Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Transition

Transition Quotes (26 quotes)

A hundred years ago, the electric telegraph made possible—indeed, inevitable—the United States of America. The communications satellite will make equally inevitable a United Nations of Earth; let us hope that the transition period will not be equally bloody.
Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, Edwin E. Aldrin et al., First on the Moon (1970), 389.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Communication (94)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electric (76)  |  Equally (130)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Nation (193)  |  Period (198)  |  Possible (552)  |  Satellite (28)  |  State (491)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  United Nations (3)  |  United States (31)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

As the saying goes, the Stone Age did not end because we ran out of stones; we transitioned to better solutions. The same opportunity lies before us with energy efficiency and clean energy.
In letter (1 Feb 2013) to Energy Department employees announcing his decision not to serve a second term.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Better (486)  |  Clean (50)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Energy Efficiency (5)  |  Lie (364)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stone Age (12)

Clarity about the aims and problems of socialism is of greatest significance in our age of transition. Since, under present circumstances, free and unhindered discussion of these problems has come under a powerful taboo, I consider the foundation of this magazine to be an important public service.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Consider (416)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Important (209)  |  Magazine (24)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Service (110)  |  Significance (113)  |  Socialism (4)  |  Taboo (5)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (144)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (168)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Same (157)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Theory (970)  |  Treat (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variable (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

Evolution is a theory of organic change, but it does not imply, as many people assume, that ceaseless flux is the irreducible state of nature and that structure is but a temporary incarnation of the moment. Change is more often a rapid transition between stable states than a continuous transformation at slow and steady rates. We live in a world of structure and legitimate distinction. Species are the units of nature’s morphology.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Assume (38)  |  Ceaseless (6)  |  Change (593)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flux (21)  |  Imply (17)  |  Incarnation (3)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Live (628)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Often (106)  |  Organic (158)  |  People (1005)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rate (29)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Stable (30)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Structure (344)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Unit (33)  |  World (1774)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Framework (31)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (23)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proper (144)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rigid (24)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Solid (116)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (300)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Swing (11)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Throughout (98)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

In knowledge that man only is to be condemned and despised who is not in a state of transition.
As quoted, without citation in Lecture, 'The Study of History' (11 Jun 1895) delivered at Cambridge, published as Lord Acton, A Lecture on The Study of History (1895), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemned (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  State (491)

It will be a general expression of the facts that have been detailed, relating to the changes and transitions by electricity, in common philosophical language, to say, that hydrogen, the alkaline substances, the metals, and certain metallic oxides, are all attracted by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and contrariwise, that oxygen and acid substances are attracted by positively electrified metallic surfaces and rejected by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and these attractive and repulsive forces are sufficiently energetic to destroy or suspend the usual operation of elective affinity.
Bakerian Lecture, 'On Some Chemical Agencies of Electricity', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1807, 97, 28-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Affinity (27)  |  Alkali (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Charge (59)  |  Common (436)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Detail (146)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Metal (84)  |  Operation (213)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Say (984)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Will (2355)

Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.
Aphorism as given by the fictional character Dezhnev Senior, in Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain (1987), 71.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Death (388)  |  Life (1795)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Trouble (107)

Pavlov’s data on the two fundamental antagonistic nervous processes—stimulation and inhibition—and his profound generalizations regarding them, in particular, that these processes are parts of a united whole, that they are in a state of constant conflict and constant transition of the one to the other, and his views on the dominant role they play in the formation of the higher nervous activity—all those belong to the most established natural—scientific validation of the Marxist dialectal method. They are in complete accord with the Leninist concepts on the role of the struggle between opposites in the evolution, the motion of matter.
In E. A. Asratyan, I. P. Pavlov: His Life and Work (1953), 153.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accord (36)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Complete (204)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (144)  |  Data (156)  |  Dominance (5)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Formation (96)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Higher (37)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Vladimir Lenin (3)  |  Karl Marx (21)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (18)  |  Play (112)  |  Process (423)  |  Profound (104)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Regard (305)  |  Role (86)  |  Scientific (941)  |  State (491)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Validation (2)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

The facts of nature are what they are, but we can only view them through the spectacles of our mind. Our mind works largely by metaphor and comparison, not always (or often) by relentless logic. When we are caught in conceptual traps, the best exit is often a change in metaphor–not because the new guideline will be truer to nature (for neither the old nor the new metaphor lies ‘out there’ in the woods), but because we need a shift to more fruitful perspectives, and metaphor is often the best agent of conceptual transition.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Best (459)  |  Catch (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Exit (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Guideline (4)  |  Largely (13)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Often (106)  |  Old (481)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Shift (44)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Trap (6)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Work (1351)

