Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Describe

Describe Quotes (128 quotes)

'Normal' science, in Kuhn's sense, exists. It is the activity of the non-revolutionary, or more precisely, the not-too-critical professional: of the science student who accepts the ruling dogma of the day... in my view the 'normal' scientist, as Kuhn describes him, is a person one ought to be sorry for... He has been taught in a dogmatic spirit: he is a victim of indoctrination... I can only say that I see a very great danger in it and in the possibility of its becoming normal... a danger to science and, indeed, to our civilization. And this shows why I regard Kuhn's emphasis on the existence of this kind of science as so important.
'Normal Science and its Dangers', in I. Lakatos and A. Musgrave (eds.), Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge (1970), 52-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Activity (210)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Danger (115)  |  Description (84)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Dogmatism (14)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indoctrination (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  Thomas S. Kuhn (22)  |  More (2559)  |  Normal (28)  |  Person (363)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Professional (70)  |  Regard (305)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Show (346)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Student (300)  |  Victim (35)  |  View (488)  |  Why (491)

Question: State what are the conditions favourable for the formation of dew. Describe an instrument for determining the dew point, and the method of using it.
Answer: This is easily proved from question 1. A body of gas as it ascends expands, cools, and deposits moisture; so if you walk up a hill the body of gas inside you expands, gives its heat to you, and deposits its moisture in the form of dew or common sweat. Hence these are the favourable conditions; and moreover it explains why you get warm by ascending a hill, in opposition to the well-known law of the Conservation of Energy.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179, Question 12. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Body (537)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Deposition (4)  |  Description (84)  |  Determination (78)  |  Dew (9)  |  Easy (204)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Favor (63)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gas (83)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hill (20)  |  Howler (15)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  State (491)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Use (766)  |  Walk (124)  |  Warm (69)  |  Well-Known (4)  |  Why (491)

Qui ergo munitam vult habere navem habet etiam acum jaculo suppositam. Rotabitur enim et circumvolvetur acus, donec cuspis acus respiciat orientem sicque comprehendunt quo tendere debeant nautaw cum Cynosura latet in aeris turbatione; quamvis ad occasum numquam tendat, propter circuli brevitatem.
If then one wishes a ship well provided with all things, then one must have also a needle mounted on a dart. The needle will be oscillated and turn until the point of the needle directs itself to the East* [North], thus making known to sailors the route which they should hold while the Little Bear is concealed from them by the vicissitudes of the atmosphere; for it never disappears under the horizon because of the smallness of the circle it describes.
Latin text from Thomas Wright, 'De Utensilibus', A Volume of Vocabularies, (1857) as cited with translation in Park Benjamin, The Intellectual Rise in Electricity: A History (1895), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bear (159)  |  Circle (110)  |  Compass (34)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Known (454)  |  Little (707)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Making (300)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Sailor (16)  |  Ship (62)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Will (2355)

Thomasina: Every week I plot your equations dot for dot, x’s against y’s in all manner of algebraical relation, and every week they draw themselves as commonplace geometry, as if the world of forms were nothing but arcs and angles. God’s truth, Septimus, if there is an equation for a curve like a bell, there must be an equation for one like a bluebell, and if a bluebell, why not a rose? Do we believe nature is written in numbers?
Septimus: We do.
Thomasina: Then why do your shapes describe only the shapes of manufacture?
Septimus: I do not know.
Thomasina: Armed thus, God could only make a cabinet.
In the play, Acadia (1993), Scene 3, 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arc (12)  |  Arm (81)  |  Armed (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bell (35)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Curve (49)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dot (16)  |  Draw (137)  |  Equation (132)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Plot (11)  |  Relation (157)  |  Rose (34)  |  Shape (72)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Week (70)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)  |  Written (6)

Toutes les fois que dans une équation finale on trouve deux quantités inconnues, on a un lieu, l'extrémité de l'une d’elles décrivant une ligne droite ou courbe. La ligne droite est simple et unique dans son genre; les espèces des courbes sont en nombre indéfini, cercle, parabole, hyperbole, ellipse, etc.
Whenever two unknown magnitudes appear in a final equation, we have a locus, the extremity of one of the unknown magnitudes describing a straight line or a curve. The straight line is simple and unique; the classes of curves are indefinitely many,—circle, parabola, hyperbola, ellipse, etc.
Introduction aux Lieux Plans et Solides (1679) collected in OEuvres de Fermat (1896), Vol. 3, 85. Introduction to Plane and Solid Loci, as translated by Joseph Seidlin in David E. Smith(ed.)A Source Book in Mathematics (1959), 389. Alternate translation using Google Translate: “Whenever in a final equation there are two unknown quantities, there is a locus, the end of one of them describing a straight line or curve. The line is simple and unique in its kind, species curves are indefinite in number,—circle, parabola, hyperbola, ellipse, etc.”
Science quotes on:  |  Circle (110)  |  Curve (49)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Final (118)  |  Locus (5)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Simple (406)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Two (937)  |  Unique (67)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Whenever (81)

[Answering question whether he was tired of life:] Tired! Not so long as there is an undescribed intestinal worm, or the riddle of a fossil bone, or a rhizopod new to me.
Related about Joseph Leidy by Dr. Weir Mitchell, as stated in Richard A. Gregory, Discovery: Or, The Spirit and Service of Science (1916), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Bone (95)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Question (621)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Tired (13)  |  Worm (42)

A barbarous practice, the inconsistency, folly, and injury of which no words can sufficiently describe.
Condemning the use of mercurial medicines.
Quoted in Wooster Beach, A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Health (1848), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Drug (57)  |  Folly (43)  |  Injury (36)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Poison (40)  |  Practice (204)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

A good many times I have been present at gatherings of people who, by the standards of the traditional culture, are thought highly educated and who have with considerable gusto been expressing their incredulity at the illiteracy of scientists. Once or twice I have been provoked and have asked the company how many of them could describe the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The response was cold: it was also negative. Yet I was asking something which is about the scientific equivalent of: Have you read a work of Shakespeare's?
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 14-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Cold (112)  |  Company (59)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Culture (143)  |  Educated (12)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Good (889)  |  Illiteracy (7)  |  Incredulity (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Negative (63)  |  People (1005)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Response (53)  |  Science Literacy (5)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Something (719)  |  Standard (57)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Work (1351)

A government, at bottom, is nothing more than a gang of men, and as a practical matter most of them are inferior men ... Government is actually the worst failure of civilized man. There has never been a really good one, and even those that are most tolerable are arbitrary, cruel, grasping and unintelligent. Indeed, it would not be far wrong to describe the best as the common enemy of all decent citizens.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Bad (180)  |  Best (459)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Common (436)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Decent (10)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Failure (161)  |  Far (154)  |  Gang (4)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Practical (200)  |  Really (78)  |  Tolerable (2)  |  Unintelligent (2)  |  Worst (57)  |  Wrong (234)

A mile and a half from town, I came to a grove of tall cocoanut trees, with clean, branchless stems reaching straight up sixty or seventy feet and topped with a spray of green foliage sheltering clusters of cocoanuts—not more picturesque than a forest of colossal ragged parasols, with bunches of magnified grapes under them, would be. I once heard a grouty northern invalid say that a cocoanut tree might be poetical, possibly it was; but it looked like a feather-duster struck by lightning. I think that describes it better than a picture—and yet, without any question, there is something fascinating about a cocoanut tree—and graceful, too.
In Roughing It (1913), 184-85.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bunch (7)  |  Clean (50)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Feather (12)  |  Foliage (5)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grape (4)  |  Green (63)  |  Grove (5)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Say (984)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Something (719)  |  Spray (4)  |  Stem (31)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strike (68)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trunk (21)

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustable source of pure and exciting contemplations:— One would think that Shakespeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man as finding
    “Tongues in trees—books in running brooks—
    Sermons in stones—and good in everything.”
Accustomed to trace the operations of general causes and the exemplification of general laws, in circumstances where the uninformed and uninquiring eye, perceives neither novelty nor beauty, he walks in the midst of wonders; every object which falls in his way elucidates some principle, affords some instruction and impresses him with a sense of harmony and order. Nor is it a mere passive pleasure which is thus communicated. A thousand questions are continually arising in his mind, a thousand objects of enquiry presenting themselves, which keep his faculties in constant exercise, and his thoughts perpetually on the wing, so that lassitude is excluded from his life, and that craving after artificial excitement and dissipation of the mind, which leads so many into frivolous, unworthy, and destructive pursuits, is altogether eradicated from his bosom.
In Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Arising (22)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Running (61)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Stone (162)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unworthy (18)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wonder (236)

A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner: Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time. When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most.
Anonymous
Widely found in varied accounts, so is most likely proverbial. Seen misattributed (?) to George Bernard Shaw, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source as verification.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Dog (70)  |  Elder (8)  |  Evil (116)  |  Feed (27)  |  Fight (44)  |  Good (889)  |  Inner (71)  |  Inside (26)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mean (809)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Native (38)  |  Native American (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reply (56)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Win (52)

A neurotic person can be most simply described as someone who, while he was growing up, learned ways of behaving that are self-defeating in his society.
In Margaret Mead and Rhoda Bubendey Métraux (ed.), Margaret Mead, Some Personal Views (1979), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Behave (17)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Growing (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neurotic (6)  |  Person (363)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Self (267)  |  Simple (406)  |  Society (326)  |  Way (1217)

