Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index U > Category: Unite

Unite Quotes (42 quotes)

But how shall we this union well expresse?
Naught tyes the soule: her subtiltie is such
She moves the bodie, which she doth possesse.
Yet no part toucheth, but by Vertue's touch.
Then dwels she not therein as in a tent;
Nor as a pilot in his Ship doth sit;
Nor as the spider in his web is pent;
Nor as the Waxe retaines the print in it;
Nor as a Vessell water doth containe;
Nor as one Liquor in another shed;
Nor as the heate dath in the fire remaine;
Nor as a voice throughout the ayre is spred;
But as the faire and cheerfull morning light,
Doth here, and there, her silver beames impart,
And in an instant doth her selfe unite
To the transparent Aire, in all, and part:
Still resting whole, when blowes the Aire devide;
Abiding pure, when th' Aire is most corrupted;
Throughout the Aire her beames dispersing wide,
And when the Aire is tost, not interrupted:
So doth the piercing Soule the body fill;
Being all in all, and all in part diffus'd;
Indivisible, incorruptible still,
Not forc't, encountred, troubled or confus'd.
And as the Sunne above the light doth bring,
Tough we behold it in the Aire below;
So from th'eternall light the Soule doth spring,
Though in the Bodie she her powers do show.
From 'Nosce Teipsum' (1599), in Claire Howard (ed.), The Poems of Sir John Davies (1941), 151-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fire (189)  |  Impart (23)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Instant (45)  |  Light (607)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Naught (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Pure (291)  |  Ship (62)  |  Show (346)  |  Silver (46)  |  Spider (14)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tent (11)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Union (51)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Buddha (5)  |  Capable (168)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cling (6)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Content (69)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Count (105)  |  Definition (221)  |  Depth (94)  |  Desire (204)  |  Devout (5)  |  Divine (112)  |  Domain (69)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Force (487)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  Himself (461)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Outside (141)  |  Person (363)  |  Personality (62)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rational (90)  |  Regardless (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Seem (145)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Superpersonal (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Value (365)

All sciences deal in unity. They unite phenomena in a principle.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 379.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Deal (188)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Unity (78)

All the experiments which have been hitherto carried out, and those that are still being daily performed, concur in proving that between different bodies, whether principles or compounds, there is an agreement, relation, affinity or attraction (if you will have it so), which disposes certain bodies to unite with one another, while with others they are unable to contract any union: it is this effect, whatever be its cause, which will help us to give a reason for all the phenomena furnished by chemistry, and to tie them together.
From Elemens de Chymie Theorique (1749). As quoted, in Trevor Harvey Levere, Affinity and Matter: Elements of Chemical Philosophy, 1800-1865 (1971), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Daily (87)  |  Different (577)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reason (744)  |  Still (613)  |  Tie (38)  |  Together (387)  |  Union (51)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

Between the lowest and the highest degree of spiritual and corporal perfection, there is an almost infinite number of intermediate degrees. The succession of degrees comprises the Universal Chain. It unites all beings, ties together all worlds, embraces all the spheres. One SINGLE BEING is outside this chain, and this is HE who made it.
Contemplation de la nature (1764), Vol. I, 27. Trans. Stephen Jay Gould, Ontogeny and Phylogeny (1977), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Degree (276)  |  Embrace (46)  |  God (757)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Outside (141)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Single (353)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Succession (77)  |  Tie (38)  |  Together (387)  |  Universal (189)  |  World (1774)

Chemists must unite in order to force upon the reluctant world the power of their discoveries.
Shortly after World War I. Quoted, as a memory of Pope, in Sir William Jackson Pope Memorial Lecture by Leslie H. Lampitt, 'Sir William Jackson Pope: His Influence on Scientific Organisation' Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (31 Jan 1947), 95, No. 4736, 174. Webmaster notes that this is given as a memory, and the wording therefore may not be verbatim.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (156)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Force (487)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Reluctant (4)  |  World (1774)

