Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: System

System Quotes (141 quotes)

Les hommes se tromperont toujours, quand ils abandonneront l'expérience pour des systèmes enfantés par l’imagination. L’homme est l’ouvrage de la nature, il existe dans la nature, il est soumis à ses lois, il ne peut s’en affranchir, il ne peut même par la pensée en sortir; c’est en vain que son esprit veut s’élancer au delà des bornes du monde visible, il est toujours forcé d’y rentrer.
Men always fool themselves when they give up experience for systems born of the imagination. Man is the work of nature, he exists in nature, he is subject to its laws, he can not break free, he can not leave even in thought; it is in vain that his spirit wants to soar beyond the bounds of the visible world, he is always forced to return.
Opening statement of first chapter of Système de la Nature (1770), Vol. 1, 1. Translation by Webmaster using Google Translate. In the English edition (1820-21), Samuel Wilkinson gives this as “Man has always deceived himself when he abandoned experience to follow imaginary systems.—He is the work of nature.—He exists in Nature.—He is submitted to the laws of Nature.—He cannot deliver himself from them:—cannot step beyond them even in thought. It is in vain his mind would spring forward beyond the visible world: direful and imperious necessity ever compels his return.”
Science quotes on:  |  Escape (34)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fool (70)  |  Free (59)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Law (418)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Limit (86)  |  Man (345)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Return (35)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Submit (12)  |  Thought (374)  |  Vain (26)  |  Work (457)

A good method of discovery is to imagine certain members of a system removed and then see how what is left would behave: for example, where would we be if iron were absent from the world: this is an old example.
Aphorism 258 in Notebook J (1789-1793), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (16)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Certain (84)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Example (57)  |  Good (228)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Iron (53)  |  Member (27)  |  Method (154)  |  Remainder (2)  |  Removal (10)  |  World (667)

A marine protozoan is an aqueous salty system in an aqueous salty medium, but a man is an aqueous salty system in a medium in which there is but little water and most of that poor in salts.
Quoted in Larry R. Squire (ed.), The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography (1996), Vol. 1, 558.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (345)  |  Marine (7)  |  Marine Biology (23)  |  Medium (12)  |  Protozoan (2)  |  Salt (23)  |  Water (244)

A regiment of soldiers on parade is, according to some philosophers, a system.
From Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797-1800). As translated by Luis H. Gray in Kuno Francke and Isidore Singer (eds.), The German Classics: Masterpieces of German Literature Translated Into English (1913), Vol. 4, 176.
Science quotes on:  |  According (8)  |  Parade (2)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Regiment (2)  |  Soldier (9)

A scientifically unimportant discovery is one which, however true and however interesting for other reasons, has no consequences for a system of theory with which scientists in that field are concerned.
The Structure of Social Action (1937), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (76)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Field (119)  |  Importance (183)  |  Interest (170)  |  Reason (330)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Theory (582)  |  Truth (750)

A … difference between most system-building in the social sciences and systems of thought and classification of the natural sciences is to be seen in their evolution. In the natural sciences both theories and descriptive systems grow by adaptation to the increasing knowledge and experience of the scientists. In the social sciences, systems often issue fully formed from the mind of one man. Then they may be much discussed if they attract attention, but progressive adaptive modification as a result of the concerted efforts of great numbers of men is rare.
The Study of Man (1941), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Theory (582)

Abstract as it is, science is but an outgrowth of life. That is what the teacher must continually keep in mind. … Let him explain … science is not a dead system—the excretion of a monstrous pedantism—but really one of the most vigorous and exuberant phases of human life.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 195-196.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Continually (14)  |  Dead (45)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Explain (61)  |  Human (445)  |  Life (917)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Phase (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Vigorous (11)

Aimed by us are futuristic humane machines wherein human level electronic intelligence and nerve system are combined to machines of ultraprecision capabilities.
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 467.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Capability (35)  |  Combine (15)  |  Electronic (10)  |  Human (445)  |  Humane (5)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Level (51)  |  Machine (133)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Precision (38)

Almost every major systematic error which has deluded men for thousands of years relied on practical experience. Horoscopes, incantations, oracles, magic, witchcraft, the cures of witch doctors and of medical practitioners before the advent of modern medicine, were all firmly established through the centuries in the eyes of the public by their supposed practical successes. The scientific method was devised precisely for the purpose of elucidating the nature of things under more carefully controlled conditions and by more rigorous criteria than are present in the situations created by practical problems.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (4)  |  Care (73)  |  Century (94)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Control (93)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cure (88)  |  Delusion (13)  |  Devising (7)  |  Elucidation (6)  |  Error (230)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Experience (268)  |  Eye (159)  |  Horoscope (2)  |  Incantation (4)  |  Magic (67)  |  Major (24)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Modern (104)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Practicality (6)  |  Practitioner (12)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Problem (362)  |  Public (82)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reliance (9)  |  Rigor (12)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Situation (41)  |  Success (202)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Witch Doctor (2)  |  Witchcraft (4)  |  Year (214)

An autocratic system of coercion, in my opinion, soon degenerates. For force always attracts men of low morality, and I believe it to be an invariable rule that tyrants of genius are succeeded by scoundrels. For this reason I have always been passionately opposed to systems such as we see in Italy and Russia to-day.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attract (15)  |  Belief (400)  |  Coercion (2)  |  Degenerate (8)  |  Force (194)  |  Genius (186)  |  Invariable (4)  |  Italy (4)  |  Low (16)  |  Morality (33)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Oppose (16)  |  Passionately (2)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rule (135)  |  Russia (9)  |  Scoundrel (6)  |  See (197)  |  Soon (17)  |  Succeed (11)  |  To-Day (5)  |  Tyrant (8)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Accept (37)  |  Belief (400)  |  Corner (24)  |  Defense (15)  |  Difference (208)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Disrespect (2)  |  Drive (38)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Failure (118)  |  Former (18)  |  Full (38)  |  Help (68)  |  House (36)  |  Imply (12)  |  Impose (17)  |  Inadequate (13)  |  Lamentable (3)  |  Local (15)  |  Location (5)  |  Material (124)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (64)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Range (38)  |  Rationale (5)  |  Raw (10)  |  Reality (140)  |  Reason (330)  |  Representative (9)  |  Rich (48)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (17)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (188)  |  Spot (11)  |  Stem (11)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Teach (102)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tide (18)  |  Tough (8)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Unconsciously (3)  |  Understand (189)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Variation (50)  |  Variety (53)  |  Vary (14)

As for Galen’s netlike plexus, I do not need to pass on a lot of misinformation about it here, as I am quite sure that I have examined the whole system of the cerebral vessels. There is no occasion for making things up, since we are certain that Galen was deluded by his dissection of ox brains and described the cerebral vessels, not of a human but of oxen.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem (1543), Book III, 310, as translated by William Frank Richardson and John Burd Carman, in 'Structure of the Plexus in the Prior Ventricles of the Brain; Galen’s Netlike Plexus', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book III: The Veins And Arteries; Book IV: The Nerves (1998), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Deluded (2)  |  Dissection (26)  |  Examined (3)  |  Galen (19)  |  Human (445)  |  Misinformation (3)  |  Ox (3)  |  Vessel (21)

As, no matter what cunning system of checks we devise, we must in the end trust some one whom we do not check, but to whom we give unreserved confidence, so there is a point at which the understanding and mental processes must be taken as understood without further question or definition in words. And I should say that this point should be fixed pretty early in the discussion.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 220-221.
Science quotes on:  |  Check (16)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Cunning (7)  |  Definition (152)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Mental (57)  |  Process (201)  |  Question (315)  |  Trust (40)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Unreserved (2)  |  Word (221)

