Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Statue

Statue Quotes (16 quotes)

Ode to The Amoeba
Recall from Time's abysmal chasm
That piece of primal protoplasm
The First Amoeba, strangely splendid,
From whom we're all of us descended.
That First Amoeba, weirdly clever,
Exists today and shall forever,
Because he reproduced by fission;
He split himself, and each division
And subdivision deemed it fitting
To keep on splitting, splitting, splitting;
So, whatsoe'er their billions be,
All, all amoebas still are he.
Zoologists discern his features
In every sort of breathing creatures,
Since all of every living species,
No matter how their breed increases
Or how their ranks have been recruited,
From him alone were evoluted.
King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba
And Hoover sprang from that amoeba;
Columbus, Shakespeare, Darwin, Shelley
Derived from that same bit of jelly.
So famed is he and well-connected,
His statue ought to be erected,
For you and I and William Beebe
Are undeniably amoebae!
(1922). Collected in Gaily the Troubadour (1936), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  All (4107)  |  Alone (312)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  William Beebe (5)  |  Billion (96)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Breed (24)  |  Chasm (8)  |  Clever (38)  |  Christopher Columbus (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Creature (233)  |  Charles Darwin (304)  |  Descend (47)  |  Discern (33)  |  Division (66)  |  Evolution (594)  |  Exist (444)  |  First (1284)  |  Fission (10)  |  Forever (103)  |  Himself (461)  |  Herbert Hoover (13)  |  Increase (211)  |  Jelly (6)  |  Life (1801)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (801)  |  Ode (3)  |  Poem (96)  |  Primal (5)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Mary Shelley (9)  |  Species (402)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Split (13)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Zoologist (12)

Majestatis naturæ by ingenium
Genius equal to the majesty of nature.
Inscribed ordered by King Louis XV for the base of a statue of Buffon placed at Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris. In M. Guizot, trans. by Robert Black, A Popular History of France from the Earliest Times, Vol. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Comte Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon (35)  |  Genius (285)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Nature (1928)

And from my pillow, looking forth by light
Of moon or favouring stars, I could behold
The antechapel where the statue stood
Of Newton with his prism and silent face,
The marble index of a mind for ever
Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.
'Residence at Cambridge', The Prelude, or, Growth of a Poet's Mind: An Autobiographical Poem (1850), Book 3, 57-58.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (312)  |  Chapel (3)  |  Face (212)  |  Index (4)  |  Light (609)  |  Looking (189)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Moon (238)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (335)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Poem (96)  |  Prism (7)  |  Sea (309)  |  Silence (56)  |  Star (430)  |  Stars (304)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thought (956)  |  Through (849)

GEOLOGY, n. The science of the earth's crust —to which, doubtless, will be added that of its interior whenever a man shall come up garrulous out of a well. The geological formations of the globe already noted are catalogued thus: The Primary, or lower one, consists of rocks, bones of mired mules, gas-pipes, miners' tools, antique statues minus the nose, Spanish doubloons and ancestors. The Secondary is largely made up of red worms and moles. The Tertiary comprises railway tracks, patent pavements, grass, snakes, mouldy boots, beer bottles, tomato cans, intoxicated citizens, garbage, anarchists, snap-dogs and fools.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  115.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Ancestor (61)  |  Beer (10)  |  Bone (96)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Consist (223)  |  Crust (38)  |  Dog (70)  |  Earth (998)  |  Fool (116)  |  Formation (96)  |  Garbage (8)  |  Gas (83)  |  Geology (223)  |  Grass (46)  |  Humour (116)  |  Interior (32)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mole (5)  |  Patent (33)  |  Primary (80)  |  Railway (18)  |  Rock (164)  |  Science (3880)  |  Snake (27)  |  Snap (7)  |  Strata (35)  |  Tool (117)  |  Track (40)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2354)  |  Worm (42)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Bearable (2)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Corpse (6)  |  Crown (38)  |  Death (391)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Defy (11)  |  Effort (227)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Form (961)  |  Hero (42)  |  History (675)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Love (310)  |  More (2559)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Pain (137)  |  Part (223)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Reduce (95)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Render (93)  |  Represent (154)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Sake (58)  |  Scholar (50)  |  Struggle (106)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)

History without the history of science, to alter slightly an apothegm of Lord Bacon, resembles a statue of Polyphemus without his eye—that very feature being left out which most marks the spirit and life of the person. My own thesis is complementary: science taught ... without a sense of history is robbed of those very qualities that make it worth teaching to the student of the humanities and the social sciences.
'The History of Science and the Teaching of Science', in I. Bernard Cohen and Fletcher G. Watson (eds.), General Education in Science (1952), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Being (1278)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Eye (423)  |  Feature (45)  |  History (675)  |  History Of Science (64)  |  Humanities (20)  |  Life (1801)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mark (43)  |  Most (1729)  |  Person (363)  |  Quality (135)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sense (770)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Student (301)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Worth (169)