Heat energy of uniform temperature [is] the ultimate fate of all energy. The power of sunlight and coal, electric power, water power, winds and tides do the work of the world, and in the end all unite to hasten the merry molecular dance.
Matter and Energy (1911), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Coal (57)  |  Dance (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Fate (72)  |  Haste (6)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Heat (174)  |  Merry (3)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Power (746)  |  Solar Power (9)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Tidal Power (3)  |  Tide (34)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Power (6)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wind Power (9)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I am convinced that an important stage of human thought will have been reached when the physiological and the psychological, the objective and the subjective, are actually united, when the tormenting conflicts or contradictions between my consciousness and my body will have been factually resolved or discarded.
Physiology of the Higher Nervous Activity (1932), 93-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Body (537)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Discard (29)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Objective (91)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reach (281)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Stage (143)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Thought (953)  |  Torment (18)  |  Will (2355)

If atomic bombs are to be added as new weapons to the arsenals of a warring world, or to the arsenals of nations preparing for war, then the time will come when mankind will curse the names of Los Alamos and Hiroshima. The people must unite, or they will perish.
Speech at Fuller Lodge when the U.S. Army was honouring the work at Los Alamos. (16 Oct 1945). Quoted in Kai Bird, Martin J. Sherwin, American Prometheus: the Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (2005), 323.
Science quotes on:  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Curse (17)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Los Alamos (5)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Nation (193)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Perish (50)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Time (1877)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

If the views we have ventured to advance be correct, we may almost consider {greek words} of the ancients to be realised in hydrogen, an opinion, by the by, not altogether new. If we actually consider the specific gravities of bodies in their gaseous state to represent the number of volumes condensed into one; or in other words, the number of the absolute weight of a single volume of the first matter ({greek words}) which they contain, which is extremely probable, multiples in weight must always indicate multiples in volume, and vice versa; and the specific gravities, or absolute weights of all bodies in a gaseous state, must be multiples of the specific gravity or absolute weight of the first matter, ({Greek words}), because all bodies in the gaseous state which unite with one another unite with reference to their volume.
'Correction of a Mistake in the Essay on the Relation between the Specific Gravities of Bodies in their Gaseous State and the Weights of their Atoms', Annals of Philosophy (1816), 7, 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Body (537)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Correctness (12)  |  First (1283)  |  Gas (83)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greek (107)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Matter (798)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Realization (43)  |  Represent (155)  |  Single (353)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  State (491)  |  Venture (18)  |  Vice (40)  |  View (488)  |  Volume (19)  |  Weight (134)  |  Word (619)

In an age of egoism, it is so difficult to persuade man that of all studies, the most important is that of himself. This is because egoism, like all passions, is blind. The attention of the egoist is directed to the immediate needs of which his senses give notice, and cannot be raised to those reflective needs that reason discloses to us; his aim is satisfaction, not perfection. He considers only his individual self; his species is nothing to him. Perhaps he fears that in penetrating the mysteries of his being he will ensure his own abasement, blush at his discoveries, and meet his conscience. True philosophy, always at one with moral science, tells a different tale. The source of useful illumination, we are told, is that of lasting content, is in ourselves. Our insight depends above all on the state of our faculties; but how can we bring our faculties to perfection if we do not know their nature and their laws! The elements of happiness are the moral sentiments; but how can we develop these sentiments without considering the principle of our affections, and the means of directing them? We become better by studying ourselves; the man who thoroughly knows himself is the wise man. Such reflection on the nature of his being brings a man to a better awareness of all the bonds that unite us to our fellows, to the re-discovery at the inner root of his existence of that identity of common life actuating us all, to feeling the full force of that fine maxim of the ancients: 'I am a man, and nothing human is alien to me.'
Considerations sur les diverses méthodes à suivre dans l'observation des peuples sauvages (1800) The Observation of Savage Peoples, trans. F. C. T. Moore (1969), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attention (190)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Blind (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Common (436)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Consider (416)  |  Depend (228)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Identity (19)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passion (114)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Root (120)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Studying (70)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Useful (250)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wise Man (15)

