds, I think, the supreme position among the laws of nature.” It is not a little instructive that so similar a law should hold the supreme position among the biological sciences. While it is possible that both may ultimately be absorbed by some more general principle, for the present we should note that the laws as they stand present profound differences—-(1) The systems considered in thermodynamics are permanent; species on the contrary are liable to extinction, although biological improvement must be expected to occur up to the end of their existence. (2) Fitness, although measured by a uniform method, is qualitatively different for every different organism, whereas entropy, like temperature, is taken to have the same meaning for all physical systems. (3) Fitness may be increased or decreased by changes in the environment, without reacting quantitatively upon that environment. (4) Entropy changes are exceptional in the physical world in being irreversible, while irreversible evolutionary changes form no exception among biological phenomena. Finally, (5) entropy changes lead to a progressive disorganization of the physical world, at least from the human standpoint of the utilization of energy, while evolutionary changes are generally recognized as producing progressively higher organization in the organic world.
The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection (1930), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (130)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Human (1468)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Variance (12)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Zero (37)

Land that is left wholly to nature, that has no improvement of pasturage, tillage, or planting, is called, as indeed it is, “waste”.
In John Locke and Thomas Preston Peardon (ed.), The Second Treatise of Civil Government: An Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent and End of Civil Government (Dec 1689, 1952), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Call (769)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Land (115)  |  Leave (130)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Planting (4)  |  Tillage (2)  |  Waste (101)

Looking back across the long cycles of change through which the land has been shaped into its present form, let us realise that these geographical revolutions are not events wholly of the dim past, but that they are still in progress. So slow and measured has been their march, that even from the earliest times of human history they seem hardly to have advanced at all. But none the less are they surely and steadily transpiring around us. In the fall of rain and the flow of rivers, in the bubble of springs and the silence of frost, in the quiet creep of glaciers and the tumultuous rush of ocean waves, in the tremor of the earthquake and the outburst of the volcano, we may recognise the same play of terrestrial forces by which the framework of the continents has been step by step evolved.
Lecture at the Evening Meeting, Royal Geographical Society (24 Mar 1879), 'Discussion on Geographical Evolution', in Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society and Monthly Record (1879), New Monthly Series, 1, 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Change (593)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creep (15)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flow (83)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Framework (31)  |  Frost (14)  |  Glacier (17)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  March (46)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Rain (62)  |  Revolution (129)  |  River (119)  |  Silence (56)  |  Slow (101)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Still (613)  |  Surely (101)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tremor (2)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Wave (107)

Man continues to be the only 150 pound nonlinear servomechanism that can be wholly mass-produced by unskilled labor.
In 'Mechanisms in Anxiety', Journal of Neuropsychiatry (Sep-Oct 1963), 5, 416. Also appears as “Man is the only…reproduced…” for the opening sentence by Ashley Montagu in 'Forward: Origin of the Specious' for Robin Fox, The Passionate Mind: Sources of Destruction and Creativity (2000), xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Continue (165)  |  Labor (107)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Nonlinear (4)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Unskilled (4)

Mark all Mathematical heads which be wholly and only bent on these sciences, how solitary they be themselves, how unfit to live with others, how unapt to serve the world. (c.1550)
The Scholemaster (1570), Book 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Live (628)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solitude (18)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Unfit (12)  |  World (1774)

Much as I admired the elegance of physical theories, which at that time geology wholly lacked, I preferred a life in the woods to one in the laboratory.
From J. Tuzo Wilson, 'Early Days in University Geophysics', Ann. Rev. Earth Planet Sci. (1982), 10, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Geology (220)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lack (119)  |  Life (1795)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wood (92)  |  Woods (11)

My steamboat voyage to Albany and back, has turned out rather more favorable than I had calculated. The distance from New York to Albany is one hundred and fifty miles; I ran it up in thirty-two hours, and down in thirty. I had a light breeze against me the whole way, both going and coming, and the voyage has been performed wholly by, the power of the steam engine. I overtook many sloops and schooners beating to windward and parted with them as if they had been at anchor. The power of propelling boats by steam is now fully proved.
Letter to Joel Barlow, Philadelphia, from New York (22 Aug 1807), in The Literary Magazine, and American Register for 1807 (1808), Vol. 8, No. 47, 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Back (390)  |  Both (493)  |  Coming (114)  |  Distance (161)  |  Down (456)  |  Engine (98)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Power (746)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Steamboat (6)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

