Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Singing

Singing Quotes (19 quotes)

A work of genius is something like the pie in the nursery song, in which the four and twenty blackbirds are baked. When the pie is opened, the birds begin to sing. Hereupon three fourths of the company run away in a fright; and then after a time, feeling ashamed, they would fain excuse themselves by declaring, the pie stank so, they could not sit near it. Those who stay behind, the men of taste and epicures, say one to another, We came here to eat. What business have birds, after they have been baked, to be alive and singing? This will never do. We must put a stop to so dangerous an innovation: for who will send a pie to an oven, if the birds come to life there? We must stand up to defend the rights of all the ovens in England. Let us have dead birds..dead birds for our money. So each sticks his fork into a bird, and hacks and mangles it a while, and then holds it up and cries, Who will dare assert that there is any music in this bird’s song?
Co-author with his brother Augustus William Hare Guesses At Truth, By Two Brothers: Second Edition: With Large Additions (1848), Second Series, 86. (The volume is introduced as “more than three fourths new.” This quote is identified as by Julius; Augustus had died in 1833.)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Ashamed (3)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Baking (2)  |  Begin (260)  |  Behind (137)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blackbird (4)  |  Business (149)  |  Company (59)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Dare (50)  |  Death (388)  |  Defend (30)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  England (40)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fork (2)  |  Fright (10)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hacking (2)  |  Holding (3)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Life (1795)  |  Money (170)  |  Music (129)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nursery (4)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Oven (5)  |  Pie (3)  |  Right (452)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sing (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Song (37)  |  Stand (274)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stink (7)  |  Stop (80)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themself (3)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

After that cancellation [of the Superconducting Super Collider in Texas, after $2 billion had been spent on it], we physicists learned that we have to sing for our supper. ... The Cold War is over. You can't simply say “Russia!” to Congress, and they whip out their checkbook and say, “How much?” We have to tell the people why this atom-smasher is going to benefit their lives.
As quoted in Alan Boyle, 'Discovery of Doom? Collider Stirs Debate', article (8 Sep 2008) on a msnbc.com web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Atom Smasher (2)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Billion (95)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cold War (2)  |  Congress (19)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  People (1005)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Russia (13)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Spent (85)  |  Supper (10)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Texas (4)  |  War (225)  |  Why (491)

Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king and officers of sorts;
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home,
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad,
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor.
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil citizens kneading up the honey;
The poor mechanic porters crowding
Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors pale
The lazy yawning drone.
Henry V (1599), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abroad (18)  |  Act (272)  |  Arm (81)  |  Building (156)  |  Burden (27)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civil (26)  |  Creature (233)  |  Drone (4)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Gate (32)  |  Gold (97)  |  Home (170)  |  Honey (15)  |  Justice (39)  |  King (35)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Majesty (21)  |  March (46)  |  Mason (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Officer (12)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Porter (2)  |  Roof (13)  |  Royal (57)  |  Rule (294)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Sting (3)  |  Summer (54)  |  Survey (33)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tent (11)  |  Velvet (4)

How narrow is the vision that exalts the busyness of the ant above the singing of the grasshopper.
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (28)  |  Busy (28)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Grasshopper (7)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Vision (123)

I have known silence: the cold earthy silence at the bottom of a newly dug well; the implacable stony silence of a deep cave; the hot, drugged midday silence when everything is hypnotised and stilled into silence by the eye of the sun;… I have heard summer cicadas cry so that the sound seems stitched into your bones. I have heard tree frogs in an orchestration as complicated as Bach singing in a forest lit by a million emerald fireflies. I have heard the Keas calling over grey glaciers that groaned to themselves like old people as they inched their way to the sea. I have heard the hoarse street vendor cries of the mating Fur seals as they sang to their sleek golden wives, the crisp staccato admonishment of the Rattlesnake, the cobweb squeak of the Bat and the belling roar of the Red deer knee-deep in purple heather.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (7)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cave (15)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Cobweb (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Cry (29)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deer (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Forest (150)  |  Frog (38)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Golden (45)  |  Groan (5)  |  Hot (60)  |  Implacable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Midday (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchestration (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seal (18)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sing (26)  |  Sound (183)  |  Squeak (2)  |  Staccato (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  Way (1217)

