Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Church

Church Quotes (56 quotes)

Mathematical truth has validity independent of place, personality, or human authority. Mathematical relations are not established, nor can they be abrogated, by edict. The multiplication table is international and permanent, not a matter of convention nor of relying upon authority of state or church. The value of π is not amenable to human caprice. The finding of a mathematical theorem may have been a highly romantic episode in the personal life of the discoverer, but it cannot be expected of itself to reveal the race, sex, or temperament of this discoverer. With modern means of widespread communication even mathematical notation tends to be international despite all nationalistic tendencies in the use of words or of type.
Anonymous
In 'Light Thrown on the Nature of Mathematics by Certain Aspects of Its Development', Mathematics in General Education (1940), 256. This is the Report of the Committee on the Function of Mathematics in General Education of the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum, which was established by the Executive Board of the Progressive Education Association in 1932.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amenable (4)  |  Authority (95)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Communication (94)  |  Convention (14)  |  Despite (7)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Episode (5)  |  Establish (57)  |  Expect (200)  |  Human (1468)  |  Independent (67)  |  International (37)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Modern (385)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Nation (193)  |  Notation (27)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personality (62)  |  Place (177)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Romantic (13)  |  Sex (69)  |  State (491)  |  Table (104)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Validity (47)  |  Value (365)  |  Widespread (22)  |  Word (619)

Third Fisherman: Master, I marvel how the fishes live in the sea.
First Fisherman: Why, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones: I can compare our rich misers to nothing so fitly as to a whale; a’ plays and tumbles, driving the poor fry before him, and at last devours them all at a mouthful: such whales have I heard on o’ the land, who never leave gaping till they’ve swallowed the whole parish, church, steeple, bells, and all.
In Pericles (1609), Act 2, Scene 1, line 29-38.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bell (35)  |  Compare (69)  |  Devour (29)  |  Do (1908)  |  Driving (28)  |  Eat (104)  |  First (1283)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Master (178)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Poor (136)  |  Sea (308)  |  Steeple (3)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Whale (32)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

A conflict arises when a religious community insists on the absolute truthfulness of all statements recorded in the Bible. This means an intervention on the part of religion into the sphere of science; this is where the struggle of the Church against the doctrines of Galileo and Darwin belongs. On the other hand, representatives of science have often made an attempt to arrive at fundamental judgments with respect to values and ends on the basis of scientific method, and in this way have set themselves in opposition to religion. These conflicts have all sprung from fatal errors.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Basis (173)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bible (91)  |  Community (104)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Fatal (12)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Insist (20)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Often (106)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Record (154)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Representative (14)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spring (133)  |  Statement (142)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truthfulness (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

A laboratory of natural history is a sanctuary where nothing profane should be tolerated. I feel less agony at improprieties in churches than in a scientific laboratory.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Agony (7)  |  Feel (367)  |  History (673)  |  Impropriety (4)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Less (103)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Profane (6)  |  Sanctuary (11)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Toleration (6)

A political law or a scientific truth may be perilous to the morals or the faith of individuals; but it cannot on this ground be resisted by the Church. … A discovery may be made in science which will shake the faith of thousands; yet religion cannot regret it or object to it. The difference in this respect between a true and a false religion is, that one judges all things by the standard of their truth, the other by the touchstone of its own interests. A false religion fears the progress of all truth; a true religion seeks and recognises truth wherever it can be found.
From 'Cardinal Wiseman and the Home and Foreign Review' (1862), collected in John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Baron Acton, John Neville Figgis (ed.) and Reginald Vere Laurence (ed.), The History of Freedom and Other Essays (1907), 449-450. The Darwinian controversy was at its height when this was written.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Faith (203)  |  False (100)  |  Fear (197)  |  Ground (217)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interest (386)  |  Judge (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Moral (195)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peril (9)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Progress (465)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Regret (30)  |  Religion (361)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shake (41)  |  Standard (57)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Touchstone (5)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)

A weird happening has occurred in the case of a lansquenet named Daniel Burghammer, of the squadron of Captain Burkhard Laymann Zu Liebenau, of the honorable Madrucci Regiment in Piadena, in Italy. When the same was on the point of going to bed one night he complained to his wife, to whom he had been married by the Church seven years ago, that he had great pains in his belly and felt something stirring therein. An hour thereafter he gave birth to a child, a girl. When his wife was made aware of this, she notified the occurrence at once. Thereupon he was examined and questioned. … He confessed on the spot that he was half man and half woman and that for more than seven years he had served as a soldier in Hungary and the Netherlands… . When he was born he was christened as a boy and given in baptism the name of Daniel… . He also stated that while in the Netherlands he only slept once with a Spaniard, and he became pregnant therefrom. This, however, he kept a secret unto himself and also from his wife, with whom he had for seven years lived in wedlock, but he had never been able to get her with child… . The aforesaid soldier is able to suckle the child with his right breast only and not at all on the left side, where he is a man. He has also the natural organs of a man for passing water. Both are well, the child is beautiful, and many towns have already wished to adopt it, which, however, has not as yet been arranged. All this has been set down and described by notaries. It is considered in Italy to be a great miracle, and is to be recorded in the chronicles. The couple, however, are to be divorced by the clergy.
Anonymous
'From Piadena in Italy, the 26th day of May 1601'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) The Fugger Newsletter (1970), 247-248. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg. This was footnoted in The Story of the Secret Service (1937), 698. https://books.google.com/books?id=YfssAAAAMAAJ Richard Wilmer Rowan - 1937
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consider (416)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happening (58)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pain (136)  |  Passing (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Record (154)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Water (481)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)