Biological evolution is a system of constant divergence without subsequent joining of branches. Lineages, once distinct, are separate forever. In human history, transmission across lineages is, perhaps, the major source of cultural change. Europeans learned about corn and potatoes from Native Americans and gave them smallpox in return.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (9)  |  Biological (21)  |  Branch (61)  |  Change (291)  |  Constant (40)  |  Corn (10)  |  Cultural (16)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Divergence (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Forever (42)  |  Give (117)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Join (15)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lineage (2)  |  Major (24)  |  Potato (6)  |  Return (35)  |  Separate (46)  |  Smallpox (12)  |  Source (71)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  Transmission (23)

By their very nature chemical controls are self-defeating, for they have been devised and applied without taking into account the complex biological systems against which they have been blindly hurled.
Silent Spring (1962), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Apply (38)  |  Biological (21)  |  Blindly (2)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Complex (78)  |  Control (93)  |  Devise (11)  |  Hurl (2)  |  Nature (1029)

By virtue of the way it has organized its technological base, contemporary industrial society tends to be totalitarian. For 'totalitarian' is not only a terroristic political coordination of society, but also a non-terroristic economic-technical coordination which operates through the manipulation of needs by vested interests. It thus precludes the emergence of an effective opposition against the whole. Not only a specific form of government or party rule makes for totalitarianism, but also a specific system of production and distribution which may well be compatible with a 'pluralism' of parties, newspapers, 'countervailing powers,' etc.
One Dimensional Man (1964), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Coordination (4)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Economy (46)  |  Government (85)  |  Industry (91)  |  Manipulation (9)  |  Newspaper (27)  |  Party (16)  |  Pluralism (3)  |  Production (105)  |  Rule (135)  |  Society (188)  |  Technology (199)

Combining in our survey then, the whole range of deposits from the most recent to the most ancient group, how striking a succession do they present:– so various yet so uniform–so vast yet so connected. In thus tracing back to the most remote periods in the physical history of our continents, one system of operations, as the means by which many complex formations have been successively produced, the mind becomes impressed with the singleness of nature's laws; and in this respect, at least, geology is hardly inferior in simplicity to astronomy.
The Silurian System (1839), 574.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Combination (69)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Connection (86)  |  Continent (39)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Formation (54)  |  History (302)  |  Impression (51)  |  Law (418)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Operation (96)  |  Production (105)  |  Range (38)  |  Recent (23)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Succession (39)  |  Survey (14)  |  Trace (39)  |  Uniformity (17)  |  Variety (53)  |  Vast (56)

Despite its importance to navigation, fishing, oil and gas development, and maritime safety, our understanding of how the Gulf system works remains extremely limited.
In 'Opinion: Why we can’t forget the Gulf', CNN (16 Apr 2015).
Science quotes on:  |  Despite (3)  |  Development (228)  |  Extremely (10)  |  Fishing (12)  |  Gas (46)  |  Gulf (10)  |  Importance (183)  |  Limited (13)  |  Navigation (12)  |  Oil (37)  |  Safety (39)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Work (457)

Despite the dazzling successes of modern technology and the unprecedented power of modern military systems, they suffer from a common and catastrophic fault. While providing us with a bountiful supply of food, with great industrial plants, with high-speed
Science and Survival (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Catastrophic (2)  |  Common (92)  |  Dazzling (11)  |  Despite (3)  |  Fault (27)  |  Food (139)  |  Great (300)  |  Industrial (11)  |  Military (24)  |  Modern (104)  |  Plant (173)  |  Power (273)  |  Provide (48)  |  Success (202)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Supply (31)  |  Technology (199)  |  Unprecedented (7)

Despite the recurrence of events in which the debris-basin system fails in its struggle to contain the falling mountains, people who live on the front line are for the most part calm and complacent. It appears that no amount of front-page or prime-time attention will ever prevent such people from masking out the problem.
The Control of Nature
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Appear (55)  |  Attention (76)  |  Calm (13)  |  Complacent (4)  |  Contain (37)  |  Despite (3)  |  Event (97)  |  Fail (34)  |  Fall (89)  |  Front (10)  |  Line (44)  |  Live (186)  |  Mask (7)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Part (146)  |  People (269)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Problem (362)  |  Recurrence (3)  |  Struggle (60)

During the war years I worked on the development of radar and other radio systems for the R.A.F. and, though gaining much in engineering experience and in understanding people, rapidly forgot most of the physics I had learned.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Development (228)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Experience (268)  |  Forgetfulness (5)  |  Gain (48)  |  Learning (174)  |  People (269)  |  Physics (301)  |  Radar (6)  |  Radio (27)  |  Understanding (317)  |  War (144)

Engineering is the application of scientific and mathematical principles to practical ends such as the design, manufacture, and operation of efficient and economical structures, machines, processes, and systems.
In Bernice Zeldin Schacter, Issues and Dilemmas of Biotechnology: A Reference Guide (1999), 1, citing the American Heritage Dictionary, 2nd College Edition.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Design (92)  |  Economical (7)  |  Efficient (20)  |  End (141)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Machine (133)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Operation (96)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Process (201)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Structure (191)

Engineers apply the theories and principles of science and mathematics to research and develop economical solutions to practical technical problems. Their work is the link between scientific discoveries and commercial applications. Engineers design products, the machinery to build those products, the factories in which those products are made, and the systems that ensure the quality of the product and efficiency of the workforce and manufacturing process. They design, plan, and supervise the construction of buildings, highways, and transit systems. They develop and implement improved ways to extract, process, and use raw materials, such as petroleum and natural gas. They develop new materials that both improve the performance of products, and make implementing advances in technology possible. They harness the power of the sun, the earth, atoms, and electricity for use in supplying the Nation’s power needs, and create millions of products using power. Their knowledge is applied to improving many things, including the quality of health care, the safety of food products, and the efficient operation of financial systems.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook (2000) as quoted in Charles R. Lord. Guide to Information Sources in Engineering (2000), 5. This definition has been revised and expanded over time in different issues of the Handbook.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Application (117)  |  Applied (15)  |  Atom (251)  |  Build (80)  |  Building (51)  |  Commercial (25)  |  Construction (69)  |  Create (98)  |  Design (92)  |  Develop (55)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Economical (7)  |  Efficiency (25)  |  Efficient (20)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Ensure (8)  |  Extract (13)  |  Factory (13)  |  Finance (2)  |  Food (139)  |  Harness (15)  |  Health Care (7)  |  Highway (10)  |  Implement (5)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Material (124)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Million (89)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Gas (2)  |  Need (211)  |  Operation (96)  |  Performance (27)  |  Petroleum (7)  |  Plan (69)  |  Power (273)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Product (72)  |  Quality (65)  |  Raw (10)  |  Research (517)  |  Safety (39)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Solution (168)  |  Sun (211)  |  Supervise (2)  |  Technical (26)  |  Technology (199)  |  Theory (582)  |  Using (6)

Engineers participate in the activities which make the resources of nature available in a form beneficial to man and provide systems which will perform optimally and economically.
1957
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Available (18)  |  Beneficial (10)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Form (210)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Optimally (2)  |  Participate (4)  |  Perform (27)  |  Provide (48)  |  Resource (47)

