Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Connection

Connection Quotes (86 quotes)
Connexion Quotes

Question: Show how the hypothenuse face of a right-angled prism may be used as a reflector. What connection is there between the refractive index of a medium and the angle at which an emergent ray is totally reflected?
Answer: Any face of any prism may be used as a reflector. The con nexion between the refractive index of a medium and the angle at which an emergent ray does not emerge but is totally reflected is remarkable and not generally known.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 182-3, Question 29. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (15)  |  Answer (201)  |  Emergent (3)  |  Examination (60)  |  Face (69)  |  Howler (15)  |  Hypotenuse (3)  |  Index (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Medium (12)  |  Prism (4)  |  Question (315)  |  Ray (32)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Reflector (3)  |  Refraction (7)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Show (55)  |  Total (29)

[About describing atomic models in the language of classical physics:] We must be clear that when it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The poet, too, is not nearly so concerned with describing facts as with creating images and establishing mental connections.
As quoted by Werner Heisenberg, as translated by Arnold J. Pomerans, in Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations (1971), 41. The words are not verbatim, but as later recollected by Werner Heisenberg describing his early encounter with Bohr in 1920.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Classical Physics (5)  |  Concern (76)  |  Creation (211)  |  Description (72)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Fact (609)  |  Image (38)  |  Language (155)  |  Mental (57)  |  Poet (59)  |  Poetry (96)

A man should abandon that country wherein there is neither respect, nor employment, nor connections, nor the advancement of science.
In Charles Wilkins (trans.) Fables and Proverbs from the Sanskrit: being the Hitopadesa (1885), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Advancement (36)  |  Country (121)  |  Employment (22)  |  Man (345)  |  Respect (57)  |  Science (1699)

As a net is made up of a series of ties, so everything in this world is connected by a series of ties. If anyone thinks that the mesh of a net is an independent, isolated thing, he is mistaken. It is called a net because it is made up of a series of a interconnected meshes, and each mesh has its place and responsibility in relation to other meshes.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Independence (32)  |  Isolation (26)  |  Net (10)  |  Web Of Life (4)

Astronomy affords the most extensive example of the connection of physical sciences. In it are combined the sciences of number and quantity, or rest and motion. In it we perceive the operation of a force which is mixed up with everything that exists in the heavens or on earth; which pervades every atom, rules the motion of animate and inanimate beings, and is a sensible in the descent of the rain-drop as in the falls of Niagara; in the weight of the air, as in the periods of the moon.
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1858), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Animate (6)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Atom (251)  |  Being (39)  |  Combination (69)  |  Descent (14)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Example (57)  |  Existence (254)  |  Force (194)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Inanimate (14)  |  Mix (13)  |  Moon (132)  |  Motion (127)  |  Niagara (2)  |  Number (179)  |  Operation (96)  |  Perception (53)  |  Period (49)  |  Pervade (4)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Raindrop (3)  |  Rest (64)  |  Rule (135)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Weight (61)

Chemistry and physics are experimental sciences; and those who are engaged in attempting to enlarge the boundaries of science by experiment are generally unwilling to publish speculations; for they have learned, by long experience, that it is unsafe to anticipate events. It is true, they must make certain theories and hypotheses. They must form some kind of mental picture of the relations between the phenomena which they are trying to investigate, else their experiments would be made at random, and without connection.
From 'Radium and Its Products', Harper’s Magazine (Dec 1904), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (8)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Enlarge (15)  |  Event (97)  |  Experience (268)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mental (57)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physics (301)  |  Picture (55)  |  Publish (18)  |  Random (21)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unsafe (5)  |  Unwilling (4)

Combining in our survey then, the whole range of deposits from the most recent to the most ancient group, how striking a succession do they present:– so various yet so uniform–so vast yet so connected. In thus tracing back to the most remote periods in the physical history of our continents, one system of operations, as the means by which many complex formations have been successively produced, the mind becomes impressed with the singleness of nature's laws; and in this respect, at least, geology is hardly inferior in simplicity to astronomy.
The Silurian System (1839), 574.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Combination (69)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Continent (39)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Formation (54)  |  History (302)  |  Impression (51)  |  Law (418)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Operation (96)  |  Production (105)  |  Range (38)  |  Recent (23)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Succession (39)  |  Survey (14)  |  System (141)  |  Trace (39)  |  Uniformity (17)  |  Variety (53)  |  Vast (56)

Creating a new theory is not like destroying an old barn and erecting a skyscraper in its place. It is rather like climbing a mountain, gaining new and wider views, discovering unexpected connections between our starting point and its rich environment. But the point from which we started out still exists and can be seen, although it appears smaller and forms a tiny part of our broad view gained by the mastery of the obstacles on our adventurous way up.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (36)  |  Barn (4)  |  Climb (14)  |  Create (98)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Discover (115)  |  Erect (3)  |  Gain (48)  |  Mastery (20)  |  Mountain (111)  |  New (340)  |  Obstacle (21)  |  Old (104)  |  Skyscraper (6)  |  Starting Point (6)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unexpected (26)  |  View (115)  |  Wide (14)

Discoveries are not generally made in the order of their scientific arrangement: their connexions and relations are made out gradually; and it is only when the fermentation of invention has subsided that the whole clears into simplicity and order.
In 'The Equilibrium of Forces on a Point', Elementary Treatise on Mechanics (1819), Vol. 1, Preface, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Clear (52)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Fermentation (14)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Invention (283)  |  Order (167)  |  Relation (96)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Subside (3)  |  Whole (122)

Every occurrence in Nature is preceded by other occurrences which are its causes, and succeeded by others which are its effects. The human mind is not satisfied with observing and studying any natural occurrence alone, but takes pleasure in connecting every natural fact with what has gone before it, and with what is to come after it.
In Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers, Ice and Glaciers (1872), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Before (6)  |  Cause (231)  |  Effect (133)  |  Fact (609)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Study (331)  |  Succeeding (2)

Freeman’s gift? It’s cosmic. He is able to see more interconnections between more things than almost anybody. He sees the interrelationships, whether it’s in some microscopic physical process or in a big complicated machine like Orion. He has been, from the time he was in his teens, capable of understanding essentially anything that he’s interested in. He’s the most intelligent person I know.
As quoted in Kenneth Brower, 'The Danger of Cosmic Genius', The Atlantic (Dec 2010). Webmaster note: The Orion Project was a study of the possibility of nuclear powered propulsion of spacecraft.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (26)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Freeman Dyson (43)  |  Gift (47)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Interested (4)  |  Know (321)  |  Machine (133)  |  Microscopic (10)  |  Person (114)  |  Physical (94)  |  Process (201)  |  Relationship (59)  |  See (197)  |  Teen (2)  |  Understand (189)

