Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Chill

Chill Quotes (9 quotes)

Let me tell you how at one time the famous mathematician Euclid became a physician. It was during a vacation, which I spent in Prague as I most always did, when I was attacked by an illness never before experienced, which manifested itself in chilliness and painful weariness of the whole body. In order to ease my condition I took up Euclid’s Elements and read for the first time his doctrine of ratio, which I found treated there in a manner entirely new to me. The ingenuity displayed in Euclid’s presentation filled me with such vivid pleasure, that forthwith I felt as well as ever.
Selbstbiographie (1875), 20. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 146.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Attack (84)  |  Biography (240)  |  Body (537)  |  Condition (356)  |  Display (56)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Element (310)  |  Euclid (54)  |  First (1283)  |  Illness (34)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Read (287)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vacation (4)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Weariness (6)  |  Whole (738)

Mr. Hobbes told me that the cause of his Lordship’s [Francis Bacon s] death was trying an experiment: viz., as he was taking the air in a coach with Dr. Witherborne, a Scotchman, physician to the King, towards Highgate, snow lay on the ground, and it came into my Lord’s thoughts, why flesh might not be preserved in snow as in salt. They were resolved they would try the experiment presently. They alighted out of the coach and went into a poor woman s house at the bottom of Highgate Hill and bought a hen and made the woman exenterate it, and then stuffed the body with snow, and my Lord did help to do it himself The snow so chilled him that he immediately fell so extremely ill that he could not return to his lodgings.
In Brief Lives (late 17th century), as excerpted in The Retrospective Review (1821), 292.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  House (140)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Lord (93)  |  Physician (273)  |  Poor (136)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Refrigeration (3)  |  Return (124)  |  Salt (46)  |  Snow (37)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Why (491)  |  Woman (151)

On Tuesday evening at Museum, at a ball in the gardens. The night was chill, I dropped too suddenly from Differential Calculus into ladies’ society, and could not give myself freely to the change. After an hour’s attempt so to do, I returned, cursing the mode of life I was pursuing; next morning I had already shaken hands, however, with Diff. Calculus, and forgot the ladies….
From his diary for 10 Aug 1851, as quoted in J. Helen Gardner and Robin J. Wilson, 'Thomas Archer Hirst—Mathematician Xtravagant II: Student Days in Germany', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jun-Jul 1993), 6, No. 100, 534.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Ball (62)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Change (593)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Forget (115)  |  Garden (60)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lady (11)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mode (41)  |  Morning (94)  |  Museum (31)  |  Myself (212)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Return (124)  |  Shake (41)  |  Society (326)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)

Science, the partisan of no country, but the beneficent patroness of all, has liberally opened a temple where all may meet. Her influence on the mind, like the sun on the chilled earth, has long been preparing it for higher cultivation and further improvement. The philosopher of one country sees not an enemy in the philosopher of another; he takes his seat in the temple of science, and asks not who sits beside him.
In Letter to the Abbé Reynal, on the 'Affairs of North America in which the Mistakes in the Abbé’s Account of the Revolution of America are Corrected and Cleared Up', collected in The Works of Thomas Paine (1797), Vol. 1, 295. Originally published in the Pennsylvania magazine (1775).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beneficent (9)  |  Country (251)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enemy (82)  |  High (362)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Influence (222)  |  Long (790)  |  Meet (31)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Open (274)  |  Partisan (5)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seat (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sun (385)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)

The diseases which are hard to cure in neighborhoods… are catarrh, hoarseness, coughs, pleurisy, consumption, spitting of blood, and all others that are cured not by lowering the system but by building it up. They are hard to cure, first, because they are originally due to chills; secondly, because the patient's system being already exhausted by disease, the air there, which is in constant agitation owing to winds and therefore deteriorated, takes all the sap of life out of their diseased bodies and leaves them more meager every day. On the other hand, a mild, thick air, without drafts and not constantly blowing back and forth, builds up their frames by its unwavering steadiness, and so strengthens and restores people who are afflicted with these diseases.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 6, Sec. 3. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Catarrh (2)  |  Constant (144)  |  Consumption (14)  |  Cough (8)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Draft (6)  |  Due (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Hard (243)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mild (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  System (537)  |  Wind (128)

The earth and its atmosphere constitute a vast distilling apparatus in which the equatorial ocean plays the part of the boiler, and the chill regions of the poles the part of the condenser. In this process of distillation heat plays quite as necessary a part as cold.
In Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers, Ice and Glaciers (1872), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Boiler (7)  |  Cold (112)  |  Condenser (4)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equator (6)  |  Heat (174)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Part (222)  |  Playing (42)  |  Pole (46)  |  Process (423)  |  Region (36)  |  Vast (177)

The end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century were remarkable for the small amount of scientific movement going on in this country, especially in its more exact departments. ... Mathematics were at the last gasp, and Astronomy nearly so—I mean in those members of its frame which depend upon precise measurement and systematic calculation. The chilling torpor of routine had begun to spread itself over all those branches of Science which wanted the excitement of experimental research.
Quoted in Sophia Elizabeth De Morgan, Memoir of Augustus De Morgan (1882), 41
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  19th Century (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Century (310)  |  Country (251)  |  Department (92)  |  Depend (228)  |  End (590)  |  Exact (68)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Last (426)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Research (664)  |  Routine (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Small (477)  |  Spread (83)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Want (497)

We think of Euclid as of fine ice; we admire Newton as we admire the peak of Teneriffe. Even the intensest labors, the most remote triumphs of the abstract intellect, seem to carry us into a region different from our own—to be in a terra incognita of pure reasoning, to cast a chill on human glory.
In Estimates of Some Englishmen and Scotchmen (1856), 411-412
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cast (66)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fine (33)  |  Glory (58)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ice (54)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Labor (107)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Peak (20)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Region (36)  |  Remote (83)  |  Think (1086)  |  Triumph (73)

[Pure mathematics is] good to give chills in the spine to a certain number of people, me included. I don’t know what else it is good for, and I don’t care. But … like von Neumann said, one never knows whether someone is going to find another use for it.
In The Beauty of Doing Mathematics: Three Public Dialogues (1985), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Certain (550)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Spine (9)  |  Use (766)  |  John von Neumann (28)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.