Adam is fading out. It is on account of Darwin and that crowd. I can see that he is not going to last much longer. There's a plenty of signs. He is getting belittled to a germ—a little bit of a speck that you can't see without a microscope powerful enough to raise a gnat to the size of a church. They take that speck and breed from it: first a flea; then a fly, then a bug, then cross these and get a fish, then a raft of fishes, all kinds, then cross the whole lot and get a reptile, then work up the reptiles till you've got a supply of lizards and spiders and toads and alligators and Congressmen and so on, then cross the entire lot again and get a plant of amphibiums, which are half-breeds and do business both wet and dry, such as turtles and frogs and ornithorhyncuses and so on, and cross-up again and get a mongrel bird, sired by a snake and dam'd by a bat, resulting in a pterodactyl, then they develop him, and water his stock till they've got the air filled with a million things that wear feathers, then they cross-up all the accumulated animal life to date and fetch out a mammal, and start-in diluting again till there's cows and tigers and rats and elephants and monkeys and everything you want down to the Missing Link, and out of him and a mermaid they propagate Man, and there you are! Everything ship-shape and finished-up, and nothing to do but lay low and wait and see if it was worth the time and expense.
'The Refuge of the Derelicts' collected in Mark Twain and John Sutton Tuckey, The Devil's Race-Track: Mark Twain's Great Dark Writings (1980), 340-41. - 1980
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Adam (7)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bird (149)  |  Both (493)  |  Bug (10)  |  Business (149)  |  Cow (39)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Dry (57)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expense (16)  |  Feather (12)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flea (11)  |  Fly (146)  |  Frog (38)  |  Germ (53)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Lot (151)  |  Low (80)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Missing (21)  |  Missing Link (4)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pterodactyl (2)  |  Rat (37)  |  Reptile (29)  |  See (1081)  |  Ship (62)  |  Snake (26)  |  Speck (23)  |  Spider (14)  |  Start (221)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tiger (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toad (10)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Wait (58)  |  Want (497)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

After all, we scientific workers … like women, are the victims of fashion: at one time we wear dissociated ions, at another electrons; and we are always loth to don rational clothing; some fixed belief we must have manufactured for us: we are high or low church, of this or that degree of nonconformity, according to the school in which we are brought up—but the agnostic is always rare of us and of late years the critic has been taboo.
'The Thirst of Salted Water or the Ions Overboard', Science Progress (1909), 3, 643.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Agnostic (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Degree (276)  |  Electron (93)  |  High (362)  |  Ion (21)  |  Late (118)  |  Low (80)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Must (1526)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rational (90)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Taboo (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Victim (35)  |  Year (933)

After we came out of the church, we stood talking for some time together of Bishop Berkeley’s ingenious sophistry to prove the non-existence of matter, and that every thing in the universe is merely ideal. I observed, that though we are satisfied his doctrine is not true, it is impossible to refute it. I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty force against a large stone, till he rebounded from it, “I refute it thus.”
In Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1820), Vol. 1, 218.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  George Berkeley (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Force (487)  |  Forget (115)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Samuel Johnson (50)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Prove (250)  |  Stone (162)  |  Striking (48)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)

Better far off to leave half the ruins and nine-tenths of the churches unseen and to see well the rest; to see them not once, but again and often again; to watch them, to learn them, to live with them, to love them, till they have become a part of life and life’s recollections.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Far (154)  |  Half (56)  |  Learn (629)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Love (309)  |  Nine-Tenths (3)  |  Often (106)  |  Part (222)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Rest (280)  |  Ruin (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Watch (109)

