Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Ruler

Ruler Quotes (21 quotes)

For a modern ruler the laws of conservation and transformation of energy, when the vivifing stream takes its source, the ways it wends its course in nature, and how, under wisdom and knowledge, it may be intertwined with human destiny, instead of careering headlong to the ocean, are a study at least as pregnant with consequences to life as any lesson taught by the long unscientific history of man.
Science and Life (1920), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Course (409)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Energy (344)  |  Energy Conservation (5)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Stream (81)  |  Study (653)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Unscientific (13)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wisdom (221)

Gold and iron at the present day, as in ancient times, are the rulers of the world; and the great events in the world of mineral art are not the discovery of new substances, but of new and rich localities of old ones.
Lecture (26 Npv 1851), to the London Society of Arts, 'The General Bearing of the Great Exhibition on the Progress of Art and Science', collected in Lectures on the Results of the Great Exhibition of 1851' (1852), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Event (216)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Iron (96)  |  Mineral (59)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Present (619)  |  Rich (62)  |  Substance (248)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

He (Anaxagoras) is said to have been twenty years old at the time of Xerxes' crossing, and to have lived to seventy-two. Apollodorus says in his Chronicles that he was born in the seventieth Olympiad (500-497 B.C.) and died in the first year of the eighty-eighth (428/7). He began to be a philosopher at Athens in the archonship of Callias (456/5), at the age of twenty, as Demetrius Phalereus tells us in his Register of Archons, and they say he spent thirty years there. … There are different accounts given of his trial. Sotion, in his Succession of Philosophers, says that he was prosecuted by Cleon for impiety, because he maintained that the sun was a red hot mass of metal, and after that Pericles, his pupil, had made a speech in his defence, he was fined five talents and exiled. Satyrus in his Uves, on the other hand, says that the charge was brought by Thucydides in his political campaign against Pericles; and he adds that the charge was not only for the impiety but for Medism as well; and he was condemned to death in his absence. ... Finally he withdrew to Lampsacus, and there died. It is said that when the rulers of the city asked him what privilege he wished to be granted, he replied that the children should be given a holiday every year in the month in which he died. The custom is preserved to the present day. When he died the Lampsacenes buried him with full honours.
Diogenes Laërtius 2.7. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 353.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Anaxagoras (10)  |  Ask (411)  |  Charge (59)  |  Children (200)  |  City (78)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Custom (42)  |  Death (388)  |  Defence (14)  |  Different (577)  |  First (1283)  |  Grant (73)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hot (60)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mass (157)  |  Metal (84)  |  Month (88)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Political (121)  |  Present (619)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Register (21)  |  Say (984)  |  Speech (61)  |  Spent (85)  |  Succession (77)  |  Sun (385)  |  Talent (94)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trial (57)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)  |  Year (933)

Historically, Statistics is no more than State Arithmetic, a system of computation by which differences between individuals are eliminated by the taking of an average. It has been used—indeed, still is used—to enable rulers to know just how far they may safely go in picking the pockets of their subjects.
In Facts from Figures (1951), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Average (82)  |  Computation (24)  |  Difference (337)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Enable (119)  |  History (673)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Know (1518)  |  More (2559)  |  Picking (2)  |  Pocket (11)  |  State (491)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)

I am of the African race, and in the colour which is natural to them of the deepest dye; and it is under a sense of the most profound gratitude to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe.
Letter to Thomas Jefferson included with a copy of Banneker’s first almanacs. In George Washington Williams, History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880 (1882), Vol. 1, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  African (10)  |  African American (6)  |  Color (137)  |  Dye (10)  |  God (757)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Profound (104)  |  Race (268)  |  Sense (770)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Universe (857)

If a psychiatric and scientific inquiry were to be made upon our rulers, mankind would be appalled at the disclosures.
Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics (1958), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Appall (2)  |  Disclosure (6)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Scientific (941)