A “pacifist male” is a contradiction in terms. Most self-described “pacifists” are not pacific; they simply assume false colors. When the wind changes, they hoist the Jolly Roger.
In 'From the Notebooks of Lazarus Long', Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 258.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  False (100)  |  Male (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pacifist (2)  |  Self (267)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Wind (128)

About thirty years ago there was much talk that geologists ought only to observe and not theorise; and I well remember some one saying that at this rate a man might as well go into a gravel-pit and count the pebbles and describe the colours. How odd it is that anyone should not see that all observation must be for or against some view if it is to be of any service!
Letter to Henry Fawcett (18 Sep 1861). In Charles Darwin, Francis Darwin, Albert Charles Seward, More Letters of Charles Darwin (1903), Vol. 1, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Color (137)  |  Count (105)  |  Description (84)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Gravel (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Pit (19)  |  Remember (179)  |  See (1081)  |  Service (110)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

An experiment is an observation that can be repeated, isolated and varied. The more frequently you can repeat an observation, the more likely are you to see clearly what is there and to describe accurately what you have seen. The more strictly you can isolate an observation, the easier does your task of observation become, and the less danger is there of your being led astray by irrelevant circumstances, or of placing emphasis on the wrong point. The more widely you can vary an observation, the more clearly will the uniformity of experience stand out, and the better is your chance of discovering laws.
In A Text-Book of Psychology (1909), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Astray (11)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Clear (100)  |  Danger (115)  |  Description (84)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Easier (53)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Likely (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Point (580)  |  Repeat (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strict (17)  |  Task (147)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

Anatomy is to physiology as geography is to history; it describes the theatre of events.
De Naturali Parte Medicinae Libri Septem (1542), Ch. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Event (216)  |  Geography (36)  |  History (673)  |  Physiology (95)

And ye who wish to represent by words the form of man and all the aspects of his membrification, get away from that idea. For the more minutely you describe, the more you will confuse the mind of the reader and the more you will prevent him from a knowledge of the thing described. And so it is necessary to draw and describe.
From Notebooks (AnA, 14v; Cf. QII, 1), as translated by J. Playfair McMurrich, in Leonardo da Vinci the Anatomist (1930), 76, (Institution Publication 411, Carnegie Institution of Washington).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Draw (137)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Reader (40)  |  Represent (155)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Depend (228)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Goethe (3)  |  Higher (37)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Magic (86)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (746)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Real (149)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solution (267)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

As we cannot use physician for a cultivator of physics, I have called him a physicist. We need very much a name to describe a cultivator of science in general. I should incline to call him a Scientist. Thus we might say, that as an Artist is a Musician, Painter or Poet, a Scientist is a Mathematician, Physicist, or Naturalist.
The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840), Vol. I, cxiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Description (84)  |  General (511)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Musician (21)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Need (290)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Painter (29)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poet (83)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Use (766)

At the beginning of this debate Stephen [Hawking] said that he thinks that he is a positivist, whereas I am a Platonist. I am happy with him being a positivist, but I think that the crucial point here is, rather, that I am a realist. Also, if one compares this debate with the famous debate of Bohr and Einstein, some seventy years ago, I should think that Stephen plays the role of Bohr, whereas I play Einstein's role! For Einstein argued that there should exist something like a real world, not necessarily represented by a wave function, whereas Bohr stressed that the wave function doesn't describe a 'real' microworld but only 'knowledge' that is useful for making predictions.
Debate at the Isaac Newton Institute of the Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University (1994), transcribed in Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose, The Nature of Space and Time (1996), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Compare (69)  |  Debate (38)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Exist (443)  |  Function (228)  |  Happy (105)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  Microworld (2)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Point (580)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Represent (155)  |  Role (86)  |  Something (719)  |  Stress (22)  |  Think (1086)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wave (107)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Concerning alchemy it is more difficult to discover the actual state of things, in that the historians who specialise in this field seem sometimes to be under the wrath of God themselves; for, like those who write of the Bacon-Shakespeare controversy or on Spanish politics, they seem to become tinctured with the kind of lunacy they set out to describe.
The Origins of Modern Science (1949), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discover (553)  |  Field (364)  |  God (757)  |  Historian (54)  |  Kind (557)  |  More (2559)  |  Politics (112)  |  Set (394)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  State (491)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Write (230)

Consciousness… does not appear to itself chopped up in bits. Such words as “chain” or “train” do not describe it fitly as it presents itself in the first instance. It is nothing jointed; it flows. A “river” or a “stream” are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described. In talking of it hereafter, let us call it the stream of thought, of consciousness, or of subjective life.
Source of the expression “stream of consciousness”.
The Principles of Psychology (1890), Vol. 1, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expression (175)  |  First (1283)  |  Flow (83)  |  Joint (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Present (619)  |  River (119)  |  Stream (81)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Word (619)

Creative activity could be described as a type of learning process where teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.
In Drinkers of Infinity: Essays, 1955-1967 (1969), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Creative (137)  |  Individual (404)  |  Learning (274)  |  Locate (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Same (157)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Type (167)

Culture may even be described simply as that which makes life worth living.
In Notes Toward a Definition of Culture (1948, 2014), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Culture (143)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Simply (53)  |  Worth (169)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deal (188)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (144)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (168)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Same (157)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transition (26)  |  Treat (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variable (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

Even if there is only one possible unified theory, it is just a set of rules and equations. What is it that breathes fire into the equations and makes a universe for them to describe? The usual approach of science of constructing a mathematical model cannot answer the questions of why there should be a universe for the model to describe. Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing?
A Brief History of Time (1998), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Description (84)  |  Equation (132)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fire (189)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Model (102)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Question (621)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unified Theory (7)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)

Every appearance in nature corresponds to some state of the mind, and that state of the mind can only be described by presenting that natural appearance as its picture. An enraged man is a lion, a cunning man is a fox, a firm man is a rock, a learned man is a torch. A lamb is innocence; a snake is subtle spite; flowers express to us the delicate affections. Light and darkness are our familiar expressions for knowledge and ignorance ; and heat for love. Visible distance behind and before us, is respectively our image of memory and hope.
In essay, 'Language', collected in Nature: An Essay ; And, Lectures on the Times (1844), 23-24.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Behind (137)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Distance (161)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Firm (47)  |  Flower (106)  |  Fox (9)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hope (299)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Image (96)  |  Innocence (13)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Lion (22)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Picture (143)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rock (161)  |  Snake (26)  |  Spite (55)  |  State (491)  |  State Of Mind (4)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Torch (12)  |  Visible (84)

Former arbiters of taste must have felt (as so many apostles of ‘traditional values’ and other highminded tags for restriction and conformity do today) that maintaining the social order required a concept of unalloyed heroism. Human beings so designated as role models had to embody all virtues of the paragon–which meant, of course, that they could not be described in their truly human and ineluctably faulted form.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apostle (3)  |  Arbiter (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Course (409)  |  Designation (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embody (16)  |  Fault (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Role (86)  |  Role Model (7)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Taste (90)  |  Today (314)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Truly (116)  |  Value (365)  |  Virtue (109)

His spiritual insights were in three major areas: First, he has inspired mankind to see the world anew as the ultimate reality. Second, he perceived and described the physical universe itself as immanently divine. And finally, he challenged us to accept the ultimate demands of modern science which assign humanity no real or ultimate importance in the universe while also aspiring us to lives of spiritual celebration attuned to the awe, beauty and wonder about us.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Anew (18)  |  Area (31)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Assign (13)  |  Attune (2)  |  Awe (43)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Celebration (7)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Demand (123)  |  Divine (112)  |  Finally (26)  |  First (1283)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immanently (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Insight (102)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Live (628)  |  Major (84)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Physical (508)  |  Real (149)  |  Reality (261)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

I believe that mathematical reality lies outside us, that our function is to discover or observe it, and that the theorems which we prove, and which we describe grandiloquently as our “creations,” are simply the notes of our observations.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (327)  |  Discover (553)  |  Function (228)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Outside (141)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reality (261)  |  Theorem (112)

I can understand your aversion to the use of the term ‘religion’ to describe an emotional and psychological attitude which shows itself most clearly in Spinoza ... I have not found a better expression than ‘religious’ for the trust in the rational nature of reality that is, at least to a certain extent, accessible to human reason.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Better (486)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extent (139)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Least (75)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Show (346)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Term (349)  |  Trust (66)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)

I conceived and developed a new geometry of nature and implemented its use in a number of diverse fields. It describes many of the irregular and fragmented patterns around us, and leads to full-fledged theories, by identifying a family of shapes I call fractals.
The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), Introduction, xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Develop (268)  |  Family (94)  |  Field (364)  |  Fractal (9)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Implement (13)  |  Lead (384)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Shape (72)  |  Theory (970)  |  Use (766)

I find in Geology a never failing interest, as [it] has been remarked, it creates the same gran[d] ideas respecting this world, which Astronomy do[es] for the universe.—We have seen much fine scenery that of the Tropics in its glory & luxuriance, exceeds even the language of Humboldt to describe. A Persian writer could alone do justice to it, & if he succeeded he would in England, be called the 'grandfather of all liars'.— But I have seen nothing, which more completely astonished me, than the first sight of a Savage; It was a naked Fuegian his long hair blowing about, his face besmeared with paint. There is in their countenances, an expression, which I believe to those who have not seen it, must be inconceivably wild. Standing on a rock he uttered tones & made gesticulations than which, the cries of domestic animals are far more intelligible.
Letter to Charles Whitley, 23 July 1834. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1821-1836 (1985), Vol. I, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Call (769)  |  Completely (135)  |  Countenance (8)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Expression (175)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Baron Friedrich Wilhelm Christian Karl Ferdinan von Humboldt (5)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Interest (386)  |  Justice (39)  |  Language (293)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Persian (4)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sight (132)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Tone (22)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wild (87)  |  World (1774)  |  Writer (86)

