Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Favor

Favor Quotes (63 quotes)
Favour Quotes


Dans les champs de l’observation le hasard ne favorise que les esprits préparés.
In the field of observation, chance favours only the prepared mind.
Inaugural Address as newly appointed Professor and Dean (Sep 1854) at the opening of the new Faculté des Sciences at Lille (7 Dec 1854). In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, translated by Mrs. R. L. Devonshire (1919), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (239)  |  Field (364)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observation (555)  |  Serendipity (15)

Question: State what are the conditions favourable for the formation of dew. Describe an instrument for determining the dew point, and the method of using it.
Answer: This is easily proved from question 1. A body of gas as it ascends expands, cools, and deposits moisture; so if you walk up a hill the body of gas inside you expands, gives its heat to you, and deposits its moisture in the form of dew or common sweat. Hence these are the favourable conditions; and moreover it explains why you get warm by ascending a hill, in opposition to the well-known law of the Conservation of Energy.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179, Question 12. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Body (537)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Deposition (4)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Determination (78)  |  Dew (9)  |  Easy (204)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gas (83)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hill (20)  |  Howler (15)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  State (491)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Use (766)  |  Walk (124)  |  Warm (69)  |  Well-Known (4)  |  Why (491)

[In refutation of evolution] There is not enough evidence, consistent evidence to make it as fact, and I say that because for theory to become a fact, it needs to consistently have the same results after it goes through a series of tests. The tests that they put—that they use to support evolution do not have consistent results. Now too many people are blindly accepting evolution as fact. But when you get down to the hard evidence, it’s merely a theory.
[In favor of the teaching of creationism alongside evolution in schools.]
From interview by Miles O'Brien on CNN (30 Mar 1996). Reported from transcript, via Nexis, in New York Magazine (15 Sep 2010).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Become (815)  |  Blind (95)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Consistently (8)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hard (243)  |  Merely (316)  |  People (1005)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Series (149)  |  Support (147)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)

A week or so after I learned that I was to receive the Miller Award, our president, Marty Morton, phoned and asked me if I would utter a few words of scientific wisdom as a part of the ceremony. Unfortunately for me, and perhaps for you, I agreed to do so. In retrospect I fear that my response was a serious error, because I do not feel wise. I do not know whether to attribute my response to foolhardiness, to conceit, to an inordinate susceptibility to flattery, to stupidity, or to some combination of these unfortunate attributes all of which I have been told are recognizable in my personality. Personally, I tend to favor stupidity, because that is a condition over which I have little control.
Bartholomew, April 1993, unpublished remarks when receiving the Miller Award from the Cooper Ornithological Society.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Award (13)  |  Ceremony (6)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flattery (7)  |  Inordinate (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Miller (2)  |  Part (222)  |  Personality (62)  |  Personally (7)  |  Phone (2)  |  President (31)  |  Receive (114)  |  Response (53)  |  Retrospect (2)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serious (91)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Susceptibility (3)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tend (124)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Utter (7)  |  Week (70)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Word (619)

Anybody who really wants to abolish war must resolutely declare himself in favor of his own country’s committing a portion of its sovereignty in favor of international institutions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abolish (12)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Commit (41)  |  Country (251)  |  Declare (45)  |  Himself (461)  |  Institution (69)  |  International (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Portion (84)  |  Really (78)  |  Resolutely (3)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Want (497)  |  War (225)

As to the Christian religion, Sir, … there is a balance in its favor from the number of great men who have been convinced of its truth after a serious consideration of the question. Grotius was an acute man, a lawyer, a man accustomed to examine evidence, and he was convinced. Grotius was not a recluse, but a man of the world, who surely had no bias on the side of religion. Sir Isaac Newton set out an infidel, and came to be a very firm believer.
(1763). In George Birkbeck Hill (ed.), Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1799), Vol. 1, 524.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Balance (77)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bias (20)  |  Christian (43)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Firm (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Infidel (3)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Man (2251)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Surely (101)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Evolution is a process which favors cooperating rather than disoperating groups and that “fitness” is a function of the group as a whole than of separate individuals. The fitness of the individual is largely derived from his membership on a group.
In On Being Human (1950), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Function (228)  |  Group (78)  |  Individual (404)  |  Membership (5)  |  Process (423)  |  Separate (143)  |  Whole (738)

Experimental evidence is strongly in favor of my argument that the chemical purity of the air is of no importance.
Lecturer on Physiology at London Hospital, in 'Impure Air Not Unhealthful If Stirred and Cooled,' in The New York Times, September 22, 1912.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Argument (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Importance (286)