My story [Lord of the Rings] is not an allegory of Atomic power, but of Power (exerted for Domination). Nuclear physics can be used for that purpose. But they need not be. They need not be used at all. If there is any contemporary reference in my story at all it is to what seems to me the most widespread assumption of our time: that if a thing can be done, it must be done. This seems to me wholly false.
From Letter draft to Joanna de Bortadano (Apr 1956). In Humphrey Carpenter (ed.) assisted by Christopher Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (1995, 2014), 246, Letter No. 186.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Allegory (7)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Atomic Power (9)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Domination (12)  |  Exert (39)  |  False (100)  |  Lord (93)  |  Lord Of The Rings (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Power (746)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reference (33)  |  Story (118)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Widespread (22)

No aphorism is more frequently repeated in connection with field trials, than that we must ask Nature few questions, or, ideally, one question, at a time. The writer is convinced that this view is wholly mistaken. Nature, he suggests, will best respond to a logical and carefully thought out questionnaire; indeed, if we ask her a single question, she will often refuse to answer until some other topic has been discussed.
'The Arrangement of Field Experiments', The Journal of the Ministry of Agriculture, 1926, 33, 511.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Ask (411)  |  Best (459)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Connection (162)  |  Field (364)  |  Indeed (324)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Questionnaire (3)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Research (664)  |  Single (353)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Topic (21)  |  Trial (57)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writer (86)

No collateral science had profited so much by palæontology as that which teaches the structure and mode of formation of the earth’s crust, with the relative position, time, and order of formation of its constituent stratified and unstratified parts. Geology has left her old hand-maiden mineralogy to rest almost wholly on the broad shoulders of her young and vigorous offspring, the science of organic remains.
In article 'Palæontology' contributed to Encyclopædia Britannica (8th ed., 1859), Vol. 17, 91.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Broad (27)  |  Collateral (4)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Crust (38)  |  Earth (996)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geology (220)  |  Handmaiden (2)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Mode (41)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Position (77)  |  Profit (52)  |  Relative (39)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Structure (344)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Young (227)

One must be wary in attributing scientific discovery wholly to any one person. Almost every discovery has a long and precarious history. Someone finds a bit here, another a bit there. A third step succeeds later and thus onward till a genius pieces the bits together and makes the decisive contribution. Science, like the Mississippi, begins in a tiny rivulet in the distant forest. Gradually other streams swell its volume. And the roaring river that bursts the dikes is formed from countless sources.
In 'The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge', Harper’s (Jun/Nov 1939), No. 179, 549
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (61)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bit (22)  |  Burst (39)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Countless (36)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Dike (2)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distant (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  History (673)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Long (790)  |  Mississippi (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Piece (38)  |  Precarious (5)  |  River (119)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Roar (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Source (93)  |  Step (231)  |  Stream (81)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Swell (4)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Together (387)  |  Volume (19)  |  Wary (3)  |  Whole (738)

One rarely hears of the mathematical recitation as a preparation for public speaking. Yet mathematics shares with these studies [foreign languages, drawing and natural science] their advantages, and has another in a higher degree than either of them.
Most readers will agree that a prime requisite for healthful experience in public speaking is that the attention of the speaker and hearers alike be drawn wholly away from the speaker and concentrated upon the thought. In perhaps no other classroom is this so easy as in the mathematical, where the close reasoning, the rigorous demonstration, the tracing of necessary conclusions from given hypotheses, commands and secures the entire mental power of the student who is explaining, and of his classmates. In what other circumstances do students feel so instinctively that manner counts for so little and mind for so much? In what other circumstances, therefore, is a simple, unaffected, easy, graceful manner so naturally and so healthfully cultivated? Mannerisms that are mere affectation or the result of bad literary habit recede to the background and finally disappear, while those peculiarities that are the expression of personality and are inseparable from its activity continually develop, where the student frequently presents, to an audience of his intellectual peers, a connected train of reasoning. …
One would almost wish that our institutions of the science and art of public speaking would put over their doors the motto that Plato had over the entrance to his school of philosophy: “Let no one who is unacquainted with geometry enter here.”
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alike (60)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Audience (26)  |  Background (43)  |  Bad (180)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Command (58)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Connect (125)  |  Count (105)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hear (139)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Institution (69)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peer (12)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recede (11)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Share (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (300)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Unaffected (6)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Our most successful theories in physics are those that explicitly leave room for the unknown, while confining this room sufficiently to make the theory empirically disprovable. It does not matter whether this room is created by allowing for arbitrary forces as Newtonian dynamics does, or by allowing for arbitrary equations of state for matter, as General Relativity does, or for arbitrary motions of charges and dipoles, as Maxwell's electrodynamics does. To exclude the unknown wholly as a “unified field theory” or a “world equation” purports to do is pointless and of no scientific significance.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Charge (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Equation (132)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Matter (798)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pointless (6)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Significance (113)  |  State (491)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unknown (182)  |  World (1774)