Inspiration plays no less a role in science than it does in the realm of art. It is a childish notion to think that a mathematician attains any scientifically valuable results by sitting at his desk with a ruler, calculating machines or other mechanical means. The mathematical imagination of a Weierstrass is naturally quite differently oriented in meaning and result than is the imagination of an artist, and differs basically in quality. But the psychological processes do not differ. Both are frenzy (in the sense of Plato’s “mania”) and “inspiration.”
Max Weber
From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufsätze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. As given in H.H. Gerth and C. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 136.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Attain (125)  |  Basic (138)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculating Machine (3)  |  Childish (20)  |  Desk (13)  |  Differ (85)  |  Differently (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mania (3)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Notion (113)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plato (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Quality (135)  |  Realm (85)  |  Result (677)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Think (1086)  |  Value (365)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)

Meton: With the straight ruler I set to work
To make the circle four-cornered.
First(?) allusion to the problem of squaring the circle. As quoted in B. L. Van Der Waerden, Science Awakening (1954, 2012), Vol. 1, 130, Aristophanes writes this as a joke in his The Birds, which implies the scholarly problem of the quadrature of the circle was known to his audience in ancient Athens.
Science quotes on:  |  Circle (110)  |  Corner (57)  |  Set (394)  |  Square (70)  |  Straight (73)  |  Work (1351)

Moreover I can assure you that the misuse word “national” by our rulers has thoroughly broken me of the habit of national feeling that was pronounced in my case. I would now be willing see Germany disappear as a power and merge into a pacified Europe.
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 529. Cited from Armin Herman (ed.), Albert Einstein/Arnold Sommerfeld. Briefwechsel: Sechzig Briefe aus dem goldenen Zeitalter der modernen Physik (1968, German), 114-115.
Science quotes on:  |  Assure (15)  |  Broken (56)  |  Case (99)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Europe (43)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Germany (13)  |  Habit (168)  |  Merge (3)  |  Misuse (13)  |  National (26)  |  Power (746)  |  See (1081)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Willing (44)  |  Word (619)

No physician, in so far as he is a physician, considers his own good in what he prescribes, but the good of his patient; for the true physician is also a ruler having the human body as a subject, and is not a mere money-maker.
Plato
In Plato and B. Jowett (trans.), The Dialogues of Plato (1875), Vol. 3, 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Maker (34)  |  Mere (84)  |  Money (170)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prescribing (5)  |  Subject (521)  |  True (212)

Now that we know nature thoroughly, a child can see that in making experiments we are simply paying nature compliments. It is no more than a ceremonial ritual. We know the answers in advance. We consult nature in the same way as great rulers consult their parliaments.
Aphorism 67 in Notebook E (1775-1776), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ceremony (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Parliament (7)  |  Ritual (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Way (1217)

Operationally, God is beginning to resemble not a ruler, but the last fading smile of a cosmic Cheshire Cat.
Religion without Revelation (1957), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cat (47)  |  Cheshire Cat (3)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  God (757)  |  Last (426)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Smile (31)

Overwhelming evidences of an intelligence and benevolent intention surround us, show us the whole of nature through the work of a free will and teach us that all alive beings depend on an eternal creator-ruler.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benevolent (9)  |  Creator (91)  |  Depend (228)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intention (46)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Show (346)  |  Surround (30)  |  Teach (277)  |  Through (849)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Rulers and generals muster their troops. Magnates muster the sums of money which give them power. The fascist dictators muster the irrational human reactions which make it possible for them to attain and maintain their power over the masses. The scientists muster knowledge and means of research. But, thus far, no organization fighting for freedom has ever mustered the biological arsenal where the weapons are to be found for the establishment and the maintenance of human freedom. All precision of our social existence notwithstanding, there is as yet no definition of the word freedom which would be in keeping with natural science. No word is more misused and misunderstood. To define freedom is the same as to define sexual health. But nobody will openly admit this. The advocacy of personal and social freedom is connected with anxiety and guilt feelings. As if to be free were a sin or at least not quite as it should be. Sex-economy makes this guilt feeling comprehensible: freedom without sexual self-determination is in itself a contradiction. But to be sexual means—according to the prevailing human structure—to be sinful or guilty. There are very few people who experience sexual love without guilt feeling. “Free love” has acquired a degrading meaning: it lost the meaning given it by the old fighters for freedom. In films and in books, to be genital and to be criminal are presented as the same thing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Attain (125)  |  Biological (137)  |  Book (392)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degrade (8)  |  Determination (78)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascist (2)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fighter (4)  |  Film (10)  |  Find (998)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Guilt (14)  |  Guilty (9)  |  Health (193)  |  Human (1468)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Least (75)  |  Lose (159)  |  Love (309)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Misunderstand (4)  |  Misuse (13)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Muster (2)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Old (481)  |  Openly (2)  |  Organization (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Precision (68)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Research (664)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Sin (42)  |  Sinful (2)  |  Social (252)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sum (102)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Troop (5)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