Hypotheses may be useful, though involving much that is superfluous, and even erroneous: for they may supply the true bond of connexion of the facts; and the superfluity and error may afterwards be pared away.
Aphorism 11, 'Aphorisms Concerning Science', The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840), Vol. 1, xxxvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (230)  |  Fact (609)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Involve (27)  |  Superfluous (8)  |  Useful (66)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Accommodation (5)  |  Accustom (7)  |  Afraid (15)  |  Apparent (26)  |  Atom (251)  |  Change (291)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Difference (208)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Finite (22)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Idea (440)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Material (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Physical (94)  |  Process (201)  |  Property (96)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Radius (4)  |  Star (251)  |  Stellar (3)  |  Structure (191)  |  System (141)  |  Theory (582)  |  Universe (563)

I have now said enough to show you that it is indispensable for this country to have a scientific education in connexion with manufacturers, if we wish to outstrip the intellectual competition which now, happily for the world, prevails in all departments of industry. As surely as darkness follows the setting of the sun, so surely will England recede as a manufacturing nation, unless her industrial population become much more conversant with science than they are now.
'The Study of Abstract Science Essential to the Progress of Industry', Records of the School of Mines (1852) 1, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Competition (26)  |  Conversant (4)  |  Country (121)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Education (280)  |  England (31)  |  Industry (91)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Manufacturer (10)  |  Nation (111)  |  Population (71)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science Education (11)  |  Setting (6)  |  Sun (211)  |  Sunset (15)  |  World (667)

I once knew an otherwise excellent teacher who compelled his students to perform all their demonstrations with incorrect figures, on the theory that it was the logical connection of the concepts, not the figure, that was essential.
In Ernst Mach and Thomas Joseph McCormack, Space and Geometry (1906), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Compel (14)  |  Concept (102)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Essential (87)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Logic (187)  |  Perform (27)  |  Student (131)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Theory (582)

I then began to study arithmetical questions without any great apparent result, and without suspecting that they could have the least connexion with my previous researches. Disgusted at my want of success, I went away to spend a few days at the seaside, and thought of entirely different things. One day, as I was walking on the cliff, the idea came to me, again with the same characteristics of conciseness, suddenness, and immediate certainty, that arithmetical transformations of indefinite ternary quadratic forms are identical with those of non-Euclidian geometry.
Science and Method (1908), trans. Francis Maitland (1914), 53-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (68)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Cliff (6)  |  Conciseness (2)  |  Difference (208)  |  Disgust (6)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Idea (440)  |  Identity (9)  |  Immediacy (2)  |  Non-Euclidian (2)  |  Previous (8)  |  Question (315)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Seaside (2)  |  Study (331)  |  Success (202)  |  Suddenness (4)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Walk (56)  |  Wanting (2)

In a lot of scientists, the ratio of wonder to skepticism declines in time. That may be connected with the fact that in some fields—mathematics, physics, some others—the great discoveries are almost entirely made by youngsters.
Quoted in interview with magazine staff, Psychology Today (Jan 1996).
Science quotes on:  |  Decline (11)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Enthusiasm (28)  |  Fact (609)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Physics (301)  |  Ratio (15)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Skepticism (18)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Youth (57)

In our day grand generalizations have been reached. The theory of the origin of species is but one of them. Another, of still wider grasp and more radical significance, is the doctrine of the Conservation of Energy, the ultimate philosophical issues of which are as yet but dimly seem-that doctrine which “binds nature fast in fate” to an extent not hitherto recognized, exacting from every antecedent its equivalent consequent, and bringing vital as well as physical phenomena under the dominion of that law of causal connexion which, so far as the human understanding has yet pierced, asserts itself everywhere in nature.
'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast', (19 Aug 1874). Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 1801.
Science quotes on:  |  Antecedent (3)  |  Assertion (23)  |  Binding (8)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Cause (231)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Conservation Of Energy (25)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Dominion (6)  |  Equivalent (14)  |  Everywhere (14)  |  Exacting (2)  |  Extent (30)  |  Fate (38)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Grandness (2)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Human (445)  |  Issue (37)  |  Law (418)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Origin Of Species (39)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Physics (301)  |  Radical (17)  |  Reach (68)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Significance (60)  |  Theory (582)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Vitality (10)

In speaking of cause and effect we arbitrarily give relief to those elements to whose connection we have to attend … in the respect in which it is important to us. [But t]here is no cause nor effect in nature; nature has but an individual existence; nature simply is. .
In The Science of Mechanics (1893), 483.
Science quotes on:  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Cause And Effect (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Important (124)  |  Individual (177)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Simply (34)

In the center of everything rules the sun; for who in this most beautiful temple could place this luminary at another better place whence it can light up the whole at once? ... In this arrangement we thus find an admirable harmony of the world, and a constant harmonious connection between the motion and the size of the orbits as could not be found otherwise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Better (131)  |  Center (30)  |  Constant (40)  |  Everything (120)  |  Find (248)  |  Harmonious (4)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Light (246)  |  Motion (127)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Place (111)  |  Rule (135)  |  Size (47)  |  Sun (211)  |  Temple (22)  |  Whole (122)  |  World (667)

It always seems to be easier to obtain financial support for science when there is some connection with defence. Oceanography is no exception to this.
In 'Man Explores the Sea', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (Sep 1963), 111, No. 5086, 786.
Science quotes on:  |  Defence (5)  |  Funding (12)  |  Oceanography (16)  |  Science (1699)

It is a remarkable illustration of the ranging power of the human intellect that a principle first detected in connection with the clumsy puffing of the early steam engines should be found to apply to the whole world, and possibly, even to the whole cosmic universe.
In Man and Energy (1955, 1963), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (38)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  First (174)  |  Human Intellect (4)  |  Illustration (24)  |  Principle (228)  |  Steam Engine (41)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

It is interesting to transport one’s self back to the times when Astronomy began; to observe how discoveries were connected together, how errors have got mixed up with truth, have delayed the knowledge of it, and retarded its progress; and, after having followed the various epochs and traversed every climate, finally to contemplate the edifice founded on the labours of successive centuries and of various nations.
Description of Bailly’s plan when writing his history of astronomy books, quoted by François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, in 'Bailly', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 114. Arago first presented this biography of Bailly when he read it to the Academy of Sciences (26 Feb 1844).
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Century (94)  |  Climate (38)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Edifice (13)  |  Epoch (12)  |  Error (230)  |  Founded (10)  |  History Of Astronomy (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Labour (36)  |  Mixed (4)  |  Nation (111)  |  Observation (418)  |  Progress (317)  |  Retarded (3)  |  Successive (14)  |  Time (439)  |  Truth (750)

It is very desirable to have a word to express the Availability for work of the heat in a given magazine; a term for that possession, the waste of which is called Dissipation. Unfortunately the excellent word Entropy, which Clausius has introduced in this connexion, is applied by him to the negative of the idea we most naturally wish to express. It would only confuse the student if we were to endeavour to invent another term for our purpose. But the necessity for some such term will be obvious from the beautiful examples which follow. And we take the liberty of using the term Entropy in this altered sense ... The entropy of the universe tends continually to zero.
Sketch of Thermodynamics (1868), 100-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Application (117)  |  Availability (10)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Rudolf Clausius (8)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Continuity (23)  |  Desire (101)  |  Dissipation (2)  |  Endeavour (24)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Example (57)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Expression (82)  |  Follow (66)  |  Heat (90)  |  Idea (440)  |  Introduce (27)  |  Invention (283)  |  Liberty (17)  |  Magazine (19)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Negative (24)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Possession (37)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Sense (240)  |  Student (131)  |  Term (87)  |  Unfortunately (14)  |  Universe (563)  |  Waste (57)  |  Word (221)  |  Work (457)  |  Zero (15)