People looked at glaciers for thousands of years before they found out that ice was a fluid, so it has taken them and will continue to take them not less before they see that the inorganic is not wholly inorganic.
In Samuel Butler and Henry Festing Jones (ed.), 'Mind and Matter', The Note-books of Samuel Butler (1912, 1917), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Continue (165)  |  Find (998)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Ice (54)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  People (1005)  |  See (1081)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Scheele, it was said, never forgot anything if it had to do with chemistry. He never forgot the look, the feel, the smell of a substance, or the way it was transformed in chemical reactions, never forgot anything he read, or was told, about the phenomena of chemistry. He seemed indifferent, or inattentive, to most things else, being wholly dedicated to his single passion, chemistry. It was this pure and passionate absorption in phenomena—noticing everything, forgetting nothing—that constituted Scheele's special strength.
Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood (2001), 44.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Dedicated (19)  |  Dedication (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Feel (367)  |  Look (582)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Passion (114)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Read (287)  |  Single (353)  |  Smell (27)  |  Special (184)  |  Strength (126)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transform (73)  |  Way (1217)

Science is one thing, wisdom is another. Science is an edged tool, with which men play like children, and cut their own fingers. If you look at the results which science has brought in its train, you will find them to consist almost wholly in elements of mischief. See how much belongs to the word “Explosion” alone, of which the ancients knew nothing.
Written for fictional character, the Rev. Dr. Opimian, in Gryll Grange (1861), collected in Sir Henry Cole (ed.) The Works of Thomas Love Peacock(1875), Vol. 2, 380. (An incorrect citation is found in Robert L. Weber, More Random Walks in Science (1982), 48. Weber attributes to Arthur Eddington in 'The Decline of Determinism.' Webmaster checked an article by this name in Mathematical Gazette (May 1932) but found nothing resembling the quote therein.)
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Belong (162)  |  Children (200)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cut (114)  |  Element (310)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Look (582)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tool (117)  |  Train (114)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Word (619)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Color (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Omit (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Show (346)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (653)  |  Summary (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

Sociological method as we practice it rests wholly on the basic principle that social facts must be studied as things, that is, as realities external to the individual. There is no principle for which we have received more criticism; but none is more fundamental. Indubitably for sociology to be possible, it must above all have an object all its own. It must take cognizance of a reality which is not in the domain of other sciences... there can be no sociology unless societies exist, and that societies cannot exist if there are only individuals.
Suicide: A Study in Sociology (1897), trans. J. A. Spaulding and G. Simpson (1952), 37-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Domain (69)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Individual (404)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Thing (1915)

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; other to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books; else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores. [The studies pass into the manners.]
'Of Studies' (1625) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 6, 498.
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Book (392)  |  Common (436)  |  Conference (17)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Extract (40)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Water (481)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wit (59)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

That the machine of Heaven is not a hard and impervious body full of various real spheres, as up to now has been believed by most people. It will be proved that it extends everywhere, most fluid and simple, and nowhere presents obstacles as was formerly held, the circuits of the Planets being wholly free and without the labour and whirling round of any real spheres at all, being divinely governed under a given law.
De Mundi Aetherei Recentioribus Phaenomenis (On Recent Phenomena in the Aetherial World) (1588). Quoted in M. Boas Hall, The Scientific Renaissance 1450-1630 (1962), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Free (232)  |  Govern (64)  |  Hard (243)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Impervious (5)  |  Labour (98)  |  Law (894)  |  Machine (257)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Present (619)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