The field of scientific abstraction encompasses independent kingdoms of ideas and of experiments and within these, rulers whose fame outlasts the centuries. But they are not the only kings in science. He also is a king who guides the spirit of his contemporaries by knowledge and creative work, by teaching and research in the field of applied science, and who conquers for science provinces which have only been raided by craftsmen.
While president of the German Chemical Society, making memorial remarks dedicated to the deceased Professor Lunge (Jan 1923). As quoted in Richard Willstätter, Arthur Stoll (ed. of the original German) and Lilli S. Hornig (trans.), From My Life: The Memoirs of Richard Willstätter (1958), 174-175.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Century (310)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Craftsman (5)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fame (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Guide (97)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  King (35)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Province (35)  |  Raid (4)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Work (1351)

The student of biology is often struck with the feeling that historians, when dealing with the rise and fall of nations, do not generally view the phenomena from a sufficiently high biological standpoint. To me, at least, they seem to attach too much importance to individual rulers and soldiers, and to particular wars, policies, religions, and customs; while at the same time they make little attempt to extract the fundamental causes of national success or failure.
Introduction written by Ross for William Henry Samuel Jones, Malaria, a Neglected Factor in the History of Greece and Rome (1907), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cause (541)  |  Custom (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Extract (40)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  High (362)  |  Historian (54)  |  Importance (286)  |  Individual (404)  |  Little (707)  |  Nation (193)  |  Policy (24)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rise (166)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Striking (48)  |  Student (300)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)

The study of abstract science … offers unbounded fields of pleasurable, healthful, and ennobling exercise to the restless intellect of man, expanding his powers and enlarging his conceptions of the wisdom, the energy, and the beneficence of the Great Ruler of the universe
In 'Report of the Secretary', Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution for 1859 (1860), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Conception (154)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Ennoble (8)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expand (53)  |  Field (364)  |  Great (1574)  |  Health (193)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Man (2251)  |  Offer (141)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Restless (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wisdom (221)

The sun … is a body of great size and power, the ruler, not only of the seasons and of the different climates, but also of the stars themselves and of the heavens. When we consider his operations, we must regard him as the life, or rather the mind of the universe, the chief regulator and the God of nature; he also lends his light to the other stars. He is the most illustrious and excellent, beholding all things and hearing all things.
In The Natural History of Pliny (1855), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Chief (97)  |  Climate (97)  |  Consider (416)  |  Different (577)  |  Excellent (28)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regulator (3)  |  Season (47)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)

