Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Strengthen

Strengthen Quotes (22 quotes)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Become (172)  |  Best (173)  |  Buddha (5)  |  Capable (51)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cling (6)  |  Completely (32)  |  Conceive (39)  |  Concern (110)  |  Conflict (55)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Content (69)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Count (49)  |  Definition (192)  |  Depth (51)  |  Desire (142)  |  Devout (5)  |  Divine (61)  |  Domain (42)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Effect (166)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Enlightened (7)  |  Exist (148)  |  Extend (44)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Force (249)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Goal (100)  |  Important (205)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Kind (140)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Object (175)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Outside (48)  |  Person (154)  |  Personality (47)  |  Possible (158)  |  Rational (57)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Religion (239)  |  Religious (49)  |  Remain (113)  |  Require (85)  |  Same (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Seem (143)  |  Selfish (3)  |  Sense (321)  |  Significance (71)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Superpersonal (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  Unite (23)  |  Value (242)

Because basic learning takes place so early—as…the classic musical South Pacific reminds us, “You've got to be taught before it’s too late, before you are six or seven or eight; you’ve got to be carefully taught,”—we must strengthen our pre-school program, especially Headstart, Kindergarten and Day Care.
In address, to the Economic Club of Detroit (14 Jan 1990), 'Where Do We Go From Here?' on the massiechairs.com website.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (66)  |  Carefully (12)  |  Classic (10)  |  Early (62)  |  Kindergarten (4)  |  Learning (177)  |  Musical (10)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Teach (188)

Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (64)  |  Ambition (34)  |  Character (118)  |  Develop (107)  |  Ease (35)  |  Experience (342)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Quiet (16)  |  Soul (166)  |  Success (250)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Trial (28)

Every mathematical book that is worth reading must be read “backwards and forwards”, if I may use the expression. I would modify Lagrange’s advice a little and say, “Go on, but often return to strengthen your faith.” When you come on a hard or dreary passage, pass it over; and come back to it after you have seen its importance or found the need for it further on.
In Algebra, Part 2 (1889), Preface, viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (40)  |  Back (104)  |  Backwards (4)  |  Book (257)  |  Dreary (5)  |  Expression (110)  |  Faith (157)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (408)  |  Forward (36)  |  Hard (99)  |  Importance (218)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Modify (15)  |  Need (287)  |  Often (106)  |  Pass (93)  |  Passage (20)  |  Read (145)  |  Return (55)  |  See (369)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Worth (99)

Exercise in the most rigorous thinking that is possible will of its own accord strengthen the sense of truth and right, for each advance in the ability to distinguish between correct and false thoughts, each habit making for rigour in thought development will increase in the sound pupil the ability and the wish to ascertain what is right in life and to defend it.
In Anleitung zum mathematischen Unterricht in den höheren Schulen (1906), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Advance (165)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Correct (85)  |  Defend (29)  |  Development (289)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Exercise (69)  |  False (99)  |  Habit (112)  |  Life (1131)  |  Pupil (36)  |  Right (197)  |  Rigor (23)  |  Sense (321)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Thought (546)  |  Truth (928)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wish (92)

I pray every day and I think everybody should. I don’t think you can be up here and look out the window as I did the first day and look out at the Earth from this vantage point. We’re not so high compared to people who went to the moon and back. But to look out at this kind of creation out here and not believe in God is, to me, impossible. It just strengthens my faith.
From NASA transcript of News Conference by downlink from Space Shuttle Discovery during its STS-95 Mission in Earth orbit (5 Nov 1998). In response to question from Paul Hoveston of USA Today asking John Glenn about how the space flight strengthened his faith and if he had any time to pray in orbit.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Creation (242)  |  Earth (638)  |  Faith (157)  |  God (535)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Moon (199)  |  Pray (16)  |  Window (40)

In general … science per se does not increase the destructiveness of war, since, as a rule, it strengthens the defense as much as the attack.
In 'Boredom or Doom in a Scientific World', United Nations World (Sep 1948), Vol. 2, No. 8, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (41)  |  Defense (18)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Increase (146)  |  Science (2067)  |  War (161)

Indeed, the aim of teaching [mathematics] should be rather to strengthen his [the pupil’s] faculties, and to supply a method of reasoning applicable to other subjects, than to furnish him with an instrument for solving practical problems.
In John Perry (ed.), Discussion on the Teaching of Mathematics (1901), 84. The discussion took place on 14 Sep 1901 at the British Association at Glasgow, during a joint meeting of the mathematics and physics sections with the education section. The proceedings began with an address by John Perry. Magnus spoke in the Discussion that followed.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (89)  |  Applicable (11)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Method (239)  |  Practical (133)  |  Problem (497)  |  Pupil (36)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Solve (78)  |  Subject (240)  |  Supply (47)  |  Teach (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)

