Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Widespread

Widespread Quotes (9 quotes)

Clinical ecology [is] a new branch of medicine aimed at helping people made sick by a failure to adapt to facets of our modern, polluted environment. Adverse reactions to processed foods and their chemical contaminants, and to indoor and outdoor air pollution with petrochemicals, are becoming more and more widespread and so far these reactions are being misdiagnosed by mainstream medical practitioners and so are not treated effectively.
Quoted in article 'Richard Mackarness', Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Adverse (2)  |  Air Pollution (4)  |  Allergy (2)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Effectiveness (10)  |  Environment (138)  |  Facet (5)  |  Failure (118)  |  Food (139)  |  Illness (22)  |  Mainstream (3)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Modern (104)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Practitioner (12)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Sickness (20)  |  Treatment (88)

Measurement has too often been the leitmotif of many investigations rather than the experimental examination of hypotheses. Mounds of data are collected, which are statistically decorous and methodologically unimpeachable, but conclusions are often trivial and rarely useful in decision making. This results from an overly rigorous control of an insignificant variable and a widespread deficiency in the framing of pertinent questions. Investigators seem to have settled for what is measurable instead of measuring what they would really like to know.
'Patient Care—Mystical Research or Researchable Mystique/', Clinical Research (1964), 12, no. 4, 422.
Science quotes on:  |  Collection (38)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Control (93)  |  Data (100)  |  Decision (58)  |  Deficiency (8)  |  Examination (60)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Framing (2)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Insignificance (9)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Like (18)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Pertinent (3)  |  Question (315)  |  Rare (31)  |  Result (250)  |  Rigor (12)  |  Settle (10)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Usefulness (70)  |  Variable (9)

Meat-eating has not, to my knowledge, been recorded from other parts of the chimpanzee’s range in Africa, although if it is assumed that human infants are in fact taken for food, the report that five babies were carried off in West Africa suggests that carnivorous behavior may be widespread.
In 'Chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Reserve', collected in Primate Behavior: Field Studies of Monkeys and Apes (1965), 473.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (15)  |  Animal Behavior (9)  |  Assume (19)  |  Baby (18)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Carnivorous (3)  |  Chimpanzee (12)  |  Eating (21)  |  Fact (609)  |  Food (139)  |  Human (445)  |  Infant (13)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Meat (11)  |  Range (38)  |  Record (56)  |  Report (31)  |  Suggest (15)

My story [Lord of the Rings] is not an allegory of Atomic power, but of Power (exerted for Domination). Nuclear physics can be used for that purpose. But they need not be. They need not be used at all. If there is any contemporary reference in my story at all it is to what seems to me the most widespread assumption of our time: that if a thing can be done, it must be done. This seems to me wholly false.
From Letter draft to Joanna de Bortadano (Apr 1956). In Humphrey Carpenter (ed.) assisted by Christopher Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (1995, 2014), 246, Letter No. 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Allegory (6)  |  Assumption (49)  |  Atomic Power (7)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Domination (12)  |  False (79)  |  Lord Of The Rings (6)  |  Need (211)  |  Nuclear Physics (4)  |  Power (273)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reference (17)  |  Story (58)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Act (80)  |  Age (137)  |  America (74)  |  Authority (50)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Beginnings (2)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (71)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Common (92)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (4)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Dislike (11)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Emergency (6)  |  Eminently (2)  |  Emphasize (6)  |  Enterprise (20)  |  Era (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Face (69)  |  Fear (113)  |  Federal (5)  |  Find (248)  |  First (174)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (117)  |  Great (300)  |  Growth (111)  |  Ideology (7)  |  Important (124)  |  Individualism (2)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Intense (11)  |  Large (82)  |  Largely (12)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (70)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (24)  |  Modern (104)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Number (179)  |  Organization (79)  |  Original (36)  |  Part (146)  |  Portray (3)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Private (17)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Public (82)  |  Quicken (2)  |  Recent (23)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Repeat (27)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Response (24)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Save (46)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (188)  |  State (96)  |  Step (67)  |  Stress (8)  |  Substantial (7)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Time (439)  |  Toward (29)  |  Trend (16)  |  Try (103)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Work (457)  |  Worth (74)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (214)