I despise Birth-Control first because it is ... an entirely meaningless word; and is used so as to curry favour even with those who would first recoil from its real meaning. The proceeding these quack doctors recommend does not control any birth. ... But these people know perfectly well that they dare not write the plain word Birth-Prevention, in any one of the hundred places where they write the hypocritical word Birth-Control. They know as well as I do that the very word Birth-Prevention would strike a chill into the public... Therefore they use a conventional and unmeaning word, which may make the quack medicine sound more innocuous. ... A child is the very sign and sacrament of personal freedom. He is a fresh will added to the wills of the world; he is something that his parents have freely chosen to produce ... he is their own creative contribution to creation.
In 'Babies and Distributism', The Well and the Shadows (1935). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 272.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Child (307)  |  Choice (110)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Control (167)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Dare (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  First (1283)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hypocrite (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Parent (76)  |  People (1005)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Quack (18)  |  Real (149)  |  Recoil (6)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Sacrament (2)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Strike (68)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

I have been scientifically studying the traits and dispositions of the “lower animals” (so-called,) and contrasting them with the traits and dispositions of man. I find the result profoundly humiliating to me. For it obliges me to renounce my allegiance to the Darwinian theory of the Ascent of Man from the Lower Animals; since it now seems plain to me that that theory ought to be vacated in favor of a new and truer one, this new and truer one to be named the Descent of Man from the Higher Animals.
From 'Man's Place in the Animal World' (1896) in What is Man?: and Other Philosophical Writings (1973), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Call (769)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Descent Of Man (6)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Find (998)  |  Lower (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Oblige (6)  |  Renounce (5)  |  Result (677)  |  Scent (7)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Studying (70)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)

I have lived myself to see the disciples of Hoffman, Boerhaave, Stalh, Cullen, Brown, succeed one another like the shifting figures of a magic lanthern, and their fancies, like the dresses of the annual doll-babies from Paris, becoming from their novelty, the vogue of the day, and yielding to the next novelty their ephemeral favor. The patient, treated on the fashionable theory, sometimes gets well in spite of the medicine.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph (ed.), Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 4, 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Becoming (96)  |  Hermann Boerhaave (21)  |  Brown (23)  |  Sir Thomas Browne (22)  |  William Cullen (5)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Doll (2)  |  Dress (9)  |  Ephemeral (4)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Figure (160)  |  Magic (86)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Myself (212)  |  Next (236)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Patient (199)  |  Recovery (23)  |  See (1081)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Spite (55)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Succession (77)  |  Theory (970)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vogue (4)

I returned and saw under the sun that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.
Bible
Ecclesiastes 9:11. As given in the King James Version.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Battle (34)  |  Bread (39)  |  Chance (239)  |  Happen (274)  |  Race (268)  |  Return (124)  |  Riches (12)  |  Saw (160)  |  Skill (109)  |  Strong (174)  |  Sun (385)  |  Swift (12)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wise (131)

I stand in favor of using seeds and products that have a proven track record. … There is a big gap between what the facts are, and what the perceptions are. … I mean “genetically modified” sounds Frankensteinish. Drought-resistant sounds really like something you’d want.
Speech at Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) convention, San Diego (Jun 2014). Audio on AgWired website.
Science quotes on:  |  Drought (13)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Frankenstein (3)  |  Gap (33)  |  Mean (809)  |  Perception (97)  |  Product (160)  |  Record (154)  |  Seed (93)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Stand (274)  |  Term (349)  |  Track (38)  |  Track Record (4)  |  Want (497)

If we sink to the biochemical level, then the human being has lost a great many synthetic abilities possessed by other species and, in particular, by plants and microorganisms. Our loss of ability to manufacture a variety of vitamins makes us dependent on our diet and, therefore, on the greater synthetic versatility of other creatures. This is as much a “degenerative” change as the tapeworm’s abandonment of a stomach it no longer needs, but since we are prejudiced in our own favor, we don’t mention it.
In 'The Modern Demonology' (Jan 1962). Collected in Asimov on Physics (1976), 150.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Ability (152)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Change (593)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degenerative (2)  |  Diet (54)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Loss (110)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Mention (82)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Sink (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Tapeworm (2)  |  Variety (132)  |  Versatility (5)  |  Vitamin (13)

In logic, A asserts and B denies. Assertions being proverbially untrue, the presumption would be in favor of B’s innocence were it not that denials are notoriously false.
The Unabridged Devil’s Dictionary (2000), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Denial (17)  |  False (100)  |  Innocence (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Notorious (8)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Untrue (12)

In the fields of observation chance favors only the prepared mind.
In a lecture at the University of Lille, December 7, 1854.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (239)  |  Field (364)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observation (555)

It is inaccurate to say I hate everything. I am strongly in favor of common sense, common honesty, and common decency. This makes me forever ineligible for any public office.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Decency (4)  |  Everything (476)  |  Forever (103)  |  Hate (64)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Office (71)  |  Public (96)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strongly (9)

It is not error which opposes the progress of truth; it is indolence, obstinacy, the spirit of routine, every thing which favors inaction.
In Fielding Hudson Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine (1929), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (321)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Progress (465)  |  Routine (25)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)

It is said of Jacobi, that he attracted the particular attention and friendship of Böckh, the director of the philological seminary at Berlin, by the great talent he displayed for philology, and only at the end of two years’ study at the University, and after a severe mental struggle, was able to make his final choice in favor of mathematics.
In Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2 (1908), 661.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Attract (23)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Choice (110)  |  Director (2)  |  Display (56)  |  End (590)  |  Final (118)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  Karl Jacobi (10)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Particular (76)  |  Philological (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Severe (16)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Study (653)  |  Talent (94)  |  Two (937)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)