The actual evolution of mathematical theories proceeds by a process of induction strictly analogous to the method of induction employed in building up the physical sciences; observation, comparison, classification, trial, and generalisation are essential in both cases. Not only are special results, obtained independently of one another, frequently seen to be really included in some generalisation, but branches of the subject which have been developed quite independently of one another are sometimes found to have connections which enable them to be synthesised in one single body of doctrine. The essential nature of mathematical thought manifests itself in the discernment of fundamental identity in the mathematical aspects of what are superficially very different domains. A striking example of this species of immanent identity of mathematical form was exhibited by the discovery of that distinguished mathematician … Major MacMahon, that all possible Latin squares are capable of enumeration by the consideration of certain differential operators. Here we have a case in which an enumeration, which appears to be not amenable to direct treatment, can actually be carried out in a simple manner when the underlying identity of the operation is recognised with that involved in certain operations due to differential operators, the calculus of which belongs superficially to a wholly different region of thought from that relating to Latin squares.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Amenable (4)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Belong (162)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Branch (150)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Capable (168)  |  Carry (127)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Classification (97)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential (7)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discernment (4)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Domain (69)  |  Due (141)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Example (94)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Identity (19)  |  Include (90)  |  Independent (67)  |  Independently (24)  |  Induction (77)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Latin (38)  |  Percy Alexander MacMahon (3)  |  Major (84)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Operator (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Really (78)  |  Recognise (9)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Square (70)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthesize (3)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Trial (57)  |  Underlying (30)

The American Cancer Society's position on the question of a possible cause-effect relationship between cigarette smoking and lung cancer is:
1. The evidence to date justifies suspicion that cigarette smoking does, to a degree as yet undetermined, increase the likelihood of developing cancer of the lung.
2. That available evidence does not constitute irrefutable proof that cigarette smoking is wholly or chiefly or partly responsible for lung cancer.
3. That the evidence at hand calls for the extension of statistical and laboratory studies designed to confirm or deny a causual relationship between cigarette smoking and lung cancer.
4. That the society is committed to furthering such intensified investigation as its resources will permit.
Conclusions of statement after a meeting of the ACS board of directors in San Francisco (17 Mar 1954). Quoted in 'Tobacco Industry Denies Cancer Tie'. New York Times (14 Apr 1954), 51.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Available (78)  |  Call (769)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Degree (276)  |  Deny (66)  |  Design (195)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extension (59)  |  Increase (210)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Irrefutable (4)  |  Justification (48)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lung (34)  |  Lung Cancer (7)  |  Permit (58)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Research (664)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Society (326)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Will (2355)

The central problem of biological evolution is the nature of mutation, but hitherto the occurrence of this has been wholly refractory and impossible to influence by artificial means, although a control of it might obviously place the process of evolution in our hands.
'The Recent Findings in Heredity' (unpublished lecture, 1916, Lilly Library), 3. Quoted in Elof Axel Carlson, Genes, Radiation, and Society: The Life and Work of H. J. Muller (1981), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Central (80)  |  Control (167)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Influence (222)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Refractory (3)

The cult of individual personalities is always, in my view, unjustified. To be sure, nature distributes her gifts variously among her children. But there are plenty of the well-endowed ones too, thank God, and I am firmly convinced that most of them live quiet, unregarded lives. It strikes me as unfair, and even in bad taste, to select a few of them for boundless admiration, attributing superhuman powers of mind and character to them. This has been my fate, and the contrast between the popular estimate of my powers and achievements and the reality is simply grotesque. The consciousness of this extraordinary state of affairs would be unbearable but for one great consoling thought: it is a welcome symptom in an age which is commonly denounced as materialistic, that it makes heroes of men whose ambitions lie wholly in the intellectual and moral sphere. This proves that knowledge and justice are ranked above wealth and power by a large section of the human race. My experience teaches me that this idealistic outlook is particularly prevalent in America, which is usually decried as a particularly materialistic country.
From Mein Weltbild, as translated by Alan Harris (trans.), 'Some Notes on my American Impressions', The World as I See It (1956, 1993), 37-38.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Age (499)  |  Ambition (43)  |  America (127)  |  Bad (180)  |  Biography (240)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Character (243)  |  Children (200)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consoling (4)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Country (251)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fate (72)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Justice (39)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Power (746)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reality (261)  |  Select (44)  |  Sphere (116)  |  State (491)  |  Strike (68)  |  Superhuman (5)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Usually (176)  |  View (488)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Welcome (16)

