Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index Q > Category: Quicken

Quicken Quotes (7 quotes)

But for the persistence of a student of this university in urging upon me his desire to study with me the modern algebra I should never have been led into this investigation; and the new facts and principles which I have discovered in regard to it (important facts, I believe), would, so far as I am concerned, have remained still hidden in the womb of time. In vain I represented to this inquisitive student that he would do better to take up some other subject lying less off the beaten track of study, such as the higher parts of the calculus or elliptic functions, or the theory of substitutions, or I wot not what besides. He stuck with perfect respectfulness, but with invincible pertinacity, to his point. He would have the new algebra (Heaven knows where he had heard about it, for it is almost unknown in this continent), that or nothing. I was obliged to yield, and what was the consequence? In trying to throw light upon an obscure explanation in our text-book, my brain took fire, I plunged with re-quickened zeal into a subject which I had for years abandoned, and found food for thoughts which have engaged my attention for a considerable time past, and will probably occupy all my powers of contemplation advantageously for several months to come.
In Johns Hopkins Commemoration Day Address, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 3, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advantageous (10)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continent (76)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Engage (39)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Food (199)  |  Function (228)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Less (103)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modern (385)  |  Month (88)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Pertinacity (2)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probably (49)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Represent (155)  |  Several (32)  |  Stick (24)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Track (38)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  University (121)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Urge (17)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  Womb (24)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)  |  Zeal (11)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Framework (31)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (23)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proper (144)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rigid (24)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Solid (116)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (300)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Swing (11)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Transition (26)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

He who would know what geometry is, must venture boldly into its depths and learn to think and feel as a geometer. I believe that it is impossible to do this, and to study geometry as it admits of being studied and am conscious it can be taught, without finding the reason invigorated, the invention quickened, the sentiment of the orderly and beautiful awakened and enhanced, and reverence for truth, the foundation of all integrity of character, converted into a fixed principle of the mental and moral constitution, according to the old and expressive adage “abeunt studia in mores”.
In 'A probationary Lecture on Geometry, in Collected Mathematical Papers (1908), Vol. 2, 9. [The Latin phrase, “abeunt studia in mores” translates as “studies pass on into character”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Adage (4)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Convert (22)  |  Depth (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fix (25)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invigorate (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Venture (18)

I should rejoice to see … Euclid honourably shelved or buried “deeper than did ever plummet sound” out of the schoolboys’ reach; morphology introduced into the elements of algebra; projection, correlation, and motion accepted as aids to geometry; the mind of the student quickened and elevated and his faith awakened by early initiation into the ruling ideas of polarity, continuity, infinity, and familiarization with the doctrines of the imaginary and inconceivable.
From Presidential Address (1869) to the British Association, Exeter, Section A, collected in Collected Mathematical Papers of Lames Joseph Sylvester (1908), Vol. 2, 657. Also in George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 93. [Note: “plummet sound” refers to ocean depth measurement (sound) from a ship using a line dropped with a weight (plummet). —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Aid (97)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bury (16)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deep (233)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Early (185)  |  Element (310)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Faith (203)  |  Familiarization (2)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Initiation (7)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Motion (310)  |  Plummet (2)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Projection (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Rule (294)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Shelve (2)  |  Sound (183)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)

Mathematics … engages, it fructifies, it quickens, compels attention, is as circumspect as inventive, induces courage and self-confidence as well as modesty and submission to truth. It yields the essence and kernel of all things, is brief in form and overflows with its wealth of content. It discloses the depth and breadth of the law and spiritual element behind the surface of phenomena; it impels from point to point and carries within itself the incentive toward progress; it stimulates the artistic perception, good taste in judgment and execution, as well as the scientific comprehension of things.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 40. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behind (137)  |  Breadth (15)  |  Brief (36)  |  Carry (127)  |  Circumspect (2)  |  Compel (30)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Content (69)  |  Courage (69)  |  Depth (94)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Element (310)  |  Engage (39)  |  Essence (82)  |  Execution (25)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Impel (5)  |  Incentive (9)  |  Induce (22)  |  Inventive (8)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modesty (17)  |  Overflow (9)  |  Perception (97)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Confidence (9)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Submission (4)  |  Surface (209)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Yield (81)

Nature is no great mother who has borne us. She is our creation. It is our brain that she quickens to life. Things are because we see them, and what we see, and how we see it, depends on the Arts that have influenced us. To look at a thing is very different from seeing a thing. One does not see anything until one sees its beauty.
In 'Decay of Lying', The Writings of Oscar Wilde: Epigrams, Phrases and Philosophies For the Use of the Young (1907), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Brain (270)  |  Creation (327)  |  Depend (228)  |  Different (577)  |  Great (1574)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Thing (1915)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  America (127)  |  Arch (11)  |  Authority (95)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (149)  |  Class (164)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Common (436)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Emergency (10)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Era (51)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Face (212)  |  Fear (197)  |  Federal (6)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Ideology (14)  |  Important (209)  |  Individualism (3)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Intense (20)  |  Large (394)  |  Largely (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (232)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (40)  |  Modern (385)  |  National (26)  |  Native (38)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Organization (114)  |  Original (58)  |  Part (222)  |  Portray (4)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Private (23)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Public (96)  |  Range (99)  |  Recent (77)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Relax (2)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Response (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Save (118)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (326)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Stress (22)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toward (45)  |  Trend (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (13)  |  Value (365)  |  Widespread (22)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (933)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.