Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Radiant

Radiant Quotes (10 quotes)

For when I look at the moon I do not see a hostile, empty world. I see the radiant body where man has taken his first steps into a frontier that will never end.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Body (243)  |  Empty (40)  |  End (195)  |  First (313)  |  Frontier (25)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Moon (199)  |  See (369)  |  Step (109)  |  World (892)

If, again with the light of science, we trace forward into the future the condition of our globe, we are compelled to admit that it cannot always remain in its present condition; that in time, the store of potential energy which now exists in the sun and in the bodies of celestial space which may fall into it will be dissipated in radiant heat, and consequently the earth, from being the theatre of life, intelligence, of moral emotions, must become a barren waste.
Address (Jul 1874) at the grave of Joseph Priestley, in Joseph Henry and Arthur P. Molella, et al. (eds.), A Scientist in American Life: Essays and Lectures of Joseph Henry (1980), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Barren (15)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Future (284)  |  Globe (47)  |  Heat (100)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Life (1124)  |  Planet (262)  |  Potential Energy (3)  |  Present (174)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sun (276)  |  Waste (64)

In the case of the Sun, we have a new understanding of the cosmological meaning of sacrifice. The Sun is, with each second, transforming four million tons of itself into light—giving itself over to become energy that we, with every meal, partake of. The Sun converts itself into a flow of energy that photosynthesis changes into plants that are consumed by animals. Humans have been feasting on the Sun’s energy stored in the form of wheat or maize or reindeer as each day the Sun dies as Sun and is reborn as the vitality of Earth. These solar flares are in fact the very power of the vast human enterprise. Every child of ours needs to learn the simple truth: she is the energy of the Sun. And we adults should organize things so her face shines with the same radiant joy.
In The Hidden Heart of the Cosmos: Humanity and the New Story (1996), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Child (245)  |  Consume (9)  |  Cosmological (6)  |  Die (81)  |  Earth (635)  |  Energy (214)  |  Joy (88)  |  Light (345)  |  Maize (2)  |  Meal (16)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Plant (199)  |  Reindeer (2)  |  Sacrifice (32)  |  Same (155)  |  Shine (43)  |  Solar Flare (2)  |  Sun (276)  |  Vitality (15)  |  Wheat (10)

In the pure mathematics we contemplate absolute truths which existed in the divine mind before the morning stars sang together, and which will continue to exist there when the last of their radiant host shall have fallen from heaven.
From Address (22 Apr 1857) for Inauguration of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, collected in 'Academical Education', Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions (1870), Vol. 3, 514. This is seen misattributed to Eric Temple Bell, who only quoted it, attributing it to Everett, in for example, Mathematics: Queen and Servant of Sciences (1938), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Divine (60)  |  Exist (147)  |  Fall (119)  |  Heaven (151)  |  Host (16)  |  Mind (743)  |  Morning (43)  |  Pure Mathematics (63)  |  Sing (25)  |  Star (336)  |  Truth (914)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 678, which is the eighth of the reign of Egfrid, in the month of August, appeared a star, called a comet, which continued for three months, rising in the morning, and darting out, as it were, a pillar of radiant flame.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum: The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, Book IV, Chap. XII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede (1843), Vol. 3, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (115)  |  Comet (50)  |  Flame (26)  |  Month (31)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Star (336)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (34)  |  Alike (22)  |  Architect (20)  |  Art (284)  |  Artistic (15)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Behold (18)  |  Change (363)  |  Character (115)  |  Cold (58)  |  Color (99)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (40)  |  Content (66)  |  Control (111)  |  Correlation (11)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Countless (21)  |  Curious (41)  |  Delicacy (3)  |  Derive (33)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Ensemble (4)  |  Especially (30)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Everywhere (24)  |  Figure (68)  |  Find (405)  |  Flux (13)  |  Form (308)  |  Fusion (12)  |  Glorify (5)  |  Grace (17)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (152)  |  Home (83)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Inner (39)  |  Interest (235)  |  Intricacy (7)  |  Invariant (7)  |  Lie (115)  |  Life (1124)  |  Light (345)  |  Logic (247)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mean (101)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (40)  |  Mood (12)  |  Motive (33)  |  Music (95)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Order (239)  |  Paint (21)  |  Pencil (17)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (285)  |  Psychic (6)  |  Pure (98)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (454)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Religious (49)  |  Remain (111)  |  Respect (86)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (61)  |  Same (155)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (104)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (28)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (11)  |  Stress (12)  |  Sublime (27)  |  Surpass (19)  |  Sustain (23)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Symmetry (37)  |  Temple (25)  |  Thought (536)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (17)  |  Transformation (54)  |  True (201)  |  Type (51)  |  Variety (69)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (94)  |  World (892)