I have procured some of the mice mentioned in my former letters, a young one and a female with young, both of which I have preserved in brandy. From the colour, shape, size, and manner of nesting, I make no doubt but that the species is nondescript [not known to science]. They are much smaller and more slender than the mus domesticus medius of Ray; and have more of the squirrel or dormouse colour ... They never enter into houses; are carried into ricks and barns with the sheaves; abound in harvest, and build their nests amidst the straws of the corn above the ground, and sometimes in thistles.
[Part of his observations on the harvest mouse, which he was the first to describe as a new species.]
Letter XII (4 Nov 1767) in The Natural History of Selborne (1789, 1899), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Barn (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Brandy (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Corn (19)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enter (141)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Ground (217)  |  Harvest (27)  |  House (140)  |  Known (454)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Nest (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Ray (114)  |  John Ray (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sheaf (2)  |  Species (401)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Straw (7)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Young (227)

I suppose that I tend to be optimistic about the future of physics. And nothing makes me more optimistic than the discovery of broken symmetries. In the seventh book of the Republic, Plato describes prisoners who are chained in a cave and can see only shadows that things outside cast on the cave wall. When released from the cave at first their eyes hurt, and for a while they think that the shadows they saw in the cave are more real than the objects they now see. But eventually their vision clears, and they can understand how beautiful the real world is. We are in such a cave, imprisoned by the limitations on the sorts of experiments we can do. In particular, we can study matter only at relatively low temperatures, where symmetries are likely to be spontaneously broken, so that nature does not appear very simple or unified. We have not been able to get out of this cave, but by looking long and hard at the shadows on the cave wall, we can at least make out the shapes of symmetries, which though broken, are exact principles governing all phenomena, expressions of the beauty of the world outside.
In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1989), 'Conceptual Foundations of the Unified Theory of Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions.' Nobel Lectures: Physics 1971-1980 (1992), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cast (66)  |  Cave (15)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expression (175)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Governing (20)  |  Hard (243)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Low (80)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plato (76)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Republic (15)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shape (72)  |  Simple (406)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vision (123)  |  Wall (67)  |  World (1774)

I think that the two things that almost any astronaut would describe [as most fun about being in space] are the weightlessness and the view of Earth. Weightlessness is just a lot of fun!
Interview conducted on Scholastic website (20 Nov 1998).
Science quotes on:  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fun (38)  |  Lot (151)  |  Most (1731)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Weightlessness (2)

If a little less time was devoted to the translation of letters by Julius Caesar describing Britain 2000 years ago and a little more time was spent on teaching children how to describe (in simple modern English) the method whereby ethylene was converted into polythene in 1933 in the ICI laboratories at Northwich, and to discussing the enormous social changes which have resulted from this discovery, then I believe that we should be training future leaders in this country to face the world of tomorrow far more effectively than we are at the present time.
Quoted in an Obituary, D. P. Craig, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1972), 18, 461.
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  Britain (24)  |  Caesar_Julius (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Children (200)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Face (212)  |  Future (429)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Leader (43)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Politician (38)  |  Present (619)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Spent (85)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Training (80)  |  Translation (21)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

If they would, for Example, praise the Beauty of a Woman, or any other Animal, they describe it by Rhombs, Circles, Parallelograms, Ellipses, and other geometrical terms …
In 'A Voyage to Laputa', Travels Into Several Remote Nations of the World by Captain Lemuel Gulliver (1726), Vol 2, Part 3, 26. (Gulliver’s Travels)
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Circle (110)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Example (94)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallelogram (3)  |  Praise (26)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Woman (151)

If you are out to describe the truth, leave elegance to the tailor.
On being reproached that his formula of gravitation was longer and more cumbersome than Newton’s.
Quoted in J. H. Mitchell, Writing for Professional and Technical Journals (1968), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Formula (98)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  More (2559)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)

If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you’re doing.
Widely quoted, without citation. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Doing (280)  |  Know (1518)  |  Process (423)

In every case the awakening touch has been the mathematical spirit, the attempt to count, to measure, or to calculate. What to the poet or the seer may appear to be the very death of all his poetry and all his visions—the cold touch of the calculating mind,—this has proved to be the spell by which knowledge has been born, by which new sciences have been created, and hundreds of definite problems put before the minds and into the hands of diligent students. It is the geometrical figure, the dry algebraical formula, which transforms the vague reasoning of the philosopher into a tangible and manageable conception; which represents, though it does not fully describe, which corresponds to, though it does not explain, the things and processes of nature: this clothes the fruitful, but otherwise indefinite, ideas in such a form that the strict logical methods of thought can be applied, that the human mind can in its inner chamber evolve a train of reasoning the result of which corresponds to the phenomena of the outer world.
In A History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1896), Vol. 1, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Born (33)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Chamber (7)  |  Cold (112)  |  Conception (154)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Count (105)  |  Create (235)  |  Death (388)  |  Definite (110)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Dry (57)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Inner (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Poet (83)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Represent (155)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seer (4)  |  Spell (9)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strict (17)  |  Student (300)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Touch (141)  |  Train (114)  |  Transform (73)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

In modern thought, (if not in fact)
Nothing is that doesn't act, So that is reckoned wisdom which
Describes the scratch but not the itch.
Anonymous
Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man? (2nd Ed.,1964), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Description (84)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Itch (10)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Scratch (13)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wisdom (221)

In the first book I shall describe all the positions of the spheres, along with the motions which I attribute to the Earth, so that the book will contain as it were the general structure of the universe. In the remaining books I relate the motions of the remaining stars, and all the spheres, to the mobility of the Earth, so that it can be thence established how far the motions and appearances of the remaining stars and spheres can be saved, if they are referred to the motions of the Earth.
'To His Holiness Pope Paul III', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans, A. M. Duncan (1976), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Book (392)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Mobility (11)  |  Motion (310)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Structure (344)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

It is good to recall that three centuries ago, around the year 1660, two of the greatest monuments of modern history were erected, one in the West and one in the East; St. Paul’s Cathedral in London and the Taj Mahal in Agra. Between them, the two symbolize, perhaps better than words can describe, the comparative level of architectural technology, the comparative level of craftsmanship and the comparative level of affluence and sophistication the two cultures had attained at that epoch of history. But about the same time there was also created—and this time only in the West—a third monument, a monument still greater in its eventual import for humanity. This was Newton’s Principia, published in 1687. Newton's work had no counterpart in the India of the Mughuls.
'Ideals and Realities' (1975). Reprinted in Ideals and Realities (1984), 48.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affluence (3)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Attain (125)  |  Better (486)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Craftsmanship (4)  |  Culture (143)  |  Description (84)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  History (673)  |  Humanity (169)  |  London (12)  |  Modern (385)  |  Monument (45)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Principia (13)  |  Sophistication (9)  |  Still (613)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It is hard to describe the exact route to scientific achievement, but a good scientist doesn’t get lost as he travels it.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Exact (68)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lost (34)  |  Route (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Travel (114)

It is not so long since, during one of the meetings of the Association, one of the leading English newspapers briefly described a sitting of this Section in the words, “Saturday morning was devoted to pure mathematics, and so there was nothing of any general interest:” still, such toleration is better than undisguised and ill-informed hostility.
In Report of the 67th meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Better (486)  |  Brief (36)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  English (35)  |  General (511)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Inform (47)  |  Interest (386)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Morning (94)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Section (11)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Still (613)  |  Toleration (6)  |  Word (619)

It is not surprising that our language should be incapable of describing the processes occurring within the atoms, for, as has been remarked, it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consists only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. Furthermore, it is very difficult to modify our language so that it will be able to describe these atomic processes, for words can only describe things of which we can form mental pictures, and this ability, too, is a result of daily experience. Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory—which seems entirely adequate for the treatment of atomic processes; for visualization, however, we must content ourselves with two incomplete analogies—the wave picture and the corpuscular picture.
The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory, trans. Carl Eckart and Frank C. Hoyt (1949), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Atom (355)  |  Consist (223)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Experience (467)  |  Form (959)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Particle (194)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

It is quite possible that mathematics was invented in the ancient Middle East to keep track of tax receipts and grain stores. How odd that out of this should come a subtle scientific language that can effectively describe and predict the most arcane aspects of the Universe.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arcane (4)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Grain (50)  |  Invent (51)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Middle East (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Science And Mathematics (10)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Store (48)  |  Tax (26)  |  Track (38)  |  Universe (857)