Even today I still get letters from young students here and there who say, Why are you people trying to program intelligence? Why don’t you try to find a way to build a nervous system that will just spontaneously create it? Finally I decided that this was either a bad idea or else it would take thousands or millions of neurons to make it work and I couldn’t afford to try to build a machine like that.
As quoted in Jeremy Bernstein, 'A.I.', The New Yorker (14 Dec 1981), 57, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (11)  |  Bad (78)  |  Build (80)  |  Computer Science (10)  |  Create (98)  |  Decide (25)  |  Idea (440)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Machine (133)  |  Million (89)  |  Nervous (5)  |  Neuron (9)  |  Program (32)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Work (457)

Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact.
Quoted in interview with magazine staff, Psychology Today (Jan 1996).
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (15)  |  Child (189)  |  Education (280)  |  Enthusiasm (28)  |  Intact (3)  |  Kid (12)  |  Science Education (11)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Start (68)  |  Trickle (2)  |  Wonder (134)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (12)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Branch (61)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Communication (58)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (31)  |  Improbability (7)  |  Level (51)  |  Principal (15)  |  River (68)  |  Run (33)  |  Size (47)  |  Trunk (10)  |  Valley (16)  |  Variety (53)  |  Work (457)

Every science has for its basis a system of principles as fixed and unalterable as those by which the universe is regulated and governed. Man cannot make principles; he can only discover them.
In The Age of Reason (1794, 1834), 30-31.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (60)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Fixed (11)  |  Governing (4)  |  Principle (228)  |  Science (1699)  |  Unalterable (4)  |  Universe (563)

Finite systems of deterministic ordinary nonlinear differential equations may be designed to represent forced dissipative hydrodynamic flow. Solutions of these equations can be identified with trajectories in phase space. For those systems with bounded solutions, it is found that nonperiodic solutions are ordinarily unstable with respect to small modifications, so that slightly differing initial states can evolve into considerably different states. Systems with bounded solutions are shown to possess bounded numerical solutions.
A simple system representing cellular convection is solved numerically. All of the solutions are found to be unstable, and almost all of them are nonperiodic.
The feasibility of very-long-range weather prediction is examined in the light of these results
Abstract from his landmark paper introducing Chaos Theory in relation to weather prediction, 'Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow', Journal of the Atmospheric Science (Mar 1963), 20, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos Theory (4)  |  Differential Equation (9)  |  Flow (31)  |  Hydrodynamics (2)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Phase Space (2)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Solution (168)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Weather (27)

For what is thought to be a ‘system’ is after all, just conventional, and I do not see how one is supposed to divide up the world objectively so that one can make statements about parts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conventional (16)  |  Divide (24)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Part (146)  |  See (197)  |  Statement (56)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Thought (374)  |  World (667)

From the level of pragmatic, everyday knowledge to modern natural science, the knowledge of nature derives from man’s primary coming to grips with nature; at the same time it reacts back upon the system of social labour and stimulates its development.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Back (55)  |  Derive (18)  |  Development (228)  |  Everyday (13)  |  Grip (8)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Labour (36)  |  Level (51)  |  Modern (104)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pragmatic (2)  |  Primary (29)  |  React (6)  |  Same (92)  |  Social (93)  |  Stimulate (9)  |  Time (439)

Given a situation, a system with a Leerstelle [a gap], whether a given completion (Lueckenfuellung) does justice to the structure, is the “right” one, is often determined by the structure of the system, the situation. There are requirements, structurally determined; there are possible in pure cases unambiguous decisions as to which completion does justice to the situation, which does not, which violates the requirements and the situation.
From 'Some Problems in the Theory of Ethics', collected in Mary Henle (ed.), Documents of Gestalt Psychology (1961), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Completion (15)  |  Decision (58)  |  Determine (45)  |  Gap (20)  |  Justice (24)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Right (144)  |  Situation (41)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Structure (191)  |  Unambiguous (4)  |  Violate (3)

God put a secret art into the forces of Nature so as to enable it to fashion itself out of chaos into a perfect world system.
Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens (1755), editted and translated by William Hastie in Kant's Cosmogony (1900), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (63)  |  Force (194)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Secret (98)

Great thinkers build their edifices with subtle consistency. We do our intellectual forebears an enormous disservice when we dismember their visions and scan their systems in order to extract a few disembodied ‘gems’–thoughts or claims still accepted as true. These disarticulated pieces then become the entire legacy of our ancestors, and we lose the beauty and coherence of older systems that might enlighten us by their unfamiliarity–and their consequent challenge in our fallible (and complacent) modern world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Become (100)  |  Build (80)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Claim (52)  |  Coherence (8)  |  Complacent (4)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Disembodied (4)  |  Disservice (4)  |  Edifice (13)  |  Enlighten (2)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Entire (29)  |  Extract (13)  |  Gem (9)  |  Great (300)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Legacy (6)  |  Lose (53)  |  Modern World (2)  |  Old (104)  |  Order (167)  |  Piece (32)  |  Scan (3)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Thought (374)  |  True (120)  |  Unfamiliarity (4)  |  Vision (55)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Carry (35)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (79)  |  Concept (102)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Depth (32)  |  Design (92)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Earth (487)  |  Field (119)  |  Flexible (3)  |  Functional (5)  |  Granite (6)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Matter (270)  |  Opponent (10)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Primeval (8)  |  Process (201)  |  Raise (20)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rock (107)  |  Satisfactory (9)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sea (143)  |  Study (331)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Variety (53)  |  Abraham Werner (4)  |  Working (20)

Historically, science has pursued a premise that Nature can be understood fully, its future predicted precisely, and its behavior controlled at will. However, emerging knowledge indicates that the nature of Earth and biological systems transcends the limits of science, questioning the premise of knowing, prediction, and control. This knowledge has led to the recognition that, for civilized human survival, technological society has to adapt to the constraints of these systems.
As quoted in Chris Maser, Decision-Making for a Sustainable Environment: A Systemic Approach (2012), 4, citing N. Narasimhan, 'Limitations of Science and Adapting to Nature', Environmental Research Letters (Jul-Sep 2007), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Biology (150)  |  Constraint (8)  |  Control (93)  |  Earth (487)  |  Future (229)  |  History (302)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Premise (14)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Society (188)  |  Survival (49)  |  Technology (199)  |  Understanding (317)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Accommodation (5)  |  Accustom (7)  |  Afraid (15)  |  Apparent (26)  |  Atom (251)  |  Change (291)  |  Connection (86)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Difference (208)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Finite (22)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Idea (440)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Material (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Physical (94)  |  Process (201)  |  Property (96)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Radius (4)  |  Star (251)  |  Stellar (3)  |  Structure (191)  |  Theory (582)  |  Universe (563)

I am afraid I shall have to give up my trade; I am far too inert to keep up with organic chemistry, it is becoming too much for me, though I may boast of having contributed something to its development. The modern system of formulae is to me quite repulsive.
Letter to Christian Schönbein (21 May 1862), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), footnote, 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Boast (12)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Development (228)  |  Formula (51)  |  Inert (9)  |  Modern (104)  |  Organic Chemistry (33)  |  Trade (24)

I am convinced there is only one way to eliminate these grave evils, namely through the establishment of a socialist economy, accompanied by an educational system which would be oriented toward social goals.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (18)  |  Convinced (16)  |  Economy (46)  |  Educational (6)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Evil (67)  |  Goal (81)  |  Grave (20)  |  Namely (10)  |  Orient (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Toward (29)

