Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Formulation

Formulation Quotes (36 quotes)

A mathematical science is any body of propositions which is capable of an abstract formulation and arrangement in such a way that every proposition of the set after a certain one is a formal logical consequence of some or all the preceding propositions. Mathematics consists of all such mathematical sciences.
In Lectures on Fundamental Concepts of Algebra and Geometry (1911), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Body (537)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consist (223)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Formal (33)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Precede (23)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Way (1217)

Before an experiment can be performed, it must be planned—the question to nature must be formulated before being posed. Before the result of a measurement can be used, it must be interpreted—nature's answer must be understood properly. These two tasks are those of the theorist, who finds himself always more and more dependent on the tools of abstract mathematics. Of course, this does not mean that the experimenter does not also engage in theoretical deliberations. The foremost classical example of a major achievement produced by such a division of labor is the creation of spectrum analysis by the joint efforts of Robert Bunsen, the experimenter, and Gustav Kirchoff, the theorist. Since then, spectrum analysis has been continually developing and bearing ever richer fruit.
'The Meaning and Limits of Exact Science', Science (30 Sep 1949), 110, No. 2857, 325. Advance reprinting of chapter from book Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bearing (9)  |  Being (1278)  |  Robert Bunsen (8)  |  Classical (45)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Creation (327)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Development (422)  |  Division (65)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engage (39)  |  Example (94)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Find (998)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Himself (461)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Joint (31)  |  Kirchoff_Gustav (3)  |  Labor (107)  |  Major (84)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Plan (117)  |  Produced (187)  |  Properly (20)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Richness (14)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Task (147)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)

Dance … is life, or becomes it, in a way that other arts cannot attain. It is not in stone, or words or tones, but in our muscles. It is a formulation of their movements.
In Art Is Action: A Discussion of Nine Arts in a Modern World (1939), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Attain (125)  |  Become (815)  |  Dance (32)  |  Life (1795)  |  Movement (155)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Other (2236)  |  Stone (162)  |  Tone (22)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

During the time that [Karl] Landsteiner gave me an education in the field of imununology, I discovered that he and I were thinking about the serologic problem in very different ways. He would ask, What do these experiments force us to believe about the nature of the world? I would ask, What is the most. simple and general picture of the world that we can formulate that is not ruled by these experiments? I realized that medical and biological investigators were not attacking their problems the same way that theoretical physicists do, the way I had been in the habit of doing.
‘Molecular Disease’, Pfizer Spectrum (1958), 6:9, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Karl Landsteiner (8)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realization (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Everybody now wants to discover universal laws which will explain the structure and behavior of the nucleus of the atom. But actually our knowledge of the elementary particles that make up the nucleus is tiny. The situation calls for more modesty. We should first try to discover more about these elementary particles and about their laws. Then it will be the time for the major synthesis of what we really know, and the formulation of the universal law.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Call (769)  |  Discover (553)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elementary Particle (2)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Major (84)  |  Modesty (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Particle (194)  |  Situation (113)  |  Structure (344)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Try (283)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Framework (31)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (23)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proper (144)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rigid (24)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Solid (116)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (300)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Swing (11)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Transition (26)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

I am sure that one secret of a successful teacher is that he has formulated quite clearly in his mind what the pupil has got to know in precise fashion. He will then cease from half-hearted attempts to worry his pupils with memorising a lot of irrelevant stuff of inferior importance.
In 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Cease (79)  |  Education (378)  |  Heart (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lot (151)  |  Memorization (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Secret (194)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Will (2355)

I think that the formation of [DNA's] structure by Watson and Crick may turn out to be the greatest developments in the field of molecular genetics in recent years.
‘Discussion des rapports de M Pauling’, Rep. Institut International de Chemie Solvay: Conference on Proteins, 6-14 April 1953 (1953), 113.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Development (422)  |  DNA (77)  |  Field (364)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Recent (77)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Turn (447)  |  James Watson (33)  |  Year (933)

If an explanation is so vague in its inherent nature, or so unskillfully molded in its formulation, that specific deductions subject to empirical verification or refutation can not be based upon it, then it can never serve as a working hypothesis. A hypothesis with which one can not work is not a working hypothesis.
'Role of Analysis in Scientific Investigation', Bulletin of the Geological Society of America (1933), 44, 479.
Science quotes on:  |  Deduction (82)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Mold (33)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Specific (95)  |  Subject (521)  |  Vague (47)  |  Verification (31)  |  Work (1351)