It is the task of science, as a collective human undertaking, to describe from the external side, (on which alone agreement is possible), such statistical regularity as there is in a world “in which every event has a unique aspect, and to indicate where possible the limits of such description. It is not part of its task to make imaginative interpretation of the internal aspect of reality—what it is like, for example, to be a lion, an ant or an ant hill, a liver cell, or a hydrogen ion. The only qualification is in the field of introspective psychology in which each human being is both observer and observed, and regularities may be established by comparing notes. Science is thus a limited venture. It must act as if all phenomena were deterministic at least in the sense of determinable probabilities. It cannot properly explain the behaviour of an amoeba as due partly to surface and other physical forces and partly to what the amoeba wants to do, with out danger of something like 100 per cent duplication. It must stick to the former. It cannot introduce such principles as creative activity into its interpretation of evolution for similar reasons. The point of view indicated by a consideration of the hierarchy of physical and biological organisms, now being bridged by the concept of the gene, is one in which science deliberately accepts a rigorous limitation of its activities to the description of the external aspects of events. In carrying out this program, the scientist should not, however, deceive himself or others into thinking that he is giving an account of all of reality. The unique inner creative aspect of every event necessarily escapes him.
In 'Gene and Organism', American Naturalist, (1953), 87, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Ant (28)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Cell (138)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creative (137)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Former (137)  |  Gene (98)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Inner (71)  |  Internal (66)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Ion (21)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Limited (101)  |  Lion (22)  |  Liver (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Side (233)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Surface (209)  |  Task (147)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Unique (67)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

It would be possible to describe absolutely everything scientifically, but it would make no sense. It would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure.
Attributed to Einstein by Frau Born. Paraphrased words as given in Ronald William Clark, Einstein (1984), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Everything (476)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Sense (770)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Variation (90)  |  Wave (107)

It’s like trying to describe what you feel when you’re standing on the rim of the Grand Canyon or remembering your first love or the birth of your child. You have to be there to really know what it’s like.
As quoted on the nmspacemuseum.org website of the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Birth (147)  |  Child (307)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand Canyon (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Love (309)  |  Rim (5)  |  Stand (274)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)

Just now nuclear physicists are writing a great deal about hypothetical particles called neutrinos supposed to account for certain peculiar facts observed in β-ray disintegration. We can perhaps best describe the neutrinos as little bits of spin-energy that have got detached. I am not much impressed by the neutrino theory. In an ordinary way I might say that I do not believe in neutrinos… But I have to reflect that a physicist may be an artist, and you never know where you are with artists. My old-fashioned kind of disbelief in neutrinos is scarcely enough. Dare I say that experimental physicists will not have sufficient ingenuity to make neutrinos? Whatever I may think, I am not going to be lured into a wager against the skill of experimenters under the impression that it is a wager against the truth of a theory. If they succeed in making neutrinos, perhaps even in developing industrial applications of them, I suppose I shall have to believe—though I may feel that they have not been playing quite fair.
From Tarner Lecture, 'Discovery or Manufacture?' (1938), in The Philosophy of Physical Science (1939, 2012), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Application (242)  |  Artist (90)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Dare (50)  |  Deal (188)  |  Disbelief (4)  |  Disintegration (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Impression (114)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Neutrino (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physicist (5)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old (481)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Playing (42)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Skill (109)  |  Spin (26)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writing (189)

Let him look at that dazzling light hung aloft as an eternal lamp to lighten the universe; let him behold the earth, a mere dot compared with the vast circuit which that orb describes, and stand amazed to find that the vast circuit itself is but a very fine point compared with the orbit traced by the stars as they roll their course on high. But if our vision halts there, let imagination pass beyond; it will fail to form a conception long before Nature fails to supply material. The whole visible world is but an imperceptible speck in the ample bosom of Nature. No notion comes near it. Though we may extend our thought beyond imaginable space, yet compared with reality we bring to birth mere atoms. Nature is an infinite sphere whereof the centre is everywhere, the circumference nowhere. In short, imagination is brought to silence at the thought, and that is the most perceptible sign of the all-power of God.
Let man reawake and consider what he is compared with the reality of things; regard himself lost in this remote corner of Nature; and from the tiny cell where he lodges, to wit the Universe, weigh at their true worth earth, kingdoms, towns, himself. What is a man face to face with infinity?
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 43. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal’s Pensées (1950), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aloft (5)  |  Amazement (15)  |  Ample (4)  |  Atom (355)  |  Behold (18)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cell (138)  |  Centre (28)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Circumference (23)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Corner (57)  |  Course (409)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Dot (16)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extend (128)  |  Face (212)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Halt (9)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperceptibility (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Light (607)  |  Lodge (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Orb (20)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perception (97)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remote (83)  |  Roll (40)  |  Short (197)  |  Sign (58)  |  Silence (56)  |  Space (500)  |  Speck (23)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Town (27)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

Let me describe briefly how a black hole might be created. Imagine a star with a mass 10 times that of the sun. During most of its lifetime of about a billion years the star will generate heat at its center by converting hydrogen into helium. The energy released will create sufficient pressure to support the star against its own gravity, giving rise to an object with a radius about five times the radius of the sun. The escape velocity from the surface of such a star would be about 1,000 kilometers per second. That is to say, an object fired vertically upward from the surface of the star with a velocity of less than 1,000 kilometers per second would be dragged back by the gravitational field of the star and would return to the surface, whereas an object with a velocity greater than that would escape to infinity.
When the star had exhausted its nuclear fuel, there would be nothing to maintain the outward pressure, and the star would begin to collapse because of its own gravity. As the star shrank, the gravitational field at the surface would become stronger and the escape velocity would increase. By the time the radius had got down to 10 kilometers the escape velocity would have increased to 100,000 kilometers per second, the velocity of light. After that time any light emitted from the star would not be able to escape to infinity but would be dragged back by the gravitational field. According to the special theory of relativity nothing can travel faster than light, so that if light cannot escape, nothing else can either. The result would be a black hole: a region of space-time from which it is not possible to escape to infinity.
'The Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes', Scientific American, 1977, 236, 34-40.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Against (332)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Billion (95)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Create (235)  |  Down (456)  |  Energy (344)  |  Escape (80)  |  Faster (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  Heat (174)  |  Helium (11)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Increase (210)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Light (607)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mass (157)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Object (422)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Space (500)  |  Space-Time (17)  |  Special (184)  |  Star (427)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Surface (209)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Time (1877)  |  Travel (114)  |  Upward (43)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Man is a part of nature, not something contrasted with nature. His thoughts and his bodily movements follow the same laws that describe the motions of stars and atoms.
Opening of What I Believe (1925), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Body (537)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Follow (378)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Part (222)  |  Same (157)  |  Something (719)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thought (953)

May not Music be described as the Mathematic of sense, Mathematic as Music of the reason? the soul of each the same! Thus the musician feels Mathematic, the mathematician thinks Music, Music the dream, Mathematic the working life each to receive its consummation from the other when the human intelligence, elevated to its perfect type, shall shine forth glorified in some future Mozart-Dirichlet or Beethoven-Gauss a union already not indistinctly foreshadowed in the genius and labours of a Helmholtz!
In paper read 7 Apr 1864, printed in 'Algebraical Researches Containing a Disquisition On Newton’s Rule for the Discovery of Imaginary Roots', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1865), 154, 613, footnote. Also in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 419.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (3)  |  Dream (208)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foreshadow (5)  |  Future (429)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indistinct (2)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Labour (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mozart_Amadeus (2)  |  Music (129)  |  Musician (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shine (45)  |  Soul (226)  |  Think (1086)  |  Type (167)  |  Union (51)  |  Work (1351)

Most people regard scientists as explorers … Imagine a handful of people shipwrecked on a strange island and setting out to explore it. One of them cuts a solitary path through the jungle, going on and on until he is exhausted or lost or both. He eventually returns to his companions, and they listen to him with goggling eyes as he describes what he saw; what he fell into, and what bit him. After a rest he demands more supplies and sets off again to explore the unknown. Many of his companions will be doing the same, each choosing his own direction and pursuing his pioneering path.
In The Development of Design (1981), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Companion (19)  |  Cut (114)  |  Demand (123)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doing (280)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Eye (419)  |  Handful (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Island (46)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Lost (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Path (144)  |  People (1005)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strange (157)  |  Through (849)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

My observations of the young physicists who seem to be most like me and the friends I describe in this book tell me that they feel as we would if we had been chained to those same oars. Our young counterparts aren’t going into nuclear or particle physics (they tell me it’s too unattractive); they are going into condensed-matter physics, low-temperature physics, or astrophysics, where important work can still be done in teams smaller than ten and where everyone can feel that he has made an important contribution to the success of the experiment that every other member of the collaboration is aware of. Most of us do physics because it’s fun and because we gain a certain respect in the eyes of those who know what we’ve done. Both of those rewards seem to me to be missing in the huge collaborations that now infest the world of particle physics.
Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist (1987), 198.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Certain (550)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gain (145)  |  Know (1518)  |  Low (80)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Missing (21)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Research (664)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reward (68)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Team (15)  |  Tell (340)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Natural science does not simply describe and explain nature; it is part of the interplay between nature and ourselves; it describes nature as exposed to our method of questioning.
In Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1959, 1962), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Explain (322)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Interplay (7)  |  Method (505)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Science (3879)

No language which lends itself to visualizability can describe the quantum jumps.
Max Born
As quoted in epigraph, without citation, in Nick Herbert, '“And Then A Miracle Occurs”: The Quantum Measurement Problem', Quantum Reality: Beyond the New Physics (1985), Chap 8, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Description (84)  |  Jump (29)  |  Language (293)  |  Lend (4)  |  Quantum (117)