But notwithstanding these Arguments are so convictive and demonstrative, its marvellous to see how some Popish Authors (Jesuites especially) strain their wits to defend their Pagan Master Aristotle his Principles. Bullialdus speaks of a Florentine Physitian, that all the Friends he had could ever perswade him once to view the Heavens through a Telescope, and he gave that reason for his refusal, because he was afraid that then his Eyes would make him stagger concerning the truth of Aristotle’s Principles, which he was resolved he would not call into question. It were well, if these Men had as great veneration for the Scripture as they have, for Aristotles (if indeed they be his) absurd Books de cælo Sed de his satis.
(Indicating a belief that the Roman Catholic church impeded the development of modern science.)
Kometographia, Or a Discourse Concerning Comets (Boston 1684). Quoted in Michael Garibaldi Hall, The Last American Puritan: The Life of Increase Mather, 1639-1723 (1988), 167.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Author (167)  |  Belief (578)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Eye (419)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Master (178)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Religion (361)  |  Roman (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Speak (232)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Wit (59)

Collective unity is not the result of the brotherly love of the faithful for each other. The loyalty of the true believer is to the whole—the church, party, nation—and not to his fellow true believer. True loyalty between individuals is possible only in a loose and relatively free society.
In The True Believer (1951), 122
Science quotes on:  |  Believer (25)  |  Brotherly (2)  |  Collective (24)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Free (232)  |  Individual (404)  |  Loose (14)  |  Love (309)  |  Loyalty (9)  |  Nation (193)  |  Other (2236)  |  Party (18)  |  Possible (552)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Society (326)  |  True (212)  |  Unity (78)  |  Whole (738)

Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.
[Muir was aghast that the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite was to be flooded by the O'Shaughnessy Dam to provide water for San Francisco. Muir lost this land conservation battle; the dam was completed in 1914.]
John Muir
Closing remark in The Yosemite (1912), 262.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Completed (30)  |  Consecration (3)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Dam (6)  |  Flood (50)  |  Heart (229)  |  Holiness (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  People (1005)  |  Tank (6)  |  Temple (42)  |  Valley (32)  |  Water (481)

Diets were invented of the church, the workhouse and the hospital. They were started for the punishment of the spirit and have ended in the punishment of the body.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Diet (54)  |  End (590)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Invention (369)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Start (221)  |  Workhouse (2)

Do you see this egg? With this you can topple every theological theory, every church or temple in the world.
'Conversation Between d'Alembert and Diderot,' D'Alembert's Dream (written 1769, published 1830). Reprinted in Selected Writings, ed. Lester G. Crocker (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Egg (69)  |  See (1081)  |  Temple (42)  |  Theology (52)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

Every progress that a church makes in the construction of its dogmas leads to a further taming of the free spirit; every new dogma … narrows the circle of free thought. … Science, on the other hand, liberates with every step of its development, it opens up new paths to thought … In other words, it allows the individual to be truly free.
Translated from the original German, “Jeder Fortschritt, den eine Kirche in dem Aufbau ihrer Dogmen macht, führt zu einer weiter gehenden Bändigung des freien Geistes; jedes neue Dogma … verengt den Kreis des freien Denkens. … Die Naturwissenschaft umgekehrt befreit mit jedem Schritte ihrer Entwicklung, sie eröffnet dem Gedanken neue Bahnen … Sie gestattet, mit anderen Worten, dem Einzelnen in vollem Masse wahr zu sein.” In Speech to the 24th meeting of the German Naturalists and Physicians at Rostock 'Ueber die Aufgaben der Naturwissenschaften in dem neuen nationalen Leben Deutschlands', (On the tasks of the natural sciences in the new national life of Germany), published in Chemisches Zentralblatt (11 Oct 1871), No. 41, 654-655. English version by Webmaster using Google translate.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Circle (110)  |  Construction (112)  |  Development (422)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Free (232)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Individual (404)  |  Lead (384)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Narrow (84)  |  New (1216)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Step (231)  |  Taming (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truly (116)  |  Word (619)

I hate science. It denies a man’s responsibility for his own deeds, abolishes the brotherhood that springs from God’s fatherhood. It is a hectoring, dictating expertise, which makes the least lovable of the Church Fathers seem liberal by contrast. It is far easier for a Hitler or a Stalin to find a mock-scientific excuse for persecution than it was for Dominic to find a mock-Christian one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abolish (12)  |  Brotherhood (6)  |  Christian (43)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Deed (34)  |  Deny (66)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Expertise (8)  |  Far (154)  |  Father (110)  |  Fatherhood (2)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Hate (64)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Least (75)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mock (7)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seem (145)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stalin_Joseph (5)

I would beg the wise and learned fathers (of the church) to consider with all diligence the difference which exists between matters of mere opinion and matters of demonstration. ... [I]t is not in the power of professors of the demonstrative sciences to alter their opinions at will, so as to be now of one way of thinking and now of another. ... [D]emonstrated conclusions about things in nature of the heavens, do not admit of being altered with the same ease as opinions to what is permissible or not, under a contract, mortgage, or bill of exchange.
Letter to Cristina di Lorena, Grand Duchess of Tuscany (the mother of his patron Cosmo), 1615. Quoted in Sedley Taylor, 'Galileo and Papal Infallibility' (Dec 1873), in Macmillan's Magazine: November 1873 to April 1874 (1874) Vol 29, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contract (11)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Difference (337)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Exist (443)  |  Father (110)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mortgage (2)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Permissible (8)  |  Power (746)  |  Professor (128)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)