The development of science has produced an industrial revolution which has brought different peoples in such close contact with one another through colonization and commerce that no matter how some nations may still look down upon others, no country can harbor the illusion that its career is decided wholly within itself.
In Democracy and Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 337.
Science quotes on:  |  Career (75)  |  Close (69)  |  Colonization (3)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Contact (65)  |  Country (251)  |  Decide (41)  |  Development (422)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Harbor (6)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nation (193)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Within (7)

The existing premises, wholly altered by geologic science, are no longer those of Hume. The foot-print in the sand—to refer to his happy illustration—does now stand alone. Instead of one, we see many footprints, each in turn in advance of the print behind it, and on a higher level.
Lecture to the Edinburgh Philosophical Institution, 'Geology in its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Part 1', collected in The Testimony of the Rocks: or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed (1857), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Alone (311)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Behind (137)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Geology (220)  |  Happy (105)  |  David Hume (33)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Premise (37)  |  Sand (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Stand (274)  |  Turn (447)

The fact is, a biologist to-day [1928] is pretty much where an engineer would be if he knew even in detail the cycle of chemical changes which took place within an internal combustion engine but was wholly ignorant of the disposition of tho moving parts.
As guest of honour, closing day address (Jun 1928), Sixth Colloid Symposium, Toronto, Canada, 'Living Matter', printed in Harry Boyer Weiser (ed.), Colloid Symposium Monograph (1928), Vol. 6, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (69)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Internal (66)  |  Internal Combustion Engine (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)

The geologist, who is blest with an assured conviction of the immensity of geological time, moves with an ease and freedom from cause to effect wholly denied to those wanting in this conviction.
In 'The Relations of Geology', Scottish Geographical Magazine (Aug 1902), 19, No. 8, 398.
Science quotes on:  |  Assured (4)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Effect (393)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Geologic Time (2)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Move (216)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)

The logic of the subject [algebra], which, both educationally and scientifically speaking, is the most important part of it, is wholly neglected. The whole training consists in example grinding. What should have been merely the help to attain the end has become the end itself. The result is that algebra, as we teach it, is neither an art nor a science, but an ill-digested farrago of rules, whose object is the solution of examination problems. … The result, so far as problems worked in examinations go, is, after all, very miserable, as the reiterated complaints of examiners show; the effect on the examinee is a well-known enervation of mind, an almost incurable superficiality, which might be called Problematic Paralysis—a disease which unfits a man to follow an argument extending beyond the length of a printed octavo page.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science (1885), Nature, 32, 447-448.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Art (657)  |  Attain (125)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Consist (223)  |  Digest (9)  |  Disease (328)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Enervation (2)  |  Examination (98)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Example (94)  |  Far (154)  |  Follow (378)  |  Grind (11)  |  Help (105)  |  Important (209)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Known (454)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Object (422)  |  Page (30)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Part (222)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reiterate (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Solution (267)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Training (80)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

The mechanical speculations of the ancients, particularly of the Greeks, related wholly to statics. Dynamics was founded by Galileo.
In The Science of Mechanics (1893), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Founded (20)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Greek (107)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statics (6)

The one who stays in my mind as the ideal man of science is, not Huxley or Tyndall, Hooker or Lubbock, still less my friend, philosopher and guide Herbert Spencer, but Francis Galton, whom I used to observe and listen to—I regret to add, without the least reciprocity—with rapt attention. Even to-day. I can conjure up, from memory’s misty deep, that tall figure with its attitude of perfect physical and mental poise; the clean-shaven face, the thin, compressed mouth with its enigmatical smile; the long upper lip and firm chin, and, as if presiding over the whole personality of the man, the prominent dark eyebrows from beneath which gleamed, with penetrating humour, contemplative grey eyes. Fascinating to me was Francis Galton’s all-embracing but apparently impersonal beneficence. But, to a recent and enthusiastic convert to the scientific method, the most relevant of Galton’s many gifts was the unique contribution of three separate and distinct processes of the intellect; a continuous curiosity about, and rapid apprehension of individual facts, whether common or uncommon; the faculty for ingenious trains of reasoning; and, more admirable than either of these, because the talent was wholly beyond my reach, the capacity for correcting and verifying his own hypotheses, by the statistical handling of masses of data, whether collected by himself or supplied by other students of the problem.
In My Apprenticeship (1926), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admirable (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clean (50)  |  Collected (2)  |  Common (436)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Convert (22)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dark (140)  |  Data (156)  |  Deep (233)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Eye (419)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Figure (160)  |  Firm (47)  |  Friend (168)  |  Sir Francis Galton (18)  |  Gift (104)  |  Grey (10)  |  Guide (97)  |  Handling (7)  |  Himself (461)  |  Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (12)  |  Humour (116)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Impersonal (5)  |  Individual (404)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lip (4)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) (26)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misty (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physical (508)  |  Poise (4)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recent (77)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Regret (30)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Separate (143)  |  Smile (31)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Talent (94)  |  Tall (11)  |  Thin (16)  |  Train (114)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Unique (67)  |  Upper (4)  |  Whole (738)

