Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Whole

Whole Quotes (189 quotes)

... the besetting danger is not so much of embracing falsehood for truth, as of mistaking a part of the truth for the whole.
'Coleridge', essay in Dissertations and Discussions: Political, Philosophical, and Historical (1864), Vol. 2, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Beset (2)  |  Embrace (32)  |  Falsehood (25)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Part (220)  |  Truth (914)

Naturae vero rerum vis atque maiestas in omnibus momentis fide caret si quis modo partes eius ac non totam conplectatur animo.
The power and majesty of the nature of the universe at every turn lacks credence if one’s mind embraces parts of it only and not the whole.
In Pliny: Natural History (1947), Vol. 2, Book 7, 511, as translated by H. Rackham
Science quotes on:  |  Embrace (32)  |  Lack (77)  |  Majesty (13)  |  Mind (743)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Part (220)  |  Power (358)  |  Universe (683)

Omnes scientiae sunt connexae et fovent auxiliis sicut partes ejusdem totius, quarum quaelibet opus suum peragit non propter se sed pro aliis.
All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work, not for itself alone, but for the other parts; as the eye guides the body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place.
Opus Tertium [1266- 1268], chapter 4, Latin text quoted in J. B. Bury, The Idea of Progress (1920), 355 (footnote to page 25). In J. S. Brewer (ed.), Fr. Rogeri Bacon Opera ... inedita (1859), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (41)  |  Body (243)  |  Connect (30)  |  Eye (218)  |  Foot (60)  |  Guide (62)  |  Lead (158)  |  Material (154)  |  Part (220)  |  Place (174)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sustain (23)  |  Work (626)

“Pieces” almost always appear 'as parts' in whole processes. ... To sever a “'part” from the organized whole in which it occurs—whether it itself be a subsidiary whole or an “element”—is a very real process usually involving alterations in that “part”. Modifications of a part frequently involve changes elsewhere in the whole itself. Nor is the nature of these alterations arbitrary, for they too are determined by whole-conditions.
From 'Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt, I', Psychol. Forsch. (1922), 1, 47-58. As translated in 'The General Theoretical Situation' (1922), collected in W. D. Ellis (ed.), A Source Book of Gestalt Psychology (1938, 1967), Vol. 2, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (25)  |  Appear (115)  |  Arbitrary (20)  |  Change (363)  |  Determine (72)  |  Element (162)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Involve (47)  |  Modification (35)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Organized (9)  |  Part (220)  |  Piece (38)  |  Process (261)  |  Real (148)  |  Sever (2)  |  Subsidiary (4)

A body of work such as Pasteur’s is inconceivable in our time: no man would be given a chance to create a whole science. Nowadays a path is scarcely opened up when the crowd begins to pour in.
Pensées d’un Biologiste (1939). Translated in The Substance of Man (1962), Chap. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (122)  |  Body (243)  |  Chance (159)  |  Creation (239)  |  Crowd (22)  |  Man (373)  |  Nowadays (6)  |  Opening (15)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Path (84)  |  Pouring (3)  |  Scarcely (13)  |  Science (2043)  |  Time (594)  |  Work (626)

A century ago astronomers, geologists, chemists, physicists, each had an island of his own, separate and distinct from that of every other student of Nature; the whole field of research was then an archipelago of unconnected units. To-day all the provinces of study have risen together to form a continent without either a ferry or a bridge.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 182-183.
Science quotes on:  |  Archipelago (4)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Bridge (30)  |  Century (130)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Continent (52)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Ferry (4)  |  Field (170)  |  Form (308)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Island (24)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Province (14)  |  Research (589)  |  Rise (70)  |  Separate (69)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Today (117)  |  Together (77)  |  Unconnected (4)  |  Unit (31)

A crystal is like a class of children arranged for drill, but standing at ease, so that while the class as a whole has regularity both in time and space, each individual child is a little fidgety!
In Crystals and X-Rays (1948), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (58)  |  Child (245)  |  Class (83)  |  Crystal (53)  |  Drill (10)  |  Ease (35)  |  Individual (215)  |  Regularity (29)  |  Standing (11)  |  Time And Space (31)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (63)  |  Achievement (150)  |  Affection (18)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Call (127)  |  Circle (55)  |  Compassion (9)  |  Completely (32)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Creature (154)  |  Delusion (22)  |  Desire (140)  |  Embrace (32)  |  Experience (338)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Free (90)  |  Human Being (73)  |  Inner (39)  |  Kind (138)  |  Liberation (10)  |  Limit (123)  |  Live (269)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Optical (3)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Part (220)  |  Person (153)  |  Personal (66)  |  Prison (9)  |  Rest (93)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Security (33)  |  Separate (69)  |  Strive (43)  |  Task (83)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time And Space (31)  |  Universe (683)  |  Widen (4)

A man who writes a great deal and says little that is new writes himself into a daily declining reputation. When he wrote less he stood higher in people’s estimation, even though there was nothing in what he wrote. The reason is that then they still expected better things of him in the future, whereas now they can view the whole progression.
Aphorism 43 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (190)  |  Decline (17)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Expectation (54)  |  Future (284)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Progression (12)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Writer (45)

A parable: A man was examining the construction of a cathedral. He asked a stone mason what he was doing chipping the stones, and the mason replied, “I am making stones.” He asked a stone carver what he was doing. “I am carving a gargoyle.” And so it went, each person said in detail what they were doing. Finally he came to an old woman who was sweeping the ground. She said. “I am helping build a cathedral.”
...Most of the time each person is immersed in the details of one special part of the whole and does not think of how what they are doing relates to the larger picture.
[For example, in education, a teacher might say in the next class he was going to “explain Young's modulus and how to measure it,” rather than, “I am going to educate the students and prepare them for their future careers.”]
In The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn (1975, 2005), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Building (52)  |  Career (57)  |  Cathedral (15)  |  Class (83)  |  Construction (83)  |  Detail (85)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Future (284)  |  Gargoyle (3)  |  Immersion (2)  |  Mason (2)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Parable (4)  |  Part (220)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Relation (149)  |  Special (74)  |  Stone (76)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Woman (111)

A spiritual man is happy with the whole existence. He says “yes” to the whole existence.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 12
Science quotes on:  |  Existence (296)  |  Happy (46)  |  Say (228)  |  Spiritual (55)

A student who wishes now-a-days to study geometry by dividing it sharply from analysis, without taking account of the progress which the latter has made and is making, that student no matter how great his genius, will never be a whole geometer. He will not possess those powerful instruments of research which modern analysis puts into the hands of modern geometry. He will remain ignorant of many geometrical results which are to be found, perhaps implicitly, in the writings of the analyst. And not only will he be unable to use them in his own researches, but he will probably toil to discover them himself, and, as happens very often, he will publish them as new, when really he has only rediscovered them.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometrical Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Discover (196)  |  Divide (40)  |  Genius (243)  |  Geometer (22)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Ignorant (36)  |  Implicit (7)  |  Instrument (92)  |  Modern (159)  |  New (483)  |  Possess (53)  |  Powerful (66)  |  Progress (362)  |  Publish (33)  |  Research (589)  |  Result (376)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Toil (18)  |  Writing (79)

A vision of the whole of life!. Could any human undertaking be ... more grandiose? This attempt stands without rival as the most audacious enterprise in which the mind of man has ever engaged ... Here is man, surrounded by the vastness of a universe in which he is only a tiny and perhaps insignificant part—and he wants to understand it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Audacious (2)  |  Engage (25)  |  Enterprise (32)  |  Grandiose (3)  |  Human (548)  |  Insignificant (15)  |  Life (1124)  |  Mind Of Man (7)  |  Part (220)  |  Rival (10)  |  Stand (107)  |  Surround (29)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Understand (326)  |  Undertake (20)  |  Universe (683)  |  Vastness (11)  |  Vision (94)  |  Want (175)

All the events which occur upon the earth result from Law: even those actions which are entirely dependent on the caprices of the memory, or the impulse of the passions, are shown by statistics to be, when taken in the gross, entirely independent of the human will. As a single atom, man is an enigma; as a whole, he is a mathematical problem. As an individual, he is a free agent; as a species, the offspring of necessity.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 185-186.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Agent (32)  |  Atom (280)  |  Caprice (4)  |  Dependent (22)  |  Enigma (10)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Event (115)  |  Free (90)  |  Gross (7)  |  Human (548)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Independent (65)  |  Individual (215)  |  Law (513)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Memory (105)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Offspring (16)  |  Passion (70)  |  Problem (490)  |  Single (119)  |  Species (220)  |  Statistics (147)

Although the whole of this life were said to be nothing but a dream and the physical world nothing but a phantasm, I should call this dream or phantasm real enough, if, using reason well, we were never deceived by it.
Epigraph, without citation, in J.R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics (1956), 1832.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (127)  |  Deceive (16)  |  Dream (165)  |  Life (1124)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Phantasm (3)  |  Physical World (12)  |  Real (148)  |  Reason (454)  |  Say (228)

An evolution is a series of events that in itself as series is purely physical, — a set of necessary occurrences in the world of space and time. An egg develops into a chick; … a planet condenses from the fluid state, and develops the life that for millions of years makes it so wondrous a place. Look upon all these things descriptively, and you shall see nothing but matter moving instant after instant, each instant containing in its full description the necessity of passing over into the next. … But look at the whole appreciatively, historically, synthetically, as a musician listens to a symphony, as a spectator watches a drama. Now you shall seem to have seen, in phenomenal form, a story.
In The Spirit of Modern Philosophy: An Essay in the Form of Lectures (1892), 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Chick (3)  |  Condense (11)  |  Contain (67)  |  Description (84)  |  Develop (103)  |  Drama (13)  |  Egg (45)  |  Event (115)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Fluid (19)  |  Form (308)  |  History (368)  |  Instant (17)  |  Life (1124)  |  Listen (39)  |  Make (25)  |  Matter (340)  |  Million (111)  |  Move (94)  |  Musician (15)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Occurrence (32)  |  Pass (91)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Physical (129)  |  Planet (262)  |  Pure (98)  |  Series (50)  |  Set (97)  |  Space (257)  |  Spectator (9)  |  State (136)  |  Story (72)  |  Symphony (5)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Time (594)  |  Watch (64)  |  Wonder (169)  |  World (892)  |  Year (299)

Archimedes possessed so high a spirit, so profound a soul, and such treasures of highly scientific knowledge, that though these inventions [used to defend Syracuse against the Romans] had now obtained him the renown of more than human sagacity, he yet would not deign to leave behind him any commentary or writing on such subjects; but, repudiating as sordid and ignoble the whole trade of engineering, and every sort of art that lends itself to mere use and profit, he placed his whole affection and ambition in those purer speculations where there can be no reference to the vulgar needs of life; studies, the superiority of which to all others is unquestioned, and in which the only doubt can be whether the beauty and grandeur of the subjects examined, or the precision and cogency of the methods and means of proof, most deserve our admiration.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Affection (18)  |  Ambition (34)  |  Archimedes (53)  |  Art (284)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Behind (38)  |  Commentary (3)  |  Defend (29)  |  Deserve (28)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Engineering (141)  |  Examine (44)  |  Grandeur (21)  |  High (152)  |  Highly (16)  |  Human (548)  |  Ignoble (2)  |  Invention (318)  |  Leave (127)  |  Lend (3)  |  Life (1124)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Means (171)  |  Mere (78)  |  Method (230)  |  Need (283)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Place (174)  |  Possess (53)  |  Precision (50)  |  Profit (38)  |  Profound (58)  |  Proof (243)  |  Pure (98)  |  Reference (33)  |  Renown (2)  |  Repudiate (3)  |  Roman (27)  |  Sagacity (8)  |  Scientific Knowledge (9)  |  Sort (49)  |  Soul (163)  |  Speculation (103)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Study (461)  |  Subject (235)  |  Superiority (12)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Trade (30)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Unquestioned (6)  |  Vulgar (15)  |  Write (153)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (41)  |  Anybody (11)  |  Appear (115)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Common (118)  |  Complete (84)  |  Condition (160)  |  Conquer (22)  |  Consequence (110)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Depend (87)  |  Describe (56)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  Evident (26)  |  Fact (725)  |  Fail (58)  |  Genius (243)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Goethe (2)  |  Higher (36)  |  Human Mind (80)  |  Idea (577)  |  Magic (77)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Perception (61)  |  Power (358)  |  Quality (93)  |  Question (404)  |  Raise (34)  |  Real (148)  |  Require (79)  |  Seem (143)  |  Sight (47)  |  Solution (211)  |  Space (257)  |  Speak (90)  |  Stand Out (2)  |  Strange (94)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Tell (110)  |  Transform (35)  |  Visible (37)  |  Vision (94)  |  Word (299)

As in the domains of practical life so likewise in science there has come about a division of labor. The individual can no longer control the whole field of mathematics: it is only possible for him to master separate parts of it in such a manner as to enable him to extend the boundaries of knowledge by creative research.
In Die reine Mathematik in den Jahren 1884-99, 10. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Boundary (38)  |  Control (111)  |  Creative (58)  |  Division (33)  |  Enable (44)  |  Extend (41)  |  Field (170)  |  Individual (215)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Labor (71)  |  Life (1124)  |  Manner (57)  |  Master (93)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Part (220)  |  Possible (155)  |  Practical (129)  |  Research (589)  |  Science (2043)  |  Separate (69)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)

At the sight of a single bone, of a single piece of bone, I recognize and reconstruct the portion of the whole from which it would have been taken. The whole being to which this fragment belonged appears in my mind's eye.
Cited by Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Comptes-Rendus de l’Académie des Sciences. 1837, 7, 116. Trans. Franck Bourdier, 'Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire versus Cuvier: The Campaign for Paleontological Evolution (1825- 1838)', Cecil J. Schneer (ed.), Toward a History of Geology (1969), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Being (41)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Bone (63)  |  Eye (218)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Mind (743)  |  Mind’s Eye (2)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Piece (38)  |  Portion (24)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Reconstruction (13)  |  Sight (47)  |  Single (119)

Besides accustoming the student to demand, complete proof, and to know when he has not obtained it, mathematical studies are of immense benefit to his education by habituating him to precision. It is one of the peculiar excellencies of mathematical discipline, that the mathematician is never satisfied with à peu près. He requires the exact truth. Hardly any of the non-mathematical sciences, except chemistry, has this advantage. One of the commonest modes of loose thought, and sources of error both in opinion and in practice, is to overlook the importance of quantities. Mathematicians and chemists are taught by the whole course of their studies, that the most fundamental difference of quality depends on some very slight difference in proportional quantity; and that from the qualities of the influencing elements, without careful attention to their quantities, false expectation would constantly be formed as to the very nature and essential character of the result produced.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 611. [The French phrase, à peu près means “approximately”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (9)  |  Advantage (73)  |  Approximate (10)  |  Attention (115)  |  Benefit (72)  |  Careful (24)  |  Character (115)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Complete (84)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Course (83)  |  Demand (74)  |  Depend (87)  |  Difference (246)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Education (333)  |  Element (162)  |  Essential (115)  |  Exact (64)  |  Excellence (33)  |  Expectation (54)  |  False (98)  |  Form (308)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Immense (42)  |  Importance (216)  |  Influence (137)  |  Know (547)  |  Loose (14)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mode (40)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Peculiar (43)  |  Practice (92)  |  Precision (50)  |  Produce (100)  |  Proof (243)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Quality (93)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Require (79)  |  Result (376)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (2043)  |  Slight (31)  |  Source Of Error (2)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Teach (179)  |  Thought (536)  |  Truth (914)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)

Bottom trawling is a ghastly process that brings untold damage to sea beds that support ocean life. It’s akin to using a bulldozer to catch a butterfly, destroying a whole ecosystem for the sake of a few pounds of protein. We wouldn’t do this on land, so why do it in the oceans?
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bulldozer (6)  |  Butterfly (20)  |  Catch (30)  |  Damage (28)  |  Destroy (80)  |  Ecosystem (21)  |  Environment (180)  |  Ghastly (4)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1124)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Pound (13)  |  Process (261)  |  Protein (44)  |  Trawling (6)  |  Untold (6)

Collective unity is not the result of the brotherly love of the faithful for each other. The loyalty of the true believer is to the whole—the church, party, nation—and not to his fellow true believer. True loyalty between individuals is possible only in a loose and relatively free society.
In The True Believer (1951), 122
Science quotes on:  |  Believer (11)  |  Brotherly (2)  |  Church (34)  |  Collective (18)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Free (90)  |  Individual (215)  |  Loose (14)  |  Love (222)  |  Loyalty (8)  |  Nation (132)  |  Party (18)  |  Possible (155)  |  Relatively (6)  |  Result (376)  |  Society (227)  |  True (201)  |  Unity (53)

Degree is much: the whole Atlantic might be lukewarm and never boil us a potato.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Atlantic (8)  |  Boil (15)  |  Degree (81)  |  Lukewarm (2)  |  Potato (7)

Discoveries are not generally made in the order of their scientific arrangement: their connexions and relations are made out gradually; and it is only when the fermentation of invention has subsided that the whole clears into simplicity and order.
In 'The Equilibrium of Forces on a Point', Elementary Treatise on Mechanics (1819), Vol. 1, Preface, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (58)  |  Clear (97)  |  Connection (107)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Fermentation (14)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Invention (318)  |  Order (239)  |  Relation (149)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Subside (5)

Dissection ... teaches us that the body of man is made up of certain kinds of material, so differing from each other in optical and other physical characters and so built up together as to give the body certain structural features. Chemical examination further teaches us that these kinds of material are composed of various chemical substances, a large number of which have this characteristic that they possess a considerable amount of potential energy capable of being set free, rendered actual, by oxidation or some other chemical change. Thus the body as a whole may, from a chemical point of view, be considered as a mass of various chemical substances, representing altogether a considerable capital of potential energy.
From Introduction to A Text Book of Physiology (1876, 1891), Book 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (47)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Body (243)  |  Capable (49)  |  Capital (15)  |  Character (115)  |  Characteristic (94)  |  Chemical (79)  |  Chemical Change (4)  |  Compose (17)  |  Consider (80)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Dissection (28)  |  Examination (65)  |  Free (90)  |  Made (14)  |  Mass (78)  |  Material (154)  |  Optical (3)  |  Oxidation (6)  |  Physical (129)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Point Of View (41)  |  Potential Energy (3)  |  Render (30)  |  Represent (41)  |  Set (97)  |  Structural (8)  |  Various (46)

Dr. M.L. von Franz has explained the circle (or sphere) as a symbol of Self. It expresses the totality of the psyche in all its aspects, including the relationship between man and the whole of nature. It always points to the single most vital aspect of life, its ultimate wholeness.
In Aniela Jaffé, 'Symbolism in the Visual Arts', collected in Carl Jung (ed.), Man and His Symbols (1964, 1968), 266.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (57)  |  Circle (55)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Express (63)  |  Marie-Louise von Franz (2)  |  Life (1124)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Psyche (9)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Self (47)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Totality (10)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Vital (38)  |  Wholeness (7)

Euclid always contemplates a straight line as drawn between two definite points, and is very careful to mention when it is to be produced beyond this segment. He never thinks of the line as an entity given once for all as a whole. This careful definition and limitation, so as to exclude an infinity not immediately apparent to the senses, was very characteristic of the Greeks in all their many activities. It is enshrined in the difference between Greek architecture and Gothic architecture, and between Greek religion and modern religion. The spire of a Gothic cathedral and the importance of the unbounded straight line in modern Geometry are both emblematic of the transformation of the modern world.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Architecture (43)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Both (81)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cathedral (15)  |  Characteristic (94)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Definite (42)  |  Definition (191)  |  Difference (246)  |  Draw (55)  |  Enshrine (2)  |  Entity (31)  |  Euclid (52)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  Gothic (3)  |  Greek (71)  |  Immediately (21)  |  Importance (216)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Limitation (30)  |  Line (89)  |  Mention (23)  |  Modern (159)  |  Modern Mathematics (36)  |  Modern World (3)  |  Point (122)  |  Produce (100)  |  Religion (239)  |  Segment (6)  |  Sense (315)  |  Spire (5)  |  Straight Line (17)  |  Think (341)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Unbounded (5)

Euler was a believer in God, downright and straightforward. The following story is told by Thiebault, in his Souvenirs de vingt ans de séjour à Berlin, … Thiebault says that he has no personal knowledge of the truth of the story, but that it was believed throughout the whole of the north of Europe. Diderot paid a visit to the Russian Court at the invitation of the Empress. He conversed very freely, and gave the younger members of the Court circle a good deal of lively atheism. The Empress was much amused, but some of her counsellors suggested that it might be desirable to check these expositions of doctrine. The Empress did not like to put a direct muzzle on her guest’s tongue, so the following plot was contrived. Diderot was informed that a learned mathematician was in possession of an algebraical demonstration of the existence of God, and would give it him before all the Court, if he desired to hear it. Diderot gladly consented: though the name of the mathematician is not given, it was Euler. He advanced toward Diderot, and said gravely, and in a tone of perfect conviction:
Monsieur, (a + bn) / n = x, donc Dieu existe; repondez!