There has come about a general public awareness that America is not automatically, and effortlessly, and unquestionably the leader of the world in science and technology. This comes as no surprise to those of us who have watched and tried to warn against the steady deterioration in the teaching of science and mathematics in the schools for the past quarter century. It comes as no surprise to those who have known of dozens of cases of scientists who have been hounded out of jobs by silly disloyalty charges, and kept out of all professional employment by widespread blacklisting practices.
Banquet speech at American Physical Society, St. Louis, Missouri. (29 Nov 1957). In "Time to Stop Baiting Scientists", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1958), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Automatic (13)  |  Awareness (23)  |  Case (64)  |  Charge (29)  |  Dozen (5)  |  Effortless (2)  |  Employment (22)  |  Job (33)  |  Leader (19)  |  Profession (54)  |  Public (82)  |  Science And Technology (20)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Unquestionable (6)  |  World (667)

When understanding of the universe has become widespread, when the majority of men know that the stars are not sources of light but worlds, perhaps inhabited worlds like ours, then the Christian doctrine will be convicted of absurdity.
In Adolf Hitler, Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, translated by Norman Cameron and R. H. Stevens, '14 October 1941', Secret Conversations (1941 - 1944) (1953), 50
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (16)  |  Christian (17)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Light (246)  |  Majority (32)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Star (251)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

Why then be concerned about the conservation of wildlife when for all practical purposes we would be much better off if humans and their domestic animals and pets were the only living creatures on the face of the earth? There is no obvious and demolishing answer to this rather doubtful logic although in practice the destruction of all wild animals would certainly bring devastating changes to our existence on this planet as we know it today...The trouble is that everything in nature is completely interdependent. Tinker with one part of it and the repercussions ripple out in all directions...Wildlife - and that includes everything from microbes to blue whales and from a fungus to a redwood tree - has been so much part of life on the earth that we are inclined to take its continued existence for granted...Yet the wildlife of the world is disappearing, not because of a malicious and deliberate policy of slaughter and extermination, but simply because of a general and widespread ignorance and neglect.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Answer (201)  |  Better (131)  |  Bring (53)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Change (291)  |  Completely (19)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Continue (38)  |  Creature (127)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demolish (2)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Devastating (4)  |  Direction (56)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Doubtful (5)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Existence (254)  |  Extermination (10)  |  Face Of The Earth (3)  |  Fungus (4)  |  General (92)  |  Grant (21)  |  Human (445)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Include (27)  |  Interdependent (2)  |  Know (321)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Logic (187)  |  Malicious (2)  |  Microbe (17)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Neglect (23)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Part (146)  |  Pet (7)  |  Planet (199)  |  Policy (23)  |  Practical (93)  |  Practice (67)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Repercussion (4)  |  Ripple (3)  |  Simply (34)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Tinker (5)  |  Today (86)  |  Tree (143)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Wild (39)  |  Wildlife (11)  |  World (667)

Yet the widespread [planetary theories], advanced by Ptolemy and most other [astronomers], although consistent with the numerical [data], seemed likewise to present no small difficulty. For these theories were not adequate unless they also conceived certain equalizing circles, which made the planet appear to move at all times with uniform velocity neither on its deferent sphere nor about its own [epicycle's] center … Therefore, having become aware of these [defects], I often considered whether there could perhaps be found a more reasonable arrangement of circles, from which every apparent irregularity would be derived while everything in itself would move uniformly, as is required by the rule of perfect motion.
From Nicholaus Copernicus, Edward Rosen (trans.), Pawel Czartoryski (ed.) 'Commentariolus', in Nicholas Copernicus: Minor Works (1985), 81-83. Excerpted in Lisa M. Dolling, Arthur F. Gianelli and Glenn N. Statile (eds.) The Tests of Time: Readings in the Development of Physical Theory (2003), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Advanced (10)  |  Apparent (26)  |  Appear (55)  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Aware (18)  |  Center (30)  |  Circle (28)  |  Considered (10)  |  Defect (14)  |  Derived (5)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Epicycle (2)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Motion (127)  |  Move (58)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Planet (199)  |  Planetary (5)  |  Ptolemy (13)  |  Reasonable (18)  |  Required (4)  |  Rule (135)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Theory (582)  |  Time (439)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Velocity (14)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.