In general the position as regards all such new calculi is this That one cannot accomplish by them anything that could not be accomplished without them. However, the advantage is, that, provided such a calculus corresponds to the inmost nature of frequent needs, anyone who masters it thoroughly is able—without the unconscious inspiration of genius which no one can command—to solve the respective problems, yea, to solve them mechanically in complicated cases in which, without such aid, even genius becomes powerless. Such is the case with the invention of general algebra, with the differential calculus, and in a more limited region with Lagrange’s calculus of variations, with my calculus of congruences, and with Möbius’s calculus. Such conceptions unite, as it were, into an organic whole countless problems which otherwise would remain isolated and require for their separate solution more or less application of inventive genius.
Letter (15 May 1843) to Schumacher, collected in Carl Friedrich Gauss Werke (1866), Vol. 8, 298, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 197-198. From the original German, “Überhaupt verhält es sich mit allen solchen neuen Calculs so, dass man durch sie nichts leisten kann, was nicht auch ohne sie zu leisten wäre; der Vortheil ist aber der, dass, wenn ein solcher Calcul dem innersten Wesen vielfach vorkommender Bedürfnisse correspondirt, jeder, der sich ihn ganz angeeignet hat, auch ohne die gleichsam unbewussten Inspirationen des Genies, die niemand erzwingen kann, die dahin gehörigen Aufgaben lösen, ja selbst in so verwickelten Fällen gleichsam mechanisch lösen kann, wo ohne eine solche Hülfe auch das Genie ohnmächtig wird. So ist es mit der Erfindung der Buchstabenrechnung überhaupt; so mit der Differentialrechnung gewesen; so ist es auch (wenn auch in partielleren Sphären) mit Lagranges Variationsrechnung, mit meiner Congruenzenrechnung und mit Möbius' Calcul. Es werden durch solche Conceptionen unzählige Aufgaben, die sonst vereinzelt stehen, und jedesmal neue Efforts (kleinere oder grössere) des Erfindungsgeistes erfordern, gleichsam zu einem organischen Reiche.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Aid (97)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Become (815)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Command (58)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conception (154)  |  Congruence (3)  |  Countless (36)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Frequent (23)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Inmost (2)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventive (8)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  August Möbius (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Organic (158)  |  Position (77)  |  Powerless (6)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regard (305)  |  Region (36)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Respective (2)  |  Separate (143)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Variation (90)  |  Whole (738)

Its [mathematical analysis] chief attribute is clearness; it has no means for expressing confused ideas. It compares the most diverse phenomena and discovers the secret analogies which unite them. If matter escapes us, as that of air and light because of its extreme tenuity, if bodies are placed far from us in the immensity of space, if man wishes to know the aspect of the heavens at successive periods separated by many centuries, if gravity and heat act in the interior of the solid earth at depths which will forever be inaccessible, mathematical analysis is still able to trace the laws of these phenomena. It renders them present and measurable, and appears to be the faculty of the human mind destined to supplement the brevity of life and the imperfection of the senses, and what is even more remarkable, it follows the same course in the study of all phenomena; it explains them in the same language, as if in witness to the unity and simplicity of the plan of the universe, and to make more manifest the unchangeable order which presides over all natural causes.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), Discours Préliminaire, xiv, (Theory of Heat, Introduction), as translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Body (537)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Century (310)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Compare (69)  |  Confused (12)  |  Course (409)  |  Depth (94)  |  Destined (42)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Interior (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurable (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Place (177)  |  Plan (117)  |  Present (619)  |  Preside (3)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Render (93)  |  Same (157)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Tenuity (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Witness (54)

Lay down your rails, ye nations, near and far—
Yoke your full trains to Steam’s triumphal car;
Link town to town; unite in iron bands
The long-estranged and oft-embattled lands.
From poem, 'Railways' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 214.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Car (71)  |  Down (456)  |  Iron (96)  |  Land (115)  |  Lay (2)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Nation (193)  |  Rail (4)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Steam (80)  |  Town (27)  |  Train (114)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Yoke (2)

Magic is a faculty of wonderful virtue, full of most high mysteries, containing the most profound contemplation of most secret things, together with the nature, power, quality, substance and virtues thereof, as also the knowledge of whole Nature, and it doth instruct us concerning the differing and agreement of things amongst themselves, whence it produceth its wonderful effects, by uniting the virtues of things through the application of them one to the other.
In De Occulta Philosophia (1533), Vol. 1. Translation by J.F. (1651) reprinted as The Philosophy of Natural Magic (1913), 38-39.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  Application (242)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Effect (393)  |  High (362)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Magic (86)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quality (135)  |  Secret (194)  |  Substance (248)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)

Mathematic stands forth as that which unites, mediates between Man and Nature, Inner and Outer world, Thought and Perception, [as no other subject does].
In Die Erziehung der Menschheit (1826). Adapted and translated in William Henry Herford, 'The School: Mathematic', The Student’s Froebel (1894), Vol. 1, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Inner (71)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mediate (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Perception (97)  |  Stand (274)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  World (1774)