In the strict formulation of the law of causality—if we know the present, we can calculate the future—it is not the conclusion that is wrong but the premise.
On an implication of the uncertainty principle.
Quoted in David C. Cassidy, Beyond Uncertainty: Heisenberg, Quantum Physics, and the Bomb (2009), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculate (54)  |  Causality (11)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Future (429)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Premise (37)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Wrong (234)

It is by mathematical formulation of its observations and measurements that a science is able to form mathematically expressed hypotheses, and it is through its hypotheses that a natural science is able to make predictions.
The Nature of Science, and Other Essays (1971), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (695)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observation (555)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Science (3879)  |  Through (849)

It is probable that the scheme of physics will be enlarged so as to embrace the behaviour of living organisms under the influence of life and mind. Biology and psychology are not alien sciences; their operations are not solely mechanical, nor can they be formulated by physics as it is today; but they belong to a physical universe, and their mode of action ought to be capable of being formulated in terms of an enlarged physics in the future, in which the ether will take a predominant place. On the other hand it may be thought that those entities cannot be brought to book so easily, and that they will always elude our ken. If so, there will be a dualism in the universe, which posterity will find staggering, but that will not alter the facts.
In Past Years: an Autobiography (1932), 350. Quoted in book review, Waldehar Kaempfert, 'Sir Oliver Lodge Stands by the Old Physics', New York Times (21 Feb 1932), BR5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Alien (34)  |  Alter (62)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Biology (216)  |  Book (392)  |  Capable (168)  |  Dualism (4)  |  Elude (10)  |  Eluding (2)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Future (429)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Predominance (3)  |  Probability (130)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Staggering (2)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

It is structure that we look for whenever we try to understand anything. All science is built upon this search; we investigate how the cell is built of reticular material, cytoplasm, chromosomes; how crystals aggregate; how atoms are fastened together; how electrons constitute a chemical bond between atoms. We like to understand, and to explain, observed facts in terms of structure. A chemist who understands why a diamond has certain properties, or why nylon or hemoglobin have other properties, because of the different ways their atoms are arranged, may ask questions that a geologist would not think of formulating, unless he had been similarly trained in this way of thinking about the world.
‘The Place of Chemistry In the Integration of the Sciences’, Main Currents in Modern Thought (1950), 7, 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Aggregation (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Bond (45)  |  Building (156)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Bond (5)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Cytoplasm (6)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Different (577)  |  Electron (93)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fastening (2)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Haemoglobin (4)  |  Hemoglobin (5)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Look (582)  |  Material (353)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Property (168)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

Logic is not concerned with human behavior in the same sense that physiology, psychology, and social sciences are concerned with it. These sciences formulate laws or universal statements which have as their subject matter human activities as processes in time. Logic, on the contrary, is concerned with relations between factual sentences (or thoughts). If logic ever discusses the truth of factual sentences it does so only conditionally, somewhat as follows: if such-and-such a sentence is true, then such-and-such another sentence is true. Logic itself does not decide whether the first sentence is true, but surrenders that question to one or the other of the empirical sciences.
Logic (1937). In The Language of Wisdom and Folly: Background Readings in Semantics (1967), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Concern (228)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Decision (91)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empirical Science (9)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Behavior (9)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Matter (798)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Process (423)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Statement (142)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)

Mathematics is of two kinds, Rigorous and Physical. The former is Narrow: the latter Bold and Broad. To have to stop to formulate rigorous demonstrations would put a stop to most physico-mathematical inquiries. Am I to refuse to eat because I do not fully understand the mechanism of digestion?
As quoted by Charles Melbourne Focken in Dimensional Methods and Their Applications (1953), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Bold (22)  |  Broad (27)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Former (137)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Physical (508)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Stop (80)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)

Morphological information has provided the greatest single source of data in the formulation and development of the theory of evolution and that even now, when the preponderance of work is experimental, the basis for interpretation in many areas of study remains the form and relationships of structures.
'Morphology, Paleontology, and Evolution', in Sol Tax (ed.), Evolution After Darwin, Vol. 1, The Evolution of Life (1960), 524.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Data (156)  |  Development (422)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Information (166)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Preponderance (2)  |  Provide (69)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Remain (349)  |  Single (353)  |  Source (93)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Work (1351)

No research will answer all queries that the future may raise. It is wiser to praise the work for what it has accomplished and then to formulate the problems still to be solved.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Future (429)  |  Praise (26)  |  Problem (676)  |  Query (4)  |  Raise (35)  |  Research (664)  |  Solution (267)  |  Still (613)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Work (1351)