It is useless for the sheep to pass resolutions in favour of vegetarianism, while the wolf remains of a different opinion.
Dean Inge
In 'Patriotism' (Aug 1919), Outspoken Essays (1919), 42-43.
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Pass (238)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vegetarian (13)  |  Wolf (8)

It is well to remember that most arguments in favor of not trying an experiment are too flimsily based.
Quoted in a lecture published in Experientia, Supplementum II (1955), 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Base (117)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Flimsy (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Remember (179)  |  Trying (144)

Knowledge is never the exclusive possession of any favoured race; the whole world is inter-dependent and a constant stream of thought had through ages enriched the common heritage of mankind.
From 'Sir J.C. Bose’s Address', Benares Hindu University 1905-1935 (1936), 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Common (436)  |  Constant (144)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Inter (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Never (1087)  |  Possession (65)  |  Race (268)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Liebig himself seems to have occupied the role of a gate, or sorting-demon, such as his younger contemporary Clerk Maxwell once proposed, helping to concentrate energy into one favored room of the Creation at the expense of everything else.
Gravity's Rainbow (1973), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  Clerk (13)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Creation (327)  |  Demon (8)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everything (476)  |  Gate (32)  |  Himself (461)  |  Justus von Liebig (38)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Role (86)  |  Younger (21)

Many persons nowadays seem to think that any conclusion must be very scientific if the arguments in favor of it are derived from twitching of frogs’ legs—especially if the frogs are decapitated—and that—on the other hand—any doctrine chiefly vouched for by the feelings of human beings—with heads on their shoulders—must be benighted and superstitious.
Pragmatism: A New Name for Old Ways of Thinking (1907)
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Frog (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Leg (34)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Think (1086)

Natural historians tend to avoid tendentious preaching in this philosophical mode (although I often fall victim to such temptations in these essays). Our favored style of doubting is empirical: if I wish to question your proposed generality, I will search for a counterexample in flesh and blood. Such counterexamples exist in abundance, for the form a staple in a standard genre of writing in natural history–the “wonderment of oddity” or “strange ways of the beaver” tradition.
In 'Reversing Established Orders', Leonardo’s Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms (2011), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Blood (134)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Essay (27)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Form (959)  |  Generality (45)  |  Genre (3)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Mode (41)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Historian (2)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Often (106)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Preach (11)  |  Propose (23)  |  Question (621)  |  Search (162)  |  Standard (57)  |  Staple (3)  |  Strange (157)  |  Style (23)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Tend (124)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Victim (35)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonderment (2)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Alike (60)  |  Angle (20)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Back (390)  |  Beseech (3)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Death (388)  |  Decline (26)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Dial (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fix (25)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gold (97)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hold (95)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Inconclusive (3)  |  Incursion (2)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intent (8)  |  Kill (100)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Leave (130)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Move (216)  |  Murderer (3)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relate (21)  |  Roman (36)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sight (132)  |  Signal (27)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sword (15)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Transport (30)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

One can be deluded in favor of a proposition as well as against it. Reasons are often and for the most part only expositions of pretensions designed to give a coloring of legitimacy and rationality to something we would have done in any case.
Aphorism 50 in Notebook C (1772-1773), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Design (195)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Legitimacy (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reason (744)  |  Something (719)

Persons, who have a decided mathematical talent, constitute, as it were, a favored class. They bear the same relation to the rest of mankind that those who are academically trained bear to those who are not.
In Ueber die Anlage zur Mathematik (1900), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Bear (159)  |  Class (164)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Decide (41)  |  Favored (5)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Person (363)  |  Relation (157)  |  Rest (280)  |  Talent (94)  |  Train (114)

Persons, who have a decided mathematical talent, constitute, as it were, a favored class. They bear the same relation to the rest of mankind that those who are academically trained bear to those who are not.
In Ueber die Anlage zur Mathematik (1900), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Class (164)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Person (363)  |  Rest (280)  |  Talent (94)  |  Train (114)

PROJECTILE, n. The final arbiter in international disputes. Formerly these disputes were settled by physical contact of the disputants, with such simple arguments as the rudimentary logic of the times could supply —the sword, the spear, and so forth. With the growth of prudence in military affairs the projectile came more and more into favor, and is now held in high esteem by the most courageous. Its capital defect is that it requires personal attendance at the point of propulsion.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  268.
Science quotes on:  |  Ammunition (2)  |  Argument (138)  |  Contact (65)  |  Defect (31)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Final (118)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  Humour (116)  |  International (37)  |  Logic (287)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Projectile (3)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Require (219)  |  Settled (34)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spear (6)  |  Supply (93)  |  Sword (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  War (225)