Diderot, to whom algebra was Hebrew, was embarrassed and disconcerted; while peals of laughter rose on all sides. He asked permission to return to France at once, which was granted.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1878), 251. [The declaration in French expresses, “therefore God exists; please answer!” This Euler-Diderot anecdote, as embellished by De Morgan, is generally regarded as entirely fictional. Diderot before he became an encyclopedist was an accomplished mathematician and fully capable of recognizing—and responding to—the absurdity of an algebraic expression in proving the existence of God. See B.H. Brown, 'The Euler-Diderot Anecdote', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1942), 49, No. 5, 392-303. —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (162)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Amused (3)  |  Atheism (8)  |  Belief (503)  |  Believer (11)  |  Check (24)  |  Circle (55)  |  Consent (10)  |  Contrive (6)  |  Converse (7)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Court (20)  |  Deal (49)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Desire (140)  |  Denis Diderot (6)  |  Direct (82)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Leonhard Euler (34)  |  Europe (42)  |  Existence (296)  |  Exposition (13)  |  Follow (123)  |  France (26)  |  Freely (13)  |  Gladly (2)  |  God (535)  |  Good (345)  |  Grant (32)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Guest (5)  |  Hear (60)  |  Hebrew (6)  |  Inform (16)  |  Invitation (10)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Laughter (23)  |  Learn (281)  |  Lively (7)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Member (39)  |  Name (165)  |  North (11)  |  Peal (2)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Permission (7)  |  Personal (66)  |  Plot (10)  |  Possession (45)  |  Return (55)  |  Russia (13)  |  Story (72)  |  Straightforward (7)  |  Suggest (32)  |  Tell (110)  |  Tone (10)  |  Tongue (19)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (914)  |  Visit (26)  |  Young (98)

Every situation, every moment—is of infinite worth; for it is the representative of a whole eternity.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 166
Science quotes on:  |  Eternity (49)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Moment (106)  |  Representative (13)  |  Situation (52)  |  Worth (97)

Every writer must reconcile, as best he may, the conflicting claims of consistency and variety, of rigour in detail and elegance in the whole. The present author humbly confesses that, to him, geometry is nothing at all, if not a branch of art.
Concluding remark in preface to Treatise on Algebraic Plane Curves (1931), x.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (284)  |  Author (61)  |  Branch (102)  |  Claim (70)  |  Conflicting (3)  |  Consistency (23)  |  Detail (85)  |  Elegance (29)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Humbly (2)  |  Reconcile (12)  |  Rigour (16)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Variety (69)  |  Writer (45)

Evolution is a process which favors cooperating rather than disoperating groups and that “fitness” is a function of the group as a whole than of separate individuals. The fitness of the individual is largely derived from his membership on a group.
In On Being Human (1950), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Cooperation (30)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Favor (30)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Group (72)  |  Individual (215)  |  Membership (5)  |  Process (261)

Martin Luther King quote: Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.
Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.
Epigraph (without citation) in Pia Hansen, Mathematics Coaching Handbook: Working with Teachers to Improve Instruction (2009), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Faith (157)  |  First (313)  |  See (369)  |  Step (109)

Few will deny that even in the first scientific instruction in mathematics the most rigorous method is to be given preference over all others. Especially will every teacher prefer a consistent proof to one which is based on fallacies or proceeds in a vicious circle, indeed it will be morally impossible for the teacher to present a proof of the latter kind consciously and thus in a sense deceive his pupils. Notwithstanding these objectionable so-called proofs, so far as the foundation and the development of the system is concerned, predominate in our textbooks to the present time. Perhaps it will be answered, that rigorous proof is found too difficult for the pupil’s power of comprehension. Should this be anywhere the case,—which would only indicate some defect in the plan or treatment of the whole,—the only remedy would be to merely state the theorem in a historic way, and forego a proof with the frank confession that no proof has been found which could be comprehended by the pupil; a remedy which is ever doubtful and should only be applied in the case of extreme necessity. But this remedy is to be preferred to a proof which is no proof, and is therefore either wholly unintelligible to the pupil, or deceives him with an appearance of knowledge which opens the door to all superficiality and lack of scientific method.
In 'Stücke aus dem Lehrbuche der Arithmetik', Werke, Bd. 2 (1904), 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Appearance (85)  |  Apply (76)  |  Base (71)  |  Case (98)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Concern (108)  |  Confession (6)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Consistent (17)  |  Deceive (16)  |  Defect (15)  |  Deny (41)  |  Development (276)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Door (38)  |  Doubtful (9)  |  Especially (30)  |  Extreme (54)  |  Fallacy (25)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (405)  |  First (313)  |  Forego (3)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Frank (4)  |  Give (200)  |  Historic (7)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Indicate (18)  |  Instruction (72)  |  Kind (138)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Lack (77)  |  Latter (21)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (230)  |  Morally (2)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Open (66)  |  Plan (87)  |  Power (358)  |  Predominate (5)  |  Prefer (24)  |  Preference (21)  |  Present (174)  |  Proceed (41)  |  Proof (243)  |  Pupil (31)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Sense (315)  |  So-Called (21)  |  State (136)  |  Superficiality (4)  |  System (191)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Time (594)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Unintelligible (9)  |  Vicious Circle (2)  |  Wholly (12)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Accomplishment (79)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (29)  |  Application (166)  |  Attention (115)  |  Author (61)  |  Base (71)  |  Basis (89)  |  Begin (106)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (98)  |  Completely (32)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Correct (83)  |  Course (83)  |  Danger (78)  |  Decade (32)  |  Development (276)  |  Difficult (116)  |  End (195)  |  Essential (115)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  Extent (49)  |  Extreme (54)  |  Follow (123)  |  Former (25)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (25)  |  Framework (20)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Grammar (13)  |  Harness (19)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (92)  |  Implant (3)  |  Important (202)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Inquire (9)  |  Instruction (72)  |  Interest (235)  |  Introduction (34)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (217)  |  Leave (127)  |  Logic (247)  |  Lose (93)  |  Majority (42)  |  Mastery (27)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Matter (340)  |  Middle (15)  |  Modern (159)  |  Need (283)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (15)  |  Permit (30)  |  Point (122)  |  Possible (155)  |  Premise (25)  |  Proper (36)  |  Psychological (12)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Pursue (21)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (454)  |  Receive (59)  |  Recommend (7)  |  Rigid (12)  |  Secure (20)  |  Sense (315)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (49)  |  Sharpen (15)  |  Side (51)  |  Solid (50)  |  Starting Point (13)  |  Student (201)  |  Stunt (3)  |  Subject (235)  |  Success (248)  |  Swing (10)  |  Teach (179)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Tendency (54)  |  Think (341)  |  Transition (18)  |  True (201)  |  Understand (326)  |  Want (175)  |  Wise (60)  |  World (892)  |  Young (98)

For scientific endeavor is a natural whole the parts of which mutually support one another in a way which, to be sure, no one can anticipate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (10)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Natural (167)  |  Part (220)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Support (77)

For the saving the long progression of the thoughts to remote and first principles in every case, the mind should provide itself several stages; that is to say, intermediate principles, which it might have recourse to in the examining those positions that come in its way. These, though they are not self-evident principles, yet, if they have been made out from them by a wary and unquestionable deduction, may be depended on as certain and infallible truths, and serve as unquestionable truths to prove other points depending upon them, by a nearer and shorter view than remote and general maxims. … And thus mathematicians do, who do not in every new problem run it back to the first axioms through all the whole train of intermediate propositions. Certain theorems that they have settled to themselves upon sure demonstration, serve to resolve to them multitudes of propositions which depend on them, and are as firmly made out from thence as if the mind went afresh over every link of the whole chain that tie them to first self-evident principles.
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Afresh (4)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Back (104)  |  Case (98)  |  Certain (125)  |  Chain (50)  |  Deduction (68)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Depend (87)  |  Examine (44)  |  Firmly (6)  |  First (313)  |  General (156)  |  Infallible (8)  |  Intermediate (20)  |  Link (41)  |  Long (172)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Maxim (17)  |  Mind (743)  |  Multitude (20)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  New (483)  |  Point (122)  |  Position (75)  |  Principle (285)  |  Problem (490)  |  Progression (12)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Prove (108)  |  Provide (68)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Remote (39)  |  Resolve (19)  |  Run (57)  |  Save (56)  |  Self-Evident (12)  |  Serve (57)  |  Settle (18)  |  Several (31)  |  Short (49)  |  Stage (54)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Thought (536)  |  Tie (23)  |  Train (45)  |  Truth (914)  |  Unquestionable (8)  |  View (171)  |  Wary (3)

For they are, in truth, textbooks of life: they gather outer and inner experiences into a general and connected whole.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Connected (8)  |  Experience (338)  |  General (156)  |  Inner (39)  |  Life (1124)  |  Outer (13)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Truth (914)

For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?
Bible
Mark 8:36. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 17
Science quotes on:  |  Gain (67)  |  Lose (93)  |  Profit (38)  |  Soul (163)  |  World (892)

Geologists on the whole are inconsistent drivers. When a roadcut presents itself, they tend to lurch and weave. To them, the roadcut is a portal, a fragment of a regional story, a proscenium arch that leads their imaginations into the earth and through the surrounding terrane.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Arch (7)  |  Driver (5)  |  Earth (635)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Inconsistent (8)  |  Lead (158)  |  Portal (4)  |  Present (174)  |  Story (72)  |  Surround (29)  |  Tend (36)  |  Weave (11)

Great Empedocles, that ardent soul,
Leapt into Etna and was roasted whole.
Anonymous
As quoted, from an unknown poet, in Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy (1946), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Ardent (6)  |  Empedocles (10)  |  Etna (2)  |  Great (524)  |  Leap (34)  |  Roasted (2)  |  Soul (163)  |  Suicide (18)  |  Volcano (39)

He who has mastered the Darwinian theory, he who recognizes the slow and subtle process of evolution as the way in which God makes things come to pass, … sees that in the deadly struggle for existence that has raged throughout countless aeons of time, the whole creation has been groaning and travailing together in order to bring forth that last consummate specimen of God’s handiwork, the Human Soul
In The Destiny of Man Viewed in the Light of his Origin (1884), 32. Collected in Studies in Religion (1902), 19–20.
Science quotes on:  |  Consummate (4)  |  Countless (21)  |  Creation (239)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Deadly (10)  |  Eon (11)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Existence (296)  |  God (535)  |  Groan (4)  |  Handiwork (6)  |  Human (548)  |  Master (93)  |  Pass (91)  |  Process (261)  |  Rage (9)  |  Recognize (66)  |  See (369)  |  Slow (55)  |  Soul (163)  |  Specimen (17)  |  Struggle (77)  |  Subtle (33)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (38)  |  Theory (690)  |  Time (594)  |  Travail (4)

Humans everywhere share the same goals when the context is large enough. And the study of the Cosmos provides the largest possible context … . If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another … . If we are to survive, our loyalties must be broadened further, to include the whole human community, the entire planet Earth.
Cosmos
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (62)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Community (81)  |  Context (22)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Earth (635)  |  Entire (46)  |  Everywhere (24)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (405)  |  Galaxy (46)  |  Goal (100)  |  Human (548)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Include (40)  |  Large (130)  |  Let (61)  |  Live (269)  |  Loyalty (8)  |  Planet (262)  |  Possible (155)  |  Provide (68)  |  Same (155)  |  Share (49)  |  Study (461)  |  Survive (46)

I am truly a ‘lone traveler’ and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties, I have never lost a sense of distance and a need for solitude.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (144)  |  Distance (76)  |  Face (108)  |  Family (45)  |  Friend (85)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (83)  |  Immediate (43)  |  Lone (2)  |  Lose (93)  |  Need (283)  |  Sense (315)  |  Solitude (11)  |  Tie (23)  |  Traveler (26)  |  Truly (33)

I do not intend to go deeply into the question how far mathematical studies, as the representatives of conscious logical reasoning, should take a more important place in school education. But it is, in reality, one of the questions of the day. In proportion as the range of science extends, its system and organization must be improved, and it must inevitably come about that individual students will find themselves compelled to go through a stricter course of training than grammar is in a position to supply. What strikes me in my own experience with students who pass from our classical schools to scientific and medical studies, is first, a certain laxity in the application of strictly universal laws. The grammatical rules, in which they have been exercised, are for the most part followed by long lists of exceptions; accordingly they are not in the habit of relying implicitly on the certainty of a legitimate deduction from a strictly universal law. Secondly, I find them for the most part too much inclined to trust to authority, even in cases where they might form an independent judgment. In fact, in philological studies, inasmuch as it is seldom possible to take in the whole of the premises at a glance, and inasmuch as the decision of disputed questions often depends on an aesthetic feeling for beauty of expression, or for the genius of the language, attainable only by long training, it must often happen that the student is referred to authorities even by the best teachers. Both faults are traceable to certain indolence and vagueness of thought, the sad effects of which are not confined to subsequent scientific studies. But certainly the best remedy for both is to be found in mathematics, where there is absolute certainty in the reasoning, and no authority is recognized but that of one’s own intelligence.
In 'On the Relation of Natural Science to Science in general', Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects, translated by E. Atkinson (1900), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Aesthetic (34)  |  Application (166)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Authority (65)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Best (172)  |  Both (81)  |  Case (98)  |  Certain (125)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Certainty (129)  |  Classical (16)  |  Compel (20)  |  Confine (24)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Course (83)  |  Decision (72)  |  Deduction (68)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Depend (87)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Education (333)  |  Effect (165)  |  Exception (39)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Experience (338)  |  Expression (104)  |  Extend (41)  |  Fact (725)  |  Far (154)  |  Fault (33)  |  Feel (165)  |  Find (405)  |  First (313)  |  Follow (123)  |  Form (308)  |  Genius (243)  |  Glance (19)  |  Grammar (13)  |  Grammatical (2)  |  Habit (107)  |  Happen (82)  |  Important (202)  |  Improve (54)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Independent (65)  |  Individual (215)  |  Indolence (7)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Intend (16)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Language (217)  |  Legitimate (14)  |  List (10)  |  Logical (54)  |  Long (172)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Medical (24)  |  Often (106)  |  Organization (84)  |  Part (220)  |  Pass (91)  |  Philological (3)  |  Place (174)  |  Position (75)  |  Possible (155)  |  Premise (25)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Question (404)  |  Range (57)  |  Reality (188)  |  Reason (454)  |  Recognize (66)  |  Refer (13)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Representative (13)  |  Rule (173)  |  Sadness (34)  |  School (117)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Seldom (28)  |  Strict (16)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (39)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Supply (46)  |  System (191)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Thought (536)  |  Traceable (2)  |  Training (64)  |  Trust (49)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Vagueness (10)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)

I do not see any reason to assume that the heuristic significance of the principle of general relativity is restricted to gravitation and that the rest of physics can be dealt with separately on the basis of special relativity, with the hope that later on the whole may be fitted consistently into a general relativistic scheme. I do not think that such an attitude, although historically understandable, can be objectively justified. The comparative smallness of what we know today as gravitational effects is not a conclusive reason for ignoring the principle of general relativity in theoretical investigations of a fundamental character. In other words, I do not believe that it is justifiable to ask: What would physics look like without gravitation?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (157)  |  Assume (37)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Basis (89)  |  Belief (503)  |  Character (115)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Conclusive (7)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Deal (49)  |  Effect (165)  |  Fit (48)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  General (156)  |  General Relativity (5)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Heuristic (4)  |  Historically (3)  |  Hope (174)  |  Ignore (30)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Justifiable (3)  |  Justify (23)  |  Know (547)  |  Late (52)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Physics (346)  |  Principle (285)  |  Reason (454)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Rest (93)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Scheme (25)  |  See (369)  |  Significance (71)  |  Smallness (5)  |  Special Relativity (5)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Think (341)  |  Today (117)  |  Understandable (4)

I fear that the character of my knowledge is from year to year becoming more distinct and scientific; that, in exchange for vistas wide as heaven’s scope, I am being narrowed down to the field of the microscope. I see details, not wholes nor the shadow of the whole. I count some parts, and say, “I know.”
(19 Aug 1851). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: II: 1850-September 15, 1851 (1906), 406.
Science quotes on:  |  Count (48)  |  Detail (85)  |  Heavens (18)  |  Know (547)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Part (220)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Scope (23)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Vista (6)

