Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Conquer

Conquer Quotes (37 quotes)

... the United States was not built by those who waited and rested and wished to look behind them. This country was conquered by those who moved forward, and so will space.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Build (204)  |  Country (251)  |  Forward (102)  |  Look (582)  |  Move (216)  |  Rest (280)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  United States (23)  |  Wait (58)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Despair (40)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

About weak points [of the Origin] I agree. The eye to this day gives me a cold shudder, but when I think of the fine known gradations, my reason tells me I ought to conquer the cold shudder.
Letter to Asa Gray, 8 or 9 February 1860. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1860 (1993), Vol. 8, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (112)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Known (454)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Reason (744)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Weak (71)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Depend (228)  |  Describe (128)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Goethe (3)  |  Higher (37)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Magic (86)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (746)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Real (149)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solution (267)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

As we conquer peak after peak we see in front of us regions full of interest and beauty, but we do not see our goal, wo do not see the horizon; in the distance tower still higher peaks, which will yield to those who ascend them still wider prospects, and deepen the feeling, the truth of which is emphasised by every advance in science, that “Great are the Works of the Lord.”
In Presidential Address to the British Association, as quoted in Arthur L. Foley, 'Recent Developments in Physical Science, The Popular Science Monthly (1910), 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lord (93)  |  Peak (20)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Region (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Tower (42)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

Curiosity will conquer fear even more than bravery will.
The Crock of Gold (1912), 9
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Fear (197)  |  More (2559)  |  Will (2355)

Do not all charms fly
At the mere touch of cold philosophy?
There was an awful rainbow once in heaven:
We know her woof, her texture; she is given
In the dull catalogue of common things.
Philosophy will clip an Angel’s wings,
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line,
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine
Unweave a rainbow.
Lamia 1820, II, lines 229-37. In John Barnard (ed.), John Keats. The Complete Poems (1973), 431.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Angel (44)  |  Charm (51)  |  Cold (112)  |  Common (436)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dull (54)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fly (146)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mine (76)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poem (96)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)

Evolution: At the Mind's Cinema
I turn the handle and the story starts:
Reel after reel is all astronomy,
Till life, enkindled in a niche of sky,
Leaps on the stage to play a million parts.
Life leaves the slime and through all ocean darts;
She conquers earth, and raises wings to fly;
Then spirit blooms, and learns how not to die,-
Nesting beyond the grave in others' hearts.
I turn the handle: other men like me
Have made the film: and now I sit and look
In quiet, privileged like Divinity
To read the roaring world as in a book.
If this thy past, where shall they future climb,
O Spirit, built of Elements and Time?
'Evolution: At the Mind's Cinema' (1922), in The Captive Shrew and Other Poems of a Biologist (1932), 55.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Death (388)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Film (10)  |  Fly (146)  |  Future (429)  |  Grave (52)  |  Handle (28)  |  Heart (229)  |  Leap (53)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Niche (9)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Poem (96)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Read (287)  |  Sky (161)  |  Slime (6)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Stage (143)  |  Start (221)  |  Story (118)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)

Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom, in the pursuit of truth as in the endeavour after a worthy manner of life.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Fear (197)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manner (58)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Worthy (34)

For man being the minister and interpreter of nature, acts and understands so far as he has observed of the order, the works and mind of nature, and can proceed no further; for no power is able to loose or break the chain of causes, nor is nature to be conquered but by submission: whence those twin intentions, human knowledge and human power, are really coincident; and the greatest hindrance to works is the ignorance of causes.
In The Great lnstauration.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Being (1278)  |  Break (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hindrance (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Intention (46)  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Loose (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minister (9)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Submission (4)  |  Twin (15)  |  Understand (606)  |  Work (1351)

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply,– there are always new worlds to conquer.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Apply (160)  |  Belong (162)  |  Country (251)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fortunately (8)  |  Hero (42)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Know (1518)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  World (1774)

God has no intention of setting a limit to the efforts of man to conquer space.
Pius XII
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Effort (227)  |  God (757)  |  Intention (46)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Space (500)