I, Galileo Galilei, son of the late Vincenzo Galilei, of Florence, aged seventy years, being brought personally to judgment, and kneeling before your Most Eminent and Most Reverend Lords Cardinals, General Inquisitors of the universal Christian republic against heretical depravity, having before my eyes the Holy Gospels, which I touch with my own hands, swear that I have always believed, and now believe, and with the help of God will in future believe, every article which the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Rome holds, teaches, and preaches. But because I have been enjoined by this Holy Office altogether to abandon the false opinion which maintains that the sun is the centre and immovable, and forbidden to hold, defend, or teach the said false doctrine in any manner, and after it hath been signified to me that the said doctrine is repugnant with the Holy Scripture, I have written and printed a book, in which I treat of the same doctrine now condemned, and adduce reasons with great force in support of the same, without giving any solution, and therefore have been judged grievously suspected of heresy; that is to say, that I held and believed that the sun is the centre of the universe and is immovable, and that the earth is not the centre and is movable; willing, therefore, to remove from the minds of your Eminences, and of every Catholic Christian, this vehement suspicion rightfully entertained toward me, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally every other error and sect contrary to Holy Church; and I swear that I will never more in future say or assert anything verbally, or in writing, which may give rise to a similar suspicion of me; but if I shall know any heretic, or anyone suspected of heresy, that I will denounce him to this Holy Office, or to the Inquisitor or Ordinary of the place where I may be; I swear, moreover, and promise, that I will fulfil and observe fully, all the penances which have been or shall be laid on me by this Holy Office. But if it shall happen that I violate any of my said promises, oaths, and protestations (which God avert!), I subject myself to all the pains and punishments which have been decreed and promulgated by the sacred canons, and other general and particular constitutions, against delinquents of this description. So may God help me, and his Holy Gospels which I touch with my own hands. I, the above-named Galileo Galilei, have abjured, sworn, promised, and bound myself as above, and in witness thereof with my own hand have subscribed this present writing of my abjuration, which I have recited word for word. At Rome, in the Convent of Minerva, June 22, 1633. I, Galileo Galilei, have abjured as above with my own hand.
Abjuration, 22 Jun 1633. In J.J. Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 319-321.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Christian (43)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curse (17)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Holy (34)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Observe (168)  |  Office (71)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Republic (15)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rome (19)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Swear (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Witness (54)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

If finally, the science should prove that society at a certain time revert to the church and recover its old foundation of absolute faith in a personal providence and a revealed religion, it commits suicide.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Certain (550)  |  Commit (41)  |  Faith (203)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Old (481)  |  Personal (67)  |  Prove (250)  |  Providence (18)  |  Recover (11)  |  Religion (361)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Revert (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Society (326)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Time (1877)

If the world is turning, even the church can’t stop it; if it isn’t turning, nobody can go out and make it turn.
From the play Galileo Galilei (2001) .
Science quotes on:  |  Nobody (104)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)

If today you can take a thing like evolution and make it a crime to teach it in the public schools, tomorrow you can make it a crime to teach it in the private schools, and next year you can make it a crime to teach it to the hustings or in the church. At the next session you may ban books and the newspapers. Soon you may set Catholic against Protestant and Protestant against Protestant, and try to foist your own religion upon the minds of men. If you can do one you can do the other. Ignorance and fanaticism are ever busy and need feeding. Always it is feeding and gloating for more. Today it is the public school teachers; tomorrow the private. The next day the preachers and the lecturers, the magazines, the books, the newspapers. After a while, Your Honor, it is the setting of man against man and creed against creed until with flying banners and beating drums we are marching backward to the glorious ages of the sixteenth century when bigots lighted fagots to burn the men who dared to bring any intelligence and enlightenment and culture to the human mind.
Darrow’s concluding remarks before adjournment of the second day of the Scopes Monkey Trial, Dayton, Tennessee (Monday, 13 Jul 1925). In The World's Most Famous Court Trial: Tennessee Evolution Case: a Complete Stenographic Report of the Famous Court Test of the Tennessee Anti-Evolution Act, at Dayton, July 10 to 21, 1925 (1925), Second Day's Proceedings, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Banner (7)  |  Bigot (6)  |  Book (392)  |  Burn (87)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Century (310)  |  Creed (27)  |  Crime (38)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drum (8)  |  Education (378)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flying (72)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Honor (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Religion (361)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Try (283)  |  Year (933)