In the beginning God created Heaven and Earth … Which beginning of time, according to our Cronologie, fell upon the entrance of the night preceding the twenty third day of Octob. in the year of the Julian Calendar, 710 [or 4004 B.C.]. Upon the first day therefore of the world, or Octob. 23. being our Sunday, God, together with the highest Heaven, created the Angels. Then having finished, as it were, the roofe of this building, he fell in hand with the foundation of this wonderfull Fabrick of the World, he fashioned this lowermost Globe, consisting of the Deep, and of the Earth; all the Quire of Angels singing together and magnifying his name therefore … And when the Earth was void and without forme, and darknesse covered the face of the Deepe, on the very middle of the first day, the light was created; which God severing from the darknesses, called the one day, and the other night.
In 'Annals of the Old Testament', The Annals of the World (1658), excerpted in Louis A. Ruprecht, God Gardened East: A Gardener's Meditation on the Dynamics of Genesis (2008), 53-54.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Angel (44)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Creation (327)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Day (42)  |  Deep (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Globe (47)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Name (333)  |  Night (120)  |  October (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Roof (13)  |  Sunday (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Void (31)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
Concluding remarks in final chapter, The Origin of Species (1859), 490. In the second edition, Darwin changed “breathed” to “breathed by the Creator”.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bank (31)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breath (59)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Construct (124)  |  Death (388)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Famine (15)  |  Follow (378)  |  Food Web (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Worm (42)

On the morning of 1 November 1956 the US physicist John Bardeen dropped the frying-pan of eggs that he was cooking for breakfast, scattering its contents on the kitchen floor. He had just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics along with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for their invention of the transistor. That evening Bardeen was startled again, this time by a parade of his colleagues from the University of Illinois marching to the door of his home bearing champagne and singing “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow”.
In Abstract for 'John Bardeen: An Extraordinary Physicist', Physics World (2008), 21, No. 4, 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  John Bardeen (6)  |  Biography (240)  |  Walter H. Brattain (3)  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Cook (17)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Door (93)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Home (170)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Parade (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Scattering (4)  |  William B. Shockley (4)  |  Sing (26)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transistor (5)  |  University (121)  |  Win (52)

The mathematician can afford to leave to his clients, the engineers, or perhaps the popular philosophers, the emotion of belief: for himself he keeps the lyrical pleasure of metre and of evolving equations: and it is a pleasant surprise to him and an added problem if he finds that the arts can use his calculations, or that the senses can verify them, much as if a composer found that sailors could heave better when singing his songs.
In 'Revolution in Science', Some Turns of Thought in Modern Philosophy (1933), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Client (2)  |  Composer (7)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Equation (132)  |  Find (998)  |  Heave (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sailor (16)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sing (26)  |  Song (37)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Use (766)  |  Verify (23)

The morning stars sang together.
And a person of delicate ear and nice judgment discussed the singing at length, and showed how and wherein one star differed from another, and which was great and which was not.
And still the morning stars sang together.
'Classification' in Little Stings (1907, 1908), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Classification (97)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Differ (85)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Ear (68)  |  Great (1574)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nice (13)  |  Person (363)  |  Show (346)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Together (387)

The Spacious Firmament on high,
With all the blue Etherial Sky,
And spangled Heav’ns, a Shining Frame, Their great Original proclaim:
Th’unwearied Sun, from day to day
Does his Creator’s Pow’r display,
And publishes to every Land
The Work of an Almighty Hand.
Soon as the Evening Shades prevail,
The Moon takes up the wondrous Tale,
And nightly to the listning Earth Repeats the Story of her Birth:
Whilst all the Stars that round her burn,
And all the Planets, in their turn,
Confirm the Tidings as they rowl,
And spread the Truth from Pole to Pole.
What though, in solemn Silence, all
Move round the dark terrestrial Ball?
What tho’ nor real Voice nor Sound
Amid their radiant Orbs be found?
In Reason’s Ear they all rejoice,
And utter forth a glorious Voice,
For ever singing, as they shine,
“The Hand that made us is Divine”.
The Spectator, no. 465, Saturday 23 August 1712. In D. F. Bond (ed.) The Spectator (1965), Vol. 4, 144-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Ball (62)  |  Birth (147)  |  Burn (87)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dark (140)  |  Display (56)  |  Divine (112)  |  Ear (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Moon (237)  |  Move (216)  |  Orb (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pole (46)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Reason (744)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shining (35)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sky (161)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spread (83)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Story (118)  |  Sun (385)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Work (1351)