The other experiment (which I shall hardly, I confess, make again, because it was cruel) was with a dog, which, by means of a pair of bellows, wherewith I filled his lungs, and suffered them to empty again, I was able to preserve alive as long as I could desire, after I had wholly opened the thorax, and cut off all the ribs, and opened the belly. Nay, I kept him alive above an hour after I had cut off the pericardium and the mediastinum, and had handled and turned his lungs and heart and all the other parts of its body, as I pleased. My design was to make some enquiries into the nature of respiration. But though I made some considerable discovery of the necessity of fresh air, and the motion of the lungs for the continuance of the animal life, yet I could not make the least discovery in this of what I longed for, which was, to see, if I could by any means discover a passage of the air of the lungs into either the vessels or the heart; and I shall hardly be induced to make any further trials of this kind, because of the torture of this creature: but certainly the enquiry would be very noble, if we could any way find a way so to stupify the creature, as that it might not be sensible.
Letter from Robert Hooke to Robert Boyle (10 Nov 1664). In M. Hunter, A. Clericuzio and L. M. Principe (eds.), The Correspondence of Robert Boyle (2001), Vol. 2, 399.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Bellows (5)  |  Body (537)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Confess (42)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Creature (233)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Cut (114)  |  Design (195)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dog (70)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hour (186)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Noble (90)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Rib (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Torture (29)  |  Trial (57)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Vivisection (7)  |  Way (1217)

The present gigantic development of the mathematical faculty is wholly unexplained by the theory of natural selection, and must be due to some altogether distinct cause.
In Darwinism, chap. 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Altogether (9)  |  Cause (541)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Due (141)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Present (619)  |  Selection (128)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unexplained (8)

The scientist who recognizes God knows only the God of Newton. To him the God imagined by Laplace and Comte is wholly inadequate. He feels that God is in nature, that the orderly ways in which nature works are themselves the manifestations of God's will and purpose. Its laws are his orderly way of working.
The Human Meaning of Science (1940), 69.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Feel (367)  |  God (757)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Know (1518)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Law (894)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The wonderful structure of the animal system will probably never permit us to look upon it as a merely physical apparatus, yet the demands of science require that the evidently magnified principles of vitality should be reduced to their natural spheres, or if truth requires, wholly subverted in favor of those more cognizable by the human understanding. The spirit of the age will not tolerate in the devotee of science a quiet indifference. ...
In 'An Inquiry, Analogical and Experimental, into the Different Electrical conditions of Arterial and Venous Blood', New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal (1853-4), 10, 584-602 & 738-757. As cited in George B. Roth, 'Dr. John Gorrie—Inventor of Artificial Ice and Mechanical Refrigeration', The Scientific Monthly (May 1936) 42 No. 5, 464-469.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Demand (123)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Favor (63)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Look (582)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Permit (58)  |  Physical (508)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Structure (344)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)

The world probably being of much greater antiquity than physical science has thought to be possible, it is interesting and harmless to speculate whether man has shared with the world its more remote history. … Some of the beliefs and legends which have come down to us from antiquity are so universal and deep-rooted that we have are accustomed to consider them almost as old as the race itself. One is tempted to inquire how far the unsuspected aptness of some of these beliefs and sayings to the point of view so recently disclosed is the result of mere chance or coincidence, and how far it may be evidence of a wholly unknown and unsuspected ancient civilization of which all other relic has disappeared.
In 'The Elixir of Life', The Interpretation of Radium: Being the Substance of Six Free Popular Lectures Delivered at the University of Glasgow (1909, 1912), 248-250. The original lectures of early 1908, were greatly edited, rearranged and supplemented by the author for the book form.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Chance (239)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deep (233)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Down (456)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmless (8)  |  History (673)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Legend (17)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Race (268)  |  Relic (6)  |  Remote (83)  |  Result (677)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unknown (182)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