Mr. Dalton's aspect and manner were repulsive. There was no gracefulness belonging to him. His voice was harsh and brawling; his gait stiff and awkward; his style of writing and conversation dry and almost crabbed. In person he was tall, bony, and slender. He never could learn to swim: on investigating this circumstance he found that his spec. grav. as a mass was greater than that of water; and he mentioned this in his lectures on natural philosophy in illustration of the capability of different persons for attaining the art of swimming. Independence and simplicity of manner and originality were his best qualities. Though in comparatively humble circumstances he maintained the dignity of the philosophical character. As the first distinct promulgator of the doctrine that the elements of bodies unite in definite proportions to form chemical compounds, he has acquired an undying fame.
Dr John Davy's (brother of Humphry Davy) impressions of Dalton written in c.1830-31 in Malta.
John Davy
Quoted in W. C. Henry, Memoirs of the Life and Scientific Researches of John Dalton (1854), 217-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Art (657)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Best (459)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brother (43)  |  Capability (41)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conversation (43)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Definite (110)  |  Different (577)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Dry (57)  |  Element (310)  |  Fame (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Greater (288)  |  Humble (50)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Impression (114)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mention (82)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Water (481)  |  Writing (189)

My work always tried to unite the true with the beautiful, but when I had to choose one or the other, I usually chose the beautiful.
As quoted by Freeman Dyson in Obituary for Hermann Weyl in Nature (10 Mar 1956). In James Roy Newman, The World of Mathematics (2000), Vol. 3, 1831.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Other (2236)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)

My work has always tried to unite the true with the beautiful and when I had to choose one or the other, I usually chose the beautiful.
In Obituary by Freeman J. Dyson, 'Prof. Hermann Weyl, For. Mem. R.S.', Nature (10 Mar 1956), 177, 458. Dyson notes that this was told to him personally, by Weyl who was “half joking”.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Choose (112)  |  Other (2236)  |  True (212)  |  Usual (6)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)

Nature, displayed in its full extent, presents us with an immense tableau, in which all the order of beings are each represented by a chain which sustains a continuous series of objects, so close and so similar that their difference would be difficult to define. This chain is not a simple thread which is only extended in length, it is a large web or rather a network, which, from interval to interval, casts branches to the side in order to unite with the networks of another order.
'Les Oiseaux Qui Ne Peuvent Voler', Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux (1770), Vol. I, 394. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cast (66)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Display (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extent (139)  |  Immense (86)  |  Large (394)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Network (21)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Present (619)  |  Represent (155)  |  Series (149)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thread (32)  |  Web Of Life (7)

New scientific ideas never spring from a communal body, however organized, but rather from the head of an individually inspired researcher who struggles with his problems in lonely thought and unites all his thought on one single point which is his whole world for the moment.
Address on the 25th anniversary of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Gesellschaft (Jan 1936). Quoted in Surviving the Swastika: Scientific Research in Nazi Germany (1993), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Community (104)  |  Head (81)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Moment (253)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Organization (114)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Spring (133)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Nymphs! you disjoin, unite, condense, expand,
And give new wonders to the Chemist’s hand;
On tepid clouds of rising steam aspire,
Or fix in sulphur all its solid fire;
With boundless spring elastic airs unfold,
Or fill the fine vacuities of gold
With sudden flash vitrescent sparks reveal,
By fierce collision from the flint and steel. …
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Collision (15)  |  Expand (53)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flint (6)  |  Gold (97)  |  New (1216)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rising (44)  |  Solid (116)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spring (133)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steel (21)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Wonder (236)

Of the four elements water is the second in weight and the second in respect of mobility. It is never at rest until it unites with the sea…
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Element (310)  |  Mobility (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sea (308)  |  Second (62)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)

Science and technology, and the various forms of art, all unite humanity in a single and interconnected system. As science progresses, the worldwide cooperation of scientists and technologists becomes more and more of a special and distinct intellectual community of friendship, in which, in place of antagonism, there is growing up a mutually advantageous sharing of work, a coordination of efforts, a common language for the exchange of information, and a solidarity, which are in many cases independent of the social and political differences of individual states.
In The Medvedev Papers (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantageous (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Antagonism (6)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Community (104)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Form (959)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Growing (98)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Individual (404)  |  Information (166)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  More (2559)  |  Political (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Technologist (7)  |  Technology (257)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worldwide (16)