It hath been an old remark, that Geometry is an excellent Logic. And it must be owned that when the definitions are clear; when the postulata cannot be refused, nor the axioms denied; when from the distinct contemplation and comparison of figures, their properties are derived, by a perpetual well-connected chain of consequences, the objects being still kept in view, and the attention ever fixed upon them; there is acquired a habit of reasoning, close and exact and methodical; which habit strengthens and sharpens the mind, and being transferred to other subjects is of general use in the inquiry after truth.
In 'The Analyst', in The Works of George Berkeley (1898), Vol. 3, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (52)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Definition (192)  |  Deny (42)  |  Exact (68)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Habit (112)  |  Logic (260)  |  Methodical (7)  |  Mind (760)  |  Postulate (31)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Refuse (23)  |  Sharpen (16)  |  Truth (928)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Mathematical analysis is as extensive as nature itself; it defines all perceptible relations, measures times, spaces, forces, temperatures; this difficult science is formed slowly, but it preserves every principle which it has once acquired; it grows and strengthens itself incessantly in the midst of the many variations and errors of the human mind.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), Discours Préliminaire, xiv, (Theory of Heat, Introduction), as translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7. From the original French, “L’analyse mathématique est aussi étendue que la nature elle-même; elle définit tous les rapports sensibles, mesure les temps y les espaces, les forces, les températures; cette science difficile se forme avec lenteur, mais elle conserve tous les principes quelle a une fois acquis; elle s’accroît et s’affermit sans cesse au milieu de tant de variations et d’erreurs de l’esprit humain.”
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (4)  |  Define (49)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Error (277)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Formed (5)  |  Grow (99)  |  Human (550)  |  Incessantly (3)  |  Mathematical Analysis (12)  |  Measure (104)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Perceptible (5)  |  Principle (292)  |  Relation (154)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Space (257)  |  Temperature (47)  |  Time (595)

Reaching the Moon by three-man vessels in one long bound from Earth is like casting a thin thread across space. The main effort, in the coming decades, will be to strengthen this thread; to make it a cord, a cable, and, finally, a broad highway.
In 'The Coming Decades in Space', Boy’s Life (Jun 1972), 8. Reprinted in The Beginning and the End (1977), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Bound (16)  |  Broad (27)  |  Cable (7)  |  Cast (25)  |  Cord (3)  |  Decade (32)  |  Earth (638)  |  Effort (144)  |  Finally (26)  |  Highway (13)  |  Long (174)  |  Main (28)  |  Moon (199)  |  Reach (121)  |  Space (257)  |  Thin (16)  |  Thread (18)  |  Vessel (28)

Since men are really interested in nothing but their own opinions, every one who puts forward an opinion looks about him right and left for means of strengthening himself and others in it.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Interest (237)  |  Left (13)  |  Means (176)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Right (197)

The brain that isn’t used rusts. The brain that is used responds. The brain is exactly like any other part of the body: it can be strengthened by proper exercise, by proper use. Put your arm in a sling and keep it there for a considerable length of time, and, when you take it out, you find that you can’t use it. In the same way, the brain that isn’t used suffers atrophy.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (27)  |  Atrophy (6)  |  Brain (213)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Rust (5)  |  Sling (3)

The game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement. Several very valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are to be acquired or strengthened by it so as to become habits ready on all occasions.
In The Morals of Chess. As quoted in The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle (1787), 590.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Amusement (23)  |  Chess (23)  |  Game (61)  |  Habit (112)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Idle (15)  |  Mind (760)  |  Ready (38)  |  Useful (100)  |  Value (242)

The hostility of the state would be assured toward any system or science that might not strengthen its arm.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (27)  |  Assure (15)  |  Hostility (11)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  State (137)  |  System (191)

The metaphysical philosopher from his point of view recognizes mathematics as an instrument of education, which strengthens the power of attention, develops the sense of order and the faculty of construction, and enables the mind to grasp under the simple formulae the quantitative differences of physical phenomena.
In Dialogues of Plato (1897), Vol. 2, 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (121)  |  Construction (83)  |  Develop (107)  |  Difference (246)  |  Education (347)  |  Enable (46)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Formula (80)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Metaphysical (11)  |  Mind (760)  |  Order (242)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Physical (134)  |  Point Of View (41)  |  Power (366)  |  Quantitative (19)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simple (178)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

