Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Bound

Bound Quotes (12 quotes)

Der bis zur Vorrede, die ihn abweist, gelangte Leser hat das Buch für baares Geld gekauft und frägt, was ihn schadlos hält? – Meine letzte Zuflucht ist jetzt, ihn zu erinnern, daß er ein Buch, auch ohne es gerade zu lesen, doch auf mancherlei Art zu benutzen weiß. Es kann, so gut wie viele andere, eine Lücke seiner Bibliothek ausfüllen, wo es sich, sauber gebunden, gewiß gut ausnehmen wird. Oder auch er kann es seiner gelehrten Freundin auf die Toilette, oder den Theetisch legen. Oder endlich er kann ja, was gewiß das Beste von Allem ist und ich besonders rathe, es recensiren.
The reader who has got as far as the preface and is put off by that, has paid money for the book, and wants to know how he is to be compensated. My last refuge now is to remind him that he knows of various ways of using a book without precisely reading it. It can, like many another, fill a gap in his library, where, neatly bound, it is sure to look well. Or he can lay it on the dressing-table or tea-table of his learned lady friend. Or finally he can review it; this is assuredly the best course of all, and the one I specially advise.
In Preface, written at Dresden in August 1818, first German edition, Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung, 4 Bücher nebst einem Anhange der die Kritik der Kentischen Philosophie (1819), xv-xvi. As translated by E.F.J. Payne in The World as Will and Representation (1958, 1969), Vol. 1, xvii. In the preface, Schopenhauer is joking that some readers of his book may find his work does not interest them.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Book (181)  |  Compensation (6)  |  Dressing (3)  |  Filling (6)  |  Friend (63)  |  Gap (20)  |  Lady (6)  |  Learned (20)  |  Library (37)  |  Money (125)  |  Neatly (2)  |  Preface (6)  |  Reader (22)  |  Reading (51)  |  Recommendation (8)  |  Refuge (12)  |  Reminder (11)  |  Review (5)  |  Table (25)  |  Use (70)

Mon royaume est de la dimension de l’univers, et mon désir n’a pas de bornes. Je vais toujours, affranchissant l’esprit et pesant les mondes, sans haine, sans peur, sans pitié, sans amour, et sans Dieu. On m’appelle la Science.
My kingdom is of the dimension of the universe and my desire has no bounds. I am going about always to free the spirit and weigh the worlds, without hatred, without fear, without pity and without God. They call me Science.
French passage from La Tentation de Saint-Antoine (1874) in Œvres Complètes de Gustave Flaubert (1885), 222. English translation by Ernest Tristan and G.F. Monkshood, The Temptation of Saint Anthony (1910), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Desire (101)  |  Dimension (26)  |  Fear (113)  |  Free (59)  |  God (454)  |  Hatred (16)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Pity (7)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Universe (563)  |  Weigh (9)  |  World (667)

Question: If you walk on a dry path between two walls a few feet apart, you hear a musical note or “ring” at each footstep. Whence comes this?
Answer: This is similar to phosphorescent paint. Once any sound gets between two parallel reflectors or walls, it bounds from one to the other and never stops for a long time. Hence it is persistent, and when you walk between the walls you hear the sounds made by those who walked there before you. By following a muffin man down the passage within a short time you can hear most distinctly a musical note, or, as it is more properly termed in the question, a “ring” at every (other) step.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175-6, Question 2. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Before (6)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Dry (12)  |  Examination (60)  |  Following (16)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Howler (15)  |  Long (95)  |  Man (345)  |  Music (66)  |  Note (22)  |  Paint (17)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Passage (14)  |  Path (59)  |  Persistence (16)  |  Question (315)  |  Reflector (3)  |  Short (31)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Sound (59)  |  Stop (56)  |  Term (87)  |  Time (439)  |  Walk (56)  |  Wall (20)

Any frontal attack on ignorance is bound to fail because the masses are always ready to defend their most precious possession: their ignorance.
Quote appears in Henry Wysham Lanier, The Golden Book Magazine (Feb 1933), 17, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (29)  |  Defend (20)  |  Fail (34)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Mass (61)  |  Possession (37)  |  Precious (22)  |  Ready (16)

Astronomy has revealed the great truth that the whole universe is bound together by one all-pervading influence.
God's Glory in the Heavens (1862, 3rd Ed. 1867) 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Influence (110)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Truth (750)  |  Universe (563)