I suppose the body to be just a statue or a machine made of earth.
The World and Other Writings (1633), trans. and ed. Stephen Gaukroger (1998), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Earth (998)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Machine (260)  |  Suppose (156)

In a notable family called Stein
There were Gertrude, and Ep, and then Ein.
Gert's writing was hazy,
Ep's statues were crazy,
And nobody understood Ein.
Out on a Limerick (1961), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Albert Einstein (606)  |  Family (95)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Poetry (144)  |  Understood (156)  |  Writing (189)

In the vestibule of the Manchester Town Hall are placed two life-sized marble statues facing each other. One of these is that of John Dalton … the other that of James Prescott Joule. … Thus honour is done to Manchester’s two greatest sons—to Dalton, the founder of modern Chemistry and of the Atomic Theory, and the laws of chemical-combining proportions; to Joule, the founder of modern Physics and the discoverer of the Law of Conservation of Energy. The one gave to the world the final and satisfactory proof … that in every kind of chemical change no loss of matter occurs; the other proved that in all the varied modes of physical change, no loss of energy takes place.
In John Dalton and the Rise of Modern Chemistry (1895), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Change (595)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Conservation Of Mass (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Energy (346)  |  Final (119)  |  Founder (26)  |  Greatest (329)  |  Honour (56)  |  James Prescott Joule (7)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (895)  |  Life (1801)  |  Loss (110)  |  Manchester (6)  |  Marble (20)  |  Matter (801)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (516)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proof (290)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Theory (972)  |  Town Hall (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Vestibule (2)  |  World (1778)

It is something to be able to paint a particular picture or to carve a statue and so to make a few objects beautiful; but it is far more glorious to carve and paint the very atmosphere and medium through which we look, which morally we can do. To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts.
In Walden: or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1893), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Art (657)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beautiful (259)  |  Carve (5)  |  Day (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Highest (18)  |  Look (582)  |  Medium (12)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Object (423)  |  Paint (22)  |  Picture (143)  |  Quality (135)  |  Something (719)  |  Through (849)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (47)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4107)  |  Architect (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Beautiful (259)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (595)  |  Changeless (2)  |  Character (243)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (139)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (70)  |  Control (167)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Countless (37)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Derive (65)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Especially (31)  |  Eternal (111)  |  Everywhere (95)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (999)  |  Flux (21)  |  Form (961)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (363)  |  Home (170)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (233)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1801)  |  Light (609)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (235)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (42)  |  Mood (13)  |  Most (1729)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (131)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Paint (22)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (511)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (292)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (63)  |  Same (157)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Static (8)  |  Stress (22)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (94)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (956)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transformation (69)  |  True (214)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (133)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (122)  |  World (1778)

No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes than a publick library; for who can see the wall crouded on every side by mighty volumes, the works of laborious meditation, and accurate inquiry, now scarcely known but by the catalogue, and preserved only to encrease the pomp of learning, without considering how many hours have been wasted in vain endeavours, how often imagination has anticipated the praises of futurity, how many statues have risen to the eye of vanity, how many ideal converts have elevated zeal, how often wit has exulted in the eternal infamy of his antagonists, and dogmatism has delighted in the gradual advances of his authority, the immutability of his decrees, and the perpetuity of his power.
Non unquam dedit
Documenta fors majora, quam fragili loco
Starent superbi.

Seneca, Troades, II, 4-6
Insulting chance ne'er call'd with louder voice,
On swelling mortals to be proud no more.
Of the innumerable authors whose performances are thus treasured up in magnificent obscurity, most are forgotten, because they never deserved to be remembered, and owed the honours which they have once obtained, not to judgment or to genius, to labour or to art, but to the prejudice of faction, the stratagem of intrigue, or the servility of adulation.
Nothing is more common than to find men whose works are now totally neglected, mentioned with praises by their contemporaries, as the oracles of their age, and the legislators of science. Curiosity is naturally excited, their volumes after long enquiry are found, but seldom reward the labour of the search. Every period of time has produced these bubbles of artificial fame, which are kept up a while by the breath of fashion and then break at once and are annihilated. The learned often bewail the loss of ancient writers whose characters have survived their works; but perhaps if we could now retrieve them we should find them only the Granvilles, Montagus, Stepneys, and Sheffields of their time, and wonder by what infatuation or caprice they could be raised to notice.
It cannot, however, be denied, that many have sunk into oblivion, whom it were unjust to number with this despicable class. Various kinds of literary fame seem destined to various measures of duration. Some spread into exuberance with a very speedy growth, but soon wither and decay; some rise more slowly, but last long. Parnassus has its flowers of transient fragrance as well as its oaks of towering height, and its laurels of eternal verdure.
The Rambler, Number 106, 23 Mar 1751. In W. J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (eds.), The Rambler (1969), Vol. 2, 200-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (87)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (191)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (168)  |  Authority (96)  |  Break (99)  |  Breath (59)  |  Bubble (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Conviction (98)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decree (8)  |  Delight (109)  |  Destined (42)  |  Dogmatism (15)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Eternal (111)  |  Eye (423)  |  Faction (3)  |  Fame (50)  |  Find (999)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Genius (285)  |  Growth (189)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1470)  |  Ideal (100)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Inquiry (79)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Labour (98)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (632)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Library (48)  |  Long (789)  |  Loss (110)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Measure (233)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1729)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (701)  |  Oak (14)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Performance (49)  |  Period (198)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Power (748)  |  Prejudice (88)  |  Produced (187)  |  Remember (179)  |  Reward (68)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3880)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1082)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Side (232)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spread (83)  |  Striking (48)  |  Time (1877)  |  Towering (11)  |  Transient (12)  |  Vain (83)  |  Various (200)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wit (59)  |  Wonder (237)  |  Work (1352)  |  Writer (86)