I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild duck; and this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parents.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (38)  |  Bone (63)  |  Change (363)  |  Domestic (13)  |  Duck (3)  |  Find (405)  |  Fly (99)  |  Leg (18)  |  Parent (45)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Skeleton (18)  |  Walk (67)  |  Weight (75)  |  Wild (48)  |  Wing (48)

I gang my own gait and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties I have never lost an obstinate sense of detachment, of the need for solitude–a feeling which increases with the years.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (144)  |  Detachment (7)  |  Face (108)  |  Family (45)  |  Feel (165)  |  Friend (85)  |  Gang (4)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (83)  |  Immediate (43)  |  Increase (145)  |  Lose (93)  |  Need (283)  |  Obstinate (5)  |  Sense (315)  |  Solitude (11)  |  Tie (23)  |  Year (299)

I had a dislike for [mathematics], and ... was hopelessly short in algebra. ... [One extraordinary teacher of mathematics] got the whole year's course into me in exactly six [after-school] lessons of half an hour each. And how? More accurately, why? Simply because he was an algebra fanatic—because he believed that algebra was not only a science of the utmost importance, but also one of the greatest fascination. ... [H]e convinced me in twenty minutes that ignorance of algebra was as calamitous, socially and intellectually, as ignorance of table manners—That acquiring its elements was as necessary as washing behind the ears. So I fell upon the book and gulped it voraciously. ... To this day I comprehend the binomial theorem.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 261-262.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken's Recollections of School Algebra.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (41)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Binomial (2)  |  Book (257)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Course (83)  |  Ear (25)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Fanatic (7)  |  Fascination (28)  |  Greatest (62)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Half (56)  |  Hopelessness (5)  |  Hour (71)  |  How (3)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Importance (216)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Manners (3)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Minute (43)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Society (227)  |  Table (35)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Utmost (11)  |  Washing (3)  |  Why (6)  |  Year (299)

I then bequeath the whole of my property … to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
From the will of James Smithson written on 23 Oct 1826. (The amount excluded a modest lifetime annuity to a former faithful servant.) Smithson willed his estate firstly to his nephew, but it was to be bequeathed to the U.S. in the case his nephew died without heir—which did come to pass in 1835. Smithson included no further instructions concerning the Smithsonian Institution.
Science quotes on:  |  America (87)  |  Bequeath (2)  |  Diffusion (7)  |  Establishment (34)  |  Increase (145)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Property (123)  |  United States (31)  |  Washington (5)

I thought that the wisdom of our City had certainly designed the laudable practice of taking and distributing these accompts [parish records of christenings and deaths] for other and greater uses than [merely casual comments], or, at least, that some other uses might be made of them; and thereupon I ... could, and (to be short) to furnish myself with as much matter of that kind ... the which when I had reduced into tables ... so as to have a view of the whole together, in order to the more ready comparing of one Year, Season, Parish, or other Division of the City, with another, in respect of all Burials and Christnings, and of all the Diseases and Casualties happening in each of them respectively...
Moreover, finding some Truths and not-commonly-believed opinions to arise from my meditations upon these neglected Papers, I proceeded further to consider what benefit the knowledge of the same would bring to the world, ... with some real fruit from those ayrie blossoms.
From Natural and Political Observations Mentioned in a Following Index and Made upon Bills of Mortality (1662), Preface. Reproduced in Cornelius Walford, The Insurance Cyclopaedia (1871), Vol. 1, 286-287.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Benefit (72)  |  Burial (7)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Data (120)  |  Disease (275)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Meditation (12)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Season (26)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Table (35)  |  Together (77)  |  Truth (914)  |  Use (76)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  Year (299)

I was working with these very long-chain … extended-chain polymers, where you had a lot of benzene rings in them. … Transforming a polymer solution from a liquid to a fiber requires a process called spinning. … We spun it and it spun beautifully. It [Kevlar] was very strong and very stiff—unlike anything we had made before. I knew that I had made a discovery. I didn’t shout “Eureka!” but I was very excited, as was the whole laboratory excited, and management was excited, because we were looking for something new. Something different. And this was it.
From transcript for video interview (2007, published Aug 2012), 'Stephanie Kwolek: Curiosity and the Discovery of Kevlar', in the series Women in Chemistry, on Chemical Heritage Foundation website.
Science quotes on:  |  Benzene (4)  |  Different (178)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Eureka (6)  |  Excitement (40)  |  Fiber (10)  |  Invention (318)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Looking (26)  |  Management (12)  |  New (483)  |  Polymer (3)  |  Requirement (46)  |  Research (589)  |  Ring (16)  |  Shout (12)  |  Solution (211)  |  Spinning (8)  |  Stiff (3)  |  Strong (72)  |  Transforming (4)

If a mathematician of the past, an Archimedes or even a Descartes, could view the field of geometry in its present condition, the first feature to impress him would be its lack of concreteness. There are whole classes of geometric theories which proceed not only without models and diagrams, but without the slightest (apparent) use of spatial intuition. In the main this is due, to the power of the analytic instruments of investigations as compared with the purely geometric.
In 'The Present Problems in Geometry', Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1906), 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Analytic (10)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Archimedes (53)  |  Class (83)  |  Compare (37)  |  Concreteness (4)  |  Condition (160)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Due (20)  |  Feature (43)  |  Field (170)  |  First (313)  |  Geometric (5)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Impress (16)  |  Instrument (92)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Lack (77)  |  Main (27)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Model (80)  |  Modern Mathematics (36)  |  Past (150)  |  Power (358)  |  Present (174)  |  Proceed (41)  |  Purely (28)  |  Slight (31)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Theory (690)  |  View (171)

If I have put the case of science at all correctly, the reader will have recognised that modern science does much more than demand that it shall be left in undisturbed possession of what the theologian and metaphysician please to term its “legitimate field.” It claims that the whole range of phenomena, mental as well as physical—the entire universe—is its field. It asserts that the scientific method is the sole gateway to the whole region of knowledge.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (32)  |  Case (98)  |  Claim (70)  |  Correction (31)  |  Demand (74)  |  Field (170)  |  Gateway (4)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Left (13)  |  Legitimate (14)  |  Metaphysician (7)  |  Mind (743)  |  Modern Science (17)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Possession (45)  |  Range (57)  |  Reader (38)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Region (35)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Sole (20)  |  Term (120)  |  Theologian (15)  |  Undisturbed (3)  |  Universe (683)

If it be true, that some Chymists have now and then converted Lead into Gold, it was by just such a hazard, as if a man should let fall a handful of sand upon a table and the particles of it should be so ranged that we could read distinctly on it a whole page of Virgil’s Ænead.
In Traité de Physique, (1671, 1676), Part. 3, Chap. 6, 186. As translated in Rohault’s System of Natural Philosophy (1723), Part 3, Chap. 6, 154. From the original French, “Que s’il est vray que quelques Chymistes ayent autrefois converty du plomb en or, ça esté par un hazard aussi grand, que si ayant laissé tomber de haut une poignée de sable sur une table, ses gains s'estoient tellement rangez, qu'on y pût lire distinctement une page de l'Eneide de Virgile.”
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (17)  |  Chance (159)  |  Convert (22)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Fall (119)  |  Gold (68)  |  Handful (8)  |  Hazard (15)  |  Lead (158)  |  Let (61)  |  Page (27)  |  Particle (99)  |  Probability (106)  |  Read (144)  |  Sand (34)  |  Spread (33)  |  Table (35)  |  Transmutation (17)  |  Virgil (6)

If the question were, “What ought to be the next objective in science?” my answer would be the teaching of science to the young, so that when the whole population grew up there would be a far more general background of common sense, based on a knowledge of the real meaning of the scientific method of discovering truth.
Marion Savin Selections from the Scientific Correspondence of Elihu Thomson (1971), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Background (30)  |  Base (71)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Discovery (676)  |  General (156)  |  Growth (122)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Next (35)  |  Objective (63)  |  Population (78)  |  Question (404)  |  Real (148)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Teaching (107)  |  Truth (914)  |  Young (98)

If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark would be without meaning.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Creature (154)  |  Dark (76)  |  Eye (218)  |  Find (405)  |  Know (547)  |  Light (345)  |  Mean (101)  |  Universe (683)

If we range through the whole territory of nature, and endeavour to extract from each department the rich stores of knowledge and pleasure they respectively contain, we shall not find a more refined or purer source of amusement, or a more interesting and unfailing subject for recreation, than that which the observation and examination of the structure, affinities, and habits of plants and vegetables, afford.
In A Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Dahlia (1838), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (14)  |  Amusement (23)  |  Botany (51)  |  Containing (4)  |  Department (47)  |  Endeavour (25)  |  Examination (65)  |  Extraction (7)  |  Find (405)  |  Habit (107)  |  Interesting (48)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Observation (445)  |  Plant (199)  |  Pleasure (130)  |  Purity (14)  |  Range (57)  |  Recreation (19)  |  Refined (7)  |  Respectively (2)  |  Rich (61)  |  Source (90)  |  Store (21)  |  Structure (221)  |  Subject (235)  |  Territory (16)  |  Unfailing (4)  |  Vegetable (22)

If you look right, you can see the whole world from wherever you happen to be.
As quoted by Karin Lipson in 'The World's Wonders, In an Ecologist's Eyes', New York Times (27 Feb 2011), LI 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Look (52)  |  Right (196)  |  See (369)  |  Wherever (6)  |  World (892)

If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world is a garden.
The Secret Garden. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 22
Science quotes on:  |  Garden (33)  |  Right (196)  |  See (369)  |  World (892)

If you're overfishing at the top of the food chain, and acidifying the ocean at the bottom, you're creating a squeeze that could conceivably collapse the whole system.
As quoted by Mark Bittman in 'What's Worse Than an Oil Spill?', New York Times (20 Apr 2011), A23.
Science quotes on:  |  Acidification (3)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Creation (239)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Squeeze (6)  |  System (191)  |  Top (34)

If, unwarned by my example, any man shall undertake and shall succeed in really constructing an engine embodying in itself the whole of the executive department of mathematical analysis upon different principles or by simpler mechanical means, I have no fear of leaving my reputation in his charge, for he alone will be fully able to appreciate the nature of my efforts and the value of their results.
In Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864), 450.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Appreciate (29)  |  Charge (34)  |  Construct (40)  |  Department (47)  |  Different (178)  |  Effort (143)  |  Embody (16)  |  Engine (29)  |  Example (92)  |  Executive (3)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Means (171)  |  Mechanical (48)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Principle (285)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Result (376)  |  Simpler (8)  |  Succeed (26)  |  Undertake (20)  |  Value (240)  |  Warning (10)

In all things which have a plurality of parts, and which are not a total aggregate but a whole of some sort distinct from the parts, there is some cause.
[Often paraphrased as: The whole is more than the sum of its parts.]
Aristotle
Metaphysics, Book 8, 1045a, as translated by Hugh Tredennick. The subject quote is often seen misinterpreted as, “The whole is more than the sum of its parts,” but this is not a verbal quote by Aristotle; it is not found as a sentence like that in any of Aristotle's writings. For a discussion refuting that the wording of the shorter paraphrase was written by Aristotle, see Shelia Guberman and Gianfranco Minati, Dialogue about Systems (2007), section C.4, 181. An alternate translation, by W.D. Ross, is on p.182.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (14)  |  Cause (283)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Part (220)  |  Plurality (5)  |  Sort (49)  |  Thing (37)  |  Total (36)

In Euclid each proposition stands by itself; its connection with others is never indicated; the leading ideas contained in its proof are not stated; general principles do not exist. In modern methods, on the other hand, the greatest importance is attached to the leading thoughts which pervade the whole; and general principles, which bring whole groups of theorems under one aspect, are given rather than separate propositions. The whole tendency is toward generalization. A straight line is considered as given in its entirety, extending both ways to infinity, while Euclid is very careful never to admit anything but finite quantities. The treatment of the infinite is in fact another fundamental difference between the two methods. Euclid avoids it, in modern mathematics it is systematically introduced, for only thus is generality obtained.
In 'Geometry', Encyclopedia Britannica (9th edition).
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (44)  |  Aspect (57)  |  Attach (13)  |  Avoid (52)  |  Both (81)  |  Bring (90)  |  Careful (24)  |  Connection (107)  |  Consider (80)  |  Contain (67)  |  Difference (246)  |  Entirety (4)  |  Euclid (52)  |  Exist (147)  |  Extend (41)  |  Fact (725)  |  Finite (31)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  General (156)  |  Generality (34)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Give (200)  |  Great (524)  |  Group (72)  |  Idea (577)  |  Importance (216)  |  Indicate (18)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Introduce (41)  |  Lead (158)  |  Method (230)  |  Modern (159)  |  Modern Mathematics (36)  |  Obtain (45)  |  On The Other Hand (32)  |  Pervade (9)  |  Principle (285)  |  Proof (243)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Separate (69)  |  Stand (107)  |  State (136)  |  Straight Line (17)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Tendency (54)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Thought (536)  |  Toward (45)  |  Treatment (100)

In mathematics it is notorious that we start from absurdities to reach a realm of law, and our whole (mathematical) conception of the world is based on a foundation which we believe to have no existence.
In The Dance of Life (1923), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (21)  |  Base (71)  |  Belief (503)  |  Conception (88)  |  Existence (296)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Law (513)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Notorious (8)  |  Reach (119)  |  Realm (54)  |  Start (97)  |  World (892)

In modern Europe, the Middle Ages were called the Dark Ages. Who dares to call them so now? … Their Dante and Alfred and Wickliffe and Abelard and Bacon; their Magna Charta, decimal numbers, mariner’s compass, gunpowder, glass, paper, and clocks; chemistry, algebra, astronomy; their Gothic architecture, their painting,—are the delight and tuition of ours. Six hundred years ago Roger Bacon explained the precession of the equinoxes, and the necessity of reform in the calendar; looking over how many horizons as far as into Liverpool and New York, he announced that machines can be constructed to drive ships more rapidly than a whole galley of rowers could do, nor would they need anything but a pilot to steer; carriages, to move with incredible speed, without aid of animals; and machines to fly into the air like birds.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Peter Abelard (3)  |  Aid (41)  |  Air (188)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Animal (356)  |  Announce (9)  |  Architecture (43)  |  Astronomy (203)  |  Roger Bacon (20)  |  Bird (119)  |  Calendar (5)  |  Call (127)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Clock (29)  |  Compass (24)  |  Construct (40)  |  Dante Alighieri (9)  |  Dare (30)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Decimal (14)  |  Delight (64)  |  Drive (55)  |  Equinox (4)  |  Europe (42)  |  Explain (105)  |  Far (154)  |  Fly (99)  |  Glass (44)  |  Gothic (3)  |  Gunpowder (14)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Incredible (21)  |  Liverpool (3)  |  Looking (26)  |  Machine (157)  |  Magna Carta (3)  |  Mariner (8)  |  Middle Ages (7)  |  Modern (159)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Need (283)  |  New York (15)  |  Number (276)  |  Painting (42)  |  Paper (82)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Precession (2)  |  Rapid (30)  |  Reform (14)  |  Ship (44)  |  Speed (35)  |  Steer (4)  |  Transportation (11)  |  Tuition (2)

In scientific investigations it is grievously wrong to pander to the public’s impatience for results, or to let them think that for discovery it is necessary only to set up a great manufactory and a system of mass production. If in treatment team work is effective, in research it is the individual who counts first and above all. No great thought has ever sprung from anything but a single mind, suddenly conceiving. Throughout the whole world there has been too violent a forcing of the growth of ideas; too feverish a rush to perform experiments and publish conclusions. A year of vacation for calm detachment with all the individual workers thinking it all over in a desert should be proclaimed.
In Viewless Winds: Being the Recollections and Digressions of an Australian Surgeon (1939), 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Calm (22)  |  Conceive (36)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Desert (38)  |  Detachment (7)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Effective (29)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Feverish (3)  |  Force (249)  |  Great (524)  |  Grievous (3)  |  Growth (122)  |  Idea (577)  |  Impatience (12)  |  Individual (215)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Manufactory (2)  |  Mass Production (3)  |  Mind (743)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Pander (3)  |  Perform (34)  |  Proclaim (15)  |  Public (93)  |  Publish (33)  |  Research (589)  |  Result (376)  |  Rush (18)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Set Up (3)  |  Single (119)  |  Spring (70)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  System (191)  |  Teamwork (5)  |  Thought (536)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Vacation (3)  |  Violent (17)  |  Worker (30)  |  World (892)  |  Wrong (138)  |  Year (299)

In some sense, there’s nothing as impractical as astronomy. You could take away the whole astronomical universe, and most people wouldn’t know the difference—except for the sun and maybe the moon.
In interview, Rushworth M. Kidder, 'Grounded in Space Science', Christian Science Monitor (22 Dec 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (203)  |  Difference (246)  |  Impractical (3)  |  Know (547)  |  Moon (199)  |  Nothing (385)  |  People (388)  |  Sun (276)  |  Take Away (5)  |  Universe (683)

In the center of everything rules the sun; for who in this most beautiful temple could place this luminary at another better place whence it can light up the whole at once? ... In this arrangement we thus find an admirable harmony of the world, and a constant harmonious connection between the motion and the size of the orbits as could not be found otherwise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Arrangement (58)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Better (190)  |  Center (34)  |  Connection (107)  |  Constant (56)  |  Everything (180)  |  Find (405)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Harmony (70)  |  Light (345)  |  Luminary (3)  |  Motion (158)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Place (174)  |  Rule (173)  |  Size (60)  |  Sun (276)  |  Temple (25)  |  World (892)

In the whole history of the world there was never a race with less liking for abstract reasoning than the Anglo-Saxon. … Common-sense and compromise are believed in, logical deductions from philosophical principles are looked upon with suspicion, not only by legislators, but by all our most learned professional men.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Anglo-Saxon (2)  |  Belief (503)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Compromise (7)  |  Deduction (68)  |  History (368)  |  Learn (281)  |  Legislator (4)  |  Less (102)  |  Logical (54)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Principle (285)  |  Professional (37)  |  Race (103)  |  Reason (454)  |  Suspicion (28)  |  World (892)

Induction, then, is that operation of the mind by which we infer that what we know to be true in a particular case or cases, will be true in all cases which resemble the former in certain assignable respects. In other words, induction is the process by which we conclude that what is true of certain individuals of a class is true of the whole class, or that what is true at certain times will be true in similar circumstances at all times.
In A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence, and the Methods of Scientific Investigation (1843), Vol. 1, 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (98)  |  Certain (125)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Class (83)  |  Conclude (16)  |  Former (25)  |  Individual (215)  |  Induction (59)  |  Infer (12)  |  Know (547)  |  Mind (743)  |  Operation (118)  |  Particular (75)  |  Process (261)  |  Resemble (26)  |  Respect (86)  |  Similar (35)  |  Time (594)  |  True (201)  |  Word (299)