In a strange way, Marcion understood the situation better than the more conventional followers of the church, for Lucifer is merely one of the faces of a larger force. Evil is a by-product, a component, of creation.
In 'Who is Lucifer?', The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition Into the Forces of History (1997), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  By-Product (7)  |  Component (48)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Creation (327)  |  Evil (116)  |  Face (212)  |  Follower (11)  |  Force (487)  |  Lucifer (2)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Product (160)  |  Situation (113)  |  Strange (157)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Way (1217)

In addition to instructing them in the holy Scriptures, they also taught their pupils poetry, astronomy, and the calculation of the church calendar.
Bede
Referring to the teaching methods of Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Hadrian, abbot of Canterbury (A.D. 669).
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Holy (34)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Teach (277)

In Europe I have been accused of taking my scientific ideas from the Church. In America I have been called a heretic, because I will not let my church-going friends pat me on the head.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  America (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Europe (43)  |  Friend (168)  |  Head (81)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Idea (843)  |  Pat (4)  |  Scientific (941)  |  United States (31)  |  Will (2355)

In size the electron bears the same relation to an atom that a baseball bears to the earth. Or, as Sir Oliver Lodge puts it, if a hydrogen atom were magnified to the size of a church, an electron would be a speck of dust in that church.
Quoted in 'Science Entering New Epoch', New York Times (5 Apr 1908), Sunday Magazine, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Baseball (3)  |  Bear (159)  |  Dust (64)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electron (93)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Speck (23)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Countless (36)  |  Deep (233)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  False (100)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Newton (10)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (113)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spite (55)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Surround (30)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unjustly (2)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

It was not just the Church that resisted the heliocentrism of Copernicus. Many prominent figures, in the decades following the 1543 publication of De Revolutionibus, regarded the Copernican model of the universe as a mathematical artifice which, though it yielded astronomical predictions of superior accuracy, could not be considered a true representation of physical reality: 'If Nicolaus Copernicus, the distinguished and incomparable master, in this work had not been deprived of exquisite and faultless instruments, he would have left us this science far more well-established. For he, if anybody, was outstanding and had the most perfect understanding of the geometrical and arithmetical requisites for building up this discipline. Nor was he in any respect inferior to Ptolemy; on the contrary, he surpassed him greatly in certain fields, particularly as far as the device of fitness and compendious harmony in hypotheses is concerned. And his apparently absurd opinion that the Earth revolves does not obstruct this estimate, because a circular motion designed to go on uniformly about another point than the very center of the circle, as actually found in the Ptolemaic hypotheses of all the planets except that of the Sun, offends against the very basic principles of our discipline in a far more absurd and intolerable way than does the attributing to the Earth one motion or another which, being a natural motion, turns out to be imperceptible. There does not at all arise from this assumption so many unsuitable consequences as most people think.'
from Letter to Christopher Rothman, 20 Jan 1587
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Basic (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Decade (59)  |  Design (195)  |  Device (70)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Earth (996)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Master (178)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Offend (7)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Principle (507)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Publication (101)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Representation (53)  |  Respect (207)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Think (1086)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Well-Established (5)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

I’m saying that the leaders of the church have locked the sacred cow called science in the stable and they won’t let anybody enter; they should open it immediately so that we can milk that cow in the name of humanity and thus find the truth.
From the play Galileo Galilei (2001) .
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Call (769)  |  Cow (39)  |  Enter (141)  |  Find (998)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Leader (43)  |  Milk (22)  |  Name (333)  |  Open (274)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Stable (30)  |  Truth (1057)

Many of the nobles and senators, although of great age, mounted more than once to the top of the highest church in Venice, in order to see sails and shipping … so far off that it was two hours before they were seen without my spy-glass …, for the effect of my instrument is such that it makes an object fifty miles off appear as large as if it were only five miles away. ... The Senate, knowing the way in which I had served it for seventeen years at Padua, ... ordered my election to the professorship for life.
Quoted in Will Durant, Ariel Duran, The Age of Reason Begins (1961), 604. From Charles Singer, Studies in the History and Method of Science (1917), Vol. 1, 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Effect (393)  |  Glass (92)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnification (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Mount (42)  |  Noble (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Sail (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Spy (8)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Top (96)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  April (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (127)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Close (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Course (409)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Early (185)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Farm (26)  |  Father (110)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Music (129)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Note (34)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Poet (83)  |  Political (121)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (31)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (49)  |  Protect (58)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Scary (3)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

My teacher, Hopkins, often commented on the craving for certainty that led so many physicists into mysticism or into the Church and similar organisations ... Faith seems to be an occupational hazard for physicists.
Penguin New Biology (1954), 16, 44
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Faith (203)  |  Hazard (18)  |  Mysticism (14)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Teacher (143)

No science is immune to the infection of politics and the corruption of power. … The time has come to consider how we might bring about a separation, as complete as possible, between Science and Government in all countries. I call this the disestablishment of science, in the same sense in which the churches have been disestablished and have become independent of the state.
In 'The Disestablishment of Science', Encounter (Jul 1971), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Country (251)  |  Government (110)  |  Immune (3)  |  Independent (67)  |  Infection (27)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separation (57)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)