There are pessimists who hold that such a state of affairs is necessarily inherent in human nature; it is those who propound such views that are the enemies of true religion, for they imply thereby that religious teachings are utopian ideals and unsuited to afford guidance in human affairs. The study of the social patterns in certain so-called primitive cultures, however, seems to have made it sufficiently evident that such a defeatist view is wholly unwarranted.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (17)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Culture (143)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Evident (91)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Affairs (5)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imply (17)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Pessimist (7)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Propound (2)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Seem (145)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  State (491)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Study (653)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Thereby (5)  |  True (212)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Utopian (3)  |  View (488)

There are problems to whose solution I would attach an infinitely greater importance than to those of mathematics, for example touching ethics, or our relation to God, or concerning our destiny and our future; but their solution lies wholly beyond us and completely outside the province of science.
Quoted in J.R. Newman, The World of Mathematics (1956), 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Completely (135)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Greater (288)  |  Importance (286)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Outside (141)  |  Problem (676)  |  Province (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Touching (16)

There is no logical impossibility in the hypothesis that the world sprang into being five minutes ago, exactly as it then was, with a population that "remembered" a wholly unreal past. There is no logically necessary connection between events at different times; therefore nothing that is happening now or will happen in the future can disprove the hypothesis that the world began five minutes ago.
In The Analysis of Mind (1921) 159–160.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Connection (162)  |  Different (577)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Event (216)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Logic (287)  |  Minute (125)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Population (110)  |  Remember (179)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unreal (4)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

There is not wholly unexpected surprise, but surprise nevertheless, that mathematics has direct application to the physical world about us.
In The American Mathematical Monthly (1949), 56, 19. Excerpted in John Ewing (ed,), A Century of Mathematics: Through the Eyes of the Monthly (1996), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Direct (225)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  World (1774)

These Disciplines [mathematics] serve to inure and corroborate the Mind to a constant Diligence in Study; to undergo the Trouble of an attentive Meditation, and cheerfully contend with such Difficulties as lie in the Way. They wholly deliver us from a credulous Simplicity, most strongly fortify us against the Vanity of Scepticism, effectually restrain from a rash Presumption, most easily incline us to a due Assent, perfectly subject us to the Government of right Reason, and inspire us with Resolution to wrestle against the unjust Tyranny of false Prejudices. If the Fancy be unstable and fluctuating, it is to be poized by this Ballast, and steadied by this Anchor, if the Wit be blunt it is sharpened upon this Whetstone; if luxuriant it is pared by this Knife; if headstrong it is restrained by this Bridle; and if dull it is rouzed by this Spur. The Steps are guided by no Lamp more clearly through the dark Mazes of Nature, by no Thread more surely through the intricate Labyrinths of Philosophy, nor lastly is the Bottom of Truth sounded more happily by any other Line. I will not mention how plentiful a Stock of Knowledge the Mind is furnished from these, with what wholesome Food it is nourished, and what sincere Pleasure it enjoys. But if I speak farther, I shall neither be the only Person, nor the first, who affirms it; that while the Mind is abstracted and elevated from sensible Matter, distinctly views pure Forms, conceives the Beauty of Ideas, and investigates the Harmony of Proportions; the Manners themselves are sensibly corrected and improved, the Affections composed and rectified, the Fancy calmed and settled, and the Understanding raised and excited to more divine Contemplations. All which I might defend by Authority, and confirm by the Suffrages of the greatest Philosophers.
Prefatory Oration in Mathematical Lectures (1734), xxxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Affection (43)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Assent (12)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Authority (95)  |  Ballast (2)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Calm (31)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Divine (112)  |  Due (141)  |  Dull (54)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortify (4)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Government (110)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knife (23)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Maze (10)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rash (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rectified (4)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Settled (34)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spur (4)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suffrage (4)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thread (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Tyranny (14)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Vanity (19)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whetstone (2)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)