There is an insistent tendency among serious social scientists to think of any institution which features rhymed and singing commercials, intense and lachrymose voices urging highly improbable enjoyment, caricatures of the human esophagus in normal and impaired operation, and which hints implausibly at opportunities for antiseptic seduction as inherently trivial. This is a great mistake. The industrial system is profoundly dependent on commercial television and could not exist in its present form without it.
In The New Industrial State (1967), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Exist (443)  |  Feature (44)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Highly (16)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impair (3)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Inherently (5)  |  Insistent (2)  |  Institution (69)  |  Intense (20)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Normal (28)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Present (619)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seduction (3)  |  Serious (91)  |  Sing (26)  |  Social (252)  |  System (537)  |  Television (30)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Urge (17)  |  Voice (52)

Tonight, the moon came out, it was nearly full.
Way down here on earth, I could feel it’s pull.
The weight of gravity or just the lure of life,
Made me want to leave my only home tonight.
I’m just wondering how we know where we belong
Is it in the arc of the moon, leaving shadows on the lawn
In the path of fireflies and a single bird at dawn
Singing in between here and gone
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arc (12)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bird (149)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Feel (367)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Full (66)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Home (170)  |  In Between (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lure (7)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Path (144)  |  Pull (43)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sing (26)  |  Single (353)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wonder (236)

We do not ask for what useful purpose the birds do sing, for song is their pleasure since they were created for singing. Similarly, we ought not to ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the heavens ... The diversity of the phenomena of Nature is so great, and the treasures hidden in the heavens so rich, precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment.
From Mysterium Cosmographicum. Quote as translated in Carl Sagan, Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Bird (149)  |  Creation (327)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Precision (68)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Richness (14)  |  Secret (194)  |  Song (37)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Why (491)

We do not ask what hope of gain makes a little bird warble, since we know that it takes delight in singing because it is for that very singing that the bird was made, so there is no need to ask why the human mind undertakes such toil in seeking out these secrets of the heavens. ... And just as other animals, and the human body, are sustained by food and drink, so the very spirit of Man, which is something distinct from Man, is nourished, is increased, and in a sense grows up on this diet of knowledge, and is more like the dead than the living if it is touched by no desire for these things.
Mysterium Cosmographicum. Translated by A. M. Duncan in The Secret of the Universe (1981), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Dead (59)  |  Delight (108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Diet (54)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Food (199)  |  Gain (145)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Increase (210)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Made (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Sustenance (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Toil (25)  |  Touch (141)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Why (491)

We had various kinds of tape-recorded concerts and popular music. But by the end of the flight what we listened to most was Russian folk songs. We also had recordings of nature sounds: thunder, rain, the singing of birds. We switched them on most frequently of all, and we never grew tired of them. It was as if they returned us to Earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Concert (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Flight (98)  |  Folk (8)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Grow (238)  |  Kind (557)  |  Listen (73)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Popular (29)  |  Rain (62)  |  Record (154)  |  Recording (13)  |  Return (124)  |  Russian (3)  |  Sing (26)  |  Song (37)  |  Sound (183)  |  Switch (10)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Tired (13)  |  Various (200)

When the sexes differ in beauty, in the power of singing, or in producing what I have called instrumental music, it is almost invariably the male which excels the female.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Call (769)  |  Differ (85)  |  Female (50)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Male (26)  |  Music (129)  |  Power (746)

When we contemplate the whole globe as one great dewdrop, striped and dotted with continents and islands, flying through space with other stars all singing and shining together as one, the whole universe appears as an infinite storm of beauty.
John Muir
Travels in Alaska
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Continent (76)  |  Dewdrop (2)  |  Dot (16)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Island (46)  |  Other (2236)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Sing (26)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Storm (51)  |  Stripe (4)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)

Words well up freely from the breast, without necessity or intent, and there may well have been no wandering horde in any desert that did not already have its own songs. For man, as a species, is a singing creature, though the notes, in his case, are also coupled with thought.
On Language (1836), trans. Peter Heath (1988), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Creature (233)  |  Desert (56)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Song (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Thought (953)  |  Word (619)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.