If a man is not bound down, he is sure to succeed.
In Orison Swett Marden, 'Bell Telephone Talk: Hints on Success by Alexander G. Bell', How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (1901), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Success (202)

O God, I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.
Hamlet (1601), II, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (92)  |  God (454)  |  Infinity (59)  |  King (23)  |  Nutshell (2)  |  Space (154)

The efforts of most human-beings are consumed in the struggle for their daily bread, but most of those who are, either through fortune or some special gift, relieved of this struggle are largely absorbed in further improving their worldly lot. Beneath the effort directed toward the accumulation of worldly goods lies all too frequently the illusion that this is the most substantial and desirable end to be achieved; but there is, fortunately, a minority composed of those who recognize early in their lives that the most beautiful and satisfying experiences open to humankind are not derived from the outside, but are bound up with the development of the individual's own feeling, thinking and acting. The genuine artists, investigators and thinkers have always been persons of this kind. However inconspicuously the life of these individuals runs its course, none the less the fruits of their endeavors are the most valuable contributions which one generation can make to its successors.
In letter (1 May 1935), Letters to the Editor, 'The Late Emmy Noether: Professor Einstein Writes in Appreciation of a Fellow-Mathematician', New York Times (4 May 1935), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Acting (5)  |  Artist (46)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Development (228)  |  Early (39)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Experience (268)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Fortunately (7)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Generation (111)  |  Genuine (19)  |  Humankind (7)  |  Inconspicuous (3)  |  Individual (177)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Kind (99)  |  Life (917)  |  Minority (16)  |  Emmy Noether (6)  |  Nonetheless (2)  |  Outside (37)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Successor (6)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Value (180)

The end of our foundation [Salomon's House in the New Atlantis] is the knowledge of Causes and the secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
In Francis Bacon and William Rawle (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon: Philosophical Works (1887), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Effect (133)  |  Empire (10)  |  Enlargement (6)  |  Human (445)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Motion (127)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Secret (98)  |  Thing (37)

The most ominous conflict of our time is the difference of opinion, of outlook, between men of letters, historians, philosophers, the so-called humanists, on the one side and scientists on the other. The gap cannot but increase because of the intolerance of both and the fact that science is growing by leaps and bounds.
The History of Science and the New Humanism (1931), 69.Omnious;Conflict;Difference;Opinion;Outlook;Men OfLetters;Historian;Philosopher;Humanist;So-Called;Scientist;Gap;Intolerance;Fact;Growth;Leap;Bound
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (49)  |  Difference (208)  |  Fact (609)  |  Gap (20)  |  Growth (111)  |  Historian (30)  |  Humanist (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Intolerance (7)  |  Leap (23)  |  Man Of Letters (2)  |  Ominous (3)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Outlook (12)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Side (36)  |  So-Called (18)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Nature has scattered the seeds of life
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Through the animal and vegetable kingdoms, Nature has scattered the seeds of life abroad with the most profuse and liberal hand; but has been comparatively sparing in the room and the nourishment necessary to rear them. The germs of existence contained in this spot of earth, if they could freely develop themselves, would fill millions of worlds in the course of a few thousand years. Necessity, that imperious all-pervading law of nature, restrains them within the prescribed bounds. The race of plants and the race of animals shrink under this great restrictive law; and man cannot by any efforts of reason escape from it.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (5)  |  Animal (309)  |  Comparatively (6)  |  Develop (55)  |  Earth (487)  |  Effort (94)  |  Escape (34)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fill (35)  |  Freely (7)  |  Germ (27)  |  Great (300)  |  Hand (103)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Law (418)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Million (89)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nourishment (16)  |  Plant (173)  |  Prescribed (3)  |  Race (76)  |  Rear (6)  |  Reason (330)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Room (29)  |  Scattered (4)  |  Shrink (10)  |  Sparing (2)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

We are at our human finest, dancing with our minds, when there are more choices than two. Sometimes there are ten, even twenty different ways to go, all but one bound to be wrong, and the richness of the selection in such situations can lift us onto totally new ground.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Choice (64)  |  Dance (14)  |  Difference (208)  |  Ground (63)  |  Human (445)  |  Lift (17)  |  Mind (544)  |  New (340)  |  Richness (14)  |  Selection (27)  |  Situation (41)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Ten (3)  |  Totally (4)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Two (13)  |  Way (36)  |  Wrong (116)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.