One of the grandest generalizations formulated by modern biological science is that of the continuity of life; the protoplasmic activity within each living body now on earth has continued without cessation from the remote beginnings of life on our planet, and from that period until the present no single organism has ever arisen save in the form of a bit of living protoplasm detached from a pre-existing portion; the eternal flame of life once kindled upon this earth has passed from organism to organism, and is still, going on existing and propagating, incarnated within the myriad animal and plant forms of everyday life.
In History of the Human Body (1919), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Detach (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Flame (40)  |  Form (959)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Grandest (10)  |  Incarnation (3)  |  Kindled (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Modern (385)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Organism (220)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Planet (356)  |  Plant (294)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Remote (83)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Still (613)

Science is able to make cooperate catholics and mechanics, students and Nobel prize winners, because a common faith distributes the functions of workmanship despite all differences of rational formulation.
In 'The Scientific Grammar of Michael Faraday’s Diaries', Part I, 'The Classic of Science', A Classic and a Founder (1937), collected in Rosenstock-Huessy Papers (1981), Vol. 1, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Common (436)  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Despite (7)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Faith (203)  |  Function (228)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Rational (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Student (300)  |  Winner (3)  |  Workmanship (7)

Scientific discovery, or the formulation of scientific theory, starts in with the unvarnished and unembroidered evidence of the senses. It starts with simple observation—simple, unbiased, unprejudiced, naive, or innocent observation—and out of this sensory evidence, embodied in the form of simple propositions or declarations of fact, generalizations will grow up and take shape, almost as if some process of crystallization or condensation were taking place. Out of a disorderly array of facts, an orderly theory, an orderly general statement, will somehow emerge.
In 'Is the Scientific Paper Fraudulent?', The Saturday Review (1 Aug 1964), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Array (5)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Crystallization (2)  |  Declaration (10)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Embody (16)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Grow (238)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Naive (13)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Process (423)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Shape (72)  |  Simple (406)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Start (221)  |  Statement (142)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unbiased (7)  |  Unprejudiced (2)  |  Unvarnished (2)  |  Will (2355)

Since the beginning of physics, symmetry considerations have provided us with an extremely powerful and useful tool in our effort to understand nature. Gradually they have become the backbone of our theoretical formulation of physical laws.
Particle Physics and an Introduction to Field Theory (1981), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Backbone (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Effort (227)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)  |  Physics (533)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Useful (250)

That no generally applicable law of the formulation and development of hybrids has yet been successfully formulated can hardly astonish anyone who is acquainted with the extent of the task and who can appreciate the difficulties with which experiments of this kind have to contend.
'Experiments on Plant Hybrids' (1865). In Curt Stern and Eva R. Sherwood (eds.), The Origin of Genetics: A Mendel Source Book (1966), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extent (139)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Success (302)  |  Task (147)

The formulation of a problem is often more essential than its solution, which may be merely a matter of mathematical or experimental skill. To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle requires creative imagination and marks real advances in science.
In Albert Einstein and Léopold Infeld, The Evolution of Physics: The Growth of Ideas from Early Concepts to Relativity and Quanta (1938, 1966), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Essential (199)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Question (621)  |  Regard (305)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Solution (267)

The incomplete knowledge of a system must be an essential part of every formulation in quantum theory. Quantum theoretical laws must be of a statistical kind. To give an example: we know that the radium atom emits alpha-radiation. Quantum theory can give us an indication of the probability that the alpha-particle will leave the nucleus in unit time, but it cannot predict at what precise point in time the emission will occur, for this is uncertain in principle.
The Physicist's Conception of Nature (1958), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Alpha Particle (5)  |  Atom (355)  |  Emit (15)  |  Essential (199)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Indication (33)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Occur (150)  |  Particle (194)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Predict (79)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Radium (25)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Will (2355)

The mathematical formulation of the physicist’s often crude experience leads in an uncanny number of cases to an amazingly accurate description of a large class of phenomena. This shows that the mathematical language has more to commend it than being the only language which we can speak; it shows that it is, in a very real sense, the correct language.
In 'The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences,' Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics (Feb 1960), 13, No. 1 (February 1960). Collected in Eugene Paul Wigner, A.S. Wightman (ed.), Jagdish Mehra (ed.), The Collected Works of Eugene Paul Wigner (1955), Vol. 6, 542.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (164)  |  Commend (7)  |  Correct (86)  |  Crude (31)  |  Description (84)  |  Experience (467)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Sense (770)  |  Show (346)  |  Speak (232)  |  Uncanny (5)