It is well known that theoretical physicists cannot handle experimental equipment; it breaks whenever they touch it. Pauli was such a good theoretical physicist that something usually broke in the lab whenever he merely stepped across the threshold. A mysterious event that did not seem at first to be connected with Pauli's presence once occurred in Professor J. Franck's laboratory in Göttingen. Early one afternoon, without apparent cause, a complicated apparatus for the study of atomic phenomena collapsed. Franck wrote humorously about this to Pauli at his Zürich address and, after some delay, received an answer in an envelope with a Danish stamp. Pauli wrote that he had gone to visit Bohr and at the time of the mishap in Franck's laboratory his train was stopped for a few minutes at the Göttingen railroad station. You may believe this anecdote or not, but there are many other observations concerning the reality of the Pauli Effect!
From Thirty Years That Shook Physics: The Story of Quantum Theory (1966), 64. Note the so-called Pauli Effect is merely anecdotal to provide humor about supposed parapsychology phenomena in coincidences involving Pauli; it should not be confused with scientifically significant Pauli Exclusion Principle.
Science quotes on:  |  Anecdote (17)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Atom (251)  |  Belief (400)  |  Break (33)  |  Cause (231)  |  Collapse (16)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Delay (8)  |  Effect (133)  |  Envelope (5)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Event (97)  |  Experiment (543)  |  James Franck (2)  |  Humor (5)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Mishap (2)  |  Mysterious (21)  |  Observation (418)  |  Wolfgang Pauli (15)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Presence (26)  |  Railroad (10)  |  Reality (140)  |  Station (9)  |  Step (67)  |  Stopped (3)  |  Study (331)  |  Theoretical Physicist (12)  |  Threshold (7)  |  Touch (48)  |  Train (25)  |  Visit (15)

It seems to me that every phenomenon, every fact, itself is the really interesting object. Whoever explains it, or connects it with other events, usually only amuses himself or makes sport of us, as, for instance, the naturalist or historian. But a single action or event is interesting, not because it is explainable, but because it is true.
Quoted in translated from Unterhaltungen deutscher Ausgewanderten in Franz Boas, 'The Study of Geography', Science Supplement (11 Feb 1881), 9, No. 210, 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Amusement (20)  |  Event (97)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  Historian (30)  |  Interest (170)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Object (110)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Single (72)  |  Sport (9)  |  Truth (750)

It was necessary to invent everything. Dynamos, regulators, meters, switches, fuses, fixtures, underground conductors with their necessary connecting boxes, and a host of other detail parts, even down to insulating tape.
Concerning the electrical system to power his customers’ electric lights.
Science quotes on:  |  Box (8)  |  Conductor (8)  |  Dynamo (2)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Fixture (2)  |  Fuse (4)  |  Insulation (2)  |  Invent (30)  |  Meter (6)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Regulator (3)  |  Switch (7)  |  Tape (2)  |  Underground (5)

Leo Szilard’s Ten Commandments:
1. Recognize the connections of things and the laws of conduct of men, so that you may know what you are doing.
2. Let your acts be directed towards a worthy goal, but do not ask if they will reach it; they are to be models and examples, not means to an end.
3. Speak to all men as you do to yourself, with no concern for the effect you make, so that you do not shut them out from your world; lest in isolation the meaning of life slips out of sight and you lose the belief in the perfection of the creation.
4. Do not destroy what you cannot create.
5. Touch no dish, except that you are hungry.
6. Do not covet what you cannot have.
7. Do not lie without need.
8. Honor children. Listen reverently to their words and speak to them with infinite love.
9. Do your work for six years; but in the seventh, go into solitude or among strangers, so that the memory of your friends does not hinder you from being what you have become.
10. Lead your life with a gentle hand and be ready to leave whenever you are called.
Circulated by Mrs. Szilard in July 1964, in a letter to their friends (translated by Dr. Jacob Bronowski). As printed in Robert J. Levine, Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research (1988), 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Child (189)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Covet (2)  |  Creation (211)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Effect (133)  |  Example (57)  |  Friend (63)  |  Goal (81)  |  Honor (21)  |  Hunger (13)  |  Isolation (26)  |  Law (418)  |  Lie (80)  |  Life (917)  |  Listen (26)  |  Love (164)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Memory (81)  |  Model (64)  |  Need (211)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Solitude (10)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Stranger (9)  |  Work (457)

Long before I ever saw the desert I was aware of the mystical overtones which the observation of nature made audible to me. But I have never been more frequently or more vividly aware of them than in connection with the desert phenomena.
The Voice of the Desert, a Naturalist’s Interpretation (1955, 1975), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Audible (2)  |  Desert (27)  |  Frequent (10)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Overtone (2)  |  Vivid (16)

Looking down on this great metropolis, the ingenuity with which we continue to reshape our planet is very striking. It’s also sobering. It reminds me of just how easy it is for us to lose our connection with the natural world. Yet it is on this connection that the future of both humanity and the natural world will depend.
From BBC TV series Planet Earth II, while at London from the top of a skyscraper. As quoted in interview with Joe Shute, 'David Attenborough at 90: ‘I think about my mortality every day’', The Telegraph (29 Oct 2016).
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (56)  |  Future (229)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Look (46)  |  Lose (53)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Planet (199)  |  Reshape (2)

Mathematical science is in my opinion an indivisible whole, an organism whose vitality is conditioned upon the connection of its parts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (119)  |  Indivisible (7)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Organism (126)  |  Part (146)  |  Science (1699)  |  Vitality (10)  |  Whole (122)

Mathematicians are only dealing with the structure of reasoning, and they do not really care what they are talking about. They do not even need to know what they are talking about … But the physicist has meaning to all his phrases. … In physics, you have to have an understanding of the connection of words with the real world.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Real (95)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Structure (191)  |  Understand (189)  |  Word (221)  |  World (667)

My grandfather pioneered exploration of what he called “our water planet,” then my father sought to understand the human connection, and now, as part of the third generation, I’m dedicated to not only raising awareness but also to empowering people to take action.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Awareness (23)  |  Dedicate (9)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Father (44)  |  Generation (111)  |  Grandfather (7)  |  Human (445)  |  People (269)  |  Pioneer (23)  |  Planet (199)  |  Understand (189)  |  Water (244)