Radiant energy, which at the beginning [of the universe] played a predominant role in the evolutionary process, gradually lost its importance and by the end of the thirty-millionth year yielded its priority in favor of ordinary atomic matter.
In The Creation of the Universe (1952, 2012), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Beginning (305)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Importance (286)  |  Matter (798)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Predominant (3)  |  Process (423)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Role (86)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

RAILROAD, n. The chief of many mechanical devices enabling us to get away from where we are to where we are no better off. For this purpose the railroad is held in highest favor by the optimist, for it permits him to make the transit with great expedition.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  273.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Chief (97)  |  Device (70)  |  Expedition (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Humour (116)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Optimist (8)  |  Permit (58)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Railroad (32)

Religion shows a pattern of heredity which I think is similar to genetic heredity. ... There are hundreds of different religious sects, and every religious person is loyal to just one of these. ... The overwhelming majority just happen to choose the one their parents belonged to. Not the sect that has the best evidence in its favour, the best miracles, the best moral code, the best cathedral, the best stained-glass, the best music when it comes to choosing from the smorgasbord of available religions, their potential virtues seem to count for nothing compared to the matter of heredity.
From edited version of a speech, at the Edinburgh International Science Festival (15 Apr 1992), as reprinted from the Independent newspaper in Alec Fisher, The Logic of Real Arguments (2004), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (78)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Best (459)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Choose (112)  |  Code (31)  |  Count (105)  |  Different (577)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Glass (92)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Loyal (5)  |  Majority (66)  |  Matter (798)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Moral (195)  |  Music (129)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Person (363)  |  Potential (69)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Sect (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Stained Glass (2)  |  Think (1086)  |  Virtue (109)

Science is often regarded as the most objective and truth-directed of human enterprises, and since direct observation is supposed to be the favored route to factuality, many people equate respectable science with visual scrutiny–just the facts ma’am, and palpably before my eyes. But science is a battery of observational and inferential methods, all directed to the testing of propositions that can, in principle, be definitely proven false ... At all scales, from smallest to largest, quickest to slowest, many well-documented conclusions of science lie beyond the strictly limited domain of direct observation. No one has ever seen an electron or a black hole, the events of a picosecond or a geological eon.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Battery (12)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Direct (225)  |  Domain (69)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Eon (11)  |  Equate (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Factuality (2)  |  False (100)  |  Favored (5)  |  Geological (11)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inferential (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observational (15)  |  Often (106)  |  Palpably (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quick (13)  |  Regard (305)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Route (15)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  See (1081)  |  Slow (101)  |  Small (477)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Visual (15)

Since natural selection demands only adequacy, elegance of design is not relevant; any combination of behavioural adjustment, physiological regulation, or anatomical accommodation that allows survival and reproduction may be favoured by selection. Since all animals are caught in a phylogenetic trap by the nature of past evolutionary adjustments, it is to be expected that a given environmental challenge will be met in a variety of ways by different animals. The delineation of the patterns of the accommodations of diverse types of organisms to the environment contributes much of the fascination of ecologically relevant physiology.
In 'The roles of physiology and behaviour in the maintenance of homeostasis in the desert environment.', Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology (1964), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Anatomical (3)  |  Animal (617)  |  Catch (31)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Demand (123)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Give (202)  |  Meet (31)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Phylogenetic (3)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Survival (94)  |  Trap (6)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Study the hindrances, acquaint yourself with the causes which have led up to the disease. Don’t guess at them, but know them through and through if you can; and if you do not know them, know that you do not, and still inquire. “Cannot” is a word for the idle, the indifferent, the self-satisfied, but it is not admissible in science. “I do not know” is manly if it does not stop there, but to say “I cannot” is a judgment both entirely illogical, and in itself bad as favouring rest in ignorance.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lix.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Admissible (6)  |  Bad (180)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hindrance (6)  |  Idle (33)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Illogical (2)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Manly (2)  |  Rest (280)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Satisfied (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Stop (80)  |  Study (653)  |  Through (849)  |  Word (619)

Television will enormously enlarge the eye's range, and, like radio, will advertise the Elsewhere. Together with the tabs, the mags, and the movies, it will insist that we forget the primary and the near in favor of the secondary and the remote.
In 'Removal' (Jul 1938), collected in One Man's Meat (1942), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Elsewhere (10)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Eye (419)  |  Forget (115)  |  Insist (20)  |  Magazine (24)  |  Movie (16)  |  Primary (80)  |  Radio (50)  |  Range (99)  |  Remote (83)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Tabloid (2)  |  Television (30)  |  Together (387)  |  Will (2355)

The fundamental characteristic of the scientific method is honesty. In dealing with any question, science asks no favors. ... I believe that constant use of the scientific method must in the end leave its impress upon him who uses it. ... A life spent in accordance with scientific teachings would be of a high order. It would practically conform to the teachings of the highest types of religion. The motives would be different, but so far as conduct is concerned the results would be practically identical.
Address as its retiring president, to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, St. Louis (28 Dec 1903). 'Scientific Investigation and Progress', Nature 928 Jan 1904), 69:1787, 309.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Constant (144)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  End (590)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  High (362)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Identical (53)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impression (114)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Spent (85)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)