Inventions and discoveries are of two kinds. The one which we owe to chance, such as those of the mariner’s compass, gunpowder, and in general almost all the discoveries we have made in the arts. The other which we owe to genius: and here we ought to understand by the word discovery, a new combination, or a new relation perceived between certain objects or ideas. A person obtains the title of a man of genius, if the ideas which result from this combination form one grand whole, are fruitful in truths, and are of importance with respect to mankind.
From the original French, “Les inventions ou les découvertes sont de deux espèces. Il en est que nous devons au hazard; telles sont la boussole, la poudre à canon, & généralement presque toutes les découvertes que nous avons faites dans les arts. Il en est d'autres que nous devons au génie: &, par ce mot de découverte, on doit alors entendre une nouvelle combinaison, un rapport nouveau aperçu entre certains objets ou certaines idées. On obtient le titre d'homme de génie, si les idées qui résultent de ce rapport forment un grand ensemble, sont fécondes en vérités & intéressantes pour l'humanité,” in 'Du Génie', L’Esprit (1758), Discourse 4, 476. English version from Claude Adrien Helvétius and William Mudford (trans.), 'Of Genius', De l’Esprit or, Essays on the Mind and its several Faculties (1759), Essay 4, Chap. 1, 241-242.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (284)  |  Chance (159)  |  Combination (91)  |  Compass (24)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Fruitful (42)  |  Genius (243)  |  Gunpowder (14)  |  Idea (577)  |  Importance (216)  |  Invention (318)  |  Kind (138)  |  Mankind (241)  |  New (483)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Relation (149)  |  Result (376)  |  Title (18)  |  Truth (914)  |  Word (299)

Is not Cuvier the greatest poet of our age? Of course Lord Byron has set down in fine words certain of our souls’ longings; but our immortal naturalist has reconstructed whole worlds out of bleached bones. Like Cadmus, he has rebuilt great cities from teeth, repopulated thousands of forests with all the mysteries of zoology from a few pieces of coal, discovered races of giants in the foot of a mammoth.
From 'La Peau de Chagrin' (1831). As translated as by Helen Constantine The Wild Ass’s Skin (2012), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Bleached (4)  |  Bone (63)  |  Build (117)  |  Lord George Gordon Byron (27)  |  City (47)  |  Coal (45)  |  Cuvier_George (2)  |  Discover (196)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forest (107)  |  Giant (37)  |  Immortal (19)  |  Longing (9)  |  Mammoth (7)  |  Mystery (151)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Poet (78)  |  Populate (4)  |  Race (103)  |  Reconstruct (4)  |  Soul (163)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Tooth (26)  |  World (892)  |  Zoology (31)

It has become accepted doctrine that we must attempt to study the whole man. Actually we cannot study even a whole tree or a whole guinea pig. But it is a whole tree and a whole guinea pig that have survived and evolved, and we must make the attempt.
Personality (1947), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Guinea Pig (2)  |  Study (461)  |  Survival (60)  |  Tree (170)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Air (188)  |  Assignment (10)  |  Author (61)  |  Being (41)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Crowd (22)  |  Delight (64)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Earth (635)  |  Employment (23)  |  Equality (21)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (296)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (218)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Fly (99)  |  Gratification (17)  |  Happy (46)  |  Insect (64)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (88)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (158)  |  Myriad (22)  |  Nature (1211)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (6)  |  Office (22)  |  Probability (106)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (51)  |  Sport (11)  |  Spring (70)  |  Summer (33)  |  Swarm (13)  |  Teeming (2)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (12)  |  Try (141)  |  Variety (69)  |  View (171)  |  Water (292)  |  Wing (48)  |  World (892)  |  Youth (75)

It is curious to observe how differently these great men [Plato and Bacon] estimated the value of every kind of knowledge. Take Arithmetic for example. Plato, after speaking slightly of the convenience of being able to reckon and compute in the ordinary transactions of life, passes to what he considers as a far more important advantage. The study of the properties of numbers, he tells us, habituates the mind to the contemplation of pure truth, and raises us above the material universe. He would have his disciples apply themselves to this study, not that they may be able to buy or sell, not that they may qualify themselves to be shop-keepers or travelling merchants, but that they may learn to withdraw their minds from the ever-shifting spectacle of this visible and tangible world, and to fix them on the immutable essences of things.
Bacon, on the other hand, valued this branch of knowledge only on account of its uses with reference to that visible and tangible world which Plato so much despised. He speaks with scorn of the mystical arithmetic of the later Platonists, and laments the propensity of mankind to employ, on mere matters of curiosity, powers the whole exertion of which is required for purposes of solid advantage. He advises arithmeticians to leave these trifles, and employ themselves in framing convenient expressions which may be of use in physical researches.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (67)  |  Advantage (73)  |  Advise (7)  |  Apply (76)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Arithmetician (3)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Branch (102)  |  Buy (20)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consider (80)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Curious (41)  |  Despise (13)  |  Different (178)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Employ (35)  |  Essence (54)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Example (92)  |  Exertion (13)  |  Expression (104)  |  Fix (25)  |  Frame (26)  |  Great (524)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Immutable (13)  |  Important (202)  |  Kind (138)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Lament (9)  |  Late (52)  |  Learn (281)  |  Leave (127)  |  Life (1124)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Material (154)  |  Matter (340)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Mere (78)  |  Mind (743)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Number (276)  |  Observe (75)  |  On The Other Hand (32)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Pass (91)  |  Physical (129)  |  Plato (73)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Power (358)  |  Propensity (8)  |  Property (123)  |  Pure (98)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Raise (34)  |  Reckon (14)  |  Reference (33)  |  Require (79)  |  Research (589)  |  Scorn (7)  |  Sell (14)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Solid (50)  |  Speak (90)  |  Spectacle (14)  |  Study (461)  |  Tangible (8)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Travel (61)  |  Trifle (13)  |  Truth (914)  |  Universe (683)  |  Value (240)  |  Visible (37)  |  Withdraw (9)  |  World (892)

It is easier to love humanity as a whole than to love one’s neighbor. There may even be a certain antagonism between love of humanity and love of neighbor; a low capacity for getting along with those near us often goes hand in hand with a high receptivity to the idea of the brotherhood of men. About a hundred years ago a Russian landowner by the name of Petrashevsky recorded a remarkable conclusion: “Finding nothing worthy of my attachment either among women or among men, I have vowed myself to the service of mankind.” He became a follower of Fourier, and installed a phalanstery on his estate. The end of the experiment was sad, but what one might perhaps have expected: the peasants—Petrashevsky’s neighbors-burned the phalanstery.
In 'Brotherhood', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Antagonism (4)  |  Attachment (6)  |  Become (172)  |  Brotherhood (5)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Certain (125)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Easy (98)  |  End (195)  |  Estate (5)  |  Expect (44)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Find (405)  |  Follower (10)  |  Fourier (5)  |  Hand In Hand (4)  |  High (152)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Idea (577)  |  Install (2)  |  Love (222)  |  Low (24)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Myself (36)  |  Name (165)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Often (106)  |  Peasant (6)  |  Receptivity (2)  |  Record (67)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Russian (3)  |  Sadness (34)  |  Service (64)  |  Vow (4)  |  Woman (111)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (299)

It is the object of science to replace, or save, experiences, by the reproduction and anticipation of facts in thought. Memory is handier than experience, and often answers the same purpose. This economical office of science, which fills its whole life, is apparent at first glance; and with its full recognition all mysticism in science disappears.
In 'The Economy of Science', The Science of Mechanics: A Critical and Historical Exposition of Its Principles (1893), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Anticipation (14)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Disappear (29)  |  Economical (9)  |  Experience (338)  |  Fact (725)  |  Fill (61)  |  First (313)  |  Glance (19)  |  Handy (2)  |  Life (1124)  |  Memory (105)  |  Mysticism (9)  |  Object (169)  |  Office (22)  |  Often (106)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Replace (30)  |  Reproduction (61)  |  Save (56)  |  Science (2043)  |  Thought (536)

It isn’t important in which sea or lake you observe a slick of pollution, or in the forests of which country afire breaks out, or on which continent a hurricane arises. You are standing guard over the whole of our Earth.
In Jack Hassard and Julie Weisberg , Environmental Science on the Net: The Global Thinking Project (1999), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (49)  |  Break (54)  |  Continent (52)  |  Country (144)  |  Earth (635)  |  Forest (107)  |  Guard (18)  |  Hurricane (4)  |  Important (202)  |  Lake (18)  |  Observe (75)  |  Pollution (43)  |  Sea (187)  |  Stand (107)

It might be said of psychoanalysis that if you give it your little finger, it will soon have your whole hand.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Finger (44)  |  Give (200)  |  Hand (141)  |  Little (184)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Say (228)  |  Soon (34)

It needs scarcely be pointed out that in placing Mathematics at the head of Positive Philosophy, we are only extending the application of the principle which has governed our whole Classification. We are simply carrying back our principle to its first manifestation. Geometrical and Mechanical phenomena are the most general, the most simple, the most abstract of all,— the most irreducible to others, the most independent of them; serving, in fact, as a basis to all others. It follows that the study of them is an indispensable preliminary to that of all others. Therefore must Mathematics hold the first place in the hierarchy of the sciences, and be the point of departure of all Education whether general or special.
In Auguste Comte and Harriet Martineau (trans.), The Positive Philosophy (1858), Introduction, Chap. 2, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Application (166)  |  Back (104)  |  Basis (89)  |  Carry (59)  |  Classification (85)  |  Departure (9)  |  Education (333)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Extend (41)  |  Fact (725)  |  First (313)  |  Follow (123)  |  General (156)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Govern (28)  |  Head (80)  |  Hierarchy (14)  |  Hold (92)  |  Independent (65)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Manifestation (33)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mechanical (48)  |  Need (283)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Place (174)  |  Point (122)  |  Positive (43)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Principle (285)  |  Scarcely (13)  |  Science (2043)  |  Serve (57)  |  Simple (172)  |  Simply (52)  |  Special (74)  |  Study (461)

It sometimes strikes me that the whole of science is a piece of impudence; that nature can afford to ignore our impertinent interference. If our monkey mischief should ever reach the point of blowing up the earth by decomposing an atom, and even annihilated the sun himself, I cannot really suppose that the universe would turn a hair.
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, ch. 14 (1929, rev 1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (16)  |  Annihilate (6)  |  Atom (280)  |  Blow (22)  |  Decompose (7)  |  Earth (635)  |  Hair (25)  |  Ignore (30)  |  Impertinent (2)  |  Interference (12)  |  Mischief (6)  |  Monkey (40)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Piece (38)  |  Point (122)  |  Reach (119)  |  Really (78)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Strike (39)  |  Sun (276)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Turn (118)  |  Universe (683)

Man is not only part of a field, but a part and member of his group. When people are together, as when they are at work, then the most unnatural behavior, which only appears in late stages or abnormal cases, would be to behave as separate Egos. Under normal circumstances they work in common, each a meaningfully functioning part of the whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (118)  |  Concern (108)  |  Ego (15)  |  Enterprise (32)  |  Field (170)  |  Function (128)  |  Group (72)  |  Independent (65)  |  Man (373)  |  Meaningful (16)  |  Mutual (27)  |  Part (220)  |  People (388)  |  Work (626)

Man is the summit, the crown of nature's development, and must comprehend everything that has preceded him, even as the fruit includes within itself all the earlier developed parts of the plant. In a word, Man must represent the whole world in miniature.
In Lorenz Oken, trans. by Alfred Tulk, Elements of Physiophilosophy (1847), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Crown (26)  |  Development (276)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Everything (180)  |  Include (40)  |  Man (373)  |  Miniature (5)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Part (220)  |  Plant (199)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Representation (35)  |  Summit (15)  |  Word (299)  |  World (892)

Mathematical science is in my opinion an indivisible whole, an organism whose vitality is conditioned upon the connection of its parts. For with all the variety of mathematical knowledge, we are still clearly conscious of the similarity of the logical devices, the relationship of the ideas in mathematics as a whole and the numerous analogies in its different departments.
In 'Mathematical Problems', Bulletin American Mathematical Society, 8, 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (56)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Condition (160)  |  Connection (107)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Department (47)  |  Device (28)  |  Different (178)  |  Idea (577)  |  Indivisible (12)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Logical (54)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Organism (150)  |  Part (220)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Science (2043)  |  Similarity (20)  |  Variety (69)  |  Vitality (15)

Mathematicians create by acts of insight and intuition. Logic then sanctions the conquests of intuition. It is the hygiene that mathematics practices to keep its ideas healthy and strong. Moreover, the whole structure rests fundamentally on uncertain ground, the intuition of humans. Here and there an intuition is scooped out and replaced by a firmly built pillar of thought; however, this pillar is based on some deeper, perhaps less clearly defined, intuition. Though the process of replacing intuitions with precise thoughts does not change the nature of the ground on which mathematics ultimately rests, it does add strength and height to the structure.
In Mathematics in Western Culture (1964), 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (115)  |  Add (40)  |  Base (71)  |  Build (117)  |  Change (363)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conquest (19)  |  Create (150)  |  Deep (121)  |  Define (49)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Ground (90)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Height (32)  |  Human (548)  |  Hygiene (10)  |  Idea (577)  |  Insight (69)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Keep (100)  |  Less (102)  |  Logic (247)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Practice (92)  |  Precise (33)  |  Process (261)  |  Replace (30)  |  Rest (93)  |  Sanction (3)  |  Strength (79)  |  Strong (72)  |  Structure (221)  |  Thought (536)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Uncertain (14)

Mathematics … above all other subjects, makes the student lust after knowledge, fills him, as it were, with a longing to fathom the cause of things and to employ his own powers independently; it collects his mental forces and concentrates them on a single point and thus awakens the spirit of individual inquiry, self-confidence and the joy of doing; it fascinates because of the view-points which it offers and creates certainty and assurance, owing to the universal validity of its methods. Thus, both what he receives and what he himself contributes toward the proper conception and solution of a problem, combine to mature the student and to make him skillful, to lead him away from the surface of things and to exercise him in the perception of their essence. A student thus prepared thirsts after knowledge and is ready for the university and its sciences. Thus it appears, that higher mathematics is the best guide to philosophy and to the philosophic conception of the world (considered as a self-contained whole) and of one’s own being.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 40. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (115)  |  Assurance (12)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Best (172)  |  Both (81)  |  Cause (283)  |  Certainty (129)  |  Collect (16)  |  Concentrate (18)  |  Conception (88)  |  Consider (80)  |  Contribute (26)  |  Create (150)  |  Employ (35)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Fathom (8)  |  Fill (61)  |  Force (249)  |  Guide (62)  |  Independently (6)  |  Individual (215)  |  Inquiry (40)  |  Joy (88)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Lead (158)  |  Long (172)  |  Lust (5)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mature (10)  |  Mental (78)  |  Method (230)  |  Offer (43)  |  Owe (23)  |  Philosophic (4)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Power (358)  |  Prepare (34)  |  Problem (490)  |  Proper (36)  |  Ready (37)  |  Receive (59)  |  Science (2043)  |  Self-Contained (3)  |  Single (119)  |  Skillful (6)  |  Solution (211)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Student (201)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Universal (100)  |  University (80)  |  Validity (31)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)  |  World (892)

Methods of fishing are becoming more and more efficient, but the whole fishing industry is based on the exploitation of a wild population. This is almost a prehistoric concept on land, but it has never been questioned at sea.
In Men, Machines, and Sacred Cows (1984), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (71)  |  Become (172)  |  Concept (143)  |  Efficient (24)  |  Exploitation (11)  |  Fish (95)  |  Industry (108)  |  Land (115)  |  Method (230)  |  Population (78)  |  Prehistoric (6)  |  Question (404)  |  Sea (187)  |  Wild (48)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (87)  |  April (4)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Back (104)  |  Bad (99)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (172)  |  Begin (106)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (59)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (33)  |  Child (245)  |  Church (34)  |  Close (66)  |  Control (111)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Early (61)  |  Easy (98)  |  Effect (165)  |  Everything (180)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (725)  |  Family (45)  |  Farm (19)  |  Father (57)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (405)  |  Government (93)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (82)  |  Happy (46)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (83)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (47)  |  Keep (100)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (547)  |  Leave (127)  |  Life (1124)  |  Little (184)  |  Lot (29)  |  Mark (42)  |  Mother (71)  |  Move (94)  |  Music (95)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (35)  |  Night (117)  |  Note (33)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (118)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (220)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (388)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Personal (66)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (174)  |  Poet (78)  |  Political (36)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (15)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (47)  |  Protect (33)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (239)  |  Remember (81)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (228)  |  Scary (2)  |  Secret (130)  |  See (369)  |  Side (51)  |  Sign (56)  |  Society (227)  |  Son (23)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (43)  |  Tell (110)  |  Terrible (19)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Training (64)  |  Try (141)  |  Want (175)  |  Wife (23)  |  Work (626)  |  Worry (33)  |  Year (299)

Nature is so delightful and abundant in its variations that there would not be one that resembles another, and not only plants as a whole, but among their branches, leaves and fruit, will not be found one which is precisely like another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (6)  |  Branch (102)  |  Delightful (8)  |  Find (405)  |  Fruit (70)  |  Leave (127)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Plant (199)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Resemble (26)  |  Variation (61)

Nobody knows more than a tiny fragment of science well enough to judge its validity and value at first hand. For the rest he has to rely on views accepted at second hand on the authority of a community of people accredited as scientists. But this accrediting depends in its turn on a complex organization. For each member of the community can judge at first hand only a small number of his fellow members, and yet eventually each is accredited by all. What happens is that each recognizes as scientists a number of others by whom he is recognized as such in return, and these relations form chains which transmit these mutual recognitions at second hand through the whole community. This is how each member becomes directly or indirectly accredited by all. The system extends into the past. Its members recognize the same set of persons as their masters and derive from this allegiance a common tradition, of which each carries on a particular strand.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  All (8)  |  Allegiance (4)  |  Authority (65)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Chain (50)  |  Common (118)  |  Community (81)  |  Complexity (90)  |  Dependance (4)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Directly (21)  |  Extension (30)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Happening (32)  |  Indirectly (6)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Master (93)  |  Member (39)  |  Mutual (27)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Organization (84)  |  Particular (75)  |  Past (150)  |  People (388)  |  Person (153)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Set (97)  |  Strand (5)  |  System (191)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Transmission (25)  |  Validity (31)  |  Value (240)  |  View (171)

Notwithstanding all that has been discovered since Newton’s time, his saying that we are little children picking up pretty pebbles on the beach while the whole ocean lies before us unexplored remains substantially as true as ever, and will do so though we shovel up the pebbles by steam shovels and carry them off in carloads.
From 'Lessons from the History of Science: The Scientific Attitude' (c.1896), in Collected Papers (1931), Vol. 1, 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Beach (16)  |  Carload (2)  |  Children (20)  |  Discover (196)  |  Little (184)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Pebble (19)  |  Picking (2)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Remain (111)  |  French Saying (67)  |  True (201)  |  Unexplored (13)