Not one of them [formulae] can be shown to have any existence, so that the formula of one of the simplest of organic bodies is confused by the introduction of unexplained symbols for imaginary differences in the mode of combination of its elements… It would be just as reasonable to describe an oak tree as composed of blocks and chips and shavings to which it may be reduced by the hatchet, as by Dr Kolbe’s formula to describe acetic acid as containing the products which may be obtained from it by destructive influences. A Kolbe botanist would say that half the chips are united with some of the blocks by the force parenthesis; the other half joined to this group in a different way, described by a buckle; shavings stuck on to these in a third manner, comma; and finally, a compound of shavings and blocks united together by a fourth force, juxtaposition, is joined to the main body by a fifth force, full stop.
'On Dr. Kolbe's Additive Formulae', Quarterly Journal of the Chemical Society (1855), 7, 133-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acetic Acid (2)  |  Acid (83)  |  Body (537)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Element (310)  |  Existence (456)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  Influence (222)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Hermann Kolbe (4)  |  Oak (14)  |  Oak Tree (3)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Product (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Together (387)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unexplained (8)  |  Way (1217)

One might describe the mathematical quality in Nature by saying that the universe is so constituted that mathematics is a useful tool in its description. However, recent advances in physical science show that this statement of the case is too trivial. The connection between mathematics and the description of the universe goes far deeper than this, and one can get an appreciation of it only from a thorough examination of the various facts that make it up.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Connection (162)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Description (84)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Quality (135)  |  Recent (77)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Tool (117)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useful (250)  |  Various (200)

Perhaps I can best describe my experience of doing mathematics in terms of a journey through a dark unexplored mansion. You enter the first room of the mansion and it’s completely dark. You stumble around bumping into the furniture, but gradually you learn where each piece of furniture is. Finally, after six months or so, you find the light switch, you turn it on, and suddenly it’s all illuminated. You can see exactly where you were. Then you move into the next room and spend another six months in the dark. So each of these breakthroughs, while sometimes they’re momentary, sometimes over a period of a day or two, they are the culmination of—and couldn’t exist without—the many months of stumbling around in the dark that proceed them.
Quoted in interview for website for PBS TV Nova program, 'The Proof'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Completely (135)  |  Culmination (4)  |  Dark (140)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Journey (42)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Mansion (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Month (88)  |  Move (216)  |  Next (236)  |  Period (198)  |  Proceed (129)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)

Physicists speak of the particle representation or the wave representation. Bohr's principle of complementarity asserts that there exist complementary properties of the same object of knowledge, one of which if known will exclude knowledge of the other. We may therefore describe an object like an electron in ways which are mutually exclusive—e.g., as wave or particle—without logical contradiction provided we also realize that the experimental arrangements that determine these descriptions are similarly mutually exclusive. Which experiment—and hence which description one chooses—is purely a matter of human choice.
The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the Language of Nature (1982), 94.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Complementarity (5)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Description (84)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Electron (93)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Purely (109)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Representation (53)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Physics investigates the essential nature of the world, and biology describes a local bump. Psychology, human psychology, describes a bump on the bump.
Theories and Things (1981), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Bump (2)  |  Description (84)  |  Essential (199)  |  Human (1468)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Locality (6)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Psychology (154)  |  World (1774)

Pure mathematics and physics are becoming ever more closely connected, though their methods remain different. One may describe the situation by saying that the mathematician plays a game in which he himself invents the rules while the while the physicist plays a game in which the rules are provided by Nature, but as time goes on it becomes increasingly evident that the rules which the mathematician finds interesting are the same as those which Nature has chosen. … Possibly, the two subjects will ultimately unify, every branch of pure mathematics then having its physical application, its importance in physics being proportional to its interest in mathematics.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Closely (12)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connected (8)  |  Different (577)  |  Evident (91)  |  Find (998)  |  Game (101)  |  Himself (461)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Invent (51)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Play (112)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rule (294)  |  Situation (113)  |  Subject (521)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Unify (6)  |  Will (2355)

Quantum theory—at least in the Heisenberg interpretation—describes the way the world works as a literal moment-to-moment emergence of actual facts out of a background of less factual 'potentia.'
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Background (43)  |  Description (84)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Literal (11)  |  Moment (253)  |  Potentia (3)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Theory (970)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Science cannot describe individuals, but only types. If human societies cannot be classified, they must remain inaccessible to scientific description.
'Montesquieu's Contribution to the Rise of Social Science' (1892), in Montesquieu and Rousseau. Forerunners of Sociology, trans. Ralph Manheim (1960), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Human (1468)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Individual (404)  |  Must (1526)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Society (326)  |  Type (167)

Science is not a system of certain, or -established, statements; nor is it a system which steadily advances towards a state of finality... And our guesses are guided by the unscientific, the metaphysical (though biologically explicable) faith in laws, in regularities which we can uncover—discover. Like Bacon, we might describe our own contemporary science—'the method of reasoning which men now ordinarily apply to nature'—as consisting of 'anticipations, rash and premature' and as 'prejudices'.
The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1959), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Biology (216)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Faith (203)  |  Finality (7)  |  Guess (61)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Law (894)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Premature (20)  |  Rash (14)  |  Rashness (2)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Statement (142)  |  System (537)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Unscientific (13)  |  Well-Established (5)

Science is the language of the temporal world; love is that of the spiritual world. Man, indeed, describes more than he explains; while the angelic spirit sees and understands. Science saddens man; love enraptures the angel; science is still seeking; love has found.
The Works of Honoré de Balzac (1896), Vol. 19, 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Language (293)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Still (613)  |  Temporal (4)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  World (1774)

Scientific realism is the doctrine that science describes the real world: that the world actually is as science takes it to be, and that its furnishings are as science envisages them to be It is quite clear that it is not… ”
In Priceless Knowledge?: Natural Science in Economic Perspective (1996), 159-160.
Science quotes on:  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Envisage (2)  |  Furnishing (4)  |  Real (149)  |  Realism (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  World (1774)

Since the stomach gives no obvious external sign of its workings, investigators of gastric movements have hitherto been obliged to confine their studies to pathological subjects or to animals subjected to serious operative interference. Observations made under these necessarily abnormal conditions have yielded a literature which is full of conflicting statements and uncertain results. The only sure conclusion to be drawn from this material is that when the stomach receives food, obscure peristaltic contractions are set going, which in some way churn the food to a liquid chyme and force it into the intestines. How imperfectly this describes the real workings of the stomach will appear from the following account of the actions of the organ studied by a new method. The mixing of a small quantity of subnitrate of bismuth with the food allows not only the contractions of the gastric wall, but also the movements of the gastric contents to be seen with the Röntgen rays in the uninjured animal during normal digestion.
In 'The Movements of the Stomach Studied by Means of the Röntgen Rays,' American Journal of Physiology (1898), 1, 359-360.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Action (327)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bismuth (7)  |  Churn (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Food (199)  |  Force (487)  |  Gastric (3)  |  Interference (21)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Literature (103)  |  Material (353)  |  Method (505)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Operative (10)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Ray (114)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Subject (521)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  X-ray (37)  |  Yield (81)

So far, the clumsily long name 'quasi-stellar radio sources' is used to describe these objects. Because the nature of these objects is entirely unknown, it is hard to prepare a short, appropriate nomenclature for them so that their essential properties are obvious from their name. For convenience, the abbreviated form 'quasar' will be used throughout this paper.
'Gravitational Collapse', Physics Today, 1964, 17, 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Essential (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Hard (243)  |  Long (790)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Object (422)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Paper (182)  |  Quasar (4)  |  Radio (50)  |  Short (197)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

Sooner or later in every talk, [David] Brower describes the creation of the world. He invites his listeners to consider the six days of Genesis as a figure of speech for what has in fact been 4 billion years. On this scale, one day equals something like six hundred and sixty-six million years, and thus, all day Monday and until Tuesday noon, creation was busy getting the world going. Life began Tuesday noon, and the beautiful organic wholeness of it developed over the next four days. At 4 p.m. Saturday, the big reptiles came on. At three minutes before midnight on the last day, man appeared. At one-fourth of a second before midnight Christ arrived. At one-fortieth of a second before midnight, the Industrial Revolution began. We are surrounded with people who think that what we have been doing for that one-fortieth of a second can go on indefinitely. They are considered normal, but they are stark. raving mad.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 79-80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Begin (260)  |  Big (48)  |  Billion (95)  |  Brower (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Christ (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  David (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Doing (280)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Figure (160)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Invite (9)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listener (7)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Million (114)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monday (3)  |  Next (236)  |  Noon (14)  |  Normal (28)  |  Organic (158)  |  P (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Scale (121)  |  Second (62)  |  Something (719)  |  Sooner (6)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stark (3)  |  Surround (30)  |  Talk (100)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tuesday (3)  |  Wholeness (9)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

That’s the whole problem with science. You’ve got a bunch of empiricists trying to describe things of unimaginable wonder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bunch (7)  |  Empiricist (3)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unimaginable (7)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonder (236)

The concepts of ‘soul’ or ‘life’ do not occur in atomic physics, and they could not, even indirectly, be derived as complicated consequences of some natural law. Their existence certainly does not indicate the presence of any fundamental substance other than energy, but it shows only the action of other kinds of forms which we cannot match with the mathematical forms of modern atomic physics ... If we want to describe living or mental processes, we shall have to broaden these structures. It may be that we shall have to introduce yet other concepts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Atomic Physics (7)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Derive (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Indirectly (7)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Modern (385)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Presence (63)  |  Process (423)  |  Show (346)  |  Soul (226)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Want (497)

The eventual goal of science is to provide a single theory that describes the whole universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Eventual (9)  |  Goal (145)  |  Provide (69)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)