The miracle of the appropriateness of the language of mathematics for the formulation of the laws of physics is a wonderful gift which we neither understand nor deserve.
In 'The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences', Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics (Feb 1960), 13, No. 1, 14. Collected in Eugene Paul Wigner, A.S. Wightman (ed.), Jagdish Mehra (ed.), The Collected Works of Eugene Paul Wigner (1955), Vol. 6, 537.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriateness (7)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Gift (104)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Understand (606)  |  Wonderful (149)

The opinion appears to be gaining ground that this very general conception of functionality, born on mathematical ground, is destined to supersede the narrower notion of causation, traditional in connection with the natural sciences. As an abstract formulation of the idea of determination in its most general sense, the notion of functionality includes and transcends the more special notion of causation as a one-sided determination of future phenomena by means of present conditions; it can be used to express the fact of the subsumption under a general law of past, present, and future alike, in a sequence of phenomena. From this point of view the remark of Huxley that Mathematics “knows nothing of causation” could only be taken to express the whole truth, if by the term “causation” is understood “efficient causation.” The latter notion has, however, in recent times been to an increasing extent regarded as just as irrelevant in the natural sciences as it is in Mathematics; the idea of thorough-going determinancy, in accordance with formal law, being thought to be alone significant in either domain.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appear (118)  |  Being (1278)  |  Born (33)  |  Causation (14)  |  Conception (154)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connection (162)  |  Destined (42)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Domain (69)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Express (186)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Formal (33)  |  Functionality (2)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  Huxley (2)  |  Idea (843)  |  Include (90)  |  Increase (210)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Latter (21)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  One-Sided (2)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Past (337)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Recent (77)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remark (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significant (74)  |  Special (184)  |  Subsumption (3)  |  Supersede (7)  |  Term (349)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

The quantum hypothesis will eventually find its exact expression in certain equations which will be a more exact formulation of the law of causality.
In Max Planck and James Vincent Murphy (trans.), Where is Science Going?, (1932), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Causality (11)  |  Certain (550)  |  Equation (132)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Will (2355)

The steady progress of physics requires for its theoretical formulation a mathematics which get continually more advanced. ... it was expected that mathematics would get more and more complicated, but would rest on a permanent basis of axioms and definitions, while actually the modern physical developments have required a mathematics that continually shifts its foundation and gets more abstract. Non-euclidean geometry and noncommutative algebra, which were at one time were considered to be purely fictions of the mind and pastimes of logical thinkers, have now been found to be very necessary for the description of general facts of the physical world. It seems likely that this process of increasing abstraction will continue in the future and the advance in physics is to be associated with continual modification and generalisation of the axioms at the base of mathematics rather than with a logical development of any one mathematical scheme on a fixed foundation.
Introduction to a paper on magnetic monopoles, 'Quantised singularities in the electromagnetic field', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Lonndon (1931), A, 133 60. In Helge Kragh, Dirac: a Scientific Biography (1990), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continual (43)  |  Continue (165)  |  Definition (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Pastime (4)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Physics (533)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Purely (109)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Shift (44)  |  Steady (44)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

These thoughts did not come in any verbal formulation. I rarely think in words at all. A thought comes, and I may try to express it in words afterward.
As quoted as a comment to an unnamed friend, “when discussing the genesis of his ideas,” in Howard W. Eves Mathematical Circles Adieu, (1977), 59. Eves also states that “Dr. Gerald Holton, professor of physics at Harvard University, believed Einstein’s habit, from infancy on, of thinking in concepts rather than words played a key role in Einstein’s scientific work.”
Science quotes on:  |  Afterward (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Express (186)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Word (619)