Now do you not see that the eye embraces the beauty of the whole world? It counsels and corrects all the arts of mankind... it is the prince of mathematics, and the sciences founded on it are absolutely certain. It has measured the distances and sizes of the stars it has discovered the elements and their location... it has given birth to architecture and to perspective and to the divine art of painting.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Architecture (43)  |  Art (284)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Birth (93)  |  Certain (125)  |  Correct (83)  |  Counsel (7)  |  Discover (196)  |  Distance (76)  |  Divine (60)  |  Element (162)  |  Embrace (32)  |  Eye (218)  |  Founded (20)  |  Give (200)  |  Location (9)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Measure (102)  |  Painting (42)  |  Perspective (22)  |  Prince (13)  |  Science (2043)  |  See (369)  |  Size (60)  |  Star (336)  |  World (892)

On the whole, more harm than good is done by medication.
Attributed. Quoted by Oliver Wendell Holmes, 'Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science,', Address to the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 30 May 1860, Medical Communications of the Massachusetts Medical Society (1860), Vol. 9, 337.
Science quotes on:  |  Good (345)  |  Harm (37)  |  Medication (6)

One must be wary in attributing scientific discovery wholly to any one person. Almost every discovery has a long and precarious history. Someone finds a bit here, another a bit there. A third step succeeds later and thus onward till a genius pieces the bits together and makes the decisive contribution. Science, like the Mississippi, begins in a tiny rivulet in the distant forest. Gradually other streams swell its volume. And the roaring river that bursts the dikes is formed from countless sources.
In 'The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge', Harper’s (Jun/Nov 1939), No. 179, 549
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (38)  |  Begin (106)  |  Bit (22)  |  Burst (24)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Countless (21)  |  Decisive (12)  |  Dike (2)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Distant (32)  |  Find (405)  |  Forest (107)  |  Form (308)  |  Genius (243)  |  Gradual (26)  |  History (368)  |  Inventor (55)  |  Long (172)  |  Mississippi (5)  |  Piece (38)  |  Precarious (5)  |  River (79)  |  Rivulet (3)  |  Roar (5)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Source (90)  |  Step (109)  |  Stream (40)  |  Succeed (26)  |  Swell (4)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Volume (19)  |  Wary (3)

One of the most striking results of modern investigation has been the way in which several different and quite independent lines of evidence indicate that a very great event occurred about two thousand million years ago. The radio-active evidence for the age of meteorites; and the estimated time for the tidal evolution of the Moon's orbit (though this is much rougher), all agree in their testimony, and, what is far more important, the red-shift in the nebulae indicates that this date is fundamental, not merely in the history of our system, but in that of the material universe as a whole.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Date (12)  |  Different (178)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Event (115)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Great (524)  |  History (368)  |  Importance (216)  |  Independence (34)  |  Indication (23)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Meteorite (8)  |  Million (111)  |  Modern (159)  |  Moon (199)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Radioactivity (28)  |  Red-Shift (4)  |  Result (376)  |  Striking (5)  |  System (191)  |  Testimony (13)  |  Tide (24)  |  Time (594)  |  Universe (683)  |  Year (299)

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.
Ulysses speaking to Achilles, in Troilus and Cressida, Act 3, Scene 3, line 175. John Phin and Edward Dowden clarify to the true meaning of this quote in The Shakespeare Cyclopædia and New Glossary (1902), 183, writing that in ‘an article in the Galaxy for Feb., 1877, Grant White calls attention to its true meaning, which is: “There is one point on which all men are alike, one touch of human nature which shows the kindred of all mankind—that they slight familiar merit and prefer trivial novelty. ... [It is] one of the most cynical utterances of an undisputable moral truth, disparaging to the nature of all mankind, that ever came from Shakespeare's pen.” ’
Science quotes on:  |  Kin (6)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Touch (76)  |  World (892)

One would like to see mankind spend the balance of the century in a total effort to clean up and groom the surface of the globe – wipe out the jungles, turn deserts and swamps into arable land, terrace barren mountains, regulate rivers, eradicate all pests, control the weather, and make the whole land mass a fit habitation for Man. The globe should be our and not nature’s home, and we no longer nature’s guests.
In The Temper of Our Time (1967), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (54)  |  Barren (15)  |  Century (130)  |  Clean Up (4)  |  Control (111)  |  Desert (38)  |  Effort (143)  |  Eradicate (3)  |  Fit (48)  |  Globe (47)  |  Guest (5)  |  Habitation (3)  |  Home (83)  |  Jungle (14)  |  Land (115)  |  Long (172)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Regulate (8)  |  River (79)  |  See (369)  |  Spend (43)  |  Surface (101)  |  Swamp (5)  |  Total (36)  |  Turn (118)  |  Weather (32)  |  Wipe Out (3)

Only one who devotes himself to a cause with his whole strength and soul can be a true master. For this reason mastery demands all of a person.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (283)  |  Demand (74)  |  Devote (34)  |  Master (93)  |  Mastery (27)  |  Person (153)  |  Reason (454)  |  Soul (163)  |  Strength (79)  |  True (201)

Overwhelming evidences of an intelligence and benevolent intention surround us, show us the whole of nature through the work of a free will and teach us that all alive beings depend on an eternal creator-ruler.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (49)  |  Benevolent (5)  |  Depend (87)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Free Will (12)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Intention (28)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Overwhelming (21)  |  Show (90)  |  Surround (29)  |  Teach (179)  |  Work (626)

Pavlov’s data on the two fundamental antagonistic nervous processes—stimulation and inhibition—and his profound generalizations regarding them, in particular, that these processes are parts of a united whole, that they are in a state of constant conflict and constant transition of the one to the other, and his views on the dominant role they play in the formation of the higher nervous activity—all those belong to the most established natural—scientific validation of the Marxist dialectal method. They are in complete accord with the Leninist concepts on the role of the struggle between opposites in the evolution, the motion of matter.
In E. A. Asratyan, I. P. Pavlov: His Life and Work (1953), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Activity (128)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Concept (143)  |  Conflict (55)  |  Constancy (6)  |  Data (120)  |  Dominance (5)  |  Establishment (34)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Formation (58)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Higher (36)  |  Inhibition (10)  |  Vladimir Lenin (3)  |  Karl Marx (21)  |  Matter (340)  |  Motion (158)  |  Natural (167)  |  Nerve (69)  |  Opposite (50)  |  Part (220)  |  Particular (75)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (18)  |  Play (110)  |  Process (261)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Regard (93)  |  Role (49)  |  Stimulation (14)  |  Struggle (77)  |  Transition (18)  |  Union (20)

Psychogenesis has led to man. Now it effaces itself, relieved or absorbed by another and a higher function—the engendering and subsequent development of the mind, in one word noogenesis. When for the first time in a living creature instinct perceived itself in its own mirror, the whole world took a pace forward.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 181. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Absorbed (3)  |  Creature (154)  |  Development (276)  |  Engendering (3)  |  First (313)  |  Forward (36)  |  Function (128)  |  Higher (36)  |  Instinct (65)  |  Living (56)  |  Mind (743)  |  Mirror (29)  |  Pace (8)  |  Perceived (4)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Time (594)  |  Word (299)  |  World (892)

Quantum theory thus reveals a basic oneness of the universe. It shows that we cannot decompose the world into independently existing smallest units. As we penetrate into matter, nature does not show us any isolated “building blocks,” but rather appears as a complicated web of relations between the various parts of the whole. These relations always include the observer in an essential way. The human observer constitute the final link in the chain of observational processes, and the properties of any atomic object can be understood only in terms of the object’s interaction with the observer.
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Atom (280)  |  Basic (66)  |  Building Block (5)  |  Complication (23)  |  Decomposition (12)  |  Essential (115)  |  Independence (34)  |  Interaction (31)  |  Isolation (26)  |  Matter (340)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Observer (42)  |  Oneness (3)  |  Part (220)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Process (261)  |  Property (123)  |  Quantum Theory (57)  |  Relation (149)  |  Revelation (34)  |  Show (90)  |  Small (161)  |  Unit (31)  |  Universe (683)  |  Web (15)

Quite distinct from the theoretical question of the manner in which mathematics will rescue itself from the perils to which it is exposed by its own prolific nature is the practical problem of finding means of rendering available for the student the results which have been already accumulated, and making it possible for the learner to obtain some idea of the present state of the various departments of mathematics. … The great mass of mathematical literature will be always contained in Journals and Transactions, but there is no reason why it should not be rendered far more useful and accessible than at present by means of treatises or higher text-books. The whole science suffers from want of avenues of approach, and many beautiful branches of mathematics are regarded as difficult and technical merely because they are not easily accessible. … I feel very strongly that any introduction to a new subject written by a competent person confers a real benefit on the whole science. The number of excellent text-books of an elementary kind that are published in this country makes it all the more to be regretted that we have so few that are intended for the advanced student. As an example of the higher kind of text-book, the want of which is so badly felt in many subjects, I may mention the second part of Prof. Chrystal’s Algebra published last year, which in a small compass gives a great mass of valuable and fundamental knowledge that has hitherto been beyond the reach of an ordinary student, though in reality lying so close at hand. I may add that in any treatise or higher text-book it is always desirable that references to the original memoirs should be given, and, if possible, short historic notices also. I am sure that no subject loses more than mathematics by any attempt to dissociate it from its history.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (16)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (162)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Already (28)  |  Approach (53)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Available (25)  |  Avenue (6)  |  Badly (15)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Benefit (72)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Branch (102)  |  George Chrystal (7)  |  Close (66)  |  Compass (24)  |  Competent (18)  |  Confer (11)  |  Contain (67)  |  Country (144)  |  Department (47)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Example (92)  |  Excellent (26)  |  Expose (16)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (165)  |  Find (405)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Give (200)  |  Great (524)  |  High (152)  |  Historic (7)  |  History (368)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intend (16)  |  Introduction (34)  |  Journal (19)  |  Kind (138)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lie (115)  |  Literature (79)  |  Lose (93)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Means (171)  |  Memoir (11)  |  Mention (23)  |  Merely (82)  |  Nature (1211)  |  New (483)  |  Notice (34)  |  Number (276)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Original (57)  |  Part (220)  |  Peril (9)  |  Person (153)  |  Possible (155)  |  Practical (129)  |  Present (174)  |  Problem (490)  |  Prof (2)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Publish (33)  |  Question (404)  |  Reach (119)  |  Real (148)  |  Reality (188)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reference (33)  |  Regard (93)  |  Regret (20)  |  Render (30)  |  Rescue (10)  |  Result (376)  |  Science (2043)  |  Second (59)  |  Short (49)  |  Small (161)  |  State (136)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (201)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Subject (235)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Technical (40)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Theory (690)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Treatise (32)  |  Useful (98)  |  Value (240)  |  Various (46)  |  Want (175)  |  Write (153)  |  Year (299)

Science and art belong to the whole world, and the barriers of nationality vanish before them.
Wissenschaft und Kunst gehoren der Welt an, und vor ihhen verschwinden die Schranken der Nationalitat.
From 'In a Conversation With a German Historian' (1813), in Kate Louise Roberts (ed.), Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations (1922), 691.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrier (23)  |  Belong (53)  |  Nationality (2)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Vanish (18)  |  World (892)

Science conducts us, step by step, through the whole range of creation, until we arrive, at length, at God.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (35)  |  Conduct (31)  |  Creation (239)  |  God (535)  |  Length (20)  |  Range (57)  |  Science (2043)  |  Step By Step (8)

Since the examination of consistency is a task that cannot be avoided, it appears necessary to axiomatize logic itself and to prove that number theory and set theory are only parts of logic. This method was prepared long ago (not least by Frege’s profound investigations); it has been most successfully explained by the acute mathematician and logician Russell. One could regard the completion of this magnificent Russellian enterprise of the axiomatization of logic as the crowning achievement of the work of axiomatization as a whole.
Address (11 Sep 1917), 'Axiomatisches Denken' delivered before the Swiss Mathematical Society in Zürich. Translated by Ewald as 'Axiomatic Thought', (1918), in William Bragg Ewald, From Kant to Hilbert (1996), Vol. 2, 1113.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Acute (7)  |  Appear (115)  |  Avoid (52)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Completion (17)  |  Consistency (23)  |  Crown (26)  |  Enterprise (32)  |  Examination (65)  |  Explain (105)  |  Gottlob Frege (11)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Least (74)  |  Logic (247)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Magnificent (19)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Method (230)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Number Theory (6)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Profound (58)  |  Prove (108)  |  Regard (93)  |  Bertrand Russell (183)  |  Set Theory (5)  |  Successful (39)  |  Task (83)  |  Work (626)

Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical porblems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, however, weakened the connection between mathematics and physics; mathematicians, turning away from their roots of mathematics in intuition, have concentrated on refinement and emphasized the postulated side of mathematics, and at other times have overlooked the unity of their science with physics and other fields. In many cases, physicists have ceased to appreciate the attitudes of mathematicians. This rift is unquestionably a serious threat to science as a whole; the broad stream of scientific development may split into smaller and smaller rivulets and dry out. It seems therefore important to direct our efforts towards reuniting divergent trends by classifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts.
As co-author with David Hilbert, in Methods of Mathematical Physics (1937, 1989), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Appreciation (25)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Classification (85)  |  Common (118)  |  Concentration (18)  |  Connection (107)  |  Directing (5)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Divergence (4)  |  Diverse (16)  |  Effort (143)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Fact (725)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feature (43)  |  Importance (216)  |  Interconnection (7)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Method (230)  |  Overlooking (3)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Physics (346)  |  Postulate (31)  |  Problem (490)  |  Recent (29)  |  Refinement (13)  |  Rift (2)  |  Root (60)  |  Science (2043)  |  Serious (52)  |  Serving (4)  |  Source (90)  |  Threat (29)  |  Trend (17)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unity (53)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Vital (38)  |  Weakening (2)

Siphonophores do not convey the message–a favorite theme of unthinking romanticism–that nature is but one gigantic whole, all its parts intimately connected and interacting in some higher, ineffable harmony. Nature revels in boundaries and distinctions; we inhabit a universe of structure. But since our universe of structure has evolved historically, it must present us with fuzzy boundaries, where one kind of thing grades into another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Boundary (38)  |  Connect (30)  |  Convey (16)  |  Distinction (44)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Favorite (24)  |  Fuzzy (3)  |  Gigantic (23)  |  Grade (11)  |  Harmony (70)  |  High (152)  |  Historically (3)  |  Ineffable (4)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Interact (7)  |  Intimately (4)  |  Kind (138)  |  Message (35)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Part (220)  |  Present (174)  |  Revel (4)  |  Romanticism (5)  |  Structure (221)  |  Theme (12)  |  Universe (683)  |  Unthinking (3)

Specialists never contribute anything to their specialty; Helmholtz wasn’t an eye-specialist, but a German army doctor who invented the ophthalmoscope one Saturday afternoon when there wasn’t anything else to do. Incidentally, he rewrote whole chapters of physics, so that the physicists only know him as one of their own. Robert Mayer wasn’t a physicist, but another country doctor; and Pasteur, who made bacteriology, was a tanner’s son or a chemist, as you will.
In Fischerisms (1930), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (4)  |  Army (25)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Chapter (9)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Country (144)  |  Doctor (101)  |  Eye (218)  |  German (11)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (25)  |  Incidental (11)  |  Invented (4)  |  Robert Mayer (9)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Physics (346)  |  Saturday (5)  |  Son (23)  |  Specialist (25)  |  Specialty (10)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Accurate (32)  |  Acquire (38)  |  Act (115)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Angle (19)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (284)  |  Attention (115)  |  Badly (15)  |  Base (71)  |  Best (172)  |  Calculus (48)  |  Case (98)  |  Clear (97)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Country (144)  |  Curve (32)  |  Data (120)  |  Deal (49)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Deep (121)  |  Department (47)  |  Desire (140)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Direct (82)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (47)  |  Draw (55)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (38)  |  Enter (30)  |  Erroneous (4)  |  Error (275)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Exact (64)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Expect (44)  |  False (98)  |  First (313)  |  Follower (10)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (90)  |  Furnish (40)  |  Future (284)  |  General (156)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  God (535)  |  Good (345)  |  Habit (107)  |  High (152)  |  Ignorant (36)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Inference (31)  |  Instance (32)  |  Know (547)  |  Lawyer (21)  |  Learn (281)  |  Least (74)  |  Legitimate (14)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1124)  |  Likely (33)  |  Line (89)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Logic (247)  |  Logical (54)  |  Long (172)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mere (78)  |  Mind (743)  |  Moral (123)  |  Myself (36)  |  Need (283)  |  Number (276)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (73)  |  Political (36)  |  Portal (4)  |  Premise (25)  |  Primary (39)  |  Principle (285)  |  Probability (106)  |  Problem (490)  |  Process (261)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Pure Science (23)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Question (404)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Region (35)  |  Relate (19)  |  Relation (149)  |  Respect (86)  |  Right (196)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Same (155)  |  Save (56)  |  School (117)  |  Science (2043)  |  Simply (52)  |  Small (161)  |  Social (108)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (88)  |  Space (257)  |  Stand (107)  |  Start (97)  |  Statesman (18)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (235)  |  Success (248)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Surface (101)  |  System (191)  |  Systematic (32)  |  Task (83)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Together (77)  |  Topic (12)  |  Training (64)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (201)  |  Truth (914)  |  Try (141)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (80)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (10)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)  |  Variation (61)  |  Want (175)  |  Weigh (14)  |  World (892)  |  Write (153)

Taken on the whole, I would believe that Gandhi’s views were the most enlightened of all the political men in our time. We should strive to do things in his spirit ... not to use violence in fighting for our cause, but by non-participation in what we believe is evil.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (503)  |  Cause (283)  |  Enlightened (7)  |  Evil (78)  |  Fight (44)  |  Political (36)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Strive (43)  |  Time (594)  |  View (171)  |  Violence (23)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Admit (44)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Aid (41)  |  Apprehension (15)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Binomial Theorem (3)  |  Call (127)  |  Case (98)  |  Class (83)  |  Common (118)  |  Competent (18)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (239)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Difference (246)  |  Different (178)  |  Differential Calculus (8)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Easy (98)  |  Effort (143)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (68)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Furnish (40)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Great (524)  |  Group (72)  |  High (152)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Inductive (10)  |  Involve (47)  |  Johannes Kepler (90)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Large (130)  |  Law (513)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Line (89)  |  Management (12)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mental (78)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Notion (57)  |  Object (169)  |  Operation (118)  |  Part (220)  |  Particular (75)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (153)  |  Physical Science (65)  |  Place (174)  |  Point (122)  |  Power (358)  |  Practical (129)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Problem (490)  |  Process (261)  |  Product (82)  |  Purely (28)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (454)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (79)  |  Result (376)  |  Rise (70)  |  Same (155)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific Mind (5)  |  Seize (14)  |  Sense (315)  |  Simple (172)  |  Single (119)  |  Situation (52)  |  Solve (76)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (9)  |  Superior (40)  |  Tension (9)  |  Theory (690)  |  Train (45)  |  Triangle (10)  |  Universal (100)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (98)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Wide (27)