The flights of the imagination which occur to the pure mathematician are in general so much better described in his formulas than in words, that it is not remarkable to find the subject treated by outsiders as something essentially cold and uninteresting— … the only successful attempt to invest mathematical reasoning with a halo of glory—that made in this section by Prof. Sylvester—is known to a comparative few, …
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science (1871), Nature Vol. 4, 271,
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Better (486)  |  Cold (112)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Find (998)  |  Flight (98)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Glory (58)  |  Halo (7)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Invest (18)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Occur (150)  |  Outsider (6)  |  Prof (2)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Section (11)  |  Something (719)  |  Subject (521)  |  Successful (123)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Treat (35)  |  Uninteresting (9)  |  Word (619)

The history of the knowledge of the phenomena of life and of the organized world can be divided into two main periods. For a long time anatomy, and particularly the anatomy of the human body, was the α and ω of scientific knowledge. Further progress only became possible with the discovery of the microscope. A long time had yet to pass until through Schwann the cell was established as the final biological unit. It would mean bringing coals to Newcastle were I to describe here the immeasurable progress which biology in all its branches owes to the introduction of this concept of the cell concept. For this concept is the axis around which the whole of the modern science of life revolves.
Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1908) 'Partial Cell Functions.' Collected in Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Cell (138)  |  Coal (57)  |  Concept (221)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divided (50)  |  Final (118)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Owe (71)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Possible (552)  |  Progress (465)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Theodor Schwann (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

The language of the street is always strong. What can describe the folly and emptiness of scolding like the word jawing?
Science quotes on:  |  Emptiness (11)  |  Folly (43)  |  Jaw (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Scold (6)  |  Street (23)  |  Strong (174)  |  Word (619)

The least thing contains something of the unknown. Let us find it. To describe a fire that flames and a tree in a field, we must remain facing that fire and that tree until they no longer resemble, to us, any other tree, or fire. This is the way we become original.
From 'Le Roman', Pierre et Jean (1888), as translated by Alexina Loranger in 'Introduction: The Novel', Pierre et Jean (Peter and John) (1890), 39. The opening words are quoted from Gustave Flaubert. From the original French, “La moindre chose contient un peu d’inconnu. Trouvons-le. Pour décrire un feu qui flambe et un arbre dans une plaine, demeurons en face de ce feu et de cet arbre jusqu’à ce 'qu’ils ne ressemblent plus, pour nous, à aucun autre arbre et à aucun autre feu. C’est de cette façon qu’on devient original.” [Because “devient” is present tense, where the original text gave “became”, the present tense “become” has been substituted in the above quote by Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Contain (68)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Least (75)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Original (58)  |  Originality (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Way (1217)

The main duty of the historian of mathematics, as well as his fondest privilege, is to explain the humanity of mathematics, to illustrate its greatness, beauty and dignity, and to describe how the incessant efforts and accumulated genius of many generations have built up that magnificent monument, the object of our most legitimate pride as men, and of our wonder, humility and thankfulness, as individuals.
In The Study of the History of Mathematics (1936), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Duty (68)  |  Effort (227)  |  Explain (322)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genius (284)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Historian (54)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Humility (28)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Individual (404)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Monument (45)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Pride (78)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Thankfulness (2)  |  Wonder (236)

The man who classifies facts of any kind whatever, who sees their mutual relation and describes their sequence, is applying the scientific method and is a man of science.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Classify (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  See (1081)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Whatever (234)

The mathematically formulated laws of quantum theory show clearly that our ordinary intuitive concepts cannot be unambiguously applied to the smallest particles. All the words or concepts we use to describe ordinary physical objects, such as position, velocity, color, size, and so on, become indefinite and problematic if we try to use them of elementary particles.
In Across the Frontiers (1974), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Concept (221)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Object (422)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physical (508)  |  Position (77)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Theory (970)  |  Try (283)  |  Unambiguously (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Word (619)

The method of science depends on our attempts to describe the world with simple theories: theories that are complex may become untestable, even if they happen to be true. Science may be described as the art of systematic over-simplification—the art of discerning what we may with advantage omit.
Karl Raimund Popper and William Warren Bartley (ed.), The Open Universe: an Argument for Indeterminism (1991), 44. by Karl Raimund Popper, William Warren Bartley - Science - 1991
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Depend (228)  |  Description (84)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Happen (274)  |  Method (505)  |  Omit (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

The modern haematologist, instead of describing in English what he can see, prefers to describe in Greek what he can’t.
British Medical Journal (1959) 2, 359.
Science quotes on:  |  Greek (107)  |  Modern (385)  |  See (1081)

The Moon is a white strange world, great, white, soft-seeming globe in the night sky, and what she actually communicates to me across space I shall never fully know. But the Moon that pulls the tides, and the Moon that controls the menstrual periods of women, and the Moon that touches the lunatics, she is not the mere dead lump of the astronomist.... When we describe the Moon as dead, we are describing the deadness in ourselves. When we find space so hideously void, we are describing our own unbearable emptiness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Actually (27)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Control (167)  |  Dead (59)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Fully (21)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lump (4)  |  Lunatic (9)  |  Mere (84)  |  Moon (237)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Pull (43)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sky (161)  |  Soft (29)  |  Space (500)  |  Strange (157)  |  Tide (34)  |  Touch (141)  |  Unbearable (2)  |  Void (31)  |  White (127)  |  Woman (151)  |  World (1774)

The night before Easter Sunday of that year (1920) I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory, and performed a simple experiment on a frog heart according to the nocturnal design. I have to describe this experiment briefly since its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse. The hearts of two frogs were isolated, the first with its nerves, the second without. Both hearts were attached to Straub cannulas filled with a little Ringer solution. The vagus nerve of the first heart was stimulated for a few minutes. Then the Ringer solution that had been in the first heart during the stimulation of the vagus was transferred to the second heart. It slowed and its beats diminished just as if its vagus had been stimulated. Similarly, when the accelerator nerve was stimulated and the Ringer from this period transferred, the second heart speeded up and its beats increased. These results unequivocally proved that the nerves do not influence the heart directly but liberate from their terminals specific chemical substances which, in their turn, cause the well-known modifications of the function of the heart characteristic of the stimulation of its nerves.
'An Autobiographic Sketch', Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (1960), 4, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerator (10)  |  According (237)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Beat (41)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Clock (47)  |  Design (195)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Easter (4)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Frog (38)  |  Function (228)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Influence (222)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Minute (125)  |  Modification (55)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Next (236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perform (121)  |  Period (198)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Scrawl (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speed (65)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what is in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence which at a given instant knew all the forces acting in nature and the position of every object in the universe—if endowed with a brain sufficiently vast to make all necessary calculations—could describe with a single formula the motions of the largest astronomical bodies and those of the smallest atoms. To such an intelligence, nothing would be uncertain; the future, like the past, would be an open book.
As quoted in The Fascination of Physics by Jacqueline D. Spears and Dean Zollman (1986). Alternate translation: “The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what is in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence which at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective positions, motions, and general effects of all these entities at any time in the past or future.” In Harry Woolf, The Analytic spirit: essays in the history of science in honor of Henry Guerlac (1981), 91, the author states that “the language Laplace used was obviously borrowed from Concdorset, though now the words were reshuffled to express a new idea.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Book (392)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  Future (429)  |  Instant (45)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Largest (39)  |  Moment (253)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Open (274)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)

The role of biology today, like the role of every other science, is simply to describe, and when it explains it does not mean that it arrives at finality; it only means that some descriptions are so charged with significance that they expose the relationship of cause and effect.
As quoted in Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 37. Webmaster so far has not found the primary source (can you help?)
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Effect (393)  |  Explain (322)  |  Expose (23)  |  Finality (7)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Other (2236)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Significance (113)  |  Today (314)

The sciences do not try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models. By a model is meant a mathematical construct which, with the addition of certain verbal interpretations, describes observed phenomena. The justification of such a mathematical construct is solely and precisely that it is expected to work—that is, correctly to describe phenomena from a reasonably wide area. Furthermore, it must satisfy certain esthetic criteria—that is, in relation to how much it describes, it must be rather simple.
From 'Method in the Physical Sciences', in John von Neumann and L. Leary (ed.), The Unity of Knowledge (1955), 158. Reprinted in John Von Neumann, F. Bródy (ed.) and Tibor Vámos (ed.), The Neumann Compendium (2000), 628.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Construct (124)  |  Do (1908)  |  Esthetics (2)  |  Expect (200)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Justification (48)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Try (283)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)

The scientist describes what is; the engineer creates what never was.
Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1980), 26, 110. As cited in Alan L. Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1994), 138. (Also seen as “Scientists study/discover the world as it is, engineers create the world that never has been.”)
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Never (1087)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Engineering (16)  |  Scientist (820)

The scientist … must always be prepared to deal with the unknown. It is an essential part of science that you should be able to describe matters in a way where you can say something without knowing everything.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everything (476)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Way (1217)

The sublime can only be found in the great subjects. Poetry, history and philosophy all have the same object, and a very great object—Man and Nature. Philosophy describes and depicts Nature. Poetry paints and embellishes it. It also paints men, it aggrandizes them, it exaggerates them, it creates heroes and gods. History only depicts man, and paints him such as he is.
'Discours Prononcé a L' Académie française par M. De Buffon. Le Jour de sa Reception 25 Aout 1753'. Supplement a T.iv (1753), Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1777), 11. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Create (235)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sublime (46)

