Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Calendar

Calendar Quotes (9 quotes)

All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the “expanding universe” might also be called the theory of the “shrinking atom”. …
:Let us then take the whole universe as our standard of constancy, and adopt the view of a cosmic being whose body is composed of intergalactic spaces and swells as they swell. Or rather we must now say it keeps the same size, for he will not admit that it is he who has changed. Watching us for a few thousand million years, he sees us shrinking; atoms, animals, planets, even the galaxies, all shrink alike; only the intergalactic spaces remain the same. The earth spirals round the sun in an ever-decreasing orbit. It would be absurd to treat its changing revolution as a constant unit of time. The cosmic being will naturally relate his units of length and time so that the velocity of light remains constant. Our years will then decrease in geometrical progression in the cosmic scale of time. On that scale man’s life is becoming briefer; his threescore years and ten are an ever-decreasing allowance. Owing to the property of geometrical progressions an infinite number of our years will add up to a finite cosmic time; so that what we should call the end of eternity is an ordinary finite date in the cosmic calendar. But on that date the universe has expanded to infinity in our reckoning, and we have shrunk to nothing in the reckoning of the cosmic being.
We walk the stage of life, performers of a drama for the benefit of the cosmic spectator. As the scenes proceed he notices that the actors are growing smaller and the action quicker. When the last act opens the curtain rises on midget actors rushing through their parts at frantic speed. Smaller and smaller. Faster and faster. One last microscopic blurr of intense agitation. And then nothing.
In The Expanding Universe (1933) , 90-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atom (355)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Common (436)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Drama (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Expand (53)  |  Faster (50)  |  Finite (59)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Growing (98)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Owing (39)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Progression (23)  |  Property (168)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Stage (143)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Velocity (48)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

But if anyone, well seen in the knowledge, not onely of Sacred and exotick History, but of Astronomical Calculation, and the old Hebrew Kalendar, shall apply himself to these studies, I judge it indeed difficult, but not impossible for such a one to attain, not onely the number of years, but even, of dayes from the Creation of the World.
In 'Epistle to the Reader', The Annals of the World (1658). As excerpted in Wallen Yep, Man Before Adam: A Correction to Doctrinal Theology, "The Missing Link Found" (2002), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attain (125)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Creation (327)  |  Day (42)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Judge (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Number (699)  |  Old (481)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Study (653)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Every time you tear a leaf off a calendar, you present a new place for new ideas and progress.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (843)  |  Leaf (66)  |  New (1216)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Tear (42)  |  Time (1877)

However much we may enlarge our ideas of the time which has elapsed since the Niagara first began to drain the waters of the upper lakes, we have seen that this period was one only of a series, all belonging to the present zoological epoch; or that in which the living testaceous fauna, whether freshwater or marine, had already come into being. If such events can take place while the zoology of the earth remains almost stationary and unaltered, what ages may not be comprehended in those successive tertiary periods during which the Flora and Fauna of the globe have been almost entirely changed. Yet how subordinate a place in the long calendar of geological chronology do the successive tertiary periods themselves occupy! How much more enormous a duration must we assign to many antecedent revolutions of the earth and its inhabitants! No analogy can be found in the natural world to the immense scale of these divisions of past time, unless we contemplate the celestial spaces which have been measured by the astronomer.
Travels in North America (1845), Vol. 1, 51-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drain (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Event (216)  |  First (1283)  |  Freshwater (3)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Marine Geology (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Niagara Falls (4)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scale (121)  |  Series (149)  |  Space (500)  |  Stationary (10)  |  Successive (73)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoology (36)

In addition to instructing them in the holy Scriptures, they also taught their pupils poetry, astronomy, and the calculation of the church calendar.
Bede
Referring to the teaching methods of Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Hadrian, abbot of Canterbury (A.D. 669).
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Church (56)  |  Holy (34)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Teach (277)

In modern Europe, the Middle Ages were called the Dark Ages. Who dares to call them so now? … Their Dante and Alfred and Wickliffe and Abelard and Bacon; their Magna Charta, decimal numbers, mariner’s compass, gunpowder, glass, paper, and clocks; chemistry, algebra, astronomy; their Gothic architecture, their painting,—are the delight and tuition of ours. Six hundred years ago Roger Bacon explained the precession of the equinoxes, and the necessity of reform in the calendar; looking over how many horizons as far as into Liverpool and New York, he announced that machines can be constructed to drive ships more rapidly than a whole galley of rowers could do, nor would they need anything but a pilot to steer; carriages, to move with incredible speed, without aid of animals; and machines to fly into the air like birds.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 475.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Peter Abelard (3)  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  Air (347)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Animal (617)  |  Announce (13)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Roger Bacon (20)  |  Bird (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clock (47)  |  Compass (34)  |  Construct (124)  |  Dante Alighieri (10)  |  Dare (50)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drive (55)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Europe (43)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fly (146)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gothic (4)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Liverpool (3)  |  Looking (189)  |  Machine (257)  |  Magna Carta (3)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  New York (15)  |  Number (699)  |  Painting (44)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Precession (4)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Reform (22)  |  Ship (62)  |  Speed (65)  |  Steer (4)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Tuition (3)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

In the beginning God created Heaven and Earth … Which beginning of time, according to our Cronologie, fell upon the entrance of the night preceding the twenty third day of Octob. in the year of the Julian Calendar, 710 [or 4004 B.C.]. Upon the first day therefore of the world, or Octob. 23. being our Sunday, God, together with the highest Heaven, created the Angels. Then having finished, as it were, the roofe of this building, he fell in hand with the foundation of this wonderfull Fabrick of the World, he fashioned this lowermost Globe, consisting of the Deep, and of the Earth; all the Quire of Angels singing together and magnifying his name therefore … And when the Earth was void and without forme, and darknesse covered the face of the Deepe, on the very middle of the first day, the light was created; which God severing from the darknesses, called the one day, and the other night.
In 'Annals of the Old Testament', The Annals of the World (1658), excerpted in Louis A. Ruprecht, God Gardened East: A Gardener's Meditation on the Dynamics of Genesis (2008), 53-54.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Angel (44)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Call (769)  |  Creation (327)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Day (42)  |  Deep (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Globe (47)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Name (333)  |  Night (120)  |  October (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Roof (13)  |  Singing (19)  |  Sunday (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Void (31)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Noise proves nothing. Often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she laid an asteroid. — Pudd’nhead Wilson’s New Calendar
Epigraph to Chap. 5, In More Tramps Abroad (1897), Vol. 1, 40. Also published under the title Following the Equator (1897).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Egg (69)  |  Hen (7)  |  Merely (316)  |  New (1216)  |  Noise (37)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Prove (250)

The Moon and its phases gave man his first calendar. Trying to match that calendar with the seasons helped give him mathematics. The usefulness of the calendar helped give rise to the thought of beneficent gods. And with all that the Moon is beautiful, too.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneficent (9)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moon (237)  |  Phase (36)  |  Rise (166)  |  Season (47)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  Usefulness (86)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.