I am happy to report to you that the assignment of the Central Committee of the Communist party of the Soviet Union and the Soviet Government has been carried out. The world's first space flight has been accomplished in the Soviet space ship Vostok. All systems and equipment worked impeccably, I feel very well and am prepared to carry out any assignment of the party and the government.
Speech beside Khrushchev, at the tomb of Lenin and Stalin, Red Square, Moscow (14 Apr 1961). As quoted in Osgood Caruthers, 'Krushchev Leads Russian Tribute to Astronaut', New York Times (15 Apr 1961), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Assignment (10)  |  Communist (6)  |  Cosmonaut (4)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Soviet Union (3)  |  Space Flight (21)

I grew up in Japan and Hong Kong and then came to the States. Japan was a huge influence on me because, as a child, I would hear the oxcarts come and collect our sewage at night out of our house from the latrine and then take it off to the farms as fertilizer. And then the food would come back in oxcarts during the day. I always had this sort of “our poop became food” mental model. The idea of “waste equals food” was pretty inculcated, that everything was precious and the systems were coherent and cyclical.
In interview with Kerry A. Dolan, 'William McDonough On Cradle-to-Cradle Design', Forbes (4 Aug 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Collect (10)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Equal (53)  |  Farm (17)  |  Fertilizer (10)  |  Food (139)  |  House (36)  |  Idea (440)  |  Influence (110)  |  Japan (7)  |  Mental (57)  |  Model (64)  |  Night (73)  |  Precious (22)  |  Sewage (5)  |  Waste (57)

I have long been interested in landscape history, and when younger and more robust I used to do much tramping of the English landscape in search of ancient field systems, drove roads, indications of prehistoric settlement. Towns and cities, too, which always retain the ghost of their earlier incarnations beneath today's concrete and glass.
From 'An Interview With Penelope Lively', in a Reading Guide to the book The Photograph on the publisher's Penguin website.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  City (37)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Earlier (8)  |  England (31)  |  Field (119)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Glass (35)  |  History (302)  |  Incarnation (3)  |  Indication (21)  |  Interest (170)  |  Landscape (23)  |  Prehistoric (5)  |  Road (47)  |  Search (85)  |  Settlement (2)  |  Town (18)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Food is necessary to…existence
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

I think I may fairly make two postulata. First, That food is necessary to the existence of man. Secondly, That the passion between the sexes is necessary and will remain nearly in its present state. These two laws ever since we have had any knowledge of mankind, appear to have been fixed laws of our nature; and, as we have not hitherto seen any alteration in them, we have no right to conclude that they will ever cease to be what they are now, without an immediate act of power in that Being who first arranged the system of the universe; and for the advantage of his creatures, still executes, according to fixed laws, all its various operations.
First 'Essay on the Principle of Population' (1798), reprinted in Parallel Chapters from the First and Second editions of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1895), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Advantage (42)  |  Alteration (22)  |  Arranged (3)  |  Being (39)  |  Cease (23)  |  Conclude (9)  |  Creator (40)  |  Creature (127)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fixed (11)  |  Food (139)  |  God (454)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law (418)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Man (345)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Passion (54)  |  Postulate (23)  |  Power (273)  |  Present (103)  |  Remain (77)  |  Right (144)  |  Sex (48)  |  State (96)  |  Universe (563)

If more of our resources were invested in preventing sickness and accidents, fewer would have to be spent on costly cures. … In short, we should build a true “health” system—and not a “sickness” system alone.
'Special Message to the Congress Proposing a National Health Strategy' (18 Feb 1971), Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Richard M. Nixon (1972), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Alone (61)  |  Cost (31)  |  Cure (88)  |  Health (136)  |  Invest (9)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Resource (47)  |  Sickness (20)

If one has left this entire system to itself for an hour, one would say that the cat still lives if meanwhile no atom has decayed. The psi-function of the entire system would express this by having in it the living and dead cat (pardon the expression) mixed or smeared out in equal parts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Cat (31)  |  Dead (45)  |  Decay (31)  |  Entire (29)  |  Equal (53)  |  Express (32)  |  Expression (82)  |  Hour (42)  |  Leave (63)  |  Live (186)  |  Mix (13)  |  Pardon (4)  |  Part (146)  |  Say (126)  |  Smear (2)

If we take a survey of our own world … our portion in the immense system of creation, we find every part of it, the earth, the waters, and the air that surround it, filled, and as it were crouded with life, down from the largest animals that we know of to the smallest insects the naked eye can behold, and from thence to others still smaller, and totally invisible without the assistance of the microscope. Every tree, every plant, every leaf, serves not only as an habitation, but as a world to some numerous race, till animal existence becomes so exceedingly refined, that the effluvia of a blade of grass would be food for thousands.
In The Age of Reason: Being an Investigation of True and Fabulous Theology (27 Jan O.S. 1794), 60. The word “crouded” is as it appears in the original.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Assistance (7)  |  Behold (12)  |  Blade (5)  |  Creation (211)  |  Earth (487)  |  Effluvium (2)  |  Exceedingly (3)  |  Existence (254)  |  Filled (3)  |  Find (248)  |  Food (139)  |  Grass (30)  |  Habitation (3)  |  Immense (28)  |  Insect (57)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Largest (7)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Life (917)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Naked Eye (7)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Part (146)  |  Plant (173)  |  Portion (14)  |  Race (76)  |  Refined (6)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Smallest (6)  |  Surround (17)  |  Survey (14)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Totally (4)  |  Tree (143)  |  Water (244)  |  World (667)

If you're overfishing at the top of the food chain, and acidifying the ocean at the bottom, you're creating a squeeze that could conceivably collapse the whole system.
As quoted by Mark Bittman in 'What's Worse Than an Oil Spill?', New York Times (20 Apr 2011), A23.
Science quotes on:  |  Acidification (3)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Collapse (16)  |  Creation (211)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Squeeze (4)  |  Top (20)  |  Whole (122)

In an objective system … any mingling of knowledge with values is unlawful, forbidden. But [the] … “first commandment” which ensures the foundation of objective knowledge, is not itself objective. It cannot be objective: it is an ethical guideline, a rule for conduct. True knowledge is ignorant of values, but it cannot be grounded elsewhere than upon a value judgment…
In Chance and Necessity (1970), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Commandment (6)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Elsewhere (7)  |  Ensure (8)  |  Ethics (30)  |  First (174)  |  Forbidden (8)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Ground (63)  |  Guideline (3)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mingle (6)  |  Objective (49)  |  Rule (135)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unlawful (2)  |  Value (180)

In despair, I offer your readers their choice of the following definitions of entropy. My authorities are such books and journals as I have by me at the moment.
(a) Entropy is that portion of the intrinsic energy of a system which cannot be converted into work by even a perfect heat engine.—Clausius.
(b) Entropy is that portion of the intrinsic energy which can be converted into work by a perfect engine.—Maxwell, following Tait.
(c) Entropy is that portion of the intrinsic energy which is not converted into work by our imperfect engines.—Swinburne.
(d) Entropy (in a volume of gas) is that which remains constant when heat neither enters nor leaves the gas.—W. Robinson.
(e) Entropy may be called the ‘thermal weight’, temperature being called the ‘thermal height.’—Ibid.
(f) Entropy is one of the factors of heat, temperature being the other.—Engineering.
I set up these bald statement as so many Aunt Sallys, for any one to shy at.
[Lamenting a list of confused interpretations of the meaning of entropy, being hotly debated in journals at the time.]
In The Electrician (9 Jan 1903).
Science quotes on:  |  Rudolf Clausius (8)  |  Constant (40)  |  Converted (2)  |  Definition (152)  |  Despair (25)  |  Energy (185)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Enter (20)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Factor (34)  |  Heat Engine (4)  |  Height (24)  |  Imperfect (10)  |  Intrinsic (10)  |  Leave (63)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (75)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Remain (77)  |  Shy (3)  |  Peter Guthrie Tait (6)  |  Temperature (42)  |  Thermal (6)  |  Weight (61)  |  Work (457)