The history of this paper suggests that highly speculative investigations, especially by an unknown author, are best brought before the world through some other channel than a scientific society, which naturally hesitates to admit into its printed records matters of uncertain value. Perhaps one may go further and say that a young author who believes himself capable of great things would usually do well to secure the favourable recognition of the scientific world by work whose scope is limited and whose value is easily judged, before embarking upon higher flights.
'On the Physics of Media that are Composed of Free and Perfectly Elastic Molecules in a State of Motion', Philosophical Transactions (1892), 183, 560.
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (17)  |  Author (167)  |  Best (459)  |  Capable (168)  |  Channel (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embarkation (2)  |  Flight (98)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hesitate (22)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Matter (798)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Record (154)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scope (45)  |  Society (326)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees, in every object, only the traits which favor that theory.
In Letter (20 Sep 1787) to Charles Thompson. Collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph, Memoirs, Correspondence, and Private Papers of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 2, 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Form (959)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Moment (253)  |  Object (422)  |  Person (363)  |  See (1081)  |  Theory (970)  |  Trait (22)

The patent system was established, I believe, to protect the lone inventor. In this it has not succeeded. … The patent system protects the institutions which favor invention
'Inventors I Have Known', in Philip Alger, The Human Side of Engineering (1972), 137). Cited in David F. Noble, America By Design (1979), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Institution (69)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Patent (33)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Succeed (109)  |  System (537)

The ravages committed by man subvert the relations and destroy the balance which nature had established between her organized and her inorganic creations; and she avenges herself upon the intruder, by letting loose upon her defaced provinces destructive energies hitherto kept in check by organic forces destined to be his best auxiliaries, but which he has unwisely dispersed and driven from the field of action. When the forest is gone, the great reservoir of moisture stored up in its vegetable mould is evaporated, and returns only in deluges of rain to wash away the parched dust into which that mould has been converted. The well-wooded and humid hills are turned to ridges of dry rock, which encumbers the low grounds and chokes the watercourses with its debris, and–except in countries favored with an equable distribution of rain through the seasons, and a moderate and regular inclination of surface–the whole earth, unless rescued by human art from the physical degradation to which it tends, becomes an assemblage of bald mountains, of barren, turfless hills, and of swampy and malarious plains. There are parts of Asia Minor, of Northern Africa, of Greece, and even of Alpine Europe, where the operation of causes set in action by man has brought the face of the earth to a desolation almost as complete as that of the moon; and though, within that brief space of time which we call “the historical period,” they are known to have been covered with luxuriant woods, verdant pastures, and fertile meadows, they are now too far deteriorated to be reclaimable by man, nor can they become again fitted for human use, except through great geological changes, or other mysterious influences or agencies of which we have no present knowledge, and over which we have no prospective control. The earth is fast becoming an unfit home for its noblest inhabitant, and another era of equal human crime and human improvidence, and of like duration with that through which traces of that crime and that improvidence extend, would reduce it to such a condition of impoverished productiveness, of shattered surface, of climatic excess, as to threaten the depravation, barbarism, and perhaps even extinction of the species.
Man and Nature, (1864), 42-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Africa (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Balance (77)  |  Balance Of Nature (4)  |  Barbarism (7)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Best (459)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Control (167)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crime (38)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dust (64)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Excess (22)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Face (212)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Historical (70)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impoverished (3)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Mold (33)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Prospective (7)  |  Province (35)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Regular (46)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Return (124)  |  Rock (161)  |  Season (47)  |  Set (394)  |  Shattered (8)  |  Space (500)  |  Species (401)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tend (124)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Verdant (2)  |  Wash (21)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wood (92)

The story of a theory’s failure often strikes readers as sad and unsatisfying. Since science thrives on self-correction, we who practice this most challenging of human arts do not share such a feeling. We may be unhappy if a favored hypothesis loses or chagrined if theories that we proposed prove inadequate. But refutation almost always contains positive lessons that overwhelm disappointment, even when no new and comprehensive theory has yet filled the void.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correction (40)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Do (1908)  |  Failure (161)  |  Favored (5)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Lose (159)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Often (106)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Positive (94)  |  Practice (204)  |  Propose (23)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reader (40)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Correction (2)  |  Share (75)  |  Story (118)  |  Strike (68)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Unsatisfying (3)  |  Void (31)

The velocity of light is one of the most important of the fundamental constants of Nature. Its measurement by Foucault and Fizeau gave as the result a speed greater in air than in water, thus deciding in favor of the undulatory and against the corpuscular theory. Again, the comparison of the electrostatic and the electromagnetic units gives as an experimental result a value remarkably close to the velocity of light–a result which justified Maxwell in concluding that light is the propagation of an electromagnetic disturbance. Finally, the principle of relativity gives the velocity of light a still greater importance, since one of its fundamental postulates is the constancy of this velocity under all possible conditions.
Studies in Optics (1927), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (144)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Electromagnetic (2)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Jean-Bernard-Léon Foucault (3)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Greater (288)  |  Importance (286)  |  Light (607)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Possible (552)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Result (677)  |  Speed (65)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Still (613)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unit (33)  |  Value (365)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)