Remsen never wore his hat inside the door for he had much the same respect for his laboratory that most of us have for a church.
Anonymous
Quoting an unnamed former student of Remsen, speaking of his original laboratory at Johns Hopkins University in Dalton Hall on Little Ross Street, Baltimore, Maryland. In F.H. Getman The Life of Ira Remsen (1940), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Door (93)  |  Hat (9)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Respect (207)  |  Wearing (2)

Science is neither a single tradition, nor the best tradition there is, except for people who have become accustomed to its presence, its benefits and its disadvantages. In a democracy it should be separated from the state just as churches are now separated from the state.
Against Method, p. 238 (1975).The author's warning against allowing scientists to become the new 'high priests' of society.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Become (815)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Best (459)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Presence (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Tradition (69)

Scientists were rated as great heretics by the church, but they were truly religious men because of their faith in the orderliness of the universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Faith (203)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rate (29)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)

Stay your rude steps, or e’er your feet invade
The Muses’ haunts,ye sons of War and Trade!
Nor you, ye legion fiends of Church and Law,
Pollute these pages with unhallow’d paw!
Debased, corrupted, grovelling, and confin’d,
No definitions touch your senseless mind;
To you no Postulates prefer their claim,
No ardent Axioms your dull souls inflame;
For you no Tangents touch, no Angles meet,
No Circles join in osculation sweet!
From poem, with co-authors John Hookham Frere, George Canning and George Ellis, The Loves of the Triangles: A Mathematical and Philosophical Poem, Canto I, collected in Poetry of the Anti-Jacobin (1854), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Circle (110)  |  Claim (146)  |  Definition (221)  |  Dull (54)  |  Law (894)  |  Legion (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Muse (10)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Soul (226)  |  Step (231)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tangent (6)  |  Touch (141)  |  War (225)

The bell ringing for church, we went thither immediately, and with hearts full of gratitude, returned sincere thanks to God for the mercies we had received: were I a Roman Catholic, perhaps I should on this occasion vow to build a chapel to some saint, but as I am not, if I were to vow at all, it should be to build a light-house. [Upon narrowly missing a shipwreck on the Scilly rocks.]
[Frequently seen summarized as, though not Franklin's own wording: Lighthouses are more helpful than churches.
Letter written at Falmouth, England (17 Jul 1757) to Deborah Read Franklin (common-law wife). Quoted in Benjamin Franklin and William Temple Franklin, The Works of Dr. Benjamin Franklin (1818), 175 footnote added by W.T. Franklin.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bell (35)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Chapel (3)  |  God (757)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Heart (229)  |  House (140)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Light (607)  |  Lighthouse (6)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Missing (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Return (124)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roman (36)  |  Saint (17)  |  Shipwreck (7)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Vow (4)

The Christian church, in its attitude toward science, shows the mind of a more or less enlightened man of the Thirteenth Century. It no longer believes that the earth is flat, but it is still convinced that prayer can cure after medicine fails.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Century (310)  |  Christian (43)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cure (122)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flat (33)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Still (613)  |  Thirteenth (2)  |  Toward (45)

The Church saves sinners, but science seeks to stop their manufacture.
Elbert Hubbard and H. P. Taber, Philistine: A Periodical of Protest (Nov 1908), 27, No. 6, 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Seek (213)

The Greeks made Space the subject-matter of a science of supreme simplicity and certainty. Out of it grew, in the mind of classical antiquity, the idea of pure science. Geometry became one of the most powerful expressions of that sovereignty of the intellect that inspired the thought of those times. At a later epoch, when the intellectual despotism of the Church, which had been maintained through the Middle Ages, had crumbled, and a wave of scepticism threatened to sweep away all that had seemed most fixed, those who believed in Truth clung to Geometry as to a rock, and it was the highest ideal of every scientist to carry on his science “more geometrico.”
In Space,Time, Matter, translated by Henry Leopold Brose (1952), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Belief (578)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Classical (45)  |  Cling (6)  |  Crumble (3)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greek (107)  |  Grow (238)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Later (18)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Space (500)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wave (107)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Akin (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Appear (118)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Base (117)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Central (80)  |  Closely (12)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  David (6)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Early (185)  |  Element (310)  |  Especially (31)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (7)  |  Genius (284)  |  God (757)  |  Heretic (8)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Image (96)  |  Impress (64)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prison (13)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (305)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Saint (17)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Significant (74)  |  Single (353)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Stage (143)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)  |  Writing (189)  |  Writings (6)

