Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Substantial

Substantial Quotes (7 quotes)

All of our experience indicates that life can manifest itself only in a concrete form, and that it is bound to certain substantial loci. These loci are cells and cell formations. But we are far from seeking the last and highest level of understanding in the morphology of these loci of life. Anatomy does not exclude physiology, but physiology certainly presupposes anatomy. The phenomena that the physiologist investigates occur in special organs with quite characteristic anatomical arrangements; the various morphological parts disclosed by the anatomist are the bearers of properties or, if you will, of forces probed by the physiologist; when the physiologist has established a law, whether through physical or chemical investigation, the anatomist can still proudly state: This is the structure in which the law becomes manifest.
In 'Cellular-Pathologie', Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und fur klinische Medizin (1855), 8, 19, as translated in LellandJ. Rather, 'Cellular Pathology', Disease, Life, and Man: Selected Essays by Rudolf Virchow (1958), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Cell (125)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Law (418)  |  Level (51)  |  Life (917)  |  Locus (3)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Organ (60)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physiologist (12)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Pride (45)  |  Probe (6)  |  Property (96)  |  Seeking (30)  |  Structure (191)  |  Understanding (317)

Habit is a powerful means of advancement, and the habit of eternal vigilance and diligence, rarely fails to bring a substantial reward.
Quoted, without citation, in front matter to T. A. Edison Foundation, Lewis Howard Latimer: A Black Inventor: a Biography and Related Experiments You Can Do (1973). If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Diligence (14)  |  Fail (34)  |  Habit (78)  |  Reward (38)  |  Vigilance (3)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (54)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Corpse (5)  |  Crown (19)  |  Death (270)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Effort (94)  |  Hero (29)  |  History (302)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Love (164)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Pain (82)  |  Part (146)  |  Patriot (3)  |  Pedestal (2)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Render (17)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Sake (17)  |  Scholar (31)  |  Statue (9)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)

Ninety-nine [students] out of a hundred are automata, careful to walk in prescribed paths, careful to follow the prescribed custom. This is not an accident but the result of substantial education, which, scientifically defined, is the subsumption of the individual.
As quoted in various 21st century books, each time cited only as from the The Philosophy of Education (1906), with no page number. For example, in John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind of Teacher: Solving the Crisis of American Schooling (2000), 61. Note: Webmaster is suspicious of the attribution of this quote. The Library of Congress lists no such title by Harris in 1906. The LOC does catalog this title by Harris for 1893, which is a 9-page pamphlet printing the text of a series of five lectures. These lectures do not contain this quote. William Torrey Harris was editor of the International Education Series of books, of which Vol. 1 was the translation by Anna Callender Bracket of The Philosophy of Education by Johann Karl Friedrich Rosenkranz (2nd ed. rev. 1886). The translation was previously published in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy (1872, -73, -74), Vols vi-viii. Webmaster does not find the quote in that book, either. Webmaster has so far been unable to verify this quote, in these words, or even find the quote in any 19th or 20th century publication (which causes more suspicion). If you have access to the primary source for this quote, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Automaton (6)  |  Custom (24)  |  Definition (152)  |  Education (280)  |  Individual (177)  |  Path (59)  |  Prescribed (3)  |  Student (131)  |  Subsumption (2)

Of plain, sound sense, life’s current coin is made; With that we drive the most substantial trade.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Coin (9)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Current (43)  |  Drive (38)  |  Life (917)  |  Plain (24)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sound (59)  |  Trade (24)

The exterior appearance of human life is but the material embodiment, the substantial expression, of thought—the hieroglyphic writing of the soul.
In 'Genius', Wellman’s Miscellany (Dec 1871), 4, No. 6, 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Embodiment (5)  |  Expression (82)  |  Exterior (3)  |  Hieroglyphic (3)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Material (124)  |  Soul (139)  |  Thought (374)  |  Writing (72)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Act (80)  |  Age (137)  |  America (74)  |  Authority (50)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Beginnings (2)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (71)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Common (92)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (4)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Dislike (11)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Emergency (6)  |  Eminently (2)  |  Emphasize (6)  |  Enterprise (20)  |  Era (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Face (69)  |  Fear (113)  |  Federal (5)  |  Find (248)  |  First (174)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (117)  |  Great (300)  |  Growth (111)  |  Ideology (7)  |  Important (124)  |  Individualism (2)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Intense (11)  |  Large (82)  |  Largely (12)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (70)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (24)  |  Modern (104)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Number (179)  |  Organization (79)  |  Original (36)  |  Part (146)  |  Portray (3)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Private (17)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Public (82)  |  Quicken (2)  |  Recent (23)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Repeat (27)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Response (24)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Save (46)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (188)  |  State (96)  |  Step (67)  |  Stress (8)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Time (439)  |  Toward (29)  |  Trend (16)  |  Try (103)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Widespread (9)  |  Work (457)  |  Worth (74)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (214)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.