Is evolution a theory, a system or a hypothesis? It is much more: it is a general condition to which all theories, all hypotheses, all systems must bow and which they must satisfy henceforth if they are to be thinkable and true. Evolution is a light illuminating all facts, a curve that all lines must follow. ... The consciousness of each of us is evolution looking at itself and reflecting upon itself....Man is not the center of the universe as once we thought in our simplicity, but something much more wonderful—the arrow pointing the way to the final unification of the world in terms of life. Man alone constitutes the last-born, the freshest, the most complicated, the most subtle of all the successive layers of life. ... The universe has always been in motion and at this moment continues to be in motion. But will it still be in motion tomorrow? ... What makes the world in which we live specifically modern is our discovery in it and around it of evolution. ... Thus in all probability, between our modern earth and the ultimate earth, there stretches an immense period, characterized not by a slowing-down but a speeding up and by the definitive florescence of the forces of evolution along the line of the human shoot.
In The Phenomenon of Man (1975), pp 218, 220, 223, 227, 228, 277.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrow (13)  |  Bow (9)  |  Center (30)  |  Characterize (9)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Condition (119)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Curve (16)  |  Definitive (2)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fact (609)  |  Final (33)  |  Follow (66)  |  General (92)  |  Human (445)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Illuminating (3)  |  Immense (28)  |  Layer (14)  |  Life (917)  |  Light (246)  |  Line (44)  |  Live (186)  |  Looking (25)  |  Modern (104)  |  Moment (61)  |  Motion (127)  |  Period (49)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Probability (83)  |  Reflecting (3)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Successive (14)  |  Term (87)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tomorrow (29)  |  True (120)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Unification (9)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wonderful (37)  |  World (667)

It has been said by a distinguished philosopher that England is “usually the last to enter into the general movement of the European mind.” The author of the remark probably meant to assert that a man or a system may have become famous on the continent, while we are almost ignorant of the name of the man and the claims of his system. Perhaps, however, a wider range might be given to the assertion. An exploded theory or a disadvantageous practice, like a rebel or a patriot in distress, seeks refuge on our shores to spend its last days in comfort if not in splendour.
Opening from essay, 'Elementary Geometry', included in The Conflict of Studies and Other Essays (1873), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (11)  |  Assertion (23)  |  Author (39)  |  Claim (52)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Continent (39)  |  Distinguished (6)  |  Distress (5)  |  England (31)  |  Enter (20)  |  European (5)  |  Exploded (3)  |  Famous (4)  |  General (92)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Mind (544)  |  Movement (65)  |  Name (118)  |  Patriot (3)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Practice (67)  |  Rebel (4)  |  Refuge (12)  |  Remark (14)  |  Seek (57)  |  Spend (24)  |  Splendour (2)  |  Theory (582)

It is true that Fourier had the opinion that the principal end of mathematics was public utility and the explanation of natural phenomena; but a philosopher as he is should have known that the unique end of science is the honor of the human mind and that from this point of view a question of [the theory of] number is as important as a question of the system of the world.
From letter to Legendre, translation as given in F.R. Moulton, 'The Influence of Astronomy on Mathematics', Science (10 Mar 1911), N.S. Vol. 33, No. 845, 359.
Science quotes on:  |  End (141)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (13)  |  Honor (21)  |  Human (445)  |  Important (124)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural (128)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Principal (15)  |  Public (82)  |  Question (315)  |  Science (1699)  |  Theory Of Numbers (2)  |  Unique (24)  |  Utility (23)  |  World (667)

It is very different to make a practical system and to introduce it. A few experiments in the laboratory would prove the practicability of system long before it could be brought into general use. You can take a pipe and put a little coal in it, close it up, heat it and light the gas that comes out of the stem, but that is not introducing gas lighting. I'll bet that if it were discovered to-morrow in New York that gas could be made out of coal it would be at least five years before the system would be in general use.
From the New York Herald (30 Jan 1879), as cited in Leslie Tomory, 'Building the First Gas Network, 1812-1820', Technology and Culture (Jan 2011), 52, No. 1, 75-102.
Science quotes on:  |  Bet (7)  |  Coal (41)  |  Different (110)  |  Discover (115)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Gas (46)  |  Heat (90)  |  Introduce (27)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Light (246)  |  Lighting (5)  |  New York (14)  |  Pipe (6)  |  Practical (93)  |  Prove (60)  |  Stem (11)  |  Tomorrow (29)  |  Year (214)

Let us ... consider the ovum [egg] as a physical system. Its potentialities are prodigious and one's first impulse is to expect that such vast potentialities would find expression in complexity of structure. But what do we find? The substance is clouded with particles, but these can be centrifuged away leaving it optically structureless but still capable of development.... On the surface of the egg there is a fine membrane, below it fluid of high viscosity, next fluid of relatively low viscosity, and within this the nucleus, which in the resting stage is simply a bag of fluid enclosed in a delicate membrane.... The egg's simplicity is not that of a machine or a crystal, but that of a nebula. Gathered into it are units relatively simple but capable by their combinations of forming a vast number of dynamical systems...
As guest of honour, closing day address (Jun 1928), Sixth Colloid Symposium, Toronto, Canada, 'Living Matter', printed in Harry Boyer Weiser (ed.), Colloid Symposium Monograph (1928), Vol. 6, 15. Quoted in Joseph Needham, Chemical Embryology (1931), Vol. 1, 612-613.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (69)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Consider (45)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Egg (41)  |  Machine (133)  |  Membrane (11)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Nucleus (30)  |  Ovum (4)  |  Potential (34)  |  Prodigious (6)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Viscosity (3)

Let us now discuss the extent of the mathematical quality in Nature. According to the mechanistic scheme of physics or to its relativistic modification, one needs for the complete description of the universe not merely a complete system of equations of motion, but also a complete set of initial conditions, and it is only to the former of these that mathematical theories apply. The latter are considered to be not amenable to theoretical treatment and to be determinable only from observation.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Amenable (2)  |  Apply (38)  |  Complete (43)  |  Condition (119)  |  Description (72)  |  Determine (45)  |  Initial (13)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mechanistic (2)  |  Modification (31)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Physics (301)  |  Quality (65)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Set (56)  |  Theory (582)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Universe (563)

Life is order, death is disorder. A fundamental law of Nature states that spontaneous chemical changes in the universe tend toward chaos. But life has, during milliards of years of evolution, seemingly contradicted this law. With the aid of energy derived from the sun it has built up the most complicated systems to be found in the universe—living organisms. Living matter is characterized by a high degree of chemical organisation on all levels, from the organs of large organisms to the smallest constituents of the cell. The beauty we experience when we enjoy the exquisite form of a flower or a bird is a reflection of a microscopic beauty in the architecture of molecules.
The Nobel Prize for Chemistry: Introductory Address'. Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (23)  |  Architecture (35)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Bird (96)  |  Build (80)  |  Cell (125)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Chemical Change (4)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Constituent (13)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Energy (185)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Experience (268)  |  Flower (65)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Life (917)  |  Microscopic (10)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Organ (60)  |  Organism (126)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Spontaneous (12)  |  Sun (211)  |  Universe (563)