The tendency of the sciences has long been an increasing proclivity of separation and dismemberment … The mathematician turns away from the chemist; the chemist from the naturalist; the mathematician, left to himself divides himself into a pure mathematician and a mixed mathematician, who soon part company … And thus science, even mere physical science, loses all traces of unity. A curious illustration of this result may be observed in the want of any name by which we can designate the students of the knowledge of the material world collectively. We are informed that this difficulty was felt very oppressively by the members of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at their meetings at York, Oxford and Cambridge, in the last three summers. There was no general term by which these gentlemen could describe themselves with reference to their pursuits … some ingenious gentleman [William Whewell] proposed that, by analogy with artist, they might form Scientist, and added that there could be no scruple … when we have words such as sciolist, economist, and atheist—but this was not generally palatable.
In Review of Mrs Somerville, 'On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences', The Quarterly Review (1834), 51, 58-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Artist (90)  |  Association (46)  |  Atheist (15)  |  British (41)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Company (59)  |  Curious (91)  |  Description (84)  |  Designation (13)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dismemberment (3)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Economist (17)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Palatable (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sciolist (2)  |  Separation (57)  |  Soon (186)  |  Student (300)  |  Summer (54)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unity (78)  |  Want (497)  |  William Whewell (70)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The theory of the earth is the science which describes and explains changes that the terrestrial globe has undergone from its beginning until today, and which allows the prediction of those it shall undergo in the future. The only way to understand these changes and their causes is to study the present-day state of the globe in order to gradually reconstruct its earlier stages, and to develop probable hypotheses on its future state. Therefore, the present state of the earth is the only solid base on which the theory can rely.
In Albert V. Carozzi, 'Forty Years of Thinking in Front of the Alps: Saussure's (1796) Unpublished Theory of the Earth', Earth Sciences History (1989), 8 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Description (84)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Future (429)  |  Globe (47)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Order (632)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stage (143)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Theory (970)  |  Today (314)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)

The ultimate origin of the difficulty lies in the fact (or philosophical principle) that we are compelled to use the words of common language when we wish to describe a phenomenon, not by logical or mathematical analysis, but by a picture appealing to the imagination. Common language has grown by everyday experience and can never surpass these limits. Classical physics has restricted itself to the use of concepts of this kind; by analysing visible motions it has developed two ways of representing them by elementary processes; moving particles and waves. There is no other way of giving a pictorial description of motions—we have to apply it even in the region of atomic processes, where classical physics breaks down.
Max Born
Atomic Physics (1957), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apply (160)  |  Break (99)  |  Classical (45)  |  Classical Physics (5)  |  Common (436)  |  Concept (221)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Down (456)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Language (293)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Motion (310)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Use (766)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)

The Universe can be pictured, although still very imperfectly and inadequately, as consisting of pure thought, the thought of what for want of a wider word, we must describe as a mathematical thinker.
In The Mysterious Universe (1948).
Science quotes on:  |  Must (1526)  |  Pure (291)  |  Still (613)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)

The universe is made of particles and fields about which nothing can be said except to describe their mathematical structures. In a sense, the entire universe is made of mathematics. If the particles and fields are not made of mathematical structure, then please tell me what you think they are made of!
As quoted in Kendrick Frazier, 'A Mind at Play: An Interview with Martin Gardner', Skeptical Inquirer (Mar/Apr 1998), 22, No. 2, 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Entire (47)  |  Field (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Particle (194)  |  Please (65)  |  Sense (770)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)

The way we have to describe Nature is generally incomprehensible to us.
In 'Electrons and Their Interactions', QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter (1985), Chap. 3, 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Way (1217)

There are no better terms available to describe the difference between the approach of the natural and the social sciences than to call the former ‘objective’ and the latter ‘subjective.’ ... While for the natural scientist the contrast between objective facts and subjective opinions is a simple one, the distinction cannot as readily be applied to the object of the social sciences. The reason for this is that the object, the ‘facts’ of the social sciences are also opinions—not opinions of the student of the social phenomena, of course, but opinions of those whose actions produce the object of the social scientist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Approach (108)  |  Available (78)  |  Better (486)  |  Call (769)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Course (409)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Former (137)  |  Latter (21)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Object (422)  |  Objective (91)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Produce (104)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Student (300)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

There is a strange disparity between the sciences of inert matter and those of life. Astronomy, mechanics, and physics are based on concepts which can be expressed, tersely and elegantly, in mathematical language. They have built up a universe as harmonious as the monuments of ancient Greece. They weave about it a magnificent texture of calculations and hypotheses. They search for reality beyond the realm of common thought up to unutterable abstractions consisting only of equations of symbols. Such is not the position of biological sciences. Those who investigate the phenomena of life are as if lost in an inextricable jungle, in the midst of a magic forest, whose countless trees unceasingly change their place and their shape. They are crushed under a mass of facts, which they can describe but are incapable of defining in algebraic equations.
Man the Unknown (1935), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Change (593)  |  Common (436)  |  Concept (221)  |  Countless (36)  |  Crush (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Express (186)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Forest (150)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Inert (14)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magic (86)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Monument (45)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tree (246)  |  Universe (857)  |  Weave (19)

There is more evidence to prove that saltiness [of the sea] is due to the admixture of some substance ... It is this stuff which makes salt water heavy (it weighs more than fresh water) and thick. The difference in consistency is such that ships with the same cargo very nearly sink in a river when they are quite fit to navigate in the sea. This circumstance has before now caused loss to shippers freighting their ships in a river. That the thicker consistency is due to an admixture of something is proved by the fact that if you make strong brine by the admixture of salt, eggs, even when they are full, float in it. It almost becomes like mud; such a quantity of earthy matter is there in the sea.
[Aristotle recognised the different density of fresh (river) or salty (sea) water. He describes an experiment using an egg (which sinks in fresh water) that floats in a strong brine solution.]
Aristotle
Meteorology (350 B.C.), Book II, translated by E. W. Webster. Internet Classics Archive, (classics.mit.edu).
Science quotes on:  |  Admixture (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Brine (3)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Cargo (5)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Density (25)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Due (141)  |  Egg (69)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fit (134)  |  Float (30)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Loss (110)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Mud (26)  |  Navigate (3)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quantity (132)  |  River (119)  |  Salt (46)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Strong (174)  |  Substance (248)  |  Water (481)  |  Weigh (49)

There is nothing so mysterious as a fact clearly described.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Clearly (41)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nothing (966)

These parsons are so in the habit of dealing with the abstractions of doctrines as if there was no difficulty about them whatever, so confident, from the practice of having the talk all to themselves for an hour at least every week with no one to gainsay a syllable they utter, be it ever so loose or bad, that they gallop over the course when their field is Botany or Geology as if we were in the pews and they in the pulpit ... There is a story somewhere of an Englishman, Frenchman, and German being each called on to describe a camel. The Englishman immediately embarked for Egypt, the Frenchman went to the Jardin des Plantes, and the German shut himself up in his study and thought it out!
Letter to Asa Gray (29 Mar 1857). Quoted in Leonard Huxley, Life and Letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1918), Vol. 1, 477.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Botany (57)  |  Call (769)  |  Camel (11)  |  Confident (25)  |  Course (409)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Field (364)  |  Geology (220)  |  German (36)  |  Habit (168)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (186)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Joke (83)  |  Practice (204)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Story (118)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Week (70)  |  Whatever (234)

This work should commence with the conception of man, and should describe the nature of the womb, and how the child inhabits it, and in what stage it dwells there, and the manner of its quickening and feeding, and its growth, and what interval there is between one stage of growth and another, and what thing drives it forth from the body of the mother, and for what reason it sometimes emerges from the belly of its mother before the due time.
'Anatomy', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (28)  |  Body (537)  |  Child (307)  |  Conception (154)  |  Due (141)  |  Growth (187)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Premature (20)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Stage (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Womb (24)  |  Work (1351)

Thus, remarkably, we do not know the true number of species on earth even to the nearest order of magnitude. My own guess, based on the described fauna and flora and many discussions with entomologists and other specialists, is that the absolute number falls somewhere between five and thirty million.
Conservation for the 21st Century
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Base (117)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entomologist (6)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Five (16)  |  Flora (9)  |  Guess (61)  |  Know (1518)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Million (114)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Order Of Magnitude (5)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remarkably (3)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Species (401)  |  Thirty (6)  |  True (212)

To describe all the several pairs of the spinal Nerves, and to rehearse all their branchings, and to unfold the uses and actions of them, would be a work of an immense labour and trouble: and as this Neurologie cannot be learned nor understood without an exact knowledge of the Muscles, we may justly here forbear entring upon its particular institution.
In Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves (1664), trans. Samuel Pordage (1681), reprinted in William Peindel (ed.), Thomas Willis: Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves (1965), Vol. 2, 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Branch (150)  |  Branching (10)  |  Immense (86)  |  Institution (69)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Pair (9)  |  Rehearse (4)  |  Spine (9)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  Work (1351)

To give a causal explanation of an event means to deduce a statement which describes it, using as premises of the deduction one or more universal laws, together with certain singular statements, the initial conditions ... We have thus two different kinds of statement, both of which are necessary ingredients of a complete causal explanation. (1959)
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Different (577)  |  Event (216)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Premise (37)  |  Singular (23)  |  Statement (142)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)

Today scientists describe the universe in terms of two basic partial theories—the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. They are the great intellectual achievements of the first half of this century. The general theory of relativity describes the force of gravity and the large-scale structure of the universe, that is, the structure on scales from only a few miles to as large as a million million million million (1 with twenty-four zeros after it) miles, the size of the observable universe. Quantum mechanics, on the other hand, deals with phenomena on extremely small scales, such as a millionth of a millionth of an inch. Unfortunately, however, these two theories are known to be inconsistent with each other—they cannot both be correct.
A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes (1988), 11-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Basic (138)  |  Both (493)  |  Century (310)  |  Deal (188)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Observable (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Scale (121)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Today (314)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Universe (857)  |  Zero (37)