That’s the whole problem with science. You’ve got a bunch of empiricists trying to describe things of unimaginable wonder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bunch (7)  |  Describe (56)  |  Empiricist (3)  |  Problem (490)  |  Science (2043)  |  Try (141)  |  Unimaginable (6)  |  Wonder (169)

The ancients devoted a lifetime to the study of arithmetic; it required days to extract a square root or to multiply two numbers together. Is there any harm in skipping all that, in letting the school boy learn multiplication sums, and in starting his more abstract reasoning at a more advanced point? Where would be the harm in letting the boy assume the truth of many propositions of the first four books of Euclid, letting him assume their truth partly by faith, partly by trial? Giving him the whole fifth book of Euclid by simple algebra? Letting him assume the sixth as axiomatic? Letting him, in fact, begin his severer studies where he is now in the habit of leaving off? We do much less orthodox things. Every here and there in one’s mathematical studies one makes exceedingly large assumptions, because the methodical study would be ridiculous even in the eyes of the most pedantic of teachers. I can imagine a whole year devoted to the philosophical study of many things that a student now takes in his stride without trouble. The present method of training the mind of a mathematical teacher causes it to strain at gnats and to swallow camels. Such gnats are most of the propositions of the sixth book of Euclid; propositions generally about incommensurables; the use of arithmetic in geometry; the parallelogram of forces, etc., decimals.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Advance (162)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Assume (37)  |  Assumption (58)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Begin (106)  |  Book (257)  |  Camel (11)  |  Cause (283)  |  Decimal (14)  |  Devote (34)  |  Euclid (52)  |  Extract (17)  |  Eye (218)  |  Fact (725)  |  Faith (157)  |  First (313)  |  Generally (15)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Habit (107)  |  Harm (37)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Incommensurable (2)  |  Large (130)  |  Learn (281)  |  Leave (127)  |  Lifetime (28)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Method (230)  |  Methodical (7)  |  Mind (743)  |  Multiplication (22)  |  Multiply (18)  |  Number (276)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Partly (5)  |  Pedantic (3)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Point (122)  |  Present (174)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Reason (454)  |  Require (79)  |  Ridiculous (13)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Severe (16)  |  Simple (172)  |  Skip (4)  |  Square Root (8)  |  Start (97)  |  Strain (11)  |  Stride (9)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Sum (41)  |  Swallow (20)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Together (77)  |  Training (64)  |  Trial (28)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Truth (914)  |  Year (299)

The Anglo-Dane appears to possess an aptitude for mathematics which is not shared by the native of any other English district as a whole, and it is in the exact sciences that the Anglo-Dane triumphs.
In A Study of British Genius (1904), 69. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 131. Moritz adds an editorial footnote: “The mathematical tendencies of Cambridge are due to the fact that Cambridge drains the ability of nearly the whole Anglo-Danish district.”
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Appear (115)  |  Aptitude (17)  |  Cambridge (15)  |  District (9)  |  Drain (7)  |  Due (20)  |  English (34)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Fact (725)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Native (15)  |  Nearly (26)  |  Possess (53)  |  Share (49)  |  Tendency (54)  |  Triumph (46)

The art of reasoning consists in getting hold of the subject at the right end, of seizing on the few general ideas that illuminate the whole, and of persistently organizing all subsidiary facts round them.
In 'Presidential Address to the London Branch of the Mathematical Association', Mathematical Gazette (Mar 1913), 7, No. 104, 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (284)  |  Consist (45)  |  End (195)  |  Fact (725)  |  General (156)  |  Hold (92)  |  Idea (577)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Organize (20)  |  Persistent (9)  |  Reasoning (95)  |  Right (196)  |  Seize (14)  |  Subject (235)  |  Subsidiary (4)

The average gambler will say “The player who stakes his whole fortune on a single play is a fool, and the science of mathematics can not prove him to be otherwise.” The reply is obvious: “The science of mathematics never attempts the impossible, it merely shows that other players are greater fools.”
Concluding remarks to his mathematical proof, with certain assumptions, that the best betting strategy for “Gambler’s Ruin” would be to always make his largest stake on his first play. In 'Gambler’s Ruin', Annals of Mathematics (Jul 1909), 2nd Series, 10, No. 4, 189. This is also seen, without primary source, quoted as “It is true that a man who does this is a fool. I have only proved that a man who does anything else is an even bigger fool,” in Harold Eves, Return to Mathematical Circles (1988), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Average (41)  |  Fool (85)  |  Fortune (27)  |  Gambler (7)  |  Greater (42)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Merely (82)  |  Obvious (79)  |  Other (27)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Play (110)  |  Player (8)  |  Prove (108)  |  Reply (25)  |  Show (90)  |  Single (119)  |  Stake (19)  |  Strategy (10)

The basic thesis of gestalt theory might be formulated thus: there are contexts in which what is happening in the whole cannot be deduced from the characteristics of the separate pieces, but conversely; what happens to a part of the whole is, in clearcut cases, determined by the laws of the inner structure of its whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (66)  |  Case (98)  |  Characteristic (94)  |  Clear-Cut (7)  |  Context (22)  |  Conversely (2)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Determine (72)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Happen (82)  |  Inner (39)  |  Law (513)  |  Part (220)  |  Piece (38)  |  Separate (69)  |  Structure (221)  |  Theory (690)  |  Thesis (11)

The biologist can push it back to the original protist, and the chemist can push it back to the crystal, but none of them touch the real question of why or how the thing began at all. The astronomer goes back untold million of years and ends in gas and emptiness, and then the mathematician sweeps the whole cosmos into unreality and leaves one with mind as the only thing of which we have any immediate apprehension. Cogito ergo sum, ergo omnia esse videntur. All this bother, and we are no further than Descartes. Have you noticed that the astronomers and mathematicians are much the most cheerful people of the lot? I suppose that perpetually contemplating things on so vast a scale makes them feel either that it doesn’t matter a hoot anyway, or that anything so large and elaborate must have some sense in it somewhere.
As co-author with Robert Eustace, The Documents in the Case (1930), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (15)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Begin (106)  |  Biologist (41)  |  Cheerful (6)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Crystal (53)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Elaborate (20)  |  Emptiness (10)  |  End (195)  |  Gas (49)  |  Immediate (43)  |  Large (130)  |  Leave (127)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Million (111)  |  Mind (743)  |  Perpetual (20)  |  Protist (2)  |  Question (404)  |  Scale (62)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sweep (13)  |  Unreality (3)  |  Vast (88)  |  Year (299)

The chemist works along his own brilliant line of discovery and exposition; the astronomer has his special field to explore; the geologist has a well-defined sphere to occupy. It is manifest, however, that not one of these men can tell the whole tale, and make a complete story of creation. Another man is wanted. A man who, though not necessarily going into formal science, sees the whole idea, and speaks of it in its unity. This man is the theologian. He is not a chemist, an astronomer, a geologist, a botanist——he is more: he speaks of circles, not of segments; of principles, not of facts; of causes and purposes rather than of effects and appearances. Not that the latter are excluded from his study, but that they are so wisely included in it as to be put in their proper places.
In The People's Bible: Discourses Upon Holy Scripture: Vol. 1. Genesis (1885), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Botanist (17)  |  Brilliant (28)  |  Cause (283)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Circle (55)  |  Complete (84)  |  Creation (239)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Effect (165)  |  Exclusion (13)  |  Exploration (122)  |  Exposition (13)  |  Fact (725)  |  Field (170)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Idea (577)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Line (89)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Place (174)  |  Principle (285)  |  Proper (36)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Segment (6)  |  Speaking (37)  |  Special (74)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Story (72)  |  Study (461)  |  Tale (15)  |  Telling (23)  |  Theologian (15)  |  Unity (53)  |  Want (175)  |  Well-Defined (3)  |  Wisedom (2)  |  Work (626)

The crippling of individuals I consider the worst evil of capitalism. Our whole educational system suffers from this evil. An exaggerated competitive attitude is inculcated into the student, who is trained to worship acquisitive success as a preparation for his future career.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisitive (2)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Bad (99)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Career (57)  |  Competitive (8)  |  Consider (80)  |  Cripple (3)  |  Educational (7)  |  Evil (78)  |  Exaggerate (6)  |  Future (284)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Individual (215)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Student (201)  |  Success (248)  |  Suffer (40)  |  System (191)  |  Train (45)  |  Worship (25)

The discoveries of Newton have done more for England and for the race, than has been done by whole dynasties of British monarchs; and we doubt not that in the great mathematical birth of 1853, the Quaternions of Hamilton, there is as much real promise of benefit to mankind as in any event of Victoria’s reign.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (72)  |  Birth (93)  |  British (10)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Dynasty (7)  |  England (38)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Event (115)  |  Great (524)  |  Hamilton (2)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Promise (38)  |  Quaternion (7)  |  Race (103)  |  Real (148)  |  Reign (11)

The discovery of the conic sections, attributed to Plato, first threw open the higher species of form to the contemplation of geometers. But for this discovery, which was probably regarded in Plato’s tune and long after him, as the unprofitable amusement of a speculative brain, the whole course of practical philosophy of the present day, of the science of astronomy, of the theory of projectiles, of the art of navigation, might have run in a different channel; and the greatest discovery that has ever been made in the history of the world, the law of universal gravitation, with its innumerable direct and indirect consequences and applications to every department of human research and industry, might never to this hour have been elicited.
In 'A Probationary Lecture on Geometry, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2 (1908), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (23)  |  Application (166)  |  Art (284)  |  Astronomy (203)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Brain (209)  |  Channel (21)  |  Conic Section (7)  |  Consequence (110)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Course (83)  |  Department (47)  |  Different (178)  |  Direct (82)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Elicit (2)  |  First (313)  |  Form (308)  |  Geometer (22)  |  Great (524)  |  High (152)  |  History (368)  |  Hour (71)  |  Human (548)  |  Indirect (10)  |  Industry (108)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Law Of Universal Gravitation (2)  |  Long (172)  |  Navigation (16)  |  Open (66)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Plato (73)  |  Practical (129)  |  Present Day (5)  |  Probably (47)  |  Projectile (3)  |  Regard (93)  |  Research (589)  |  Run (57)  |  Science (2043)  |  Species (220)  |  Speculative (8)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Theory (690)  |  Throw (43)  |  Tune (14)  |  Unprofitable (4)  |  World (892)

The economic anarchy of capitalist society as it exists today is, in my opinion, the real source of the evil. We see before us a huge community of producers the members of which are unceasingly striving to deprive each other of the fruits of their collective labor–not by force, but on the whole in faithful compliance with legally established rules.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Capitalist (6)  |  Collective (18)  |  Community (81)  |  Compliance (5)  |  Deprive (11)  |  Economic (26)  |  Establish (55)  |  Evil (78)  |  Exist (147)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Force (249)  |  Fruit (70)  |  Huge (25)  |  Labor (71)  |  Member (39)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Producer (3)  |  Real (148)  |  Rule (173)  |  See (369)  |  Society (227)  |  Source (90)  |  Strive (43)  |  Today (117)  |  Unceasingly (2)

The emotional centre is the dynamo of our whole life.
In On Love & Psychological Exercises: With Some Aphorisms & Other Essays (1998), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Centre (27)  |  Dynamo (4)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Life (1124)

The eventual goal of science is to provide a single theory that describes the whole universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Describe (56)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Goal (100)  |  Provide (68)  |  Science (2043)  |  Single (119)  |  Theory (690)  |  Universe (683)

The Excellence of Modern Geometry is in nothing more evident, than in those full and adequate Solutions it gives to Problems; representing all possible Cases in one view, and in one general Theorem many times comprehending whole Sciences; which deduced at length into Propositions, and demonstrated after the manner of the Ancients, might well become the subjects of large Treatises: For whatsoever Theorem solves the most complicated Problem of the kind, does with a due Reduction reach all the subordinate Cases.
In 'An Instance of the Excellence of Modern Algebra, etc', Philosophical Transactions, 1694, 960.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (25)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Case (98)  |  Complicated (61)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Demonstrate (50)  |  Due (20)  |  Evident (26)  |  Excellence (33)  |  Full (63)  |  General (156)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  Kind (138)  |  Large (130)  |  Length (20)  |  Manner (57)  |  Modern (159)  |  Modern Mathematics (36)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Possible (155)  |  Problem (490)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Reach (119)  |  Reduction (41)  |  Represent (41)  |  Science (2043)  |  Solution (211)  |  Solve (76)  |  Subject (235)  |  Subordinate (8)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Time (594)  |  Treatise (32)  |  View (171)  |  Whatsoever (9)

The experimental investigation by which Ampère established the law of the mechanical action between electric currents is one of the most brilliant achievements in science. The whole, theory and experiment, seems as if it had leaped, full grown and full armed, from the brain of the “Newton of Electricity”. It is perfect in form, and unassailable in accuracy, and it is summed up in a formula from which all the phenomena may be deduced, and which must always remain the cardinal formula of electro-dynamics.
In James Clerk Maxwell, Electricity and Magnetism (1881), Vol. 2, 163
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Achievement (150)  |  Action (184)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Brain (209)  |  Brilliant (28)  |  Cardinal (6)  |  Current (54)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Electricity (135)  |  Establish (55)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Form (308)  |  Formula (79)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Law (513)  |  Leap (34)  |  Mechanical (48)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Science (2043)  |  Theory (690)  |  Unassailable (3)

The Gaia Hypothesis asserts that Earth’s atmosphere is continually interacting with geology (the lithosphere). Earth’s cycling waters (the hydrosphere), and everything that lives (the biosphere). … The image is that the atmosphere is a circulatory system for life’s bio-chemical interplay. If the atmosphere is pan of a larger whole that has some of the qualities of an organism, one of those qualities we must now pray for is resilience.
In Praise of Nature
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (21)  |  Atmosphere (79)  |  Biosphere (11)  |  Continually (16)  |  Cycle (27)  |  Earth (635)  |  Everything (180)  |  Gaia (3)  |  Geology (200)  |  Hypothesis (249)  |  Image (55)  |  Interact (7)  |  Interplay (7)  |  Large (130)  |  Life (1124)  |  Lithosphere (2)  |  Live (269)  |  Organism (150)  |  Pray (16)  |  Quality (93)  |  Resilience (2)  |  System (191)  |  Water (292)

The great artifice of regarding small deviations from the truth as being the truth itself is at the same time the foundation of wit, where the whole thing would often collapse if we were to regard these deviations in a spirit of philosophical rigor.
Aphorism from Georg Christoph Lichtenberg and R.J. Hollingdale (trans.) 'Notebook A: 1765-1770', The Waste Books (1990), 4. Also seen translated as, “The great trick of regarding small departures from the truth as the truth itself—on which is founded the entire integral calculus—is also the basis of our witty speculations, where the whole thing would often collapse if we considered the departures with philosophical rigour,” for example, as quoted in FractalVision: Put Fractals to Work For You (1992), 5, citing Aphorisms: 1764-1799.
Science quotes on:  |  Collapse (17)  |  Consider (80)  |  Departure (9)  |  Entire (46)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Great (524)  |  Integral Calculus (4)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Regard (93)  |  Rigour (16)  |  Small (161)  |  Speculation (103)  |  Trick (24)  |  Truth (914)  |  Wit (35)

The great mathematician, like the great poet or naturalist or great administrator, is born. My contention shall be that where the mathematic endowment is found, there will usually be found associated with it, as essential implications in it, other endowments in generous measure, and that the appeal of the science is to the whole mind, direct no doubt to the central powers of thought, but indirectly through sympathy of all, rousing, enlarging, developing, emancipating all, so that the faculties of will, of intellect and feeling learn to respond, each in its appropriate order and degree, like the parts of an orchestra to the “urge and ardor” of its leader and lord.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (10)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Appropriate (26)  |  Ardor (5)  |  Associate (14)  |  Bear (66)  |  Central (33)  |  Contention (10)  |  Degree (81)  |  Develop (103)  |  Direct (82)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Emancipate (2)  |  Endowment (10)  |  Enlarge (26)  |  Essential (115)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Feel (165)  |  Find (405)  |  Generous (13)  |  Great (524)  |  Implication (22)  |  Indirectly (6)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Leader (28)  |  Learn (281)  |  Lord (16)  |  Mathematic (3)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Measure (102)  |  Mind (743)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Orchestra (2)  |  Order (239)  |  Part (220)  |  Poet (78)  |  Power (358)  |  Respond (11)  |  Rouse (3)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sympathy (23)  |  Thought (536)  |  Urge (16)  |  Usually (31)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Aim (88)  |  Akin (5)  |  Already (28)  |  Appear (115)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Base (71)  |  Beginnings (4)  |  Both (81)  |  Case (98)  |  Central (33)  |  Church (34)  |  Closely (12)  |  Conceive (36)  |  Contain (67)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  David (6)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Desire (140)  |  Development (276)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Dogma (32)  |  Early (61)  |  Element (162)  |  Especially (30)  |  Existence (296)  |  Experience (338)  |  Feel (165)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (405)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (6)  |  Genius (243)  |  God (535)  |  Heretic (5)  |  High (152)  |  Human (548)  |  Image (55)  |  Impress (16)  |  Individual (215)  |  Kind (138)  |  Know (547)  |  Learn (281)  |  Light (345)  |  Marvelous (17)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Order (239)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Prison (9)  |  Prophet (11)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (93)  |  Religious (49)  |  Reveal (50)  |  Saint (11)  |  Significant (35)  |  Single (119)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Stage (54)  |  Strong (72)  |  Sublimity (4)  |  Teachings (3)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Thought (536)  |  Universe (683)  |  Want (175)  |  Wonderful (59)  |  World (892)  |  Writings (5)