Thus one becomes entangled in contradictions if one speaks of the probable position of the electron without considering the experiment used to determine it ... It must also be emphasized that the statistical character of the relation depends on the fact that the influence of the measuring device is treated in a different manner than the interaction of the various parts of the system on one another. This last interaction also causes changes in the direction of the vector representing the system in the Hilbert space, but these are completely determined. If one were to treat the measuring device as a part of the system—which would necessitate an extension of the Hilbert space—then the changes considered above as indeterminate would appear determinate. But no use could be made of this determinateness unless our observation of the measuring device were free of indeterminateness. For these observations, however, the same considerations are valid as those given above, and we should be forced, for example, to include our own eyes as part of the system, and so on. The chain of cause and effect could be quantitatively verified only if the whole universe were considered as a single system—but then physics has vanished, and only a mathematical scheme remains. The partition of the world into observing and observed system prevents a sharp formulation of the law of cause and effect. (The observing system need not always be a human being; it may also be an inanimate apparatus, such as a photographic plate.)
The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory, trans. Carl Eckart and Frank C. Hoyt (1949), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electron (93)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extension (59)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Free (232)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Include (90)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  System (537)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vector (6)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

What has been learned in physics stays learned. People talk about scientific revolutions. The social and political connotations of revolution evoke a picture of a body of doctrine being rejected, to be replaced by another equally vulnerable to refutation. It is not like that at all. The history of physics has seen profound changes indeed in the way that physicists have thought about fundamental questions. But each change was a widening of vision, an accession of insight and understanding. The introduction, one might say the recognition, by man (led by Einstein) of relativity in the first decade of this century and the formulation of quantum mechanics in the third decade are such landmarks. The only intellectual casualty attending the discovery of quantum mechanics was the unmourned demise of the patchwork quantum theory with which certain experimental facts had been stubbornly refusing to agree. As a scientist, or as any thinking person with curiosity about the basic workings of nature, the reaction to quantum mechanics would have to be: “Ah! So that’s the way it really is!” There is no good analogy to the advent of quantum mechanics, but if a political-social analogy is to be made, it is not a revolution but the discovery of the New World.
From Physics Survey Committee, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, 'The Nature of Physics', in report Physics in Perspective (1973), 61-62. As cited in I. Bernard Cohen, Revolution in Science (1985), 554-555.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Basic (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Decade (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evoke (12)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Landmark (9)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New World (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Political (121)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Question (621)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Replace (31)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Revolution (12)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Whatever be the detail with which you cram your student, the chance of his meeting in after life exactly that detail is almost infinitesimal; and if he does meet it, he will probably have forgotten what you taught him about it. The really useful training yields a comprehension of a few general principles with a thorough grounding in the way they apply to a variety of concrete details. In subsequent practice the men will have forgotten your particular details; but they will remember by an unconscious common sense how to apply principles to immediate circumstances. Your learning is useless to you till you have lost your textbooks, burnt your lecture notes, and forgotten the minutiae which you learned by heart for the examination. What, in the way of detail, you continually require will stick in your memory as obvious facts like the sun and the moon; and what you casually require can be looked up in any work of reference. The function of a University is to enable you to shed details in favor of principles. When I speak of principles I am hardly even thinking of verbal formulations. A principle which has thoroughly soaked into you is rather a mental habit than a formal statement. It becomes the way the mind reacts to the appropriate stimulus in the form of illustrative circumstances. Nobody goes about with his knowledge clearly and consciously before him. Mental cultivation is nothing else than the satisfactory way in which the mind will function when it is poked up into activity.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Cram (5)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Favor (63)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minutiae (7)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remember (179)  |  Require (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Student (300)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sun (385)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Training (80)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

Without the discovery of uniformities there can be no concepts, no classifications, no formulations, no principles, no laws; and without these no science can exist.
Co-editor with American psychologist Henry Murray (1893-1988)
'Personality Formation: the Determinants'. In Clyde Kluckhohn and Henry A. Murray (eds.), Personality in Nature, Society, and Culture (1949), 37-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (97)  |  Concept (221)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exist (443)  |  Law (894)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  Uniformity (37)

Working on the final formulation of technological patents was a veritable blessing for me. It enforced many-sided thinking and also provided important stimuli to physical thought. Academia places a young person under a kind of compulsion to produce impressive quantities of scientific publications–a temptation to superficiality.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Enforce (11)  |  Final (118)  |  Important (209)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Kind (557)  |  Patent (33)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Place (177)  |  Produce (104)  |  Provide (69)  |  Publication (101)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Superficiality (4)  |  Technological (61)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Veritable (4)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

[T]he laws of quantum mechanics itself cannot be formulated … without recourse to the concept of consciousness.
From essay by Eugene Wigner, 'The Probability of the Existence of a Self-Reproducing Unit', contributed in M. Polanyi, The Logic of Personal Knowledge: Essays Presented to Michael Polanyi on his Seventieth Birthday, 11th March 1961 (1961), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (221)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Law (894)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Recourse (12)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.