No physiologist who calmly considers the question in connection with the general truths of his science, can long resist the conviction that different parts of the cerebrum subserve different kinds of mental action. Localization of function is the law of all organization whatever: separateness of duty is universally accompanied with separateness of structure: and it would be marvellous were an exception to exist in the cerebral hemispheres.
The Principles of Psychology (1855), 607.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (18)  |  Action (151)  |  Calm (13)  |  Cerebrum (6)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Difference (208)  |  Duty (51)  |  Exception (33)  |  Existence (254)  |  Function (90)  |  Hemisphere (4)  |  Law (418)  |  Localization (2)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Mental (57)  |  Organization (79)  |  Part (146)  |  Physiologist (12)  |  Question (315)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Science (1699)  |  Serve (34)  |  Structure (191)  |  Truth (750)  |  Universality (11)

Observation by means of the microscope will reveal more wonderful things than those viewed in regard to mere structure and connection: for while the heart is still beating the contrary (i.e., in opposite directions in the different vessels) movement of the blood is observed in the vessels—though with difficulty—so that the circulation of the blood is clearly exposed.
De Pulmonibus (1661), trans. James Young, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine (1929-30), 23, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (15)  |  Blood (95)  |  Capillary (4)  |  Heart (110)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Observation (418)  |  Structure (191)  |  Vessel (21)  |  Wonder (134)

Of all obstacles to a thoroughly penetrating account of existence, none looms up more dismayingly than “time.” Explain time? Not without explaining existence. Explain existence? Not without explaining time. To uncover the deep and hidden connection between time and existence, to close on itself our quartet of questions, is a task for the future.
In article, 'Hermann Weyl and the Unity of Knowledge', American Scientist (Jul-Aug 1986), 74, 372. In the online pdf on the website weylmann.com, p. 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dismay (4)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Loom (7)  |  Obstacle (21)  |  Penetrate (21)  |  Time (439)  |  Uncover (6)

One might describe the mathematical quality in Nature by saying that the universe is so constituted that mathematics is a useful tool in its description. However, recent advances in physical science show that this statement of the case is too trivial. The connection between mathematics and the description of the universe goes far deeper than this, and one can get an appreciation of it only from a thorough examination of the various facts that make it up.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (19)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Description (72)  |  Examination (60)  |  Fact (609)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Statement (56)  |  Tool (70)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Universe (563)  |  Useful (66)  |  Various (25)

One of the first and foremost duties of the teacher is not to give his students the impression that mathematical problems have little connection with each other, and no connection at all with anything else. We have a natural opportunity to investigate the connections of a problem when looking back at its solution.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (55)  |  Duty (51)  |  First (174)  |  Foremost (8)  |  Giving (11)  |  Impression (51)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Look (46)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Natural (128)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Problem (362)  |  Solution (168)  |  Student (131)  |  Teacher (90)

Our confused wish finds expression in the confused question as to the nature of force and electricity. But the answer which we want is not really an answer to this question. It is not by finding out more and fresh relations and connections that it can be answered; but by removing the contradictions existing between those already known, and thus perhaps by reducing their number. When these painful contradictions are removed, the question as to the nature of force will not have been answered; but our minds, no longer vexed, will cease to ask illegitimate questions.
Principles of Mechanics (1899), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Expression (82)  |  Force (194)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Question (315)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Relation (96)  |  Removal (10)  |  Vexation (2)

Our experience up to date justifies us in feeling sure that in Nature is actualized the ideal of mathematical simplicity. It is my conviction that pure mathematical construction enables us to discover the concepts and the laws connecting them, which gives us the key to understanding nature… In a certain sense, therefore, I hold it true that pure thought can grasp reality, as the ancients dreamed.
In Herbert Spencer Lecture at Oxford (10 Jun 1933), 'On the Methods of Theoretical Physics'. Printed in Discovery (Jul 1933), 14, 227. Also quoted in Stefano Zambelli and ‎Donald A. R. George, Nonlinearity, Complexity and Randomness in Economics (2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Concept (102)  |  Construction (69)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dream (92)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Experience (268)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Justification (33)  |  Key (38)  |  Law (418)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pure (62)  |  Reality (140)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Thought (374)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understanding (317)

Recurrences of like cases in which A is always connected with B, that is, like results under like circumstances, that is again, the essence of the connection of cause and effect, exist but in the abstraction which we perform for the purpose of mentally reproducing the facts. Let a fact become familiar, and we no longer require this putting into relief of its connecting marks, our attention is no longer attracted to the new and surprising, and we cease to speak of cause and effect.
In The Science of Mechanics (1893), 483.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Attention (76)  |  Case (64)  |  Cause And Effect (11)  |  Cease (23)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Essence (42)  |  Exist (89)  |  Fact (609)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Mental (57)  |  New (340)  |  Perform (27)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Recurrence (3)  |  Reproduce (5)  |  Result (250)  |  Surprising (4)

Relativity teaches us the connection between the different descriptions of one and the same reality.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Description (72)  |  Different (110)  |  Reality (140)  |  Relativity (50)  |  Same (92)  |  Teach (102)

Science is beautiful when it makes simple explanations of phenomena or connections between different observations. Examples include the double helix in biology, and the fundamental equations of physics.
[Answer to question: What are the things you find most beautiful in science?]
'Stephen Hawking: "There is no heaven; it's a fairy story"', interview in newspaper The Guardian (15 May 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Difference (208)  |  DNA (67)  |  Equation (69)  |  Example (57)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Make (23)  |  Observation (418)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physics (301)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simple (111)

Science, in its ultimate ideal, consists of a set of propositions arranged in a hierarchy, the lowest level of the hierarchy being concerned with particular facts, and the highest with some general law, governing everything in the universe. The various levels in the hierarchy have a two-fold logical connection, travelling one up, one down; the upward connection proceeds by induction, the downward by deduction.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Consist (22)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Everything (120)  |  Fact (609)  |  General (92)  |  Govern (13)  |  Hierarchy (11)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Induction (45)  |  Law (418)  |  Logical (20)  |  Particular (54)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Set (56)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Universe (563)

Science, in the immediate, produces knowledge and, indirectly, means of action. It leads to methodical action if definite goals are set up in advance. For the function of setting up goals and passing statements of value transcends its domain. While it is true that science, to the extent of its grasp of causative connections, may reach important conclusions as to the compatibility and incompatibility of goals and evaluations, the independent and fundamental definitions regarding goals and values remain beyond science’s reach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Advance (123)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Definite (27)  |  Definition (152)  |  Domain (21)  |  Evaluation (5)  |  Extent (30)  |  Function (90)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Goal (81)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Important (124)  |  Incompatibility (3)  |  Independent (41)  |  Indirectly (5)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lead (101)  |  Means (109)  |  Methodical (2)  |  Pass (60)  |  Produce (63)  |  Reach (68)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remain (77)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Statement (56)  |  Transcend (9)  |  True (120)  |  Value (180)