Then if the first argument remains secure (for nobody will produce a neater one, than the length of the periodic time is a measure of the size of the spheres), the order of the orbits follows this sequence, beginning from the highest: The first and highest of all is the sphere of the fixed stars, which contains itself and all things, and is therefore motionless. It is the location of the universe, to which the motion and position of all the remaining stars is referred. For though some consider that it also changes in some respect, we shall assign another cause for its appearing to do so in our deduction of the Earth's motion. There follows Saturn, the first of the wandering stars, which completes its circuit in thirty years. After it comes Jupiter which moves in a twelve-year long revolution. Next is Mars, which goes round biennially. An annual revolution holds the fourth place, in which as we have said is contained the Earth along with the lunar sphere which is like an epicycle. In fifth place Venus returns every nine months. Lastly, Mercury holds the sixth place, making a circuit in the space of eighty days. In the middle of all is the seat of the Sun. For who in this most beautiful of temples would put this lamp in any other or better place than the one from which it can illuminate everything at the same time? Aptly indeed is he named by some the lantern of the universe, by others the mind, by others the ruler. Trismegistus called him the visible God, Sophocles' Electra, the watcher over all things. Thus indeed the Sun as if seated on a royal throne governs his household of Stars as they circle around him. Earth also is by no means cheated of the Moon's attendance, but as Aristotle says in his book On Animals the Moon has the closest affinity with the Earth. Meanwhile the Earth conceives from the Sun, and is made pregnant with annual offspring. We find, then, in this arrangement the marvellous symmetry of the universe, and a sure linking together in harmony of the motion and size of the spheres, such as could be perceived in no other way. For here one may understand, by attentive observation, why Jupiter appears to have a larger progression and retrogression than Saturn, and smaller than Mars, and again why Venus has larger ones than Mercury; why such a doubling back appears more frequently in Saturn than in Jupiter, and still more rarely in Mars and Venus than in Mercury; and furthermore why Saturn, Jupiter and Mars are nearer to the Earth when in opposition than in the region of their occultation by the Sun and re-appearance. Indeed Mars in particular at the time when it is visible throughout the night seems to equal Jupiter in size, though marked out by its reddish colour; yet it is scarcely distinguishable among stars of the second magnitude, though recognized by those who track it with careful attention. All these phenomena proceed from the same course, which lies in the motion of the Earth. But the fact that none of these phenomena appears in the fixed stars shows their immense elevation, which makes even the circle of their annual motion, or apparent motion, vanish from our eyes.
'Book One. Chapter X. The Order of the Heavenly Spheres', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 49-51.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affinity (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Back (390)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consider (416)  |  Course (409)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  Govern (64)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Immense (86)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lantern (8)  |  Lie (364)  |  Linking (8)  |  Location (15)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Making (300)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mars (44)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Month (88)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Next (236)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Observation (555)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Progression (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Return (124)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Royal (57)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Show (346)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Track (38)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Venus (20)  |  Visible (84)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

With whom [do] the adherents of historicism actually empathize[?] The answer is inevitable: with the victor. And all rulers are the heirs of those who conquered before them. Hence, empathy with the victor invariably benefits the rulers. Historical materialists know what that means. Whoever has emerged victorious participates to this day in the triumphal procession in which the present rulers step over those who are lying prostrate. According to traditional practice, the spoils are carried along in the procession. They are called cultural treasures, and a historical materialist views them with cautious detachment. For without exception the cultural treasures he surveys have an origin which he cannot contemplate without horror. They owe their existence not only to the efforts of the great minds and talents who have created them, but also to the anonymous toil of their contemporaries. There is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism.
'Theses on the Philosophy of History' (completed 1940, first published 1950). In Illuminations, ed. Hannah Arendt and trans. Harry Zohn (1970), 258.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Barbarism (7)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Empathy (3)  |  Exception (73)  |  Existence (456)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heir (12)  |  Historical (70)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Horror (14)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Origin (239)  |  Owe (71)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Procession (5)  |  Step (231)  |  Survey (33)  |  Talent (94)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toil (25)  |  Treasure (57)  |  View (488)  |  Whoever (42)

“Unless,” said I [Socrates], “either philosophers become kings in our states or those whom we now call our kings and rulers take to the pursuit of' philosophy seriously and adequately, and there is a conjunction of these two things, political power and philosophic intelligence, while the motley horde of the natures who at present pursue either apart from the other are compulsorily excluded, there can be no cessation of troubles, dear Glaucon, for our states, nor, I fancy for the human race either. Nor, until this happens, will this constitution which we have been expounding in theory ever be put into practice within the limits of possibility and see the light of the sun.”
Plato
From The Republic 5 473 c-e, in Paul Shorey (trans.), Plato in Twelve Volumes (1930, 1969), Vol. 5, 509.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Horde (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  King (35)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (746)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Race (268)  |  See (1081)  |  Socrates (16)  |  State (491)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.