The Wegener hypothesis has been so stimulating and has such fundamental implications in geology as to merit respectful and sympathetic interest from every geologist. Some striking arguments in his favor have been advanced, and it would be foolhardy indeed to reject any concept that offers a possible key to the solution of profound problems in the Earth's history.
Published while geologists remained sceptical of Alfred Wegener's idea of Continental Drift, Though unconvinced, he published these thoughts suggesting that critics should be at least be open-minded. His patience was proven justified when two decades later, the theory of plate tectonics provided a mechanism for the motion of the continents.
Some Thoughts on the Evidence for Continental Drift (1944).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Argument (138)  |  Concept (221)  |  Continent (76)  |  Continental Drift (10)  |  Decade (59)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Patience (56)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Profound (104)  |  Reject (63)  |  Remain (349)  |  Solution (267)  |  Striking (48)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Alfred L. Wegener (8)

The wonderful structure of the animal system will probably never permit us to look upon it as a merely physical apparatus, yet the demands of science require that the evidently magnified principles of vitality should be reduced to their natural spheres, or if truth requires, wholly subverted in favor of those more cognizable by the human understanding. The spirit of the age will not tolerate in the devotee of science a quiet indifference. ...
In 'An Inquiry, Analogical and Experimental, into the Different Electrical conditions of Arterial and Venous Blood', New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal (1853-4), 10, 584-602 & 738-757. As cited in George B. Roth, 'Dr. John Gorrie—Inventor of Artificial Ice and Mechanical Refrigeration', The Scientific Monthly (May 1936) 42 No. 5, 464-469.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Demand (123)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Look (582)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Permit (58)  |  Physical (508)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Structure (344)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)

There is a genuine thirst for scientific knowledge in most homes. Satisfying that thirst will, I believe, create a friendly attitude toward science and scientists which will favor the cause of science in the future. Science needs an informed and friendly public to back it up.
[Stating the goals of his NBC TV show, Nature of Things, which first aired on 5 Feb 1948.]
'Televising Science'. Physics Today (Jan 1949), 2, 26. Quoted in Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette, Science on the Air (2008), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Cause (541)  |  Create (235)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Goal (145)  |  Home (170)  |  Inform (47)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

There seem to be but three ways for a nation to acquire wealth: the first is by war, as the Romans did, in plundering their conquered neighbors—this is robbery; the second by commerce, which is generally cheating; the third by agriculture, the only honest way, wherein man receives a real increase of the seed thrown into the ground, in a kind of continual miracle, wrought by the hand of God in his favor, as a reward for his innocent life and his virtuous industry.
In 'Positions to be Examined', The Works of Benjamin Franklin Consisting of Essays, Humorous, Moral and Literary (1824), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Cheating (2)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Continual (43)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  Honest (50)  |  Increase (210)  |  Industry (137)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Nation (193)  |  Plunder (6)  |  Real (149)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reward (68)  |  Robbery (6)  |  Roman (36)  |  Seed (93)  |  Throw (43)  |  Virtuous (9)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wealth (94)

Two extreme views have always been held as to the use of mathematics. To some, mathematics is only measuring and calculating instruments, and their interest ceases as soon as discussions arise which cannot benefit those who use the instruments for the purposes of application in mechanics, astronomy, physics, statistics, and other sciences. At the other extreme we have those who are animated exclusively by the love of pure science. To them pure mathematics, with the theory of numbers at the head, is the only real and genuine science, and the applications have only an interest in so far as they contain or suggest problems in pure mathematics.
Of the two greatest mathematicians of modern tunes, Newton and Gauss, the former can be considered as a representative of the first, the latter of the second class; neither of them was exclusively so, and Newton’s inventions in the science of pure mathematics were probably equal to Gauss’s work in applied mathematics. Newton’s reluctance to publish the method of fluxions invented and used by him may perhaps be attributed to the fact that he was not satisfied with the logical foundations of the Calculus; and Gauss is known to have abandoned his electro-dynamic speculations, as he could not find a satisfying physical basis. …
Newton’s greatest work, the Principia, laid the foundation of mathematical physics; Gauss’s greatest work, the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, that of higher arithmetic as distinguished from algebra. Both works, written in the synthetic style of the ancients, are difficult, if not deterrent, in their form, neither of them leading the reader by easy steps to the results. It took twenty or more years before either of these works received due recognition; neither found favour at once before that great tribunal of mathematical thought, the Paris Academy of Sciences. …
The country of Newton is still pre-eminent for its culture of mathematical physics, that of Gauss for the most abstract work in mathematics.
In History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1903), 630.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Academy (35)  |  Academy Of Sciences (4)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animated (5)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Basis (173)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cease (79)  |  Class (164)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contain (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deterrent (2)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Due (141)  |  Easy (204)  |  Equal (83)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluxion (7)  |  Fluxions (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Head (81)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invent (51)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Laid (7)  |  Latter (21)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paris (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Preeminent (5)  |  Principia (13)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publish (36)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reader (40)  |  Real (149)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Representative (14)  |  Result (677)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Snake (26)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Style (23)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tribunal (2)  |  Tune (19)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