Simple molecules combine to make powerful chemicals. Simple cells combine to make powerful life-forms. Simple electronics combine to make powerful computers. Logically, all things are created by a combination of simpler, less capable components. Therefore, a supreme being must be in our future, not our origin. What if “God” is the consciousness that will be created when enough of us are connected by the Internet?!!
Thoughts by character Dogbert in Dilbert cartoon strip (11 Feb 1996).
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (35)  |  Cell (125)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Combination (69)  |  Component (14)  |  Computer (84)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Creation (211)  |  Electronics (8)  |  Future (229)  |  God (454)  |  Internet (12)  |  Life (917)  |  Life-Form (4)  |  Logic (187)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Origin (77)  |  Power (273)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Supreme Being (2)

Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical porblems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, however, weakened the connection between mathematics and physics; mathematicians, turning away from their roots of mathematics in intuition, have concentrated on refinement and emphasized the postulated side of mathematics, and at other times have overlooked the unity of their science with physics and other fields. In many cases, physicists have ceased to appreciate the attitudes of mathematicians. This rift is unquestionably a serious threat to science as a whole; the broad stream of scientific development may split into smaller and smaller rivulets and dry out. It seems therefore important to direct our efforts towards reuniting divergent trends by classifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts.
As co-author with David Hilbert, in Methods of Mathematical Physics (1937, 1989), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (10)  |  Appreciation (19)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Classification (79)  |  Common (92)  |  Concentration (14)  |  Directing (5)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Divergence (4)  |  Diverse (6)  |  Effort (94)  |  Emphasis (14)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Feature (34)  |  Importance (183)  |  Interconnection (7)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Method (154)  |  Overlooking (3)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Physics (301)  |  Postulate (23)  |  Problem (362)  |  Recent (23)  |  Refinement (12)  |  Rift (2)  |  Root (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Serious (37)  |  Serving (4)  |  Source (71)  |  Threat (24)  |  Trend (16)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unity (43)  |  Unquestionably (2)  |  Vital (32)  |  Weakening (2)  |  Whole (122)

The axis cylinders of all nerve fibers (motor, secretory, sensitive and sensory, conducting centrifugally or centripetally) have been proved to proceed directly from the cells. A connection with a fiber network, or an origin from such a network, does not take place.
In 'Uber einige neuere Forschungen im Gebiete der Anatomie des Centralnervensystems', Deutsche Medizirusche Wochenschrlft (1891), 7, 1352. Trans. Edwin Clarke and L. S. Jacyna, Nineteenth Century Origins of Neuroscientific Concepts (1987), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Axis (8)  |  Cell (125)  |  Centrifugal (3)  |  Centripetal (2)  |  Conducting (2)  |  Cylinder (4)  |  Direct (44)  |  Fiber (10)  |  Motor (10)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Network (10)  |  Origin (77)  |  Place (111)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Secretion (4)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sensitive (12)

The combination in time and space of all these thoughtful conceptions [of Nature] exhibits not only thought, it shows also premeditation, power, wisdom, greatness, prescience, omniscience, providence. In one word, all these facts in their natural connection proclaim aloud the One God, whom man may know, adore, and love; and Natural History must in good time become the analysis of the thoughts of the Creator of the Universe….
In Essay on Classification (1851), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Adore (2)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Combination (69)  |  Conception (63)  |  Creator (40)  |  Exhibit (12)  |  Fact (609)  |  God (454)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Know (321)  |  Love (164)  |  Natural (128)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Omniscience (3)  |  Power (273)  |  Prescience (2)  |  Proclaim (12)  |  Providence (6)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Show (55)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wisdom (151)

The earth does not belong to us; we belong to the earth. All things are connected, like the blood which unites one family. Mankind did not weave the web of life. We are but one strand within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
Ted Perry
Fictional speech from script for ABC TV movie, Home (1972). The words by the screenwriter were inspired from an Earth Day gathering in 1970, where Perry heard a historical account by physician Dr. Henry Smith. The doctor's words were published in a Seattle newspaper, written up to 33 years after being present, when in Dec 1854 Chief Seattle made an impassioned speech, in the language of his own people, the Suquwamish. The Chief, with other tribal leaders, were meeting with the Territorial Governor who was trying to get them to sign away their lands and instead receive protection on a reservation. Dr. Smith may not have been fluent in the language of the Suquwamish, although he did make some notes at the time. But he wrote poetry, making embellishment or invention likely, so it is questionable whether his newspaper account is reliable in providing the Chief's actual words. In turn, Perry has made clear that his script provided a fictional representation the Chief. The televisedquote, however became mythical, and is incorrectly passed along as attributed to Chief Seattle in 1854, but the truth is the words are contemporary, written by Perry, a screenwriter. Also seen as: Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (33)  |  Blood (95)  |  Earth (487)  |  Family (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Ourself (9)  |  Strand (5)  |  Unite (13)  |  Weave (9)  |  Web (11)  |  Whatever (9)

The forces which displace continents are the same as those which produce great fold-mountain ranges. Continental drift, faults and compressions, earthquakes, volcanicity, transgression cycles and polar wandering are undoubtedly connected causally on a grand scale. Their common intensification in certain periods of the earth’s history shows this to be true. However, what is cause and what effect, only the future will unveil.
In The Origins of Continents and Oceans (4th ed. 1929), trans. John Biram (1966), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Compression (4)  |  Continent (39)  |  Continental Drift (9)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Displacement (5)  |  Earth (487)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Fault (27)  |  Fold (4)  |  Force (194)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Period (49)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Pole (14)  |  Transgression (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unveiling (2)  |  Volcano (36)

The Historic Method may be described as the comparison of the forms of an idea, or a usage, or a belief, at any given time, with the earlier forms from which they were evolved, or the later forms into which they were developed and the establishment from such a comparison, of an ascending and descending order among the facts. It consists in the explanation of existing parts in the frame of society by connecting them with corresponding parts in some earlier frame; in the identification of present forms in the past, and past forms in the present. Its main process is the detection of corresponding customs, opinions, laws, beliefs, among different communities, and a grouping of them into general classes with reference to some one common feature. It is a certain way of seeking answers to various questions of origin, resting on the same general doctrine of evolution, applied to moral and social forms, as that which is being applied with so much ingenuity to the series of organic matter.
On Compromise (1874), 22-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Class (64)  |  Community (65)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Custom (24)  |  Detection (12)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feature (34)  |  Frame (17)  |  Group (52)  |  Idea (440)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Law (418)  |  Method (154)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Order (167)  |  Society (188)

The history of the word sankhyā shows the intimate connection which has existed for more than 3000 years in the Indian mind between ‘adequate knowledge’ and ‘number.’ As we interpret it, the fundamental aim of statistics is to give determinate and adequate knowledge of reality with the help of numbers and numerical analysis. The ancient Indian word Sankhyā embodies the same idea, and this is why we have chosen this name for the Indian Journal of Statistics.
Editorial, Vol. 1, Part 1, in the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933). Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (18)  |  Aim (58)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Determinate (5)  |  Embody (13)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Help (68)  |  History (302)  |  India (15)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Journal (13)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mind (544)  |  Name (118)  |  Number (179)  |  Reality (140)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Word (221)