The most remarkable thing was his [Clifford’s] great strength as compared with his weight, as shown in some exercises. At one time he could pull up on the bar with either hand, which is well known to be one of the greatest feats of strength. His nerve at dangerous heights was extraordinary. I am appalled now to think that he climbed up and sat on the cross bars of the weathercock on a church tower, and when by way of doing something worse I went up and hung by my toes to the bars he did the same.
Anonymous
Quoted from a letter by one of Clifford’s friends to F. Pollock, in Clifford’s Lectures and Essays (1901), Vol. 1, Introduction, 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appalled (2)  |  Badly (32)  |  Bar (8)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Climb (35)  |  Compare (69)  |  Cross (16)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Feat (10)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hang (45)  |  Height (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Pull (43)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Show (346)  |  Sit (48)  |  Something (719)  |  Strength (126)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toe (7)  |  Tower (42)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)

The narrow sectarian cannot read astronomy with impunity. The creeds of his church shrivel like dried leaves at the door of the observatory.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 474.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Creed (27)  |  Door (93)  |  Dried (2)  |  Impunity (6)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Read (287)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Shrivel (2)

The separation of state and church must be complemented by the separation of state and science, that most recent, most aggressive, and most dogmatic religious institution.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975), 295.
Science quotes on:  |  Complement (5)  |  Government (110)  |  Institution (69)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Recent (77)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separation (57)  |  State (491)

To have a railroad, there must have been first the discoverers, who found out the properties of wood and iron, fire and water, and their latent power to carry men over the earth; next the organizers, who put these elements together, surveyed the route, planned the structure, set men to grade the hill, to fill the valley, and pave the road with iron bars; and then the administrators, who after all that is done, procure the engines, engineers, conductors, ticket-distributors, and the rest of the “hands;” they buy the coal and see it is not wasted, fix the rates of fare, calculate the savings, and distribute the dividends. The discoverers and organizers often fare hard in the world, lean men, ill-clad and suspected, often laughed at, while the administrator is thought the greater man, because he rides over their graves and pays the dividends, where the organizer only called for the assessments, and the discoverer told what men called a dream. What happens in a railroad happens also in a Church, or a State.
Address at the Melodeon, Boston (5 Mar 1848), 'A Discourse occasioned by the Death of John Quincy Adams'. Collected in Discourses of Politics: The Collected Works of Theodore Parker: Part 4 (1863), 139. Note: Ralph Waldo Emerson earlier used the phrase “pave the road with iron bars,” in Nature (1836), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (11)  |  All (4108)  |  Assessment (3)  |  Bar (8)  |  Buy (20)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Coal (57)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Dividend (3)  |  Dream (208)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Fare (5)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fix (25)  |  Grade (11)  |  Grave (52)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (143)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hill (20)  |  Iron (96)  |  Latent (12)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Pave (8)  |  Pay (43)  |  Plan (117)  |  Power (746)  |  Procure (5)  |  Property (168)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Rate (29)  |  Rest (280)  |  Ride (21)  |  Road (64)  |  Route (15)  |  Saving (20)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Survey (33)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Ticket (5)  |  Together (387)  |  Valley (32)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Wood (92)  |  World (1774)

Unanimity of opinion may be fitting for a church, for the frightened or greedy victims of some (ancient, or modern) myth, or for the weak and willing followers of some tyrant. Variety of opinion is necessary for objective knowledge. And a method that encourages variety is also the only method that is comparable with a humanitarian outlook.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975, 1993), 31-32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Humanitarian (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Myth (56)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Objective (91)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Unanimity (4)  |  Variety (132)  |  Victim (35)  |  Weak (71)  |  Willing (44)

We would be 1,500 years ahead if it hadn’t been for the church dragging science back by its coat tails and burning our best minds at the stake.
In Dave Lane, Isn’t Religion Weird? Quotations for Atheists (2008), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Best (459)  |  Burning (48)  |  Coattails (2)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stake (19)  |  Year (933)

We would never get away from it. ... It’s bad enough as it is, but with the wireless telephone one could be called up at the opera, in church, in our beds. Where could one be free from interruption?
[Prediction about the cell phone made over a century ago.]
New York Times (23 Jan 1910), Sunday Magazine Section, 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bed (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell Phone (5)  |  Century (310)  |  Enough (340)  |  Free (232)  |  Interruption (5)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opera (3)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Telephone (27)

When it was first proposed to establish laboratories at Cambridge, Todhunter, the mathematician, objected that it was unnecessary for students to see experiments performed, since the results could be vouched for by their teachers, all of them of the highest character, and many of them clergymen of the Church of England.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Character (243)  |  Clergyman (5)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Object (422)  |  Objection (32)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Isaac Todhunter (14)  |  Unnecessary (23)