Until now, physical theories have been regarded as merely models with approximately describe the reality of nature. As the models improve, so the fit between theory and reality gets closer. Some physicists are now claiming that supergravity is the reality, that the model and the real world are in mathematically perfect accord.
Superforce (1984, 1985), 149.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Claim (146)  |  Claiming (8)  |  Closer (43)  |  Description (84)  |  Fit (134)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Model (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

Visible from Earth orbit … tropical rain forests of equatorial regions are huge expanses of monotonous, mottled dark green. During the day they are frequently covered with enormous thunderstorms that extend for hundreds of miles. The view has an air of fantasy about it, and you grope for words to describe what you see. My personal reaction was one of feeling humble, awed, and privileged to be witness to such a scene.
In How Do You Go To The Bathroom In Space?: All the Answers to All the Questions You Have About Living in Space (1999), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Awe (43)  |  Covered (5)  |  Dark (140)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Equatorial (2)  |  Expanse (6)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Forest (150)  |  Green (63)  |  Grope (3)  |  Humble (50)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Mile (39)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Thunderstorm (5)  |  Tropical (8)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Witness (54)  |  Word (619)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Causal (7)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (388)  |  Desire (204)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hate (64)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pain (136)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (14)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (78)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Servant (39)  |  Serve (59)  |  Social (252)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stir (21)  |  Strong (174)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

We are recorders and reporters of the facts—not judges of the behavior we describe.
Recalled on his death 25 Aug 56
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (84)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Judge (108)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Reporter (4)

We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn’t any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work.
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blind Alley (4)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idea (843)  |  Journal (30)  |  Order (632)  |  Possible (552)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Track (38)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)  |  Wrong (234)

We hold these truths to be self-evident.
Franklin's edit to the assertion of religion in Thomas Jefferson's original wording, “We hold these truths to be sacred and undeniable” in a draft of the Declaration of Independence changes it instead into an assertion of rationality. The scientific mind of Franklin drew on the scientific determinism of Isaac Newton and the analytic empiricism of David Hume and Gottfried Leibniz. In what became known as “Hume's Fork” the latters' theory distinguished between synthetic truths that describe matters of fact, and analytic truths that are self-evident by virtue of reason and definition.
As explained by Walter Isaacson in Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (2004), 312.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Declaration (10)  |  Declaration Of Independence (4)  |  Definition (221)  |  Determinism (12)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  David Hume (33)  |  Known (454)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)

We love to discover in the cosmos the geometrical forms that exist in the depths of our consciousness. The exactitude of the proportions of our monuments and the precision of our machines express a fundamental character of our mind. Geometry does not exist in the earthly world. It has originated in ourselves. The methods of nature are never so precise as those of man. We do not find in the universe the clearness and accuracy of our thought. We attempt, therefore, to abstract from the complexity of phenomena some simple systems whose components bear to one another certain relations susceptible of being described mathematically.
In Man the Unknown (1935), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Component (48)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Depth (94)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactitude (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Love (309)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monument (45)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Originate (36)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Relation (157)  |  Simple (406)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  System (537)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

We receive experience from nature in a series of messages. From these messages we extract a content of information: that is, we decode the messages in some way. And from this code of information we then make a basic vocabulary of concepts and a basic grammar of laws, which jointly describe the inner organization that nature translates into the happenings and the appearances we meet.
The Identity of Man. Quoted in Richard Dawkins, The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing (2008), 176-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Basic (138)  |  Code (31)  |  Concept (221)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extract (40)  |  Happening (58)  |  Information (166)  |  Inner (71)  |  Law (894)  |  Message (49)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organization (114)  |  Receive (114)  |  Series (149)  |  Translate (19)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Way (1217)

When we find facts within our knowledge exhibited by some new method, or even, it may be, described in a foreign language, they receive a peculiar charm of novelty and wear a fresh air.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Charm (51)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Method (505)  |  New (1216)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Receive (114)  |  Wear (18)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aim (165)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (366)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (158)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Broken (56)  |  Call (769)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (13)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (112)  |  Country (251)  |  Decision (91)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (110)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Demand (123)  |  Deny (66)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Element (310)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instance (33)  |  Intention (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Likely (34)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (144)  |  Pattern (110)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Produce (104)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Region (36)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Room (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Technical (43)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Totality (15)  |  Track (38)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (283)  |  Type (167)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)

Why is geometry often described as “cold” and “dry?” One reason lies in its inability to describe the shape of a cloud, a mountain, a coastline, or a tree. Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, coastlines are not circles, and bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line… Nature exhibits not simply a higher degree but an altogether different level of complexity.
From The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), Introduction, xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Bark (18)  |  Circle (110)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Coast (13)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Cone (7)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Dry (57)  |  Fractal (9)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Inability (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Line (91)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reason (744)  |  Shape (72)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Travel (114)  |  Tree (246)  |  Why (491)

Yet is it possible in terms of the motion of atoms to explain how men can invent an electric motor, or design and build a great cathedral? If such achievements represent anything more than the requirements of physical law, it means that science must investigate the additional controlling factors, whatever they may be, in order that the world of nature may be adequately understood. For a science which describes only the motions of inanimate things but fails to include the actions of living organisms cannot claim universality.
The Human Meaning of Science (1940), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Action (327)  |  Atom (355)  |  Build (204)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Claim (146)  |  Design (195)  |  Electric (76)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fail (185)  |  Great (1574)  |  Include (90)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Motor (23)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)  |  Possible (552)  |  Represent (155)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universality (22)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)

You see, wire telegraph is a kind of a very, very long cat. You pull his tail in New York and his head is meowing in Los Angeles. Do you understand this? And radio operates exactly the same way: you send signals here, they receive them there. The only difference is that there is no cat.
When asked to describe radio
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Angeles (4)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cat (47)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Head (81)  |  Kind (557)  |  Long (790)  |  Los (4)  |  New (1216)  |  New York (15)  |  Operate (17)  |  Pull (43)  |  Radio (50)  |  Receive (114)  |  Same (157)  |  See (1081)  |  Send (22)  |  Signal (27)  |  Tail (18)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wire (35)

[An outsider views a scientist] as a type of unscrupulous opportunist: he appears as a realist, insofar as he seeks to describe the world independent of the act of perception; as idealist insofar as he looks upon the concepts and theories as the free inventions of the human spirit (not logically derivable from that which is empirically given); as positivist insofar as he considers his concepts and theories justified only to the extent to which they furnish a logical representation of relations among sense experiences. He may even appear as Platonist or Pythagorean insofar as he considers the viewpoint of logical simplicity as an indispensable and effective tool of his research.
In 'Reply to Critcisms', Paul Arthur Schilpp (ed.), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949, 1959), Vol. 2, 684.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Appear (118)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consider (416)  |  Effective (59)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Idealist (3)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Invention (369)  |  Justify (24)  |  Logical (55)  |  Look (582)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Outsider (6)  |  Perception (97)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Positivist (5)  |  Realist (2)  |  Relation (157)  |  Representation (53)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Type (167)  |  Unscrupulous (2)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  World (1774)

[Shawn Lawrence Otto describes the damaging] strategy used to undermine science in the interest of those industries where science has pointed out the dangers of their products to individuals and human life in general … [It was] used a generation ago by the tobacco industry… First they manufacture uncertainty by raising doubts about even the most indisputable scientific evidence. Then they launder information by using seemingly independent front organizations to promote their desired message and thereby confuse the public. And finally they recruit unscrupulous scientific spokespeople to misrepresent peer-reviewed scientific findings and cherry-pick facts in an attempt to persuade the media and the public that there is still serious debate among scientists on the issue at hand.
In 'Science Is Politics', Huffington Post (28 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attempting (3)  |  Cherry-Pick (2)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Damage (34)  |  Danger (115)  |  Debate (38)  |  Description (84)  |  Desired (6)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Finding (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Front (16)  |  General (511)  |  Generation (242)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Human (1468)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indisputable (8)  |  Individual (404)  |  Industry (137)  |  Information (166)  |  Interest (386)  |  Issue (42)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Media (13)  |  Message (49)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organization (114)  |  Peer Review (4)  |  Persuasion (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Product (160)  |  Promote (29)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Public (96)  |  Raising (4)  |  Recruiting (3)  |  Review (26)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Serious (91)  |  Still (613)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Undermining (2)  |  Unscrupulous (2)  |  Using (6)

[S]ome physicists describe gravity in terms of ten dimensions all curled up. But those aren't real words—just placeholders, used to refer to parts of abstract equations.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Curl (3)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Equation (132)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Real (149)  |  Reference (33)  |  Ten (3)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Word (619)

[Watching natural history programs] brings a solace you can’t describe in words. It’s because we’re part of it fundamentally…. In moments of great grief, that’s where you look and immerse yourself. You realise you are not immortal, you are not a god, you are part of the natural world and you come to accept that.
Reflecting on the letters he received from newly bereaved people. While his series are running on TV, in dozens of letters daily (comprising the majority of the correspondence), they tell him that the only things they can face in their darkest moments are his natural-history programmes. From interview with Joe Shute, 'David Attenborough at 90: ‘I think about my mortality every day’', The Telegraph (29 Oct 2016).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grief (18)  |  History (673)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Look (582)  |  Moment (253)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Realize (147)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.