The professor may choose familiar topics as a starting point. The students collect material, work problems, observe regularities, frame hypotheses, discover and prove theorems for themselves. … the student knows what he is doing and where he is going; he is secure in his mastery of the subject, strengthened in confidence of himself. He has had the experience of discovering mathematics. He no longer thinks of mathematics as static dogma learned by rote. He sees mathematics as something growing and developing, mathematical concepts as something continually revised and enriched in the light of new knowledge. The course may have covered a very limited region, but it should leave the student ready to explore further on his own.
In A Concrete Approach to Abstract Algebra (1959), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Collect (16)  |  Concept (146)  |  Confidence (41)  |  Develop (107)  |  Discover (199)  |  Dogma (32)  |  Enrich (11)  |  Experience (342)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frame (26)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Limited (18)  |  Mastery (28)  |  Material (156)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  New (496)  |  Observe (76)  |  Problem (497)  |  Prove (109)  |  Ready (38)  |  Regularity (29)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rote (4)  |  Secure (21)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Static (8)  |  Student (203)  |  Subject (240)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Think (347)  |  Topic (12)  |  Work (635)

This weapon [the atomic bomb] has added an additional responsibility—or, better, an additional incentive—to find a sound basis for lasting peace. It provides an overwhelming inducement for the avoidance of war. It emphasizes the crisis we face in international matters and strengthens the conviction that adequate safeguards for peace must be found.
Opening address (7 Nov 1945) of Town Hall’s annual lecture series, as quoted in 'Gen. Groves Warns on Atom ‘Suicide’', New York Times (8 Nov 1945), 4. (Just three months before he spoke, two atom bombs dropped on Japan in Aug 1945 effectively ended WW II.)
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (107)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Crisis (19)  |  Find (408)  |  Incentive (8)  |  Inducement (3)  |  Intentional (4)  |  Peace (84)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Safeguard (5)  |  War (161)  |  Weapon (66)

We must make practice in thinking, or, in other words, the strengthening of reasoning power, the constant object of all teaching from infancy to adult age, no matter what may be the subject of instruction. … Effective training of the reasoning powers cannot be secured simply by choosing this subject or that for study. The method of study and the aim in studying are the all-important things.
From 'Wherein Popular Education has Failed' Forum (Dec 1892), collected in American Contributions to Civilization: And Other Essays and Addresses (1897), 229 & 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (17)  |  Age (178)  |  Aim (89)  |  Choose (60)  |  Constant (58)  |  Education (347)  |  Effective (30)  |  Important (205)  |  Infancy (12)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Matter (343)  |  Method (239)  |  Object (175)  |  Power (366)  |  Practice (94)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Secure (21)  |  Simply (53)  |  Study (476)  |  Subject (240)  |  Teaching (108)  |  Think (347)  |  Training (66)

What friends do with us and for us is a real part of our life; for it strengthens and advances our personality. The assault of our enemies is not part of our life ; it is only part of our experience ; we throw it off and guard ourselves against it as against frost, storm, rain, hail, or any other of the external evils which may be expected to happen.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Assault (11)  |  Enemy (65)  |  Evil (79)  |  Expect (44)  |  Experience (342)  |  External (57)  |  Friend (86)  |  Frost (13)  |  Guard (18)  |  Hail (4)  |  Happen (82)  |  Life (1131)  |  Part (222)  |  Personality (47)  |  Rain (33)  |  Real (149)  |  Storm (30)  |  Throw (43)

What is education? Teaching a man what his powers and relations are, and how he can best extend, strengthen, and employ them.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (173)  |  Education (347)  |  Employ (35)  |  Extend (44)  |  Power (366)  |  Relation (154)  |  Teach (188)

~~[Attributed, authorship undocumented]~~ Mathematical demonstrations are a logic of as much or more use, than that commonly learned at schools, serving to a just formation of the mind, enlarging its capacity, and strengthening it so as to render the same capable of exact reasoning, and discerning truth from falsehood in all occurrences, even in subjects not mathematical. For which reason it is said, the Egyptians, Persians, and Lacedaemonians seldom elected any new kings, but such as had some knowledge in the mathematics, imagining those, who had not, men of imperfect judgments, and unfit to rule and govern.
From an article which appeared as 'The Usefulness of Mathematics', Pennsylvania Gazette (30 Oct 1735), No. 360. Collected, despite being without clear evidence of Franklin’s authorship, in The Works of Benjamin Franklin (1809), Vol. 4, 377. Evidence of actual authorship by Ben Franklin for the newspaper article has not been ascertained, and scholars doubt it. See Franklin documents at the website founders.archives.gov. The quote is included here to attach this caution.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (64)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Discern (17)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Elect (4)  |  Enlarge (27)  |  Exact (68)  |  Falsehood (26)  |  Formation (59)  |  Govern (29)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Imperfect (20)  |  It Is Said (2)  |  Judgment (101)  |  King (35)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Logic (260)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics And Logic (10)  |  Mind (760)  |  New (496)  |  Occurrence (33)  |  Persian (2)  |  Reason (471)  |  Rule (177)  |  School (119)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Subject (240)  |  Truth (928)  |  Unfit (12)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.