The ideal of the supreme being is nothing but a regulative principle of reason which directs us to look upon all connection in the world as if it originated from an all-sufficient necessary cause.
Critique of Pure Reason (1781), trans. Norman Kemp Smith (1929), 517.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  God (454)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Reason (330)

The man of science dissects the statement, verifies the facts, and demonstrates connection even where he cannot its purpose.
From 'The Great Lawsuit. Man versus Men. Woman versus Women,' in the Boston Dial (Jul 1843), 4, No. 1, 3, which she expanded (padded) to publish as Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1844).
Science quotes on:  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Dissection (26)  |  Fact (609)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Statement (56)  |  Verify (9)

The more we learn of science, the more we see that its wonderful mysteries are all explained by a few simple laws so connected together and so dependent upon each other, that we see the same mind animating them all.
Sermon (c. 13 Jan. 1895), Mukwonago, Wisconsin, published in Olympia Brown and Gwendolen B. Willis (ed.), Olympia Brown, An Autobiography (1960). Reprinted in Annual Journal of the Universalist Historical Society (1963), vol. 4, 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Animation (3)  |  Dependence (32)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Learning (174)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Wonder (134)

The nature of the connexion between the mind and nervous matter has ever been, and must continue to be, the deepest mystery in physiology; and they who study the laws of Nature, as ordinances of God, will regard it as one of those secrets of his counsels ‘which Angels desire to look into.’
[Co-author with William Bowman]
In Robert Todd and William Bowman, The Physiological Anatomy and Physiology of Man (1845), Vol. 1, 262. Bowman was a British surgeon (1816-1892).
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (25)  |  British (5)  |  Coauthor (2)  |  Continue (38)  |  Counsel (5)  |  Deepest (3)  |  Desire (101)  |  God (454)  |  Law (418)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nervous (5)  |  Ordinance (2)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Regard (58)  |  Secret (98)  |  Study (331)  |  Surgeon (43)

The nervous system is the most complex and delicate instrument on our planet, by means of which relations, connections are established between the numerous parts of the organism, as well as between the organism, as a highly complex system, and the innumerable, external influences. If the closing and opening of electric current is now regarded as an ordinary technical device, why should there be any objection to the idea that the same principle acts in this wonderful instrument? On this basis the constant connection between the external agent and the response of the organism, which it evokes, can be rightly called an unconditioned reflex, and the temporary connection—a conditioned reflex.
The Conditioned Reflex (1935), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Called (7)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Conditioning (3)  |  Constancy (4)  |  Current (43)  |  Delicacy (2)  |  Device (24)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Establishment (29)  |  External (45)  |  Idea (440)  |  Influence (110)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Objection (16)  |  Opening (15)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Organism (126)  |  Part (146)  |  Planet (199)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reflex (9)  |  Regard (58)  |  Relation (96)  |  Response (24)  |  Technology (199)  |  Temporary (13)  |  Wonder (134)

The originality of mathematics consists in the fact that in mathematical science connections between things are exhibited which, apart from the agency of human reason, are extremely unobvious.
In Science and the Modern World (1938), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (609)  |  Human (445)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Originality (14)  |  Reason (330)  |  Science (1699)

The relative importance of the white and gray matter is often misunderstood. Were it not for the manifold connection of the nerve cells in the cortex by the tens of millions of fibres which make up the under-estimated white matter, such a brain would be useless as a telephone or telegraph station with all the interconnecting wires destroyed.
Address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia (28 Dec 1904), as quoted in 'Americans of Future Will Have Best Brains', New York Times (29 Dec 1904), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Cell (125)  |  Cortex (3)  |  Fibre (5)  |  Importance (183)  |  Misunderstanding (8)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Telegraph (31)  |  Telephone (21)

The sciences are said, and they are truly said, to have a mutual connection, that any one of them may be the better understood, for an insight into the rest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Insight (57)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Rest (64)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Truly (19)  |  Understand (189)

The significant thing about the Darbys and coke-iron is not that the first Abraham Darby “invented” a new process but that five generations of the Darby connection were able to perfect it and develop most of its applications.
In Essays on Culture Change (2003), Vol. 2, 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Coke (3)  |  Develop (55)  |  Generation (111)  |  Invent (30)  |  Iron (53)  |  New (340)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Process (201)  |  Significant (26)

The universe, as we see it, is the result of regularly working forces, having a causal connection with each other and therefore capable of being understood by human reason.
From Force and Matter: Or, Principles of the Natural Order of the Universe (1884), Preface to the 15th edition, x.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (26)  |  Causal (6)  |  Force (194)  |  Human (445)  |  Reason (330)  |  Regularly (3)  |  Result (250)  |  Understood (9)  |  Universe (563)  |  Working (20)

The unscientific person takes things as they are, and cares not for their origin. To study things from a scientific standpoint means to take an inventory of them—to find the process in which they are being produced; to connect them with other things; to see things in their causal process.
From a series of lectures at Johns Hopkins University. Lecture 5 (4 Feb 1893), 'Herbert Spencer and What Knowledge is of Most Worth', The Philosophy of Education (1893), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (73)  |  Causal (6)  |  Find (248)  |  Inventory (6)  |  Origin (77)  |  Process (201)  |  Produced (8)  |  Scientific (169)  |  See (197)  |  Standpoint (8)  |  Study (331)  |  Unscientific (7)

The ‘mad idea’ which will lie at the basis of a future fundamental physical theory will come from a realization that physical meaning has some mathematical form not previously associated with reality. From this point of view the problem of the ‘mad idea’ is the problem of choosing, not of generating, the right idea. One should not understand that too literally. In the 1960s it was said (in a certain connection) that the most important discovery of recent years in physics was the complex numbers. The author [Yuri Manin] has something like that in mind.
Mathematics and Physics (1981), Foreward. Reprinted in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Associate (9)  |  Author (39)  |  Basis (60)  |  Certain (84)  |  Choose (35)  |  Complex Number (2)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Form (210)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Future (229)  |  Generate (11)  |  Idea (440)  |  Important (124)  |  Lie (80)  |  Literally (5)  |  Mad (15)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mind (544)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physics (301)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Previously (7)  |  Problem (362)  |  Reality (140)  |  Realization (33)  |  Recent (23)  |  Right (144)  |  Say (126)  |  Theory (582)  |  Understand (189)  |  Year (214)

The “seriousness” of a mathematical theorem lies, not in its practical consequences, which are usually negligible, but in the significance of the mathematical ideas which it connects.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (76)  |  Idea (440)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Negligible (3)  |  Practical (93)  |  Seriousness (9)  |  Theorem (46)