Life through many long periods has been manifested in a countless host of varying structures, all circumscribed by one general plan, each appointed to a definite place, and limited to an appointed duration. On the whole the earth has been thus more and more covered by the associated life of plants and animals, filling all habitable space with beings capable of enjoying their own existence or ministering to the enjoyment of others; till finally, after long preparation, a being was created capable of the wonderful power of measuring and weighing all the world of matter and space which surrounds him, of treasuring up the past history of all the forms of life, and considering his own relation to the whole. When he surveys this vast and co-ordinated system, and inquires into its history and origin, can he be at a loss to decide whether it be a work of Divine thought and wisdom, or the fortunate offspring of a few atoms of matter, warmed by the anima mundi, a spark of electricity, or an accidental ray of sunshine?
Life on the Earth: Its Origin and Succession (1860), 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Animal (309)  |  Appointment (5)  |  Association (15)  |  Atom (251)  |  Capability (35)  |  Coordination (4)  |  Countless (13)  |  Cover (23)  |  Decision (58)  |  Definite (27)  |  Divine (42)  |  Duration (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Fill (35)  |  Fortune (23)  |  General (92)  |  Habitat (10)  |  History (302)  |  Host (9)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Life (917)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Loss (62)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Matter (270)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Origin (77)  |  Period (49)  |  Place (111)  |  Plan (69)  |  Plant (173)  |  Ray (32)  |  Space (154)  |  Spark (18)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sunshine (2)  |  Survey (14)  |  Thought (374)  |  Variation (50)  |  Vast (56)  |  Weight (61)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)

Linnaeus had it constantly in mind:“The closer we get to know the creatures around us, the clearer is the understanding we obtain of the chain of nature, and its harmony and system, according to which all things appear to have been created.”
In 'The Two Faces of Linnaeus', in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.), Linnaeus: The Man and his Work (1983, 1994), 16. Quoted in David Weinberger, Everything is Miscellaneous (2007), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (211)  |  Creature (127)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (26)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Understanding (317)

Man's health and well-being depends upon, among many things, the proper functioning of the myriad proteins that participate in the intricate synergisms of living systems.
Nobel Prize Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (56)  |  Function (90)  |  Health (136)  |  Intricate (14)  |  Life (917)  |  Myriad (18)  |  Participate (4)  |  Protein (43)

Mathematicians deal with possible worlds, with an infinite number of logically consistent systems. Observers explore the one particular world we inhabit. Between the two stands the theorist. He studies possible worlds but only those which are compatible with the information furnished by observers. In other words, theory attempts to segregate the minimum number of possible worlds which must include the actual world we inhabit. Then the observer, with new factual information, attempts to reduce the list further. And so it goes, observation and theory advancing together toward the common goal of science, knowledge of the structure and observation of the universe.
Lecture to Sigma Xi, 'The Problem of the Expanding Universe' (1941), printed in Sigma Xi Quarterly (1942), 30, 104-105. Reprinted in Smithsonian Institution Report of the Board of Regents (1943), 97, 123. As cited by Norriss S. Hetherington in 'Philosophical Values and Observation in Edwin Hubble's Choice of a Model of the Universe', Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences (1982), 13, No. 1, 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Advance (123)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Common (92)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Fact (609)  |  Goal (81)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Information (102)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Minimum (10)  |  Number (179)  |  Observation (418)  |  Observer (33)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Science (1699)  |  Segregation (2)  |  Structure (191)  |  Study (331)  |  Theorist (24)  |  Theory (582)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

Microsoft isn’t evil, they just make really crappy operating systems.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Evil (67)  |  Operate (12)  |  Really (50)

Moreover, the works already known are due to chance and experiment rather than to sciences; for the sciences we now possess are merely systems for the nice ordering and setting forth of things already invented; not methods of invention or directions for new works.
From Novum Oranum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 8. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (122)  |  Direction (56)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Method (154)  |  New (340)  |  Nice (9)  |  Order (167)  |  Possessing (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Setting (6)  |  Work (457)

Most American citizens think that life without the telephone is scarcely worth living. The American public telephone system is therefore enormous. Moreover the system belongs to an organization, the Bell companies, which can both control it and make the equipment needed. There is no surer way of getting efficient functional design than having equipment designed by an organization which is going to have to use it. Humans who would have to live with their own mistakes tend to think twice and to make fewer mistakes.
In 'Musical Acoustics Today', New Scientist (1 Nov 1962), 16 No. 311, 256.
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Control (93)  |  Design (92)  |  Efficient (20)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Fewer (5)  |  Functional (5)  |  Life (917)  |  Living (44)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Need (211)  |  Organization (79)  |  Public (82)  |  Scarcely (6)  |  Telephone (21)  |  Tend (23)  |  Think (205)  |  Worth (74)

Nature is disordered, powerful and chaotic, and through fear of the chaos we impose system on it. We abhor complexity, and seek to simplify things whenever we can by whatever means we have at hand. We need to have an overall explanation of what the universe is and how it functions. In order to achieve this overall view we develop explanatory theories which will give structure to natural phenomena: we classify nature into a coherent system which appears to do what we say it does.
In Day the Universe Changed (1985), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Classification (79)  |  Coherence (8)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Development (228)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fear (113)  |  Function (90)  |  Imposition (5)  |  Means (109)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Order (167)  |  Overall (3)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Research (517)  |  Seeking (30)  |  Simplification (12)  |  Structure (191)  |  Theory (582)  |  Universe (563)  |  View (115)  |  Whatever (9)  |  Whenever (8)

No anatomist ever discovered a system of organization, calculated to produce pain and disease; or, in explaining the parts of the human body, ever said, this is to irritate; this is to inflame; this duct is to convey the gravel to the kidneys; this gland to secrete the humour which forms the gout: if by chance he come at a part of which he knows not the use, the most he can say is, that it is useless; no one ever suspects that it is put there to incommode, to annoy, or torment.
The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy (1785), Vol. 1, 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Annoyance (3)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Chance (122)  |  Conveyance (2)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Duct (2)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Formation (54)  |  Gland (7)  |  Gout (5)  |  Gravel (3)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Humour (101)  |  Irritation (2)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Organization (79)  |  Pain (82)  |  Part (146)  |  Production (105)  |  Secretion (4)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Torment (13)  |  Uselessness (21)

No occupation is more worthy of an intelligent and enlightened mind, than the study of Nature and natural objects; and whether we labour to investigate the structure and function of the human system, whether we direct our attention to the classification and habits of the animal kingdom, or prosecute our researches in the more pleasing and varied field of vegetable life, we shall constantly find some new object to attract our attention, some fresh beauties to excite our imagination, and some previously undiscovered source of gratification and delight.
In A Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Dahlia (1838), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Attention (76)  |  Attraction (32)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Classification (79)  |  Delight (51)  |  Direct (44)  |  Enlightenment (11)  |  Excitement (33)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Gratification (14)  |  Habit (78)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Labour (36)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occupation (37)  |  Prosecute (3)  |  Research (517)  |  Source (71)  |  Structure (191)  |  Study (331)  |  Undiscovered (7)  |  Worthy (21)