Radiant energy, which at the beginning [of the universe] played a predominant role in the evolutionary process, gradually lost its importance and by the end of the thirty-millionth year yielded its priority in favor of ordinary atomic matter.
In The Creation of the Universe (1952, 2012), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (280)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Energy (214)  |  Matter (340)  |  Predominant (3)  |  Role (49)  |  Universe (683)

The glorious lamp of heaven, the radiant sun,
Is Nature’s eye.
From 'Ovid's Metamorphoses' (Thirteenth Book), as translated in The Works of the English Poets, Vol. 16: The Poems of Dryden, Vol. 4 (1779), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (218)  |  Glorious (23)  |  Heaven (151)  |  Lamp (16)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Sun (276)

The great truths with which it [mathematics] deals, are clothed with austere grandeur, far above all purposes of immediate convenience or profit. It is in them that our limited understandings approach nearest to the conception of that absolute and infinite, towards which in most other things they aspire in vain. In the pure mathematics we contemplate absolute truths, which existed in the divine mind before the morning stars sang together, and which will continue to exist there, when the last of their radiant host shall have fallen from heaven. They existed not merely in metaphysical possibility, but in the actual contemplation of the supreme reason. The pen of inspiration, ranging all nature and life for imagery to set forth the Creator’s power and wisdom, finds them best symbolized in the skill of the surveyor. "He meted out heaven as with a span;" and an ancient sage, neither falsely nor irreverently, ventured to say, that “God is a geometer”.
In Orations and Speeches (1870), Vol. 3, 614.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Actual (47)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Approach (53)  |  Aspire (7)  |  Austere (5)  |  Best (172)  |  Conception (88)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Continue (63)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Creator (52)  |  Deal (49)  |  Divine (60)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Exist (147)  |  Fall (119)  |  Falsely (2)  |  Find (405)  |  Forth (13)  |  Geometer (22)  |  God (535)  |  Grandeur (21)  |  Great (524)  |  Heaven (151)  |  Host (16)  |  Imagery (3)  |  Immediate (43)  |  In Vain (8)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Inspiration (59)  |  Irreverent (2)  |  Life (1124)  |  Limit (123)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Merely (82)  |  Metaphysical (11)  |  Mind (743)  |  Morning (43)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Pen (12)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Power (358)  |  Profit (38)  |  Pure Mathematics (63)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Range (57)  |  Reason (454)  |  Sage (15)  |  Say (228)  |  Set (97)  |  Sing (25)  |  Skill (65)  |  Span (5)  |  Star (336)  |  Supreme (37)  |  Surveyor (4)  |  Symbolize (6)  |  Together (77)  |  Truth (914)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Venture (18)  |  Wisdom (180)

The most beautiful emotion we can experience is the mystical. It is the power of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead. To know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their most primitive forms — this knowledge, this feeling, is at the center of true religiousness. In this sense, and in this sense only, I belong to the rank of devoutly religious men.
As quoted in Philip Frank, Einstein: His Life and Times (1947), chap. 12, sec. 5 - “Einstein’s Attitude Toward Religion.”
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (33)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Center (34)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Death (302)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Existence (296)  |  Experience (338)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Form (308)  |  Impenetrable (5)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Power (358)  |  Primitive (41)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Religiousness (3)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Stranger (15)  |  True (201)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  Wonder (169)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.