I cannot find anything showing early aptitude for acquiring languages; but that he [Clifford] had it and was fond of exercising it in later life is certain. One practical reason for it was the desire of being able to read mathematical papers in foreign journals; but this would not account for his taking up Spanish, of which he acquired a competent knowledge in the course of a tour to the Pyrenees. When he was at Algiers in 1876 he began Arabic, and made progress enough to follow in a general way a course of lessons given in that language. He read modern Greek fluently, and at one time he was furious about Sanskrit. He even spent some time on hieroglyphics. A new language is a riddle before it is conquered, a power in the hand afterwards: to Clifford every riddle was a challenge, and every chance of new power a divine opportunity to be seized. Hence he was likewise interested in the various modes of conveying and expressing language invented for special purposes, such as the Morse alphabet and shorthand. … I have forgotten to mention his command of French and German, the former of which he knew very well, and the latter quite sufficiently; …
In paper, 'William Kingdon Clifford', The Fortnightly Review (1879), 31, 671. Published in advance of Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Clifford’s Lectures and Essays (1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 9. The 'Introduction' was written by Pollock.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Arabic (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Command (58)  |  Course (409)  |  Desire (204)  |  Divine (112)  |  Early (185)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Former (137)  |  French (20)  |  General (511)  |  German (36)  |  Greek (107)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  Interest (386)  |  Journal (30)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Modern (385)  |  New (1216)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progress (465)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Shorthand (5)  |  Special (184)  |  Spent (85)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tour (2)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)

I have learnt that all our theories are not Truth itself, but resting places or stages on the way to the conquest of Truth, and that we must be contented to have obtained for the strivers after Truth such a resting place which, if it is on a mountain, permits us to view the provinces already won and those still to be conquered.
Liebig to Gilbert (25 Dec 1870). Rothamsted Archives. Quotation supplied by W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Permit (58)  |  Province (35)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

I wept when I saw the color of the sea—how can a mere color make one cry? Or moonlight, or the luminescence of the sea in a pitch black night? … But if there is one thing which is more worthy of our admiration than natural beauty, it is the art of men who have conquered this never-ending sea so Fully in a struggle that has been going since the time of the Phoenicians.
In an article 'Voyage of a German Professor to Eldorado' describing his summer 1905 travels for a series of lectures at Berkeley in America. As quoted in, George Greenstein, 'The Bulldog: A Profile of Ludwig Boltzmann', The American Scholar (1 Jan 1999), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Black (42)  |  Color (137)  |  Cry (29)  |  Luminescence (2)  |  Mere (84)  |  Moonlight (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Beauty (5)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weep (5)

In the enfranchised mind of the scientific naturalist, the usual feelings of repugnance simply do not exist. Curiosity conquers prejudice.
Under pen-name of W. N. P. Barbellion, Journal of a Disappointed Man (1919), 215
Science quotes on:  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Scientific (941)

It is not knowledge, but the act of learning, not possession but the act of getting there, which grants the greatest enjoyment. When I have clarified and exhausted a subject, then I turn away from it, in order to go into darkness again; the never-satisfied man is so strange if he has completed a structure, then it is not in order to dwell in it peacefully,but in order to begin another. I imagine the world conqueror must feel thus, who, after one kingdom is scarcely conquered, stretches out his arms for others.
Letter to Farkas Wolfgang Bolyai (2 Sep 1808). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biography (240)  |  Completed (30)  |  Conqueror (8)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Feel (367)  |  Grant (73)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possession (65)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Strange (157)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subject (521)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)

It is one of the triumphs of human wit ... to conquer by humility and submissiveness ... to make oneself small in order to appear great ... such ... are often the expedients of the neurotic.
In The Neurotic Constitution (1917), 81-82.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Expedient (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humility (28)  |  Neurotic (6)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Order (632)  |  Small (477)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Wit (59)

Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science instead of its terrors. Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths, and encourage the arts and commerce.
From Inaugural Address (20 Jan 1961). As quoted in Elizabeth Sirimarco, The Cold War (2005), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Both (493)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Depth (94)  |  Desert (56)  |  Disease (328)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Eradicate (5)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  Seek (213)  |  Side (233)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Terror (30)  |  Together (387)  |  Wonder (236)