There are still psychologists who, in a basic misunderstanding, think that gestalt theory tends to underestimate the role of past experience. Gestalt theory tries to differentiate between and-summative aggregates, on the one hand, and gestalten, structures, on the other, both in sub-wholes and in the total field, and to develop appropriate scientific tools for investigating the latter. It opposes the dogmatic application to all cases of what is adequate only for piecemeal aggregates. The question is whether an approach in piecemeal terms, through blind connections, is or is not adequate to interpret actual thought processes and the role of the past experience as well. Past experience has to be considered thoroughly, but it is ambiguous in itself; so long as it is taken in piecemeal, blind terms it is not the magic key to solve all problems.
In Productive Thinking (1959), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Adequate (18)  |  Aggregate (8)  |  Ambiguous (4)  |  Application (117)  |  Approach (33)  |  Appropriate (18)  |  Basic (52)  |  Blind (35)  |  Consider (45)  |  Develop (55)  |  Differentiate (6)  |  Dogmatic (4)  |  Experience (268)  |  Field (119)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Key (38)  |  Magic (67)  |  Misunderstanding (8)  |  Oppose (16)  |  Past (109)  |  Piecemeal (3)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Psychologist (11)  |  Question (315)  |  Role (35)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Solve (41)  |  Structure (191)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Thoroughly (7)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tool (70)  |  Total (29)  |  Try (103)  |  Underestimate (3)

There are three stages in the development of science: First, there is the observation of things and facts—the scientists map out and inventory the objects in each department of Nature; secondly, the interrelations are investigated, and this leads to a knowledge of forces and influences which produce or modify those objects…. This is the dynamic stage, the discovery of forces and laws connecting each fact with all other facts, and each province of Nature with all other provinces of Nature. The goal of this second stage of science is to make each fact in Nature throw light on all the other facts, and thus to illuminate each by all. … Science in its third and final stage learns to know everything in Nature as a part of a process which it studies in the history of its development. When it comes to see each thing in the perspective of its evolution, it knows it and comprehends it.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 378.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Development (228)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fact (609)  |  Force (194)  |  Illuminate (12)  |  Influence (110)  |  Interrelation (6)  |  Inventory (6)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Map (21)  |  Modify (11)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Perspective (15)  |  Process (201)  |  Science (1699)  |  Stage (39)  |  Study (331)

There is a huge disconnect. Those living in the most urbanised areas don’t see a wild thing from one day to the next—unless it’s a pigeon or a rat. If you lose the connection with nature, you lose a source of great pleasure.
Lamenting Britain’s urbanized population is increasingly separated from the natural world. As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Disconnect (2)  |  Huge (15)  |  Lose (53)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pigeon (4)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Rat (19)  |  Source (71)  |  Suburb (5)  |  Urban (7)  |  Wild (39)

There is no logical impossibility in the hypothesis that the world sprang into being five minutes ago, exactly as it then was, with a population that "remembered" a wholly unreal past. There is no logically necessary connection between events at different times; therefore nothing that is happening now or will happen in the future can disprove the hypothesis that the world began five minutes ago.
In The Analysis of Mind (1921) 159–160.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  Different (110)  |  Disprove (15)  |  Event (97)  |  Future (229)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Logic (187)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Past (109)  |  Population (71)  |  Remember (53)  |  Time (439)  |  Unreal (2)  |  World (667)

There is thus a possibility that the ancient dream of philosophers to connect all Nature with the properties of whole numbers will some day be realized. To do so physics will have to develop a long way to establish the details of how the correspondence is to be made. One hint for this development seems pretty obvious, namely, the study of whole numbers in modern mathematics is inextricably bound up with the theory of functions of a complex variable, which theory we have already seen has a good chance of forming the basis of the physics of the future. The working out of this idea would lead to a connection between atomic theory and cosmology.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Atomic Theory (13)  |  Basis (60)  |  Complex (78)  |  Connect (15)  |  Correspondence (8)  |  Cosmology (17)  |  Detail (65)  |  Develop (55)  |  Dream (92)  |  Establish (30)  |  Function (90)  |  Future (229)  |  Idea (440)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Modern (104)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Physics (301)  |  Property (96)  |  Realize (43)  |  Study (331)  |  Theory (582)  |  Variable (9)

Those who intend to practise Midwifery, ought first of all to make themselves masters of anatomy, and acquire a competent knowledge in surgery and physic; because of their connections with the obstetric art, if not always, at least in many cases. He ought to take the best opportunities he can find of being well instructed; and of practising under a master, before he attempts to deliver by himself. ... He should also embrace every occasion of being present at real labours, ... he will assist the poor as well as the rich, behaving always with charity and compassion.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 440-441.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (19)  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Assist (3)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Behave (13)  |  Charity (8)  |  Compassion (9)  |  Competent (10)  |  Deliver (3)  |  Embrace (22)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Intend (7)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Labour (36)  |  Master (55)  |  Obstetrics (2)  |  Occasion (12)  |  Physic (5)  |  Poor (46)  |  Practise (4)  |  Practising (2)  |  Present (103)  |  Rich (48)  |  Surgery (39)

Three engineering students were discussing who designed the human body. One said, “It was a mechanical engineer. Just look at all the joints and levers.” The second said, “No, it was an electrical engineer. The nervous system has thousands of electrical connections.” The last said, “Obviously, it was a civil engineer. Who else would run a toxic waste pipeline through a major recreation area?”
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Design (92)  |  Electrical (10)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Joint (11)  |  Joke (39)  |  Mechanical Engineer (2)  |  Nervous System (11)  |  Toxic Waste (3)

Through the reading of popular scientific books I soon reached the conviction that much in the stories of the Bible could not be true. The consequence was a positively fanatic orgy of freethinking coupled with the impression that youth is intentionally being deceived by the state through lies; it was a crushing impression. Mistrust of every kind of author ity grew out of this experience, a skeptical attitude toward the convictions that were alive in any specific social environment–an attitude that has never again left me, even though, later on, it has been tempered by a better insight into the causal connections.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Author (39)  |  Better (131)  |  Bible (83)  |  Book (181)  |  Causal (6)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Couple (4)  |  Crush (6)  |  Deceive (8)  |  Environment (138)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fanatic (5)  |  Grow (66)  |  Impression (51)  |  Insight (57)  |  Intentionally (3)  |  Kind (99)  |  Late (28)  |  Leave (63)  |  Lie (80)  |  Mistrust (4)  |  Orgy (3)  |  Popular (21)  |  Positively (2)  |  Reach (68)  |  Read (83)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Skeptical (6)  |  Social (93)  |  Soon (17)  |  Specific (30)  |  State (96)  |  Story (58)  |  Temper (6)  |  Toward (29)  |  True (120)  |  Youth (57)

To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.
Testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on Forest & Public Lands Management regarding the Utah Public Lands Management Act of 1995, Washington, D.C. (13 Jul 1995).
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (43)  |  Human (445)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Reminder (11)  |  Separation (32)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wildness (4)

To trace the series of these revolutions, to explain their causes, and thus to connect together all the indications of change that are found in the mineral kingdom, is the proper object of a THEORY OF THE EARTH.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Change (291)  |  Earth (487)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Finding (30)  |  Indication (21)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Mineral (37)  |  Object (110)  |  Properness (2)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Series (38)  |  Theory (582)  |  Trace (39)