Until its results have gone through the painful process of publication, preferably in a refereed journal of high standards, scientific research is just play. Publication is an indispensable part of science. “Publish or perish” is not an indictment of the system of academia; it is a partial prescription for creativity and innovation. Sustained and substantial publication favors creativity. Novelty of conception has a large component of unpredictability. ... One is often a poor judge of the relative value of his own creative efforts. An artist’s ranking of his own works is rarely the same as that of critics or of history. Most scientists have had similar experiences. One’s supply of reprints for a pot-boiler is rapidly exhausted, while a major monograph that is one’s pride and joy goes unnoticed. The strategy of choice is to increase the odds favoring creativity by being productive.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 233-234.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academia (4)  |  Artist (90)  |  Being (1278)  |  Choice (110)  |  Component (48)  |  Conception (154)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Critic (20)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Experience (467)  |  Favored (5)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indictment (2)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Journal (30)  |  Joy (107)  |  Judge (108)  |  Large (394)  |  Major (84)  |  Monograph (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Odds (6)  |  Often (106)  |  Painful (11)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Perish (50)  |  Play (112)  |  Poor (136)  |  Preferably (2)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Pride (78)  |  Process (423)  |  Productive (32)  |  Publication (101)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Referee (7)  |  Relative (39)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Similar (36)  |  Standard (57)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Supply (93)  |  Sustain (46)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)

Wallace’s error on human intellect arose from the in adequacy of his rigid selectionism, not from a failure to apply it. And his argument repays our study today, since its flaw persists as the weak link in many of the most ‘modern’ evolutionary speculations of our current literature. For Wallace’s rigid selectionism is much closer than Darwin’s pluralism to the attitude embodied in our favored theory today, which, ironically in this context, goes by the name of ‘Neo-Darwinism.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Close (69)  |  Closer (43)  |  Context (29)  |  Current (118)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Embody (16)  |  Error (321)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Failure (161)  |  Favored (5)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Ironically (2)  |  Link (43)  |  Literature (103)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Persist (11)  |  Pluralism (3)  |  Repay (3)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Today (314)  |  Weak (71)

We fondly imagine that evolution drives toward higher intelligence. But eagles would think evolution favored flight, elephants would naturally prefer the importance of great strength. Sharks would feel that swimming was the ultimate desirable trait, and eminent Victorians would be quite convinced that evolution preferred Victorians.
Eater (2000). In Gary Westfahl, Science Fiction Quotations: From the Inner Mind to the Outer Limits (2006), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Desirable (33)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flight (98)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Shark (10)  |  Strength (126)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Victorian (6)

We need go back only a few centuries to find the great mass of people depending on religion for the satisfaction of practically all their wishes. From rain out of the sky to good health on earth, they sought their desires at the altars of their gods. Whether they wanted large families, good crops, freedom from pestilence, or peace of mind, they conceived themselves as dependent on the favor of heaven. Then science came with its alternative, competitive method of getting what we want. That is science’s most important attribute. As an intellectual influence it is powerful enough, but as a practical way of achieving man’s desires it is overwhelming.
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieving (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Altar (10)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Back (390)  |  Century (310)  |  Conceived (3)  |  Crop (25)  |  Desire (204)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enough (340)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Freedom (129)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Health (193)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Important (209)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peace Of Mind (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Practical (200)  |  Rain (62)  |  Religion (361)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sky (161)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

Well, evolution is a theory. It is also a fact. And facts and theories are different things, not rungs in a hierarchy of increasing certainty. Facts are the world’s data. Theories are structures of ideas that explain and interpret facts. Facts do not go away while scientists debate rival theories for explaining them. Einstein’s theory of gravitation replaced Newton’s, but apples did not suspend themselves in mid-air pending the outcome. And human beings evolved from apelike ancestors whether they did so by Darwin’s proposed mechanism or by some other, yet to be discovered … Evolutionists make no claim for perpetual truth, though creationists often do (and then attack us for a style of argument that they themselves favor).
'Evolution as Fact and Theory', in Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1983), 254-255.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Apple (40)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attack (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Data (156)  |  Debate (38)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pending (2)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Rival (19)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Structure (344)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Whatever be the detail with which you cram your student, the chance of his meeting in after life exactly that detail is almost infinitesimal; and if he does meet it, he will probably have forgotten what you taught him about it. The really useful training yields a comprehension of a few general principles with a thorough grounding in the way they apply to a variety of concrete details. In subsequent practice the men will have forgotten your particular details; but they will remember by an unconscious common sense how to apply principles to immediate circumstances. Your learning is useless to you till you have lost your textbooks, burnt your lecture notes, and forgotten the minutiae which you learned by heart for the examination. What, in the way of detail, you continually require will stick in your memory as obvious facts like the sun and the moon; and what you casually require can be looked up in any work of reference. The function of a University is to enable you to shed details in favor of principles. When I speak of principles I am hardly even thinking of verbal formulations. A principle which has thoroughly soaked into you is rather a mental habit than a formal statement. It becomes the way the mind reacts to the appropriate stimulus in the form of illustrative circumstances. Nobody goes about with his knowledge clearly and consciously before him. Mental cultivation is nothing else than the satisfactory way in which the mind will function when it is poked up into activity.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Cram (5)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Form (959)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minutiae (7)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remember (179)  |  Require (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Student (300)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sun (385)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Training (80)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