Let the mind rise from victory to victory over surrounding nature, let it but conquer for human life and activity not only the surface of the earth but also all that lies between the depth of the sea and the outer limits of the atmosphere; let it command for its service prodigious energy to flow from one part of the universe to the other, let it annihilate space for the transference of its thoughts.
In Ivan Pavlov and William Horsley Gantt (trans.), Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928, 1941), Preface, 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Command (58)  |  Depth (94)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Flow (83)  |  Human (1468)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sea (308)  |  Service (110)  |  Space (500)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Victory (39)

Man will not always stay on earth; the pursuit of light and space will lead him to penetrate the bounds of the atmosphere, timidly at first, but in the end to conquer the whole of solar space
Epitaph he wrote for himself, engraved in bronze letters on the tall grey stone obelisk raised over his grave. As translated by Kenneth Syers and given in the English edition, Beyond the Planet Earth (1960) of K. Tsiolkovsky’s original Russian book (1920). Also seen translated as, “Mankind will not remain on the earth forever, but, in search of light and space, will at first timidly penetrate beyond the limits of the atmosphere and then finally conquer the spaces of the solar system.”
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bound (119)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Lead (384)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Mankind will not remain on Earth forever, but in its quest for light and space will at first timidly penetrate beyond the confines of the atmosphere, and later will conquer for itself all the space near the Sun.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Confine (26)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  Forever (103)  |  Late (118)  |  Light (607)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Quest (39)  |  Remain (349)  |  Space (500)  |  Sun (385)  |  Timid (5)  |  Will (2355)

Natural science is one of man’s weapons in his fight for freedom. For the purpose of attaining freedom in the world of nature, man must use natural science to understand, conquer, and change nature and thus attain freedom from nature.
In Speech (5 Feb 1940) to the Natural Science Research Society for the Border Regions, The Thoughts of Chairman Mao Tse-tung (1967) 127.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attain (125)  |  Change (593)  |  Fight (44)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Science (3879)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  World (1774)

Never leave an unsolved difficulty behind. I mean, don’t go any further in that book till the difficulty is conquered. In this point, Mathematics differs entirely from most other subjects. Suppose you are reading an Italian book, and come to a hopelessly obscure sentence—don’t waste too much time on it, skip it, and go on; you will do very well without it. But if you skip a mathematical difficulty, it is sure to crop up again: you will find some other proof depending on it, and you will only get deeper and deeper into the mud.
From letter to Edith Rix with hints for studying (about Mar 1885), in Stuart Dodgson Collingwood, The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll (1898), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Book (392)  |  Crop (25)  |  Deep (233)  |  Depend (228)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Italian (12)  |  Learning (274)  |  Leave (130)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mud (26)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Skip (4)  |  Studying (70)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Waste (101)  |  Will (2355)

Science does not present itself to man until mind conquers matter in striving to subject the result of experimental investigation to rational combinations.
In Alexander Humboldt and E.C. Otté (trans.), 'Introduction', Cosmos: Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe (1852), Vol. 1, 76. The translator’s preface is dated 1844.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (144)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Present (619)  |  Rational (90)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strive (46)  |  Subject (521)

The field of scientific abstraction encompasses independent kingdoms of ideas and of experiments and within these, rulers whose fame outlasts the centuries. But they are not the only kings in science. He also is a king who guides the spirit of his contemporaries by knowledge and creative work, by teaching and research in the field of applied science, and who conquers for science provinces which have only been raided by craftsmen.
While president of the German Chemical Society, making memorial remarks dedicated to the deceased Professor Lunge (Jan 1923). As quoted in Richard Willstätter, Arthur Stoll (ed. of the original German) and Lilli S. Hornig (trans.), From My Life: The Memoirs of Richard Willstätter (1958), 174-175.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Century (310)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Craftsman (5)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fame (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Guide (97)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  King (35)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Province (35)  |  Raid (4)  |  Research (664)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Work (1351)