The last few meters up to the summit no longer seem so hard. On reaching the top, I sit down and let my legs dangle into space. I don’t have to climb anymore. I pull my camera from my rucksack and, in my down mittens, fumble a long time with the batteries before I have it working properly. Then I film Peter. Now, after the hours of torment, which indeed I didn’t recognize as torment, now, when the monotonous motion of plodding upwards is at an end, and I have nothing more to do than breathe, a great peace floods my whole being. I breathe like someone who has run the race of his life and knows that he may now rest forever. I keep looking all around, because the first time I didn’t see anything of the panorama I had expected from Everest, neither indeed did I notice how the wind was continually chasing snow across the summit. In my state of spiritual abstraction, I no longer belong to myself and to my eyesight. I am nothing more than a single, narrow, gasping lung, floating over the mists and the summits.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Across (32)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Battery (8)  |  Belong (53)  |  Breathe (36)  |  Camera (6)  |  Chase (13)  |  Climb (34)  |  Continually (16)  |  Dangle (2)  |  Down (86)  |  End (195)  |  Everest (10)  |  Expect (44)  |  Eyesight (4)  |  Film (10)  |  First Time (10)  |  Float (21)  |  Flood (36)  |  Forever (59)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Great (524)  |  Hard (99)  |  Hour (71)  |  Keep (100)  |  Know (547)  |  Leg (18)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1124)  |  Long (172)  |  Lung (19)  |  Meter (9)  |  Mist (9)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  Motion (158)  |  Myself (36)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Notice (34)  |  Panorama (4)  |  Peace (84)  |  Plod (2)  |  Properly (20)  |  Pull (22)  |  Race (103)  |  Reach (119)  |  Recognize (66)  |  Rest (93)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Run (57)  |  See (369)  |  Seem (143)  |  Single (119)  |  Sit (47)  |  Snow (24)  |  Someone (21)  |  Space (257)  |  Spiritual (55)  |  State (136)  |  Summit (15)  |  Time (594)  |  Top (34)  |  Torment (14)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Wind (80)  |  Work (626)

The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: “What good is it?” If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, whether we understand it or not.
From 'Conservation' (c.1938), Round River: From the Journals of Aldo Leopold (1953), 141. Collected in The Essential Aldo Leopold: Quotations and Commentaries (1999), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Good (345)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Land (115)  |  Last Word (9)  |  Mechanism (52)  |  Part (220)  |  Plant (199)  |  Understand (326)

The late Mr. David Hume, in his posthumous works, places the powers of generation much above those of our boasted reason; and adds, that reason can only make a machine, as a clock or a ship, but the power of generation makes the maker of the machine; … he concludes, that the world itself might have been generated, rather than created; that is, it might have been gradually produced from very small beginnings, increasing by the activity of its inherent principles, rather than by a sudden evolution of the whole by the Almighty fiat.—What a magnificent idea of the infinite power of THE GREAT ARCHITECT! THE CAUSE OF CAUSES! PARENT OF PARENTS! ENS ENTIUM!
For if we may compare infinities, it would seem to require a greater infinity of power to cause the causes of effects, than to cause the effects themselves.
'Generation', Zoonomia (1794), Vol. 1, 509. Note that this passage was restated in a 1904 translation of a book by August Weismann. That rewording was given in quotation marks and attributed to Erasumus Darwin without reference to David Hume. In the reworded form, it is seen in a number of later works as a direct quote made by Erasmus Darwin. For that restated form see the webpage for August Weismann. Webmaster has checked the quotation on this webpage in the original Zoonomia, and is the only verbatim form found so far.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Almighty (10)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Boast (21)  |  Cause (283)  |  Clock (29)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Creation (239)  |  Effect (165)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Generation (137)  |  Gradually (21)  |  David Hume (33)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Inherent (30)  |  Machine (157)  |  Maker (14)  |  Power (358)  |  Reason (454)  |  Ship (44)  |  Sudden (32)  |  August Weismann (9)

The laws expressing the relations between energy and matter are, however, not solely of importance in pure science. They necessarily come first in order ... in the whole record of human experience, and they control, in the last resort, the rise or fall of political systems, the freedom or bondage of nations, the movements of commerce and industry, the origin of wealth and poverty, and the general physical welfare of the race.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Bondage (2)  |  Commerce (15)  |  Control (111)  |  Energy (214)  |  Experience (338)  |  Expression (104)  |  First (313)  |  Freedom (101)  |  General (156)  |  Human (548)  |  Importance (216)  |  Industry (108)  |  Law (513)  |  Matter (340)  |  Movement (82)  |  Nation (132)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Order (239)  |  Origin (86)  |  Physical (129)  |  Physical Science (65)  |  Politics (95)  |  Poverty (31)  |  Pure Science (23)  |  Race (103)  |  Record (67)  |  Relation (149)  |  Rise And Fall (2)  |  Solely (9)  |  System (191)  |  Wealth (66)  |  Welfare (17)

The mathematician requires tact and good taste at every step of his work, and he has to learn to trust to his own instinct to distinguish between what is really worthy of his efforts and what is not; he must take care not to be the slave of his symbols, but always to have before his mind the realities which they merely serve to express. For these and other reasons it seems to me of the highest importance that a mathematician should be trained in no narrow school; a wide course of reading in the first few years of his mathematical study cannot fail to influence for good the character of the whole of his subsequent work.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1890), Nature, 42, 467.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (95)  |  Character (115)  |  Course (83)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Effort (143)  |  Express (63)  |  Fail (58)  |  First (313)  |  Good (345)  |  High (152)  |  Importance (216)  |  Influence (137)  |  Instinct (65)  |  Learn (281)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Merely (82)  |  Mind (743)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Read (144)  |  Reality (188)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (454)  |  Require (79)  |  School (117)  |  Seem (143)  |  Serve (57)  |  Slave (27)  |  Step (109)  |  Study (461)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Tact (6)  |  Taste (48)  |  Train (45)  |  Trust (49)  |  Wide (27)  |  Work (626)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (299)

The meaning of human life and the destiny of man cannot be separable from the meaning and destiny of life in general. 'What is man?' is a special case of 'What is life?' Probably the human species is not intelligent enough to answer either question fully, but even such glimmerings as are within our powers must be precious to us. The extent to which we can hope to understand ourselves and to plan our future depends in some measure on our ability to read the riddles of the past. The present, for all its awesome importance to us who chance to dwell in it, is only a random point in the long flow of time. Terrestrial life is one and continuous in space and time. Any true comprehension of it requires the attempt to view it whole and not in the artificial limits of any one place or epoch. The processes of life can be adequately displayed only in the course of life throughout the long ages of its existence.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Answer (249)  |  Artificiality (2)  |  Awesome (11)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Dependence (37)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Display (24)  |  Epoch (20)  |  Existence (296)  |  Future (284)  |  Human (548)  |  Importance (216)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Life (1124)  |  Limit (123)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Past (150)  |  Place (174)  |  Plan (87)  |  Power (358)  |  Precious (31)  |  Present (174)  |  Process (261)  |  Question (404)  |  Read (144)  |  Requirement (46)  |  Riddle (22)  |  Separation (36)  |  Species (220)  |  Understanding (325)  |  View (171)

The modern airplane creates a new geographical dimension. A navigable ocean of air blankets the whole surface of the globe. There are no distant places any longer: the world is small and the world is one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (188)  |  Airplane (38)  |  Blanket (9)  |  Create (150)  |  Dimension (38)  |  Distant (32)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Long (172)  |  Modern (159)  |  New (483)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Place (174)  |  Small (161)  |  Surface (101)  |  World (892)

The most wonderful mystery of life may well be the means by which it created so much diversity from so little physical matter. The biosphere, all organisms combined, makes up only about one part in ten billion of the earth's mass. … Yet life has divided into millions of species, the fundamental units, each playing a unique role in relation to the whole.
In 'The Most Fundamental Unit', The Diversity of Life (1992), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (62)  |  Biosphere (11)  |  Combine (34)  |  Create (150)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Divide (40)  |  Earth (635)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Life (1124)  |  Little (184)  |  Mass (78)  |  Matter (340)  |  Means (171)  |  Million (111)  |  Mystery (151)  |  Organism (150)  |  Physical (129)  |  Play (110)  |  Relation (149)  |  Role (49)  |  Species (220)  |  Unique (41)  |  Unit (31)  |  Wonderful (59)

The notion, which is really the fundamental one (and I cannot too strongly emphasise the assertion), underlying and pervading the whole of modern analysis and geometry, is that of imaginary magnitude in analysis and of imaginary space in geometry.
In Presidential Address, in Collected Works, Vol. 11, 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Emphasize (12)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Magnitude (41)  |  Modern (159)  |  Modern Mathematics (36)  |  Notion (57)  |  Pervade (9)  |  Space (257)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Underlying (18)

The observer is not he who merely sees the thing which is before his eyes, but he who sees what parts the thing is composed of. To do this well is a rare talent. One person, from inattention, or attending only in the wrong place, overlooks half of what he sees; another sets down much more than he sees, confounding it with what he imagines, or with what he infers; another takes note of the kind of all the circumstances, but being inexpert in estimating their degree, leaves the quantity of each vague and uncertain; another sees indeed the whole, but makes such an awkward division of it into parts, throwing into one mass things which require to be separated, and separating others which might more conveniently be considered as one, that the result is much the same, sometimes even worse than if no analysis had been attempted at all.
In A System of Logic Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Attend (9)  |  Awkward (7)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Composed (3)  |  Confound (14)  |  Consider (80)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Degree (81)  |  Division (33)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Eye (218)  |  Half (56)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Inattention (4)  |  Inexpert (2)  |  Infer (12)  |  Kind (138)  |  Mass (78)  |  Merely (82)  |  Note (33)  |  Observation (445)  |  Observer (42)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Part (220)  |  Person (153)  |  Place (174)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Rare (47)  |  Require (79)  |  Result (376)  |  See (369)  |  Separate (69)  |  Set Down (2)  |  Talent (61)  |  Uncertain (14)  |  Vague (25)  |  Worse (23)  |  Wrong (138)

The opinion appears to be gaining ground that this very general conception of functionality, born on mathematical ground, is destined to supersede the narrower notion of causation, traditional in connection with the natural sciences. As an abstract formulation of the idea of determination in its most general sense, the notion of functionality includes and transcends the more special notion of causation as a one-sided determination of future phenomena by means of present conditions; it can be used to express the fact of the subsumption under a general law of past, present, and future alike, in a sequence of phenomena. From this point of view the remark of Huxley that Mathematics “knows nothing of causation” could only be taken to express the whole truth, if by the term “causation” is understood “efficient causation.” The latter notion has, however, in recent times been to an increasing extent regarded as just as irrelevant in the natural sciences as it is in Mathematics; the idea of thorough-going determinancy, in accordance with formal law, being thought to be alone significant in either domain.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science (1910), Nature, 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Alone (101)  |  Appear (115)  |  Born (30)  |  Causation (10)  |  Conception (88)  |  Condition (160)  |  Connection (107)  |  Destined (11)  |  Determination (57)  |  Determine (72)  |  Domain (40)  |  Efficient (24)  |  Express (63)  |  Extent (49)  |  Fact (725)  |  Formal (29)  |  Formulation (25)  |  Functionality (2)  |  Future (284)  |  Gain (67)  |  General (156)  |  Ground (90)  |  Huxley (2)  |  Idea (577)  |  Include (40)  |  Increase (145)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Know (547)  |  Latter (21)  |  Law (513)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Means (171)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Natural Science (89)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Notion (57)  |  One-Sided (2)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Past (150)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Point Of View (41)  |  Present (174)  |  Recent (29)  |  Regard (93)  |  Remark (26)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sequence (41)  |  Significant (35)  |  Special (74)  |  Subsumption (3)  |  Supersede (7)  |  Term (120)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Transcend (17)  |  Truth (914)  |  Understand (326)

The overwhelming astonishment, the queerest structure we know about so far in the whole universe, the greatest of all cosmological scientific puzzles, confounding all our efforts to comprehend it, is the earth.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (23)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Confounding (3)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Earth (635)  |  Effort (143)  |  Greatest (62)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Overwhelming (21)  |  Puzzle (35)  |  Science (2043)  |  Structure (221)  |  Universe (683)

The present lack of a definitely acceptable account of the origin of life should certainly not be taken as a stumbling block for the whole Darwinian world view.
In The Blind Watchmaker (1991), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (6)  |  Account (67)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Definite (42)  |  Lack (77)  |  Origin Of Life (35)  |  Present (174)  |  Stumbling Block (4)  |  World View (2)

The quantum is that embarrassing little piece of thread that always hangs from the sweater of space-time. Pull it and the whole thing unravels.
Star Wave: Mind Consciousness of Quantum Physics, 1984
Science quotes on:  |  Embarrassing (3)  |  Hang (24)  |  Little (184)  |  Piece (38)  |  Pull (22)  |  Quantum (14)  |  Space-Time (14)  |  Thread (18)  |  Unravel (5)

The science [of mathematics] has grown to such vast proportion that probably no living mathematician can claim to have achieved its mastery as a whole.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (63)  |  Claim (70)  |  Grow (98)  |  Live (269)  |  Mastery (27)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Modern Mathematics (36)  |  Probably (47)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Science (2043)  |  Vast (88)

The sky seems to be a pure, a cooler blue, the trees a deeper green. The whole world is charged with the glory of God and I feel fire and music under my feet.
On reading the scriptures. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 166
Science quotes on:  |  Blue (56)  |  Charge (34)  |  Cool (13)  |  Deep (121)  |  Feel (165)  |  Fire (132)  |  Foot (60)  |  Glory (57)  |  God (535)  |  Green (32)  |  Music (95)  |  Pure (98)  |  Seem (143)  |  Sky (124)  |  Tree (170)  |  World (892)

The treatises [of Archimedes] are without exception, monuments of mathematical exposition; the gradual revelation of the plan of attack, the masterly ordering of the propositions, the stern elimination of everything not immediately relevant to the purpose, the finish of the whole, are so impressive in their perfection as to create a feeling akin to awe in the mind of the reader.
In A History of Greek Mathematics (1921), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (53)  |  Attack (41)  |  Awe (33)  |  Create (150)  |  Elimination (18)  |  Exposition (13)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Finish (25)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Impressive (20)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mind (743)  |  Monument (26)  |  Order (239)  |  Perfection (88)  |  Plan (87)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Reader (38)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Revelation (34)  |  Work (626)

The unexpected and the incredible belong in this world. Only then is life whole.
Carl Jung
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Incredible (21)  |  Life (1124)  |  Unexpected (36)  |  World (892)

The universe is a disymmetrical whole.
In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur (1902), Vol. 1, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Symmetry (37)  |  Universe (683)

The various branches of knowledge always tend as a whole to stray away from life, and return thither only by a roundabout way.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (102)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Life (1124)  |  Return (55)  |  Stray (6)  |  Tend (36)  |  Various (46)

The whale that wanders round the Pole
Is not a table fish.
You cannot bake or boil him whole
Nor serve him in a dish.
Science quotes on:  |  Bake (2)  |  Boil (15)  |  Dish (3)  |  Fish (95)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Serve (57)  |  Whale (24)

The whole history of physics proves that a new discovery is quite likely lurking at the next decimal place.
In 'The Romance of the Next Decimal Place', Science (1 Jan 1932), 75, No. 1931, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Decimal Place (2)  |  Discovery (676)  |  History Of Physics (3)  |  Likely (33)  |  Lurk (5)  |  New (483)  |  Next (35)  |  Prove (108)

The whole of Mathematics consists in the organization of a series of aids to the imagination in the process of reasoning.
In Universal Algebra (1898), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (41)  |  Consist (45)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (31)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Organization (84)  |  Process (261)  |  Reason (454)  |  Series (50)

The whole philosophy of medicine consists in working out the histories of diseases, and applying the remedies which may dispel them; and Experience is the sole guide. This we attain by … the suggestions of common sense rather than of speculation.
In The Works of Thomas Sydenham, (1850), Vol. 2, 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (76)  |  Attain (42)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Consist (45)  |  Disease (275)  |  Dispel (3)  |  Experience (338)  |  Guide (62)  |  History (368)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Sole (20)  |  Speculation (103)  |  Suggestion (30)  |  Work (626)

The whole point of getting things done is knowing what to leave undone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Know (547)  |  Leave (127)  |  Point (122)  |  Undo (3)

The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (125)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Fanatic (7)  |  Fool (85)  |  Full (63)  |  People (388)  |  Problem (490)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Wise (60)  |  World (892)

The world of ideas which it [mathematics] discloses or illuminates, the contemplation of divine beauty and order which it induces, the harmonious connexion of its parts, the infinite hierarchy and absolute evidence of the truths with which it is concerned, these, and such like, are the surest grounds of the title of mathematics to human regard, and would remain unimpeached and unimpaired were the plan of the universe unrolled like a map at our feet, and the mind of man qualified to take in the whole scheme of creation at a glance.
In Presidential Address to British Association (19 Aug 1869), 'A Plea for the Mathematician', published in Nature (6 Jan 1870), 1, 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Concern (108)  |  Connection (107)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Creation (239)  |  Disclose (11)  |  Divine (60)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Foot (60)  |  Glance (19)  |  Ground (90)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Hierarchy (14)  |  Human (548)  |  Idea (577)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Induce (12)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Map (30)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mind Of Man (7)  |  Order (239)  |  Part (220)  |  Plan (87)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Regard (93)  |  Remain (111)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Title (18)  |  Truth (914)  |  Universe (683)  |  World (892)

The world’s the book where the eternal sense
Wrote his own thoughts; the living temple where,
Painting his very self, with figures fair
He filled the whole immense circumference.
In 'Some Sonnets of Campanella', The Cornhill Magazine (Nov 1877), 36, 549.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Circumference (16)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Fill (61)  |  Immense (42)  |  Living (56)  |  Painting (42)  |  Sense (315)  |  Temple (25)  |  Thought (536)  |  World (892)  |  Write (153)

There are no whole truths; all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil.
In Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead (1954), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Devil (21)  |  Half (56)  |  Truth (914)  |  Trying (19)

There are three ruling ideas, three so to say, spheres of thought, which pervade the whole body of mathematical science, to some one or other of which, or to two or all three of them combined, every mathematical truth admits of being referred; these are the three cardinal notions, of Number, Space and Order.
Arithmetic has for its object the properties of number in the abstract. In algebra, viewed as a science of operations, order is the predominating idea. The business of geometry is with the evolution of the properties of space, or of bodies viewed as existing in space.
In 'A Probationary Lecture on Geometry, York British Association Report (1844), Part 2; Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Admit (44)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Body (243)  |  Business (84)  |  Cardinal (6)  |  Combine (34)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (31)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Exist (147)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Idea (577)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Notion (57)  |  Number (276)  |  Object (169)  |  Operation (118)  |  Order (239)  |  Pervade (9)  |  Predominate (5)  |  Property (123)  |  Refer (13)  |  Rule (173)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2043)  |  Space (257)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Thought (536)  |  Truth (914)  |  View (171)

There could be whole antiworlds and antipeople made out of antiparticles. However, if you ever meet your antiself, don’t shake hands! You would both vanish in a great flash of light.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Antiparticle (2)  |  Both (81)  |  Flash (34)  |  Great (524)  |  Hand (141)  |  Light (345)  |  Meet (31)  |  Shake (29)  |  Vanish (18)