Truth and falsity, indeed understanding, is not necessarily something purely intellectual, remote from feelings and attitudes. ... It is in the total conduct of men rather than in their statements that truth or falsehood lives, more in what a man does, in his real reaction to other men and to things, in his will to do them justice, to live at one with them. Here lies the inner connection between truth and justice. In the realm of behavior and action, the problem recurs as to the difference between piece and part.
From 'On Truth', collected in Mary Henle (ed.), Documents of Gestalt Psychology (1961), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Difference (208)  |  Falsehood (19)  |  Falsity (12)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Inner (27)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Life (917)  |  Man (345)  |  Part (146)  |  Piece (32)  |  Problem (362)  |  Purely (15)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Real (95)  |  Realm (40)  |  Recur (3)  |  Remote (27)  |  Statement (56)  |  Total (29)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understanding (317)

Truth travels down from the heights of philosophy to the humblest walks of life, and up from the simplest perceptions of an awakened intellect to the discoveries which almost change the face of the world. At every stage of its progress it is genial, luminous, creative. When first struck out by some distinguished and fortunate genius, it may address itself only to a few minds of kindred power. It exists then only in the highest forms of science; it corrects former systems, and authorizes new generalizations. Discussion, controversy begins; more truth is elicited, more errors exploded, more doubts cleared up, more phenomena drawn into the circle, unexpected connexions of kindred sciences are traced, and in each step of the progress, the number rapidly grows of those who are prepared to comprehend and carry on some branches of the investigation,— till, in the lapse of time, every order of intellect has been kindled, from that of the sublime discoverer to the practical machinist; and every department of knowledge been enlarged, from the most abstruse and transcendental theory to the daily arts of life.
In An Address Delivered Before the Literary Societies of Amherst College (25 Aug 1835), 16-17.
Science quotes on:  |  Awakened (2)  |  Change (291)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Creative (41)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Face (69)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Genial (3)  |  Genius (186)  |  Height (24)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Luminous (9)  |  Perception (53)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Simplest (9)  |  Travel (40)  |  Truth (750)  |  Walk Of Life (2)  |  World (667)

We can trace the development of a nervous system, and correlate with it the parallel phenomena of sensation and thought. We see with undoubting certainty that they go hand in hand. But we try to soar in a vacuum the moment we seek to comprehend the connexion between them … Man the object is separated by an impassable gulf from man the subject.
In 'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast' (19 Aug 1874), in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 194-195.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (97)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Correlation (9)  |  Development (228)  |  Gulf (10)  |  Nervous System (11)  |  Object (110)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Separation (32)  |  Subject (129)  |  Thought (374)  |  Trace (39)  |  Vacuum (29)

We expect that the study of lunar geology will help to answer some longstanding questions about the early evolution of the earth. The moon and the earth are essentially a two-planet system, and the two bodies are probably closely related in origin. In this connection the moon is of special interest because its surface has not been subjected to the erosion by running water that has helped to shape the earth's surface.
In Scientific American (Sep 1964). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 Years Ago', Scientific American (Dec 2014), 311, No. 6, 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Body (193)  |  Early (39)  |  Earth (487)  |  Erosion (18)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Geology (187)  |  Help (68)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lunar (5)  |  Moon (132)  |  Origin (77)  |  Planet (199)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Running (8)  |  Shape (52)  |  Special (51)  |  Study (331)  |  Surface (74)  |  System (141)  |  Two (13)  |  Water (244)

We have no knowledge, that is, no general principles drawn from the contemplation of particular facts, but what has been built up by pleasure, and exists in us by pleasure alone. The Man of Science, the Chemist and Mathematician, whatever difficulties and disgusts they may have had to struggle with, know and feel this. However painful may be the objects with which the Anatomist's knowledge is connected, he feels that his knowledge is pleasure; and where he has no pleasure he has no knowledge.
In Lyrical Ballads: With Pastoral and Other Poems (3rd Ed., 1802), Vol. 1, Preface, xxxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Disgust (6)  |  Fact (609)  |  General (92)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Pain (82)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Principle (228)  |  Struggle (60)

We need only reflect on what has been prov'd at large, that we are never sensible of any connexion betwixt causes and effects, and that 'tis only by our experience of their constant conjunction, we can arrive at any knowledge of this relation.
A Treatise on Human Nature (1739-40), ed. L. A. Selby-Bigge (1888), book 1, part 4, section 165, 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Effect (133)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Proof (192)  |  Relationship (59)

When the number of factors coming into play in a phenomenological complex is too large, scientific method in most cases fails us. One need only think of the weather, in which case prediction even for a few days ahead is impossible. Nevertheless no one doubts that we are confronted with a causal connection whose causal components are in the main known to us.
Out of My Later Years (1995), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (14)  |  Case (64)  |  Causal (6)  |  Complex (78)  |  Component (14)  |  Confront (9)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Factor (34)  |  Fail (34)  |  Failure (118)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Know (321)  |  Large (82)  |  Main (16)  |  Need (211)  |  Number (179)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Play (60)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Think (205)  |  Weather (27)

Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. If what is seen is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively as meaningful, then we are engaged in art.
'What Artistic and Scientific Experience Have in Common', Menschen (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, Helen Dukas, Banesh Hoffmann, Albert Einstein, The Human Side (1981), 37-38. The article was published in a German magazine on modern art, upon a request from the editor, Walter Hasenclever, for a few paragraphs on the idea that there was a close connection between the artistic developments and the scientific results belonging to a given epoch. (The magazine name, and editor's name are given by Ze'ev Rosenkranz, The Einstein Scrapbook (2002), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (11)  |  Admire (10)  |  Art (205)  |  Ask (99)  |  Cease (23)  |  Communicate (10)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Engage (11)  |  Enter (20)  |  Experience (268)  |  Face (69)  |  Form (210)  |  Free (59)  |  Hope (129)  |  Language (155)  |  Logic (187)  |  Meaningful (14)  |  Mind (544)  |  Observe (48)  |  Personal (49)  |  Portray (3)  |  Realm (40)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Scene (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Wish (62)  |  World (667)

Whoever wishes to acquire a deep acquaintance with Nature must observe that there are analogies which connect whole branches of science in a parallel manner, and enable us to infer of one class of phenomena what we know of another. It has thus happened on several occasions that the discovery of an unsuspected analogy between two branches of knowledge has been the starting point for a rapid course of discovery.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 631.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Analogy (46)  |  Class (64)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Inference (26)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Occasion (12)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Unsuspected (5)

[Edison] definitely ended the distinction between the theoretical man of science and the practical man of science, so that today we think of scientific discoveries in connection with their possible present or future application to the needs of man. He took the old rule-of-thumb methods out of industry and substituted exact scientific knowledge, while, on the other hand, he directed scientific research into useful channels.
In My Friend Mr. Edison (1930). Quoted in Dyson Carter, If You Want to Invent (1939), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Thomas Edison (74)  |  Exact (38)  |  Industry (91)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Practical (93)  |  Research (517)  |  Technology (199)  |  Theoretical (10)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.