The graceful minuet-dance of fancy must give place to the toilsome, thorny pilgrimage of understanding.
On the transition from the age of romance to that of science.
In James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 431:5.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Dance (32)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pilgrimage (4)  |  Romance (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Understanding (513)

The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries, we must claim its promise. That’s how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure—our forests and waterways, our crop lands and snow-capped peaks. That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.
In Second Inaugural Address (21 Jan 2013) at the United States Capitol.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  America (127)  |  Care (186)  |  Cede (2)  |  Claim (146)  |  Command (58)  |  Creed (27)  |  Crop (25)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Economic (81)  |  Energy (344)  |  Father (110)  |  Forest (150)  |  God (757)  |  Industry (137)  |  Job (82)  |  Lead (384)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  National (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Peak (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Promise (67)  |  Resist (15)  |  Snow (37)  |  Source (93)  |  Sustainable (12)  |  Sustainable Energy (3)  |  Technology (257)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wind Power (9)

The science of genetics is in a transition period, becoming an exact science just as the chemistry in the times of Lavoisier, who made the balance an indispensable implement in chemical research.
The Genotype Conception of Heredity', The American Naturalist (1911), 45, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (77)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Implement (13)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Period (198)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)

The transition from a paradigm in crisis to a new one from which a new tradition of normal science can emerge is far from a cumulative process, one achieved by an articulation or extension of the old paradigm. Rather it is a reconstruction of the field from new fundamentals, a reconstruction that changes some of the field's most elementary theoretical generalizations as well as many of its paradigm methods and applications. During the transition period there will be a large but never complete overlap between the problems that can be solved by the old and by the new paradigm. But there will also be a decisive difference in the modes of solution. When the transition is complete, the profession will have changed its view of the field, its methods, and its goals.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 84-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Application (242)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Difference (337)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Goal (145)  |  Large (394)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Overlap (8)  |  Paradigm (14)  |  Period (198)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Profession (99)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tradition (69)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

The transition from sea-floor spreading to plate tectonics is largely a change of emphasis. Sea-floor spreading is a view about the method of production of new oceans floor on the ridge axis. The magnetic lineations give the history of this production back into the late Mesozoic and illuminate the history of the new aseismic parts of the ocean floor. This naturally directed attention to the relation of the sea-floor to the continents. There are two approaches: in the first, one looks back in time to earlier arrangements of the continents; in the second, one considers the current problem of the disposal of the rapidly growing sea floor.
'The Emergence of Plate Tectonics: A Personal View', Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 1975, 3, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attention (190)  |  Back (390)  |  Change (593)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continent (76)  |  Current (118)  |  Direct (225)  |  First (1283)  |  Growing (98)  |  History (673)  |  Late (118)  |  Look (582)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Method (505)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea-Floor Spreading (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)

Therapeutics and materia medica are in this day in the chaos of a transition.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (91)  |  Therapeutics (3)

They thought I was crazy, absolutely mad.
The response (1944) of the National Academy of Sciences, to her (later Nobel prize-winning) theory that proposed that genes could transition—'jumping'—to new locations on a chromosome.
Quoted in Claudia Wallis, 'Honoring a Modern Mendel', Time (24 Oct 1983), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Gene (98)  |  Location (15)  |  Mad (53)  |  New (1216)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Response (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Winning (19)

To turn Karl [Popper]'s view on its head, it is precisely the abandonment of critical discourse that marks the transition of science. Once a field has made the transition, critical discourse recurs only at moments of crisis when the bases of the field are again in jeopardy. Only when they must choose between competing theories do scientists behave like philosophers.
'Logic of Discovery or Psychology of Research', in I. Lakatos and A. Musgrave (eds.), Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge (1970), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Base (117)  |  Choose (112)  |  Competition (39)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Field (364)  |  Jeopardy (2)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Karl Raimund Popper (47)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Theory (970)  |  Turn (447)  |  View (488)

What beauty. I saw clouds and their light shadows on the distant dear earth…. The water looked like darkish, slightly gleaming spots…. When I watched the horizon, I saw the abrupt, contrasting transition from the earth’s light-colored surface to the absolutely black sky. I enjoyed the rich color spectrum of the earth. It is surrounded by a light blue aureole that gradually darkens, becomes turquoise, dark blue, violet, and finally coal black.
Describing his view while making the first manned orbit of the earth (12 Apr 1961). As quoted in Don Knefel, Writing and Life: A Rhetoric for Nonfiction with Readings (1986), 93. Front Cover
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abrupt (6)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Coal (57)  |  Color (137)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Dark (140)  |  Distant (33)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Gleam (12)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Rich (62)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sky (161)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Spot (17)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surround (30)  |  Violet (11)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)