The genius of Laplace was a perfect sledge hammer in bursting purely mathematical obstacles; but, like that useful instrument, it gave neither finish nor beauty to the results. In truth, in truism if the reader please, Laplace was neither Lagrange nor Euler, as every student is made to feel. The second is power and symmetry, the third power and simplicity; the first is power without either symmetry or simplicity. But, nevertheless, Laplace never attempted investigation of a subject without leaving upon it the marks of difficulties conquered: sometimes clumsily, sometimes indirectly, always without minuteness of design or arrangement of detail; but still, his end is obtained and the difficulty is conquered.
In 'Review of “Théorie Analytique des Probabilites” par M. le Marquis de Laplace, 3eme edition. Paris. 1820', Dublin Review (1837), 2, 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Clumsiness (2)  |  Design (195)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  End (590)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minuteness (8)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Please (65)  |  Power (746)  |  Purely (109)  |  Result (677)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sledge Hammer (3)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)

The moon, which is a favorite of the poets and portrayed by the Buddhists as representing the esthetic qualities of peace, serenity and beauty, is now being conquered by man’s ever expanding knowledge of science and technology. What was a mere conceptional imagination is today a concrete reality. The American landing on the moon symbolizes the very acme of scientific achievement. It is indeed a phenomenal feat of far-reaching consequences for the world of science.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  America (127)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Esthetic (3)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Feat (10)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Moon Landing (8)  |  Peace (108)  |  Poet (83)  |  Quality (135)  |  Reality (261)  |  Represent (155)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serenity (9)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Technology (257)  |  Today (314)  |  World (1774)

The problems of the infinite have challenged man’s mind and have fired his imagination as no other single problem in the history of thought. The infinite appears both strange and familiar, at times beyond our grasp, at times easy and natural to understand. In conquering it, man broke the fetters that bound him to earth. All his faculties were required for this conquest—his reasoning powers, his poetic fancy, his desire to know.
With co-author James R Newman, in 'Beyond the Google', Mathematics and the Imagination (1940), 35.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bind (25)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Break (99)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Desire (204)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Fire (189)  |  Grasp (61)  |  History (673)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poetic (7)  |  Power (746)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Single (353)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)

The Romans would never have found time to conquer the world if they had been obliged first to learn Latin.
In Heinrich Heinne and Charles Godfrey Leland (trans.), Pictures of Travel (1871), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Latin (38)  |  Learn (629)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Roman (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

There is no art or science that is too difficult for industry to attain to; it is the gift of tongues, and makes a man understood and valued in all countries, and by all nations; it is the philosopher's stone, that turns all metals, and even stones, into gold, and suffers not want to break into its dwelling; it is the northwest passage, that brings the merchant's ships as soon to him as he can desire: in a word, it conquers all enemies, and makes fortune itself pay contribution.
'Essay on Industry' (1670). In Thomas Henry Lister, Life and Administration of Edward, first Earl of Clarendon (1838), Vol. 2, 566.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Attain (125)  |  Break (99)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Country (251)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gold (97)  |  Industry (137)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Metal (84)  |  Nation (193)  |  Northwest Passage (2)  |  Passage (50)  |  Pay (43)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosopher’s Stone (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Ship (62)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stone (162)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Value (365)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)

There is, it appears, a conspiracy of scientists afoot. Their purpose is to break down religion, propagate immorality, and so reduce mankind to the level of brutes. They are the sworn and sinister agents of Beelzebub, who yearns to conquer the world, and has his eye especially upon Tennessee.
[Report on the Scopes Monkey Trial.]
Baltimore Evening Sun (11 Jul 1925). In H.L. Mencken, S. T. Joshi (Ed.), H.L. Mencken on Religion (2002), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Beelzebub (2)  |  Break (99)  |  Brute (28)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Down (456)  |  Eye (419)  |  Immorality (7)  |  Level (67)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Religion (361)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Scope (45)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (7)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Swear (6)  |  State of Tennessee (3)  |  Trial (57)  |  World (1774)  |  Yearn (12)