Nobody knows more than a tiny fragment of science well enough to judge its validity and value at first hand. For the rest he has to rely on views accepted at second hand on the authority of a community of people accredited as scientists. But this accrediting depends in its turn on a complex organization. For each member of the community can judge at first hand only a small number of his fellow members, and yet eventually each is accredited by all. What happens is that each recognizes as scientists a number of others by whom he is recognized as such in return, and these relations form chains which transmit these mutual recognitions at second hand through the whole community. This is how each member becomes directly or indirectly accredited by all. The system extends into the past. Its members recognize the same set of persons as their masters and derive from this allegiance a common tradition, of which each carries on a particular strand.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  All (8)  |  Allegiance (4)  |  Authority (50)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Chain (38)  |  Common (92)  |  Community (65)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Dependance (4)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Directly (15)  |  Extension (20)  |  Fragment (24)  |  Happening (32)  |  Indirectly (5)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Master (55)  |  Member (27)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Organization (79)  |  Particular (54)  |  Past (109)  |  People (269)  |  Person (114)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Second Hand (2)  |  Set (56)  |  Strand (5)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Transmission (23)  |  Validity (22)  |  Value (180)  |  View (115)  |  Whole (122)

Not only do the various components of the cells form a living system, in which the capacity to live, react, and reproduce is dependent on the interactions of all the members of the system; but this living system is identical with the genetic system. The form of life is determined not only by the specific nature of the hereditary units but also by the structure and arrangement of the system. The whole system is more than the sum of its parts, and the effect of each of the components depends on and is influenced by all previous reactions, whose sequence is in turn determined by the whole idiotype.
'Cytoplasmic Inheritance in Epilobium and Its Theoretical Significance', Advances in Genetics (1954), 6, 320.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Cell (125)  |  Component (14)  |  Dependent (14)  |  Effect (133)  |  Genetics (98)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Life (917)  |  Member (27)  |  Part (146)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Reproduction (57)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sum (30)

Obvious facts are apt to be over-rated. System-makers see the gravitation of history, and fail to observe its chemistry, of greater though less evident power.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Evident (14)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fail (34)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Greater (36)  |  History (302)  |  Less (54)  |  Observe (48)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Power (273)

One of the most striking results of modern investigation has been the way in which several different and quite independent lines of evidence indicate that a very great event occurred about two thousand million years ago. The radio-active evidence for the age of meteorites; and the estimated time for the tidal evolution of the Moon's orbit (though this is much rougher), all agree in their testimony, and, what is far more important, the red-shift in the nebulae indicates that this date is fundamental, not merely in the history of our system, but in that of the material universe as a whole.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Agreement (29)  |  Date (8)  |  Different (110)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Event (97)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Great (300)  |  History (302)  |  Importance (183)  |  Independence (32)  |  Indication (21)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Meteorite (5)  |  Million (89)  |  Modern (104)  |  Moon (132)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Radioactivity (26)  |  Red-Shift (4)  |  Result (250)  |  Striking (4)  |  Testimony (10)  |  Tide (18)  |  Time (439)  |  Universe (563)  |  Whole (122)  |  Year (214)

One strength of the communist system of the East is that it has some of the character of a religion and inspires the emotions of a religion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Character (82)  |  Communist (6)  |  East (10)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Religion (210)  |  Strength (63)

Only when he has published his ideas and findings has the scientist made his contribution, and only when he has thus made it part of the public domain of scholarship can he truly lay claim to it as his own. For his claim resides only in the recognition accorded by peers in the social system of science through reference to his work.
In The Sociology of Science: An Episodic Memoir (1977), 47. As quoted and cited in David A. Kronick, The Literature of the Life Sciences: Reading, Writing, Research (1985), 89. This has been summarized as a paradox “the more freely the scientist gives his intellectual property away, the more securely it becomes his property” by Mengxiong Liu, in 'The Complexity of Citation Practice: A Review of Citation Studies', The Journal of Documentation (1993), 49, No. 4, 372.
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (52)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Domain (21)  |  Finding (30)  |  Idea (440)  |  Peer (4)  |  Public (82)  |  Publication (83)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Reference (17)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Social (93)  |  Work (457)

Order is not sufficient. What is required, is something much more complex. It is order entering upon novelty; so that the massiveness of order does not degenerate into mere repetition; and so that the novelty is always reflected upon a background of system.
Alfred North Whitehead, David Ray Griffin (ed.), Donald W. Sherburne (ed.), Process and Reality: an Essay in Cosmology (2nd Ed.,1979), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (63)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Degenerate (8)  |  Novelty (19)  |  Order (167)  |  Repetition (21)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Sufficient (24)

Organisms are not billiard balls, propelled by simple and measurable external forces to predictable new positions on life’s pool table. Sufficiently complex systems have greater richness. Organisms have a history that constrains their future in myriad, subtle ways.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (20)  |  Billiard (2)  |  Complex (78)  |  Constrain (6)  |  External (45)  |  Force (194)  |  Future (229)  |  Great (300)  |  History (302)  |  Life (917)  |  Measurable (2)  |  Myriad (18)  |  New (340)  |  Organism (126)  |  Pool (10)  |  Position (54)  |  Predictable (9)  |  Propel (2)  |  Richness (14)  |  Simple (111)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Sufficiently (6)  |  Table (25)

Our new idea is simple: to build a physics valid for all coordinate systems.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (80)  |  Coordinate (2)  |  Idea (440)  |  New (340)  |  Physics (301)  |  Simple (111)  |  Valid (6)

Science asks no questions about the ontological pedigree or a priori character of a theory, but is content to judge it by its performance; and it is thus that a knowledge of nature, having all the certainty which the senses are competent to inspire, has been attained—a knowledge which maintains a strict neutrality toward all philosophical systems and concerns itself not with the genesis or a priori grounds of ideas.
Originally published in North American Review (1865). 'The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer,' repr. In Philosophical Writings of Chauncey Wright (1963), p. 8.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Ask (99)  |  Attain (21)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Character (82)  |  Competent (10)  |  Concern (76)  |  Content (39)  |  Genesis (13)  |  Ground (63)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Judge (43)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Maintain (22)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Neutrality (3)  |  Pedigree (3)  |  Performance (27)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Question (315)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Strict (7)  |  Theory (582)  |  Toward (29)

Science is not a system of certain, or -established, statements; nor is it a system which steadily advances towards a state of finality... And our guesses are guided by the unscientific, the metaphysical (though biologically explicable) faith in laws, in regularities which we can uncover—discover. Like Bacon, we might describe our own contemporary science—'the method of reasoning which men now ordinarily apply to nature'—as consisting of 'anticipations, rash and premature' and as 'prejudices'.
The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1959), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Anticipation (11)  |  Application (117)  |  Biology (150)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Faith (131)  |  Finality (2)  |  Guess (36)  |  Guidance (12)  |  Law (418)  |  Metaphysics (30)  |  Method (154)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Premature (17)  |  Rashness (2)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Regularity (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Statement (56)  |  Uncover (6)  |  Unscientific (7)  |  Well-Established (2)

Science is the systematic classification of experience.
The Physical Basis of Mind (1877), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (79)  |  Experience (268)  |  Science (1699)

Science was false by being unpoetical. It assumed to explain a reptile or a mollusk, and isolated it—which is hunting for life in graveyards. Reptile or mollusk or man or angel only exists in system, in relation.
In 'Letters and Social Aims: Poetry and Imagination', Prose works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1880), Vol. 3, 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (25)  |  Assumption (49)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explanation (161)  |  False (79)  |  Graveyard (3)  |  Hunting (7)  |  Life (917)  |  Man (345)  |  Mollusk (3)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Relation (96)  |  Reptile (23)  |  Science (1699)