When I first read Plato and came upon this gradation of beings which rises from the lightest atom to the Supreme Being, I was struck with admiration. But when I looked at it more closely, the great phantom vanished. … At first the imagination takes a pleasure in seeing the imperceptible transition from inanimate to organic matter, from plants to zoophytes, from these to animals, from these to genii, … and finally angels.
As quoted in Arthur O. Lovejoy, The Great Chain of Being: A Study of the History of an Idea (2011), 252.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Angel (44)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Genie (2)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Organic (158)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plato (76)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Read (287)  |  Rise (166)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Supreme Being (8)  |  Vanish (18)

When the mathematician says that such and such a proposition is true of one thing, it may be interesting, and it is surely safe. But when he tries to extend his proposition to everything, though it is much more interesting, it is also much more dangerous. In the transition from one to all, from the specific to the general, mathematics has made its greatest progress, and suffered its most serious setbacks, of which the logical paradoxes constitute the most important part. For, if mathematics is to advance securely and confidently, it must first set its affairs in order at home.
With co-author James R. Newman, in Mathematics and the Imagination (1940), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Confident (25)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Home (170)  |  Important (209)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Safe (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Secure (22)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Setback (3)  |  Specific (95)  |  Suffered (2)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  True (212)

When two minds of a high order, interested in kindred subjects, come together, their conversation is chiefly remarkable for the summariness of its allusions and the rapidity of its transitions. Before one of them is half through a sentence the other knows his meaning and replies. ... His mental lungs breathe more deeply, in an atmosphere more broad and vast...
In The Principles of Psychology (1918), Vol. 2, 370.
Science quotes on:  |  Allusion (2)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Broad (27)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Deep (233)  |  Finish (59)  |  Genius (284)  |  Half (56)  |  High (362)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lung (34)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Reply (56)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Subject (521)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Vast (177)

With all reserve we advance the view that a supernova represents the transition of an ordinary star into a neutron star consisting mainly of neutrons. Such a star may possess a very small radius and an extremely high density. As neutrons can be packed much more closely than ordinary nuclei and electrons, the gravitational packing energy in a cold neutron star may become very large, and under certain conditions may far exceed the ordinary nuclear packing fractions...
[Co-author with Walter Baade]
Paper presented to American Physical Society meeting at Stanford (15-16 Dec 1933). Published in Physical Review (15 Jan 1934). Cited in P. Haensel, Paweł Haensel and A. Y. Potekhin, D. G. Yakovlev, Neutron Stars: Equation of State and Structure (2007), 2-3. Longer version of quote from Freeman Dyson, From Eros to Gaia (1992), 34. The theoretical prediction of neutron stars was made after analyzing observations of supernovae and proposed as an explanation of the enormous energy released in such explosions. It was written just two years after Chadwick discovered the neutron.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Become (815)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closely (12)  |  Cold (112)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consisting (5)  |  Density (25)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Final (118)  |  High (362)  |  Large (394)  |  More (2559)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Neutron Star (3)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Packing (3)  |  Possess (156)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Small (477)  |  Stage (143)  |  Star (427)  |  Supernova (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)

[The launch of Nautilus, the world's first atomic submarine] marked a transition in naval warfare—a transition as sudden as that associated with the Monitor.
In 'Science in Review: Atomic-Powered Submarine Marks a Great Transition in Ships and Land Plants', New York Times (24 Jan 1954), E11.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  First (1283)  |  Launch (20)  |  Marked (55)  |  Monitor (7)  |  Nautilus (2)  |  Navy (9)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Submarine (12)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Warfare (11)  |  World (1774)

[Using mice as model systems for genetic engineering in biomedicine, instead of bacterial or yeast systems matters because] this transition will have as big an impact on the future of biology as the shift from printing presses to video technology has had on pop culture. A mouse-based world looks and feels different from one viewed through microorganisms.
Quoted in Michael Schrage, 'Biomedical Researchers Scurry to Make Genetically Altered Mice', San Jose Mercury News (8 Feb 1993), 3D. In Donna Jeanne Haraway and Lynn M. Randolph, [email protected]: Feminism and Technoscience (1996), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Biomedicine (2)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Feel (367)  |  Future (429)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetic Engineering (15)  |  Impact (42)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Model (102)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Printing (22)  |  Shift (44)  |  System (537)  |  Technology (257)  |  Through (849)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Yeast (7)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.