The ability of a cell to sense these broken ends, to direct them towards each other, and then to unite them so that the union of the two DNA strands is correctly oriented, is a particularly revealing example of the sensitivity of cells to all that is going on within them. They make wise decisions and act on them.
(8 Dec 1983) The Significance of Responses of the Genome to Challenge, Nobel Lecture
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cell (138)  |  Decision (91)  |  Direct (225)  |  DNA (77)  |  End (590)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Strand (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Wise (131)

The action of the mind in the acquisition of knowledge of any sort is synthetic-analytic; that is, uniting and separating. These are the two sides, or aspects, of the one process. … There is no such thing as a synthetic activity that is not accompanied by the analytic; and there is no analytic activity that is not accompanied by the synthetic. Children cannot be taught to perform these knowing acts. It is the nature of the mind to so act when it acts at all.
In The Public-School Journal (Jan 1895), Vol. 14, 281-282.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Education (378)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perform (121)  |  Process (423)  |  Separate (143)  |  Side (233)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

The bird which is drawn to the water by its need of finding there the prey on which it lives, separates the digits of its feet in trying to strike the water and move about on the surface. The skin which unites these digits at their base acquires the habit of being stretched by these continually repeated separations of the digits; thus in course of time there are formed large webs which unite the digits of ducks, geese, etc., as we actually find them. In the same way efforts to swim, that is to push against the water so as to move about in it, have stretched the membranes between the digits of frogs, sea-tortoises, the otter, beaver, etc.
On the other hand, a bird which is accustomed to perch on trees and which springs from individuals all of whom had acquired this habit, necessarily has longer digits on its feet and differently shaped from those of the aquatic animals that I have just named. Its claws in time become lengthened, sharpened and curved into hooks, to clasp the branches on which the animal so often rests.
We find in the same way that the bird of the water-side which does not like swimming and yet is in need of going to the water's edge to secure its prey, is continually liable to sink into the mud. Now this bird tries to act in such a way that its body should not be immersed in the liquid, and hence makes its best efforts to stretch and lengthen its legs. The long-established habit acquired by this bird and all its race of continually stretching and lengthening its legs, results in the individuals of this race becoming raised as though on stilts, and gradually obtaining long, bare legs, denuded of feathers up to the thighs and often higher still.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 249-50, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Bare (33)  |  Base (117)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Claw (8)  |  Course (409)  |  Duck (3)  |  Edge (47)  |  Effort (227)  |  Find (998)  |  Foot (60)  |  Form (959)  |  Frog (38)  |  Goose (12)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Large (394)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otter (2)  |  Perch (7)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Skin (47)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strike (68)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trying (144)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

The disease and its medicine are like two factions in a besieged town; they tear one another to pieces, but both unite against their common enemy, Nature.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Both (493)  |  Common (436)  |  Disease (328)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Faction (3)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Piece (38)  |  Seige (2)  |  Tear (42)  |  Town (27)  |  Two (937)  |  Unity (78)

The earth does not belong to us; we belong to the earth. All things are connected, like the blood which unites one family. Mankind did not weave the web of life. We are but one strand within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
Ted Perry
Fictional speech from script for ABC TV movie, Home (1972). The words by the screenwriter were inspired from an Earth Day gathering in 1970, where Perry heard a historical account by physician Dr. Henry Smith. The doctor's words were published in a Seattle newspaper, written up to 33 years after being present, when in Dec 1854 Chief Seattle made an impassioned speech, in the language of his own people, the Suquwamish. The Chief, with other tribal leaders, were meeting with the Territorial Governor who was trying to get them to sign away their lands and instead receive protection on a reservation. Dr. Smith may not have been fluent in the language of the Suquwamish, although he did make some notes at the time. But he wrote poetry, making embellishment or invention likely, so it is questionable whether his newspaper account is reliable in providing the Chief's actual words. In turn, Perry has made clear that his script provided a fictional representation the Chief. The televisedquote, however became mythical, and is incorrectly passed along as attributed to Chief Seattle in 1854, but the truth is the words are contemporary, written by Perry, a screenwriter. Also seen as: Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blood (134)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Family (94)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Ourself (13)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Strand (9)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weave (19)  |  Web (16)  |  Web Of Life (7)  |  Whatever (234)