When not protected by law, by popular favor or superstition, or by other special circumstances, [birds] yield very readily to the influences of civilization, and, though the first operations of the settler are favorable to the increase of many species, the great extension of rural and of mechanical industry is, in a variety of ways, destructive even to tribes not directly warred upon by man.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 93-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Bird (149)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Favorable (24)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Increase (210)  |  Industry (137)  |  Influence (222)  |  Law (894)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Popular (29)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Rural (6)  |  Settler (2)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Variety (132)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Yield (81)

When the intensity of emotional conviction subsides, a man who is in the habit of reasoning will search for logical grounds in favor of the belief which he finds in himself.
In Mysticism and Logic (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Find (998)  |  Ground (217)  |  Habit (168)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Search (162)  |  Subside (5)  |  Will (2355)

While the nature of Texas fever is by no means made clear as yet, we are able to affirm that ticks can produce it. Whether the disease can be transmitted by any other agency must be decided by future investigations. Meanwhile the evidence accumulated thus far seems to favor very strongly the dictum: No ticks, no Texas fever.
'Investigations of the Infectious Diseases of Animals', in Report of the Bureau of Animal Industry (1889-90), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (14)  |  Decision (91)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Disease (328)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fever (29)  |  Future (429)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Production (183)  |  Tick (9)  |  Transmission (34)

Why may we not add Geology to the list of poetical sciences? Why shall not that science, which is the second science in eras and magnitudes, and the first, in affording scope for the imagination, be brought into favor with the Muses and afford themes for the Poet?
In 'The Poetry of Geology', The Indicator, 1849, 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Era (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Geology (220)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Muse (10)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Theme (17)  |  Why (491)

You bring me the deepest joy that can be felt by a man [Pasteur himself] whose invincible belief is that Science and Peace will triumph over Ignorance and War, that nations will unite, not to destroy, but to build, and that the future will belong to those who will have done most for suffering humanity. But whether our efforts are or are not favored by life, let us be able to say, when we come near to the great goal, “I have done what I could.”
Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, France (27 Dec 1892) where his 70th birth was recognized. His son presented the speech due to the weakness of Pastuer's voice. In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, R. L. Devonshire (trans.) (1902), Vol. 2, 297.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Bring (90)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Deepest (4)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Effort (227)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Peace (108)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Unite (42)  |  Unity (78)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)

[N]o scientist likes to be criticized. … But you don’t reply to critics: “Wait a minute, wait a minute; this is a really good idea. I’m very fond of it. It’s done you no harm. Please don’t attack it.” That's not the way it goes. The hard but just rule is that if the ideas don't work, you must throw them away. Don't waste any neurons on what doesn’t work. Devote those neurons to new ideas that better explain the data. Valid criticism is doing you a favor.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attack (84)  |  Better (486)  |  Critic (20)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Data (156)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Harm (39)  |  Idea (843)  |  Minute (125)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neuron (9)  |  New (1216)  |  Please (65)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Validity (47)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

[Reading a cartoon story,] the boy favored reading over reality. Adults might have characterized him in any number of negative ways—as uninquisitive, uninvolved, apathetic about the world around him and his place in it. I’ve often wondered: Are many adults much different when they read the scriptures of their respective faiths?
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Apathetic (2)  |  Boy (94)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Different (577)  |  Faith (203)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Involved (90)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Story (118)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

[T]here are some common animal behaviors that seem to favor the development of intelligence, behaviors that might lead to brainy beasts on many worlds. Social interaction is one of them. If you're an animal that hangs out with others, then there's clearly an advantage in being smart enough to work out the intentions of the guy sitting next to you (before he takes your mate or your meal). And if you're clever enough to outwit the other members of your social circle, you'll probably have enhanced opportunity to breed..., thus passing on your superior intelligence. ... Nature—whether on our planet or some alien world—will stumble into increased IQ sooner or later.
Seth Shostak, Alex Barnett, Cosmic Company: the Search for Life in the Universe (2003), 62 & 67.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alien (34)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Behavior (10)  |  Beast (55)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Circle (110)  |  Clever (38)  |  Common (436)  |  Development (422)  |  Enhancement (5)  |  Enough (340)  |  Hang (45)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intention (46)  |  Interaction (46)  |  IQ (5)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mate (6)  |  Meal (18)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outwit (6)  |  Passing (76)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Smart (26)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Superior (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.