There is a mask of theory over the whole face of nature, if it be theory to infer more than we see.
The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History (1840), Vol. 1, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Face (108)  |  Inference (31)  |  Mask (7)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Theory (690)

There is no art so difficult as the art of observation: it requires a skillful, sober spirit and a well-trained experience, which can only be acquired by practice; for he is not an observer who only sees the thing before him with his eyes, but he who sees of what parts the thing consists, and in what connexion the parts stand to the whole. One person overlooks half from inattention; another relates more than he sees while he confounds it with that which he figures to himself; another sees the parts of the whole, but he throws things together that ought to be separated. ... When the observer has ascertained the foundation of a phenomenon, and he is able to associate its conditions, he then proves while he endeavours to produce the phenomena at his will, the correctness of his observations by experiment. To make a series of experiments is often to decompose an opinion into its individual parts, and to prove it by a sensible phenomenon. The naturalist makes experiments in order to exhibit a phenomenon in all its different parts. When he is able to show of a series of phenomena, that they are all operations of the same cause, he arrives at a simple expression of their significance, which, in this case, is called a Law of Nature. We speak of a simple property as a Law of Nature when it serves for the explanation of one or more natural phenomena.
'The Study of the Natural Sciences: An Introductory Lecture to the Course of Experimental Chemistry in the University of Munich, for the Winter Session of 1852-53,' as translated and republished in The Medical Times and Gazette (22 Jan 1853), N.S. Vol. 6, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (284)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Associate (14)  |  Carelessness (4)  |  Cause (283)  |  Component (16)  |  Condition (160)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Decompose (7)  |  Demonstrate (50)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Endeavour (25)  |  Experience (338)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Expression (104)  |  Eye (218)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Inattention (4)  |  Law Of Nature (64)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Observation (445)  |  Observer (42)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Part (220)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Practice (92)  |  Produce (100)  |  Proof (243)  |  Property (123)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Report (37)  |  Result (376)  |  See (369)  |  Sensible (25)  |  Separate (69)  |  Simple (172)  |  Skillful (6)  |  Sober (9)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Test (124)  |  Together (77)  |  Training (64)  |  Truth (914)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Validity (31)  |  Verify (16)

There’s not a whole lot of new atoms out there.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (280)  |  Lot (29)  |  New (483)

Thought-economy is most highly developed in mathematics, that science which has reached the highest formal development, and on which natural science so frequently calls for assistance. Strange as it may seem, the strength of mathematics lies in the avoidance of all unnecessary thoughts, in the utmost economy of thought-operations. The symbols of order, which we call numbers, form already a system of wonderful simplicity and economy. When in the multiplication of a number with several digits we employ the multiplication table and thus make use of previously accomplished results rather than to repeat them each time, when by the use of tables of logarithms we avoid new numerical calculations by replacing them by others long since performed, when we employ determinants instead of carrying through from the beginning the solution of a system of equations, when we decompose new integral expressions into others that are familiar,—we see in all this but a faint reflection of the intellectual activity of a Lagrange or Cauchy, who with the keen discernment of a military commander marshalls a whole troop of completed operations in the execution of a new one.
In Populär-wissenschafliche Vorlesungen (1903), 224-225.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (79)  |  Activity (128)  |  Already (28)  |  Assistance (10)  |  Avoid (52)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Begin (106)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Call (127)  |  Carry (59)  |  Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy (8)  |  Complete (84)  |  Decompose (7)  |  Develop (103)  |  Development (276)  |  Digit (4)  |  Discernment (3)  |  Economy (54)  |  Employ (35)  |  Equation (93)  |  Execution (17)  |  Expression (104)  |  Faint (7)  |  Familiar (42)  |  Form (308)  |  Formal (29)  |  Frequently (21)  |  High (152)  |  Highly (16)  |  Instead (19)  |  Integral (14)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Keen (10)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (24)  |  Lie (115)  |  Logarithm (9)  |  Long (172)  |  Marshal (4)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Military (29)  |  Multiplication (22)  |  Multiplication Table (10)  |  Natural Science (89)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  New (483)  |  Number (276)  |  Numerical (13)  |  Operation (118)  |  Order (239)  |  Perform (34)  |  Previously (11)  |  Reach (119)  |  Reflection (59)  |  Repeat (40)  |  Replace (30)  |  Result (376)  |  Science (2043)  |  See (369)  |  Seem (143)  |  Several (31)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Solution (211)  |  Strange (94)  |  Strength (79)  |  Symbol (65)  |  System (191)  |  Table (35)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Troop (5)  |  Unnecessary (15)  |  Utmost (11)  |  Wonderful (59)

To be in a world which is a hell, to be of that world and neither to believe in or guess at anything but that world is not merely hell but the only possible damnation: the act of a man damning himself. It may be—I hope it is—redemption to guess and perhaps perceive that the universe, the hell which we see for all its beauty, vastness, majesty, is only part of a whole which is quite unimaginable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (115)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Belief (503)  |  Damn (12)  |  Damnation (4)  |  Guess (48)  |  Hell (32)  |  Hope (174)  |  Majesty (13)  |  Merely (82)  |  Part (220)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Possible (155)  |  Redemption (3)  |  See (369)  |  Unimaginable (6)  |  Universe (683)  |  Vastness (11)  |  World (892)

To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.
Testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on Forest & Public Lands Management regarding the Utah Public Lands Management Act of 1995, Washington, D.C. (13 Jul 1995).
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (84)  |  Connection (107)  |  Human (548)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Separation (36)  |  Wildness (4)

To educate means to influence the whole personality of the student.
Quoted as an epigraph, without citation, in Stanley Gudder, A Mathematical Journey (1976), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Educate (12)  |  Influence (137)  |  Personality (47)  |  Student (201)

To say that mind is a product or function of protoplasm, or of its molecular changes, is to use words to which we can attach no clear conception. You cannot have, in the whole, what does not exist in any of the parts; and those who argue thus should put forth a definite conception of matter, with clearly enunciated properties, and show, that the necessary result of a certain complex arrangement of the elements or atoms of that matter, will be the production of self-consciousness. There is no escape from this dilemma—either all matter is conscious, or consciousness is something distinct from matter, and in the latter case, its presence in material forms is a proof of the existence of conscious beings, outside of, and independent of, what we term matter. The foregoing considerations lead us to the very important conclusion, that matter is essentially force, and nothing but force; that matter, as popularly understood, does not exist, and is, in fact, philosophically inconceivable. When we touch matter, we only really experience sensations of resistance, implying repulsive force; and no other sense can give us such apparently solid proofs of the reality of matter, as touch does. This conclusion, if kept constantly present in the mind, will be found to have a most important bearing on almost every high scientific and philosophical problem, and especially on such as relate to our own conscious existence.
In 'The Limits of Natural Selection as Applied to Man', last chapter of Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection (1870), 365-366.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (19)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arrangement (58)  |  Atom (280)  |  Attach (13)  |  Bearing (9)  |  Being (41)  |  Case (98)  |  Certain (125)  |  Change (363)  |  Clear (97)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Complex (94)  |  Conception (88)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Definite (42)  |  Dilemma (8)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Element (162)  |  Escape (46)  |  Especially (30)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Exist (147)  |  Existence (296)  |  Experience (338)  |  Fact (725)  |  Force (249)  |  Form (308)  |  Forth (13)  |  Found (11)  |  Function (128)  |  Give (200)  |  High (152)  |  Important (202)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Independent (65)  |  Latter (21)  |  Lead (158)  |  Material (154)  |  Matter (340)  |  Mind (743)  |  Molecular (7)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Outside (48)  |  Part (220)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Presence (33)  |  Present (174)  |  Problem (490)  |  Product (82)  |  Production (115)  |  Proof (243)  |  Property (123)  |  Protoplasm (12)  |  Reality (188)  |  Really (78)  |  Relate (19)  |  Repulsive (7)  |  Resistance (26)  |  Result (376)  |  Say (228)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Self-Consciousness (2)  |  Sensation (28)  |  Sense (315)  |  Show (90)  |  Solid (50)  |  Term (120)  |  Touch (76)  |  Understood (9)  |  Word (299)

We do not draw conclusions with our eyes, but with our reasoning powers, and if the whole of the rest of living nature proclaims with one accord from all sides the evolution of the world of organisms, we cannot assume that the process stopped short of Man. But it follows also that the factors which brought about the development of Man from his Simian ancestry must be the same as those which have brought about the whole of evolution.
Translation of Weismann's work in German, by John Arthur Thomson and Margaret R. Thomson, The Evolution Theory (1904), Vol. 2, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Ancestry (4)  |  Assume (37)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Development (276)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Eye (218)  |  Factor (45)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Organism (150)  |  Process (261)  |  Proclaim (15)  |  Reasoning (95)  |  Short (49)  |  Simian (2)  |  Stop (75)

We only have to look around us to see how complexity ... and psychic “temperature” are still rising: and rising no longer on the scale of the individual but now on that of the planet. This indication is so familiar to us that we cannot but recognize the objective, experiential, reality of a directionally controlled transformation of the Noosphere “as a whole.”
In Teilhard de Chardin and René Hague (trans.), The Heart of Matter (1950, 1978), 38. His term Noosphere refers to the collective sphere of human consciousness.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (90)  |  Controlled (3)  |  Familiar (42)  |  Indication (23)  |  Individual (215)  |  Objective (63)  |  Planet (262)  |  Psychic (6)  |  Reality (188)  |  Recognize (66)  |  Rising (9)  |  Scale (62)  |  See (369)  |  Temperature (46)  |  Transformation (54)

We've been fighting from the beginning for organic architecture. That is, architecture where the whole is to the part as the part is to the whole, and where the nature of materials, the nature of the purpose, the nature of the entire performance becomes a necessity—architecture of democracy.
Quoted in Aline B. Louchheim, 'Wright Analyzes Architect's Need', New York Times (26 May 1953), 23. Wright was interviewed at age 83 for the opening of a small exhibition of his work at the gallery of the National Institute and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (43)  |  Democracy (26)  |  Fight (44)  |  Material (154)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Organic (54)  |  Part (220)  |  Performance (33)  |  Purpose (193)

What is laid down, ordered, factual, is never enough to embrace the whole truth: life always spills over the rim of every cup.
As quoted, without source, in Philip J. Davis and Reuben Hersh, The Mathematical Experience (1981, 2012), xxv.
Science quotes on:  |  Cup (7)  |  Down (86)  |  Embrace (32)  |  Factual (8)  |  Laid (7)  |  Life (1124)  |  Ordered (2)  |  Rim (5)  |  Spill (2)  |  Truth (914)

When the logician has resolved each demonstration into a host of elementary operations, all of them correct, he will not yet be in possession of the whole reality, that indefinable something that constitutes the unity ... Now pure logic cannot give us this view of the whole; it is to intuition that we must look for it.
Science and Method (1914 edition, reprint 2003), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (83)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Indefinable (4)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Logic (247)  |  Logician (10)  |  Operation (118)  |  Reality (188)  |  Resolve (19)  |  Unity (53)

When we contemplate the whole globe as one great dewdrop, striped and dotted with continents and islands, flying through space with other stars all singing and shining together as one, the whole universe appears as an infinite storm of beauty.
John Muir
Travels in Alaska
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (115)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Continent (52)  |  Dewdrop (2)  |  Dot (11)  |  Fly (99)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (524)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Island (24)  |  Shine (43)  |  Sing (25)  |  Space (257)  |  Star (336)  |  Storm (30)  |  Stripe (4)  |  Together (77)  |  Universe (683)

When we survey our lives and endeavours we soon observe that almost the whole of our actions and desires are bound up with the existence of other human beings. We see that our whole nature resembles that of the social animals. We eat food that others have grown, wear clothes that others have made, live in houses that others have built. The greater part of our knowledge and beliefs has been communicated to us by other people through the medium of a language which others have created. Without language our mental capacities would be poor indeed, comparable to those of the higher animals; we have, therefore, to admit that we owe our principal advantage over the beasts to the fact of living in human society. The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Admit (44)  |  Advantage (73)  |  Alone (101)  |  Animal (356)  |  Beast (38)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Belief (503)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (93)  |  Build (117)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Communicate (16)  |  Comparable (5)  |  Conceive (36)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Create (150)  |  Degree (81)  |  Desire (140)  |  Direct (82)  |  Eat (52)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  Existence (296)  |  Fact (725)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Food (152)  |  Grave (26)  |  Great (524)  |  Grow (98)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (152)  |  House (43)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Human Society (5)  |  Individual (215)  |  Individuality (13)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Language (217)  |  Leave (127)  |  Live (269)  |  Material (154)  |  Medium (12)  |  Member (39)  |  Mental (78)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Observe (75)  |  Owe (23)  |  Part (220)  |  People (388)  |  Poor (57)  |  Primitive (41)  |  Principal (28)  |  Remain (111)  |  Resemble (26)  |  See (369)  |  Significance (71)  |  Social (108)  |  Soon (34)  |  Spiritual (55)  |  Survey (20)  |  Thought (536)  |  Virtue (61)  |  Wear (18)

When wireless is perfectly applied the whole earth will be converted into a huge brain, which in fact it is, all things being particles of a real and rhythmic whole. We shall be able to communicate with one another instantly, irrespective of distance. Not
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (76)  |  Brain (209)  |  Communicate (16)  |  Convert (22)  |  Distance (76)  |  Earth (635)  |  Fact (725)  |  Huge (25)  |  Instantly (5)  |  Irrespective (3)  |  Particle (99)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Real (148)  |  Rhythmic (2)  |  Wireless (5)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Aim (88)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (249)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (49)  |  Belief (503)  |  Best (172)  |  Better (190)  |  Break (54)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (11)  |  Connect (30)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (83)  |  Country (144)  |  Decision (72)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (42)  |  Deliberate (12)  |  Demand (74)  |  Deny (41)  |  Describe (56)  |  Design (113)  |  Different (178)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Easy (98)  |  Element (162)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (13)  |  Existence (296)  |  Explain (105)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Fact (725)  |  First (313)  |  Form (308)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Group (72)  |  Human (548)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Independent (65)  |  Individual (215)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intention (28)  |  Learn (281)  |  Likely (33)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (230)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Movement (82)  |  Natural Science (89)  |  Observe (75)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (239)  |  Part (220)  |  Path (84)  |  Pattern (79)  |  People (388)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Possible (155)  |  Prejudice (66)  |  Problem (490)  |  Produce (100)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Raise (34)  |  Reckon (14)  |  Region (35)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Result (376)  |  Room (38)  |  Seek (104)  |  Seem (143)  |  Show (90)  |  Single (119)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Science (31)  |  Society (227)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Technical (40)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (536)  |  Totality (10)  |  Track (14)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (141)  |  Type (51)  |  Wild (48)

Whoever could make two ears of corn or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
In 'Voyage to Brobdingnag', Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World (1726), Vol. 1, Pt. 2, 129. Compare later remark by See Henry Augustus Rowland, beginning “He who makes two blades of grass grow…” on the Henry Augustus Rowland Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (190)  |  Corn (13)  |  Country (144)  |  Deserve (28)  |  Essential (115)  |  Grass (35)  |  Ground (90)  |  Grow (98)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Politician (26)  |  Race (103)  |  Service (64)  |  Together (77)

William Blake called division the sin of man; Faraday was a great man because he was utterly undivided. His whole, very harmonious, very well balanced, … and used the brain in the limited way in which it is useful…. [H]e built up his few but precious speculations. Their simplicity rivals with their forcefulness.
In 'The Scientific Grammar of Michael Faraday’s Diaries', Part I, 'The Classic of Science', A Classic and a Founder (1937), collected in Rosenstock-Huessy Papers (1981), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (54)  |  William Blake (37)  |  Brain (209)  |  Divided (3)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Great (524)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Limited (18)  |  Precious (31)  |  Simple (172)  |  Sin (30)  |  Speculation (103)  |  Useful (98)  |  Way (37)

You should look at the entire Bible as a whole rather then narrowly, if you can, under close scrutiny and with juxtaposition of passages
James Dye
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bible (91)  |  Close (66)  |  Entire (46)  |  Juxtaposition (3)  |  Narrowly (4)  |  Passage (20)  |  Scrutiny (14)

[The] humanization of mathematical teaching, the bringing of the matter and the spirit of mathematics to bear not merely upon certain fragmentary faculties of the mind, but upon the whole mind, that this is the greatest desideratum is. I assume, beyond dispute.
Address (28 Mar 1912), Michigan School Masters' Club, Ann Arbor, 'The Humanization of the Teaching of Mathematics. Printed in Science (26 Apr 1912). Collected in The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking: Essays and Addresses (1916), 62-63.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (37)  |  Desideratum (2)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Fragmentary (4)  |  Greatest (62)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mind (743)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Teaching (107)

~~[Attributed]~~ A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.
As quoted, without citation, in William Joseph Grace, Art of Communicating Ideas (1952), 389. Sadly, much searching produces no primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Car (27)  |  Education (333)  |  Freight (3)  |  Railroad (27)  |  School (117)  |  Steal (13)  |  University (80)

…comparing the capacity of computers to the capacity of the human brain, I’ve often wondered, where does our success come from? The answer is synthesis, the ability to combine creativity and calculation, art and science, into whole that is much greater than the sum of its parts.
In How Life Imitates Chess: Making the Right Moves, from the Board to the Boardroom (2007), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Answer (249)  |  Art (284)  |  Brain (209)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Combination (91)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Computer (104)  |  Creativity (70)  |  Greater (42)  |  Human (548)  |  Part (220)  |  Science (2043)  |  Success (248)  |  Sum (41)  |  Synthesis (43)  |  Wonder (169)

“That’s another thing we’ve learned from your Nation,” said Mein Herr, “map-making. But we’ve carried it much further than you. What do you consider the largest map that would be really useful?”
“About six inches to the mile.”
“Only six inches!” exclaimed Mein Herr. “We very soon got to six yards to the mile. Then we tried a hundred yards to the mile. And then came the grandest idea of all! We actually made a map of the country, on the scale of a mile to the mile!
“Have you used it much?” I enquired.
“It has never been spread out, yet,” said Mein Herr: “the farmers objected: they said it would cover the whole country, and shut out the sunlight! So we now use the country itself, as its own map, and I assure you it does nearly as well.”
From Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (47)  |  Assure (15)  |  Cartography (3)  |  Country (144)  |  Cover (37)  |  Enquire (4)  |  Farmer (25)  |  Grand (27)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Idea (577)  |  Inch (9)  |  Large (130)  |  Making (27)  |  Map (30)  |  Mile (39)  |  Model (80)  |  Object (169)  |  Scale (62)  |  Shut (9)  |  Spread (33)  |  Sunlight (18)  |  Useful (98)  |  Yard (7)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.