The geometrical problems and theorems of the Greeks always refer to definite, oftentimes to rather complicated figures. Now frequently the points and lines of such a figure may assume very many different relative positions; each of these possible cases is then considered separately. On the contrary, present day mathematicians generate their figures one from another, and are accustomed to consider them subject to variation; in this manner they unite the various cases and combine them as much as possible by employing negative and imaginary magnitudes. For example, the problems which Apollonius treats in his two books De sectione rationis, are solved today by means of a single, universally applicable construction; Apollonius, on the contrary, separates it into more than eighty different cases varying only in position. Thus, as Hermann Hankel has fittingly remarked, the ancient geometry sacrifices to a seeming simplicity the true simplicity which consists in the unity of principles; it attained a trivial sensual presentability at the cost of the recognition of the relations of geometric forms in all their changes and in all the variations of their sensually presentable positions.
In 'Die Synthetische Geometrie im Altertum und in der Neuzeit', Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung (1902), 2, 346-347. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112. The spelling of the first “Apollonius” has been corrected from “Appolonius” in the original English text. From the original German, “Die geometrischen Probleme und Sätze der Griechen beziehen sich allemal auf bestimmte, oft recht komplizierte Figuren. Nun können aber die Punkte und Linien einer solchen Figur häufig sehr verschiedene Lagen zu einander annehmen; jeder dieser möglichen Fälle wird alsdann für sich besonders erörtert. Dagegen lassen die heutigen Mathematiker ihre Figuren aus einander entstehen und sind gewohnt, sie als veränderlich zu betrachten; sie vereinigen so die speziellen Fälle und fassen sie möglichst zusammen unter Benutzung auch negativer und imaginärer Gröfsen. Das Problem z. B., welches Apollonius in seinen zwei Büchern de sectione rationis behandelt, löst man heutzutage durch eine einzige, allgemein anwendbare Konstruktion; Apollonius selber dagegen zerlegt es in mehr als 80 nur durch die Lage verschiedene Fälle. So opfert, wie Hermann Hankel treffend bemerkt, die antike Geometrie einer scheinbaren Einfachheit die wahre, in der Einheit der Prinzipien bestehende; sie erreicht eine triviale sinnliche Anschaulichkeit auf Kosten der Erkenntnis vom Zusammenhang geometrischer Gestalten in aller Wechsel und in aller Veränderlichkeit ihrer sinnlich vorstellbaren Lage.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Attain (125)  |  Book (392)  |  Case (99)  |  Change (593)  |  Combine (57)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consist (223)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cost (86)  |  Definite (110)  |  Different (577)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greek (107)  |  Hermann Hankel (16)  |  Imaginary Number (6)  |  Line (91)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Negative (63)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relation (157)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Single (353)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Today (314)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Two (937)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universal (189)  |  Variation (90)  |  Various (200)

The importance of a result is largely relative, is judged differently by different men, and changes with the times and circumstances. It has often happened that great importance has been attached to a problem merely on account of the difficulties which it presented; and indeed if for its solution it has been necessary to invent new methods, noteworthy artifices, etc., the science has gained more perhaps through these than through the final result. In general we may call important all investigations relating to things which in themselves are important; all those which have a large degree of generality, or which unite under a single point of view subjects apparently distinct, simplifying and elucidating them; all those which lead to results that promise to be the source of numerous consequences; etc.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 44. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 444.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Artifice (4)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Final (118)  |  Gain (145)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Judge (108)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Noteworthy (2)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Promise (67)  |  Relative (39)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Single (353)  |  Solution (267)  |  Source (93)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)

The individual on his own is stable only so long as he is possessed of self-esteem. The maintenance of self-esteem is a continuous task which taxes all of the individual’s powers and inner resources. We have to prove our worth and justify our existence anew each day. When, for whatever reason, self-esteem is unattainable, the autonomous individual becomes a highly explosive entity. He turns away from an unpromising self and plunges into the pursuit of pride—the explosive substitute for self-esteem. All social disturbances and upheavals have their roots in crises of individual self-esteem, and the great endeavor in which the masses most readily unite is basically a search for pride.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 18
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Basically (4)  |  Become (815)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Entity (35)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Highly (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Justify (24)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Mass (157)  |  Most (1731)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Pride (78)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resource (63)  |  Root (120)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Esteem (6)  |  Social (252)  |  Stable (30)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Task (147)  |  Tax (26)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unattainable (6)  |  Unpromising (2)  |  Upheaval (4)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Worth (169)