Search your parks in all your cities, you’ll find no statues of committees.
Anonymous
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  City (78)  |  Committee (16)  |  Find (999)  |  Park (6)  |  Search (162)

The book of Nature is the book of Fate. She turns the gigantic pages,—leaf after leaf,—never re-turning one. One leaf she lays down, a floor of granite; then a thousand ages, and a bed of slate; a thousand ages, and a measure of coal; a thousand ages, and a layer of marl and mud: vegetable forms appear; her first misshapen animals, zoophyte, trilobium, fish; then, saurians,—rude forms, in which she has only blocked her future statue, concealing under these unwieldy monsters the fine type of her coming king. The face of the planet cools and dries, the races meliorate, and man is born. But when a race has lived its term, it comes no more again.
From 'Fate', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume 6: The Conduct of Life (1860), 15. This paragraph is the prose version of his poem, 'Song of Nature'.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Bed (23)  |  Birth (147)  |  Block (12)  |  Book (394)  |  Book Of Fate (2)  |  Book Of Nature (12)  |  Coal (58)  |  Coming (114)  |  Concealing (2)  |  Cool (13)  |  Down (455)  |  Dry (58)  |  Evolution (594)  |  Face (212)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (1284)  |  Fish (121)  |  Floor (20)  |  Form (961)  |  Future (433)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Granite (7)  |  King (35)  |  Layer (40)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1801)  |  Man (2249)  |  Measure (233)  |  Monster (31)  |  More (2559)  |  Mud (26)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Never (1087)  |  Page (31)  |  Planet (357)  |  Race (268)  |  Returning (2)  |  Rude (6)  |  Saurian (2)  |  Slate (6)  |  Term (349)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Trilobite (6)  |  Turn (447)  |  Type (167)  |  Unwieldy (2)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Zoophyte (4)

The mind, in short, works on the data it receives very much as a sculptor works on his block of stone. In a sense the statue stood there from eternity. But there were a thousand different ones beside it, and the sculptor alone is to thank for having extricated this one from the rest. Just so with the world of each of us, howsoever different our several views of it may be, all lay embedded in the primordial chaos of sensations, which gave the mere matter to the thought of all of us indifferently.
In 'The Stream of Thought', The Principles of Psychology (1890), Vol. 1, 288.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Alone (312)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Data (156)  |  Different (577)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Matter (801)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Receive (114)  |  Rest (281)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Stone (162)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thought (956)  |  Thousand (331)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1352)  |  World (1778)

[The ancient monuments] were all dwarfs in size and pigmies in spirit beside this mighty Statue of Liberty, and its inspiring thought. Higher than the monument in Trafalgar Square which commemorates the victories of Nelson on the sea; higher than the Column Vendome, which perpetuates the triumphs of Napoleon on the land; higher than the towers of the Brooklyn Bridge, which exhibit the latest and greatest results of science, invention, and industrial progress, this structure rises toward the heavens to illustrate an idea ... which inspired the charter in the cabin of the Mayflower and the Declaration of Independence from the Continental Congress.
Speech at unveiling of the Statue of Liberty, New York. In E.S. Werner (ed.), Werner's Readings and Recitations (1908), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Ancient (191)  |  Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (19)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Brooklyn Bridge (2)  |  Charter (4)  |  Column (15)  |  Commemorate (3)  |  Congress (19)  |  Declaration (10)  |  Declaration Of Independence (4)  |  Dwarf (7)  |  Greatest (329)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Higher (37)  |  Idea (846)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Invention (378)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Monument (45)  |  Napoleon (16)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Pigmy (3)  |  Progress (468)  |  Result (678)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sea (309)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Square (70)  |  Statue Of Liberty (2)  |  Structure (346)  |  Thought (956)  |  Tower (42)  |  Trafalgar (2)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Victory (39)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.