When young Galileo, then a student at Pisa, noticed one day during divine service a chandelier swinging backwards and forwards, and convinced himself, by counting his pulse, that the duration of the oscillations was independent of the arc through which it moved, who could know that this discovery would eventually put it in our power, by means of the pendulum, to attain an accuracy in the measurement of time till then deemed impossible, and would enable the storm-tossed seaman in the most distant oceans to determine in what degree of longitude he was sailing?
Hermann von Helmholtz, Edmund Atkinson (trans.), Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects: First Series (1883), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Arc (12)  |  Attain (125)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Counting (26)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Enable (119)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Forward (102)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Himself (461)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Independent (67)  |  Know (1518)  |  Longitude (6)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Power (746)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Sailing (14)  |  Seaman (3)  |  Service (110)  |  Storm (51)  |  Student (300)  |  Swing (11)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toss (7)  |  Young (227)

You shall not eat or drink in the company of other people but with lepers alone, and you shall know that when you shall have died you will not be buried in the church.
Anonymous
Advice to lepers in the Middle Ages in Treves. Quoted in O. Schell, Zur Geschichte des Aussatzes am Niederrhein, Ardir für Geschichte der Medezin (1910), 3, 335-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Company (59)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leprosy (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Will (2355)

[1665-08-16] ...Hence to the Exchange, which I have not been a great while. But Lord, how sad a sight it is to see the streets empty of people, and very few upon the Change - jealous of every door that one sees shut up, lest it should be the plague - and about us, two shops in three, if not more, generally shut up. ... It was dark before I could get home; and so land at church-yard stairs, where to my great trouble I met a dead Corps, of the plague, in the narrow ally, just bringing down a little pair of stairs - but I thank God I was not much disturbed at it. However, I shall beware of being late abroad again.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (16 Aug 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beware (16)  |  Change (593)  |  Dark (140)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exchange (37)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Home (170)  |  Late (118)  |  Little (707)  |  Lord (93)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  People (1005)  |  Plague (41)  |  See (1081)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sight (132)  |  Thank (46)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)

[1665-09-14] ...my finding that although the Bill [total of dead] in general is abated, yet the City within the walls is encreasd and likely to continue so (and is close to our house there) - my meeting dead corps's of the plague, carried to be buried close to me at noonday through the City in Fanchurch-street - to see a person sick of the sores carried close by me by Grace-church in a hackney-coach - my finding the Angell tavern at the lower end of Tower-hill shut up; and more then that, the alehouse at the Tower-stairs; and more then that, that the person was then dying of the plague when I was last there, a little while ago at night, to write a short letter there, and I overheard the mistress of the house sadly saying to her husband somebody was very ill, but did not think it was of the plague - to hear that poor Payne my waterman hath buried a child and is dying himself - to hear that a labourer I sent but the other day to Dagenhams to know how they did there is dead of the plague and that one of my own watermen, that carried me daily, fell sick as soon as he had landed me on Friday morning last, when I had been all night upon the water ... is now dead of the plague - to hear ... that Mr Sidny Mountagu is sick of a desperate fever at my Lady Carteret's at Scott's hall - to hear that Mr. Lewes hath another daughter sick - and lastly, that both my servants, W Hewers and Tom Edwards, have lost their fathers, both in St. Sepulcher's parish, of the plague this week - doth put me into great apprehensions of melancholy, and with good reason. But I put off the thoughts of sadness as much as I can, and the rather to keep my wife in good heart and family also.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (14 Sep 1665)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Both (493)  |  Child (307)  |  City (78)  |  Continue (165)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daughter (29)  |  End (590)  |  Family (94)  |  Father (110)  |  Fever (29)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Grace (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  House (140)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Plague (41)  |  Poor (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Servant (39)  |  Short (197)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sick (81)  |  Soon (186)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Total (94)  |  Tower (42)  |  Wall (67)  |  Water (481)  |  Week (70)  |  Wife (41)  |  Write (230)

[Concerning] the usual contempt with which an orthodox analytic group treats all outsiders and strangers ... I urge you to think of the young psychoanalysts as your colleagues, collaborators and partners and not as spies, traitors and wayward children. You can never develop a science that way, only an orthodox church.
Letter to a colleague (Nov 1960). In Colin Wilson, New Pathways in Psychology: Maslow and the Post-Freudian Revolution (1972, 2001), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Never (1087)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Outsider (6)  |  Partner (5)  |  Psychoanalyst (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Think (1086)  |  Traitor (3)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wayward (3)  |  Young (227)

[Louis Rendu, Bishop of Annecy] collects observations, makes experiments, and tries to obtain numerical results; always taking care, however, so to state his premises and qualify his conclusions that nobody shall be led to ascribe to his numbers a greater accuracy than they merit. It is impossible to read his work, and not feel that he was a man of essentially truthful mind and that science missed an ornament when he was appropriated by the Church.
In The Glaciers of the Alps (1860), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Appropriation (5)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Care (186)  |  Collection (64)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Essential (199)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miss (51)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Premise (37)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Read (287)  |  Louis le Chanoine Rendu (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  State (491)  |  Statement (142)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.