The lover is moved by the thing loved, as the sense is by that which perceives, and it unites with it and they become one and the same thing... when the lover is united with the beloved it finds rest there; when the burden is laid down there it finds rest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Beloved (3)  |  Burden (27)  |  Down (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Laid (7)  |  Love (309)  |  Lover (11)  |  Move (216)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Rest (280)  |  Same (157)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  United (14)

The true contrast between science and religion is that science unites the world and makes it possible for people of widely differing backgrounds to work together and to cooperate. Religion, on the other hand, by its very claim to know “The Truth” through “revelation,” is inherently divisive and a creator of separatism and hostility.
Conclusion to 'Uniting the World—Or Dividing It: Which Outlook Is Truly Universal, which Parochial in the Extreme?', Free Inquiry (Spring 1998), 18, No.2. Collected in Science and Religion: Are They Compatible?, 148. Not found in that article, a widely circulated, brief form of this idea is: “Religion divides us, while it is our human characteristics that bind us to each other.” but Webmaster has not yet confirmed any source for that form. If you know a primary source for it, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (43)  |  Claim (146)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Creator (91)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Know (1518)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Possible (552)  |  Religion (361)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The word “electromagnetic” which is used to characterize the phenomena produced by the conducting wires of the voltaic pile, … were those which M. Oersted discovered, exhibited by an electric current and a magnet. I have determined to use the word electrodynamic in order to unite under a common name all these phenomena, and particularly to designate those which I have observed between two voltaic conductors. It expresses their true character, that of being produced by electricity in motion: while the electric attractions and repulsions, which have been known for a long time, are electrostatic phenomena produced by the unequal distribution of electricity at rest in the bodies in which they are observed.
New terminology introduced in 'Experiments on the New Electrodynamical Phenomena', Annales de Chemie et de Physique (1822), Series 2, Vol. 20, 60. As translated in Dagobert David Runes (ed.), A Treasury of World Science (1962), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Common (436)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Current (118)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Electromagnetic (2)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Known (454)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Motion (310)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Observed (149)  |  Hans Christian Oersted (5)  |  Order (632)  |  Produced (187)  |  Repulsion (7)  |  Rest (280)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Use (766)  |  Voltaic (9)  |  Voltaic Pile (2)  |  Wire (35)  |  Word (619)

Very old and wide-spread is the opinion that forests have an important impact on rainfall. ... If forests enhance the amount and frequency of precipitation simply by being there, deforestation as part of agricultural expansion everywhere, must necessarily result in less rainfall and more frequent droughts. This view is most poignantly expressed by the saying: Man walks the earth and desert follows his steps! ... It is not surprising that under such circumstances the issue of a link between forests and climate has ... been addressed by governments. Lately, the Italian government has been paying special attention to reforestation in Italy and its expected improvement of the climate. ... It must be prevented that periods of heavy rainfall alternate with droughts. ...In the Unites States deforestation plays an important role as well and is seen as the cause for a reduction in rainfall. ... committee chairman of the American Association for Advancement of Science demands decisive steps to extend woodland in order to counteract the increasing drought. ... some serious concerns. In 1873, in Vienna, the congress for agriculture and forestry discussed the problem in detail; and when the Prussian house of representatives ordered a special commission to examine a proposed law pertaining to the preservation and implementation of forests for safeguarding, it pointed out that the steady decrease in the water levels of Prussian rivers was one of the most serious consequences of deforestation only to be rectified by reforestation programs. It is worth mentioning that ... the same concerns were raised in Russia as well and governmental circles reconsidered the issue of deforestation.
as quoted in Eduard Brückner - The Sources and Consequences of Climate Change and Climate Variability in Historical Times editted by N. Stehr and H. von Storch (2000)
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Amount (151)  |  Association (46)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Climate (97)  |  Concern (228)  |  Congress (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Demand (123)  |  Desert (56)  |  Detail (146)  |  Drought (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Expect (200)  |  Express (186)  |  Extend (128)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forest (150)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Government (110)  |  House (140)  |  Impact (42)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Italian (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Point (580)  |  Precipitation (7)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rectified (4)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Result (677)  |  River (119)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serious (91)  |  Special (184)  |  Spread (83)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Step (231)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Wide (96)  |  Worth (169)