There seem to be but three ways for a nation to acquire wealth: the first is by war, as the Romans did, in plundering their conquered neighbors—this is robbery; the second by commerce, which is generally cheating; the third by agriculture, the only honest way, wherein man receives a real increase of the seed thrown into the ground, in a kind of continual miracle, wrought by the hand of God in his favor, as a reward for his innocent life and his virtuous industry.
In 'Positions to be Examined', The Works of Benjamin Franklin Consisting of Essays, Humorous, Moral and Literary (1824), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Cheating (2)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Continual (43)  |  Favor (63)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  Honest (50)  |  Increase (210)  |  Industry (137)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Nation (193)  |  Plunder (6)  |  Real (149)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reward (68)  |  Robbery (6)  |  Roman (36)  |  Seed (93)  |  Throw (43)  |  Virtuous (9)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wealth (94)

Today there remain but a few small areas on the world’s map unmarked by explorers’ trails. Human courage and endurance have conquered the Poles; the secrets of the tropical jungles have been revealed. The highest mountains of the earth have heard the voice of man. But this does not mean that the youth of the future has no new worlds to vanquish. It means only that the explorer must change his methods.
On the Trail of Ancient Man (1926), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Courage (69)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endurance (6)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Map (44)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Pole (46)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Secret (194)  |  Small (477)  |  Today (314)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

True and constant vigour of body is the effect of health, which is much better preserved with watery, herbaceous, frugal, and tender food, than with vinous, abundant, hard, and gross flesh (che col cameo vinoso ed unto abundante e duro). And in a sound body, a clear intelligence, and desire to suppress the mischievous inclinations (voglie dannose), and to conquer the irrational passions, produces true worth.
From Dell Vitto Pitagorico (1743), (The Pythagorean Diet: for the Use of the Medical Faculty), as translated quotes in Howard Williams, The Ethics of Diet: A Catena of Authorities Deprecatory of the Practice of Flesh-Eating (1883), 158.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abundant (22)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Constant (144)  |  Desire (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Food (199)  |  Hard (243)  |  Health (193)  |  Herbaceous (2)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Mischievous (11)  |  Passion (114)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Sound (183)  |  Suppress (6)  |  Tender (4)  |  Vegetarian (13)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Water (481)  |  Worth (169)

We claim to be more moral than other nations, and to conquer and govern and tax and plunder weaker peoples for their good! While robbing them we actually claim to be benefactors! And then we wonder, or profess to wonder, why other Governments hate us! Are they not fully justified in hating us? Is it surprising that they seek every means to annoy us, that they struggle to get navies to compete with us, and look forward to a time when some two or three of them may combine together and thoroughly humble and cripple us? And who can deny that any just Being, looking at all the nations of the earth with impartiality and thorough knowledge, would decide that we deserve to be humbled, and that it might do us good?
In 'Practical Politics', The Clarion (30 Sep 1904), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefactor (4)  |  Claim (146)  |  Combine (57)  |  Deny (66)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Forward (102)  |  Good (889)  |  Govern (64)  |  Government (110)  |  Hate (64)  |  Humble (50)  |  Impartiality (7)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Navy (9)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Plunder (6)  |  Profess (20)  |  Seek (213)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Tax (26)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Why (491)  |  Wonder (236)

With whom [do] the adherents of historicism actually empathize[?] The answer is inevitable: with the victor. And all rulers are the heirs of those who conquered before them. Hence, empathy with the victor invariably benefits the rulers. Historical materialists know what that means. Whoever has emerged victorious participates to this day in the triumphal procession in which the present rulers step over those who are lying prostrate. According to traditional practice, the spoils are carried along in the procession. They are called cultural treasures, and a historical materialist views them with cautious detachment. For without exception the cultural treasures he surveys have an origin which he cannot contemplate without horror. They owe their existence not only to the efforts of the great minds and talents who have created them, but also to the anonymous toil of their contemporaries. There is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism.
'Theses on the Philosophy of History' (completed 1940, first published 1950). In Illuminations, ed. Hannah Arendt and trans. Harry Zohn (1970), 258.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Barbarism (7)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Empathy (3)  |  Exception (73)  |  Existence (456)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heir (12)  |  Historical (70)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Horror (14)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Origin (239)  |  Owe (71)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Procession (5)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Step (231)  |  Survey (33)  |  Talent (94)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toil (25)  |  Treasure (57)  |  View (488)  |  Whoever (42)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.