Until that afternoon, my thoughts on planetary atmospheres had been wholly concerned with atmospheric analysis as a method of life detection and nothing more. Now that I knew the composition of the Martian atmosphere was so different from that of our own, my mind filled with wonderings about the nature of the Earth. If the air is burning, what sustains it at a constant composition? I also wondered about the supply of fuel and the removal of the products of combustion. It came to me suddenly, just like a flash of enlightenment, that to persist and keep stable, something must be regulating the atmosphere and so keeping it at its constant composition. Moreover, if most of the gases came from living organisms, then life at the surface must be doing the regulation.
Homage to Gaia: The Life of an Independent Scholar (2000), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Burning (48)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concern (228)  |  Constant (144)  |  Detection (16)  |  Different (577)  |  Doing (280)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Flash (49)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Gaia (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mars (44)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organism (220)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Product (160)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Something (719)  |  Stable (30)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supply (93)  |  Surface (209)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wonder (236)

When we no longer look at an organic being as a savage looks at a ship, as something wholly beyond his comprehension; when we regard every production of nature as one which has had a long history; when we contemplate every complex structure and instinct as the summing up of many contrivances, each useful to the possessor, in the same way as any great mechanical invention is the summing up of the labour, the experience, the reason, and even the blunders of numerous workmen; when we thus view each organic being, how far more interesting, I speak from experience, does the study of natural history become!
From the Conclusion of Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, Or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (3rd. ed., 1861), 521.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Experience (467)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Invention (369)  |  Labour (98)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Production (183)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Savage (29)  |  Ship (62)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Summation (3)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Workman (13)

Without any remaining wilderness we are committed wholly, without chance for even momentary reflection and rest, to a headlong drive into our technological termite-life, the Brave New World of a completely man-controlled environment. We need wilderness preserved—as much of it as is still left, and as many kinds—because it was the challenge against which our character as a people was formed.
Letter (3 Dec 1960) written to David E. Pesonen of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission. Collected in 'Coda: Wilderness Letter', The Sound of Mountain Water: The Changing American West (1969), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Brave (12)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Committed (2)  |  Completely (135)  |  Controlled (3)  |  Drive (55)  |  Environment (216)  |  Form (959)  |  Formed (5)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Preserved (3)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Still (613)  |  Technological (61)  |  Termite (7)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  World (1774)

[1665-06-10] ...In the evening home to supper, and there to my great trouble hear that the plague is come into the City (though it hath these three or four weeks since its beginning been wholly out of the City); but where it begin but in my good friend and neighbour's, Dr Burnett in Fanchurch Street - which in both points troubles me mightily. To the office to finish my letters, and then home to bed, being troubled at the sickness ... and particularly how to put my things and estate in order, in case it should please God to call me away.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (10 Jun 1665)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  City (78)  |  Finish (59)  |  Friend (168)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  Home (170)  |  Letter (109)  |  Office (71)  |  Order (632)  |  Plague (41)  |  Please (65)  |  Point (580)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Supper (10)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Week (70)

[Fossils found in the Secondary formation are] unrefined and imperfect [species and the species in the Tertiary formation] are very perfect and wholly similar to those that are seen in the modern sea. [Thus] as many ages have elapsed during the elevation of the Alps, as there are races of organic fossil bodies embedded within the strata.
Quoted in Francesco Rodolico, 'Arduino', In Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1970), Vol. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (8)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Formation (96)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Modern (385)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Organic (158)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Race (268)  |  Sea (308)  |  Species (401)  |  Strata (35)

[Tom Bombadil is] an exemplar, a particular embodying of pure (real) natural science: the spirit that desires knowledge of other things, their history and nature, because they are ‘other’ and wholly independent of the enquiring mind, a spirit coeval with the rational mind, and entirely unconcerned with ‘doing’ anything with the knowledge: Zoology and Botany not Cattle-breeding or Agriculture. Even the Elves hardly show this: they are primarily artists.
From Letter draft to Peter Hastings (manager of a Catholic bookshop in Oxford, who wrote about his enthusiasm for Lord of the Rings) (Sep 1954). In Humphrey Carpenter (ed.) assisted by Christopher Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (1995, 2014), 192, Letter No. 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Artist (90)  |  Botany (57)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Desire (204)  |  Doing (280)  |  Elf (6)  |  Embody (16)  |  Exemplar (2)  |  History (673)  |  Independent (67)  |  Inquiring (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lord Of The Rings (6)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rational (90)  |  Real (149)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Zoology (36)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.