We should therefore, with grace and optimism, embrace NOMA’s tough-minded demand: Acknowledge the personal character of these human struggles about morals and meanings, and stop looking for definite answers in nature’s construction. But many people cannot bear to surrender nature as a ‘transitional object’–a baby’s warm blanket for our adult comfort. But when we do (for we must) , nature can finally emerge in her true form: not as a distorted mirror of our needs, but as our most fascinating comp anion. Only then can we unite the patches built by our separate magisteria into a beautiful and coherent quilt called wisdom.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Adult (19)  |  Anion (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Baby (28)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Coherent (13)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Construction (112)  |  Definite (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distort (22)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Finally (26)  |  Form (959)  |  Grace (31)  |  Human (1468)  |  Looking (189)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Patch (8)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  Separate (143)  |  Stop (80)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transitional (2)  |  True (212)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wisdom (221)

What helps luck is a habit of watching for opportunities, of having a patient but restless mind, of sacrificing one’s ease or vanity, or uniting a love of detail to foresight, and of passing through hard times bravely [and cheerfully].
In The Wish of His Life (1878), Vol. 1, 25. The ending "and cheerfully" is not part of the original text, though it is seen added in Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors, Both Ancient and Modern (1891), 320. The original text ends “whistling the air of ‘Marlbrough’.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bravely (3)  |  Detail (146)  |  Ease (35)  |  Foresight (6)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hard (243)  |  Help (105)  |  Love (309)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Patient (199)  |  Restless (11)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Watch (109)

When the simplest compounds of this element are considered (marsh gas, chloride of carbon, chloroform, carbonic acid, phosgene, sulphide of carbon, hydrocyanic acid, etc.) it is seen that the quantity of carbon which chemists have recognised as the smallest possible, that is, as an atom, always unites with 4 atoms of a monatomic or with two atoms of a diatomic element; that in general, the sum of the chemical units of the elements united with one atom of carbon is 4. This leads us to the view that carbon is tetratomic or tetrabasic. In the cases of substances which contain several atoms of carbon, it must be assumed that at least some of the atoms are in some way held in the compound by the affinity of carbon, and that the carbon atoms attach themselves to one another, whereby a part of the affinity of the one is naturally engaged with an equal part of the affinity of the other. The simplest and therefore the most probable case of such an association of carbon atoms is that in which one affinity unit of one is bound by one of the other. Of the 2 x 4 affinity units of the two carbon atoms, two are used up in holding the atoms together, and six remain over, which can be bound by atom)' of other elements.
'Ueber die Konstitution und die Metamorphosen der chemischen Verbindungen', Annalen (1858) 5, 106. Trans. in J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry (1972), Vol. 4, 536.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Affinity (27)  |  Association (46)  |  Atom (355)  |  Attach (56)  |  Bond (45)  |  Bound (119)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbonic Acid (4)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chloroform (4)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Element (310)  |  Gas (83)  |  General (511)  |  Lead (384)  |  Methane (7)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phosgene (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Remain (349)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sum (102)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

Wonder … and not any expectation of advantage from its discoveries, is the first principle which prompts mankind to the study of Philosophy, of that science which pretends to lay open the concealed connections that unite the various appearances of nature.
In 'The History of Astronomy,' Essays on Philosophical Subjects (1795).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Connection (162)  |  Expectation (65)  |  First (1283)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Open (274)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Various (200)  |  Wonder (236)

Words divide, pictures unite.
In Otto Neurath, Empiricism and Sociology (1973), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Maxim (17)  |  Picture (143)  |  Unity (78)  |  Word (619)

You bring me the deepest joy that can be felt by a man [Pasteur himself] whose invincible belief is that Science and Peace will triumph over Ignorance and War, that nations will unite, not to destroy, but to build, and that the future will belong to those who will have done most for suffering humanity. But whether our efforts are or are not favored by life, let us be able to say, when we come near to the great goal, “I have done what I could.”
Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, France (27 Dec 1892) where his 70th birth was recognized. His son presented the speech due to the weakness of Pastuer's voice. In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, R. L. Devonshire (trans.) (1902), Vol. 2, 297.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Bring (90)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Deepest (4)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Effort (227)  |  Favor (63)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Peace (108)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Unity (78)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.