So numerous are the objects which meet our view in the heavens, that we cannot imagine a point of space where some light would not strike the eye;—innumerable stars, thousands of double and multiple systems, clusters in one blaze with their tens of thousands of stars, and the nebulae amazing us by the strangeness of their forms and the incomprehensibility of their nature, till at last, from the limit of our senses, even these thin and airy phantoms vanish in the distance.
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1858), 420.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazement (9)  |  Blaze (9)  |  Cluster (10)  |  Distance (54)  |  Eye (159)  |  Form (210)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Incomprehensibility (2)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Light (246)  |  Limit (86)  |  Multiple (9)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Phantom (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Sense (240)  |  Space (154)  |  Star (251)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  Thin (7)  |  Vanish (10)  |  View (115)

Strategy is a style of thinking, a conscious and deliberate process, an intensive implementation system, the science of insuring future success.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conscious (25)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Future (229)  |  Intensive (7)  |  Process (201)  |  Science (1699)  |  Strategy (8)  |  Style (15)  |  Success (202)  |  Think (205)

Taxonomy is often regarded as the dullest of subjects, fit only for mindless ordering and sometimes denigrated within science as mere “stamp collecting” (a designation that this former philatelist deeply resents). If systems of classification were neutral hat racks for hanging the facts of the world, this disdain might be justified. But classifications both reflect and direct our thinking. The way we order represents the way we think. Historical changes in classification are the fossilized indicators of conceptual revolutions.
In Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1983, 2010), 72
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Classification (79)  |  Concept (102)  |  Direct (44)  |  Disdain (4)  |  Dull (26)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Hang (13)  |  Hat (8)  |  Historical (10)  |  Indicator (6)  |  Mindless (3)  |  Neutral (7)  |  Order (167)  |  Rack (4)  |  Reflect (17)  |  Represent (27)  |  Resent (4)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Stamp Collecting (4)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Thinking (222)

Technology can relieve the symptoms of a problem without affecting the underlying causes. Faith in technology as the ultimate solution to all problems can thus divert our attention from the most fundamental problem—the problem of growth in a finite system
et al., The Limits to Growth (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (10)  |  Attention (76)  |  Cause (231)  |  Divert (3)  |  Faith (131)  |  Finite (22)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Growth (111)  |  Problem (362)  |  Relieve (3)  |  Solution (168)  |  Symptom (16)  |  Technology (199)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Underlying (14)

The activity characteristic of professional engineering is the design of structures, machines, circuits, or processes, or of combinations of these elements into systems or plants and the analysis and prediction of their performance and costs under specified working conditions.
1954
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Combination (69)  |  Condition (119)  |  Cost (31)  |  Design (92)  |  Element (129)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Machine (133)  |  Performance (27)  |  Plant (173)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Process (201)  |  Professional (27)  |  Specify (6)  |  Structure (191)  |  Work (457)

The astronomers said, ‘Give us matter and a little motion and we will construct the universe. It is not enough that we should have matter, we must also have a single impulse, one shove to launch the mass and generate the harmony of the centrifugal and centripetal forces.’ ... There is no end to the consequences of the act. That famous aboriginal push propagates itself through all the balls of the system, and through every atom of every ball.
From essay, 'Nature', collected in Ralph Waldo Emerson and J.E. Cabot (ed.), Emerson's Complete Works: Essays, Second Series (1884), Vol. 3, 176-177.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Atom (251)  |  Ball (20)  |  Big Bang (38)  |  Centrifugal (3)  |  Centripetal (2)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Construct (25)  |  End (141)  |  Enough (6)  |  Force (194)  |  Generate (11)  |  Give (117)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Launch (8)  |  Mass (61)  |  Matter (270)  |  Motion (127)  |  Push (22)  |  Shove (2)  |  Single (72)  |  Universe (563)

The Author of nature has not given laws to the universe, which, like the institutions of men, carry in themselves the elements of their own destruction; he has not permitted in his works any symptom of infancy or of old age, or any sign by which we may estimate either their future or their past duration. He may put an end, as he no doubt gave a beginning, to the present system at some determinate period of time; but we may rest assured, that this great catastrophe will not be brought about by the laws now existing, and that it is not indicated by any thing which we perceive.
'Biographical Account of the Late Dr James Hutton, F.R.S. Edin.' (read 1803), Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1805), 5, 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Assurance (8)  |  Author (39)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Catastrophe (17)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Determination (53)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Duration (9)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Existence (254)  |  Future (229)  |  Indication (21)  |  Infancy (6)  |  Institution (32)  |  Law (418)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Old Age (18)  |  Perception (53)  |  Period (49)  |  Permission (5)  |  Present (103)  |  Sign (36)  |  Symptom (16)  |  Time (439)  |  Universe (563)  |  Work (457)

The belief is growing on me that the disease is communicated by the bite of the mosquito. … She always injects a small quantity of fluid with her bite—what if the parasites get into the system in this manner.
Letter (27 May 1896) to Patrick Manson. In The Great Malaria Problem and Its Solution: From the Memoirs of Ronald Ross (1988), 72. Ross asked for Manson’s opinion; the ellipsis above, in full is: “What do you think?” As quoted in William Derek Foster, A History of Parasitology (1965), 173. (It was for this insight that Ross was awarded a Nobel Prize.)
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Bite (11)  |  Disease (257)  |  Fluid (18)  |  Growing (15)  |  Injection (7)  |  Manner (35)  |  Mosquito (12)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Small (97)  |  Think (205)

The Builder of this Universe was wise,
He plann’d all souls, all systems, planets, particles:
The Plan He shap'd all Worlds and Æons by,
Was—Heavens!—was thy small Nine-and-thirty Articles!
In 'Practical-Devotional', Past and Present, Book 2, Chap 15, collected in On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History (1840), 101. Note: “Nine-and-thirty Articles” of the Church of England.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (15)  |  Builder (10)  |  Eon (8)  |  Formation (54)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Particle (90)  |  Plan (69)  |  Planet (199)  |  Poem (85)  |  Small (97)  |  Soul (139)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  World (667)

The concept of an independent system is a pure creation of the imagination. For no material system is or can ever be perfectly isolated from the rest of the world. Nevertheless it completes the mathematician’s “blank form of a universe” without which his investigations are impossible. It enables him to introduce into his geometrical space, not only masses and configurations, but also physical structure and chemical composition. Just as Newton first conclusively showed that this is a world of masses, so Willard Gibbs first revealed it as a world of systems.
The Order of Nature: An Essay (1917), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Gibbs_Willard (3)

The crippling of individuals I consider the worst evil of capitalism. Our whole educational system suffers from this evil. An exaggerated competitive attitude is inculcated into the student, who is trained to worship acquisitive success as a preparation for his future career.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisitive (2)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Bad (78)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Career (54)  |  Competitive (6)  |  Consider (45)  |  Cripple (2)  |  Educational (6)  |  Evil (67)  |  Exaggerate (3)  |  Future (229)  |  Inculcate (5)  |  Individual (177)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Student (131)  |  Success (202)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Train (25)  |  Whole (122)  |  Worship (22)

The critical mathematician has abandoned the search for truth. He no longer flatters himself that his propositions are or can be known to him or to any other human being to be true; and he contents himself with aiming at the correct, or the consistent. The distinction is not annulled nor even blurred by the reflection that consistency contains immanently a kind of truth. He is not absolutely certain, but he believes profoundly that it is possible to find various sets of a few propositions each such that the propositions of each set are compatible, that the propositions of each set imply other propositions, and that the latter can be deduced from the former with certainty. That is to say, he believes that there are systems of coherent or consistent propositions, and he regards it his business to discover such systems. Any such system is a branch of mathematics.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Aim (58)  |  Belief (400)  |  Blur (4)  |  Branch (61)  |  Business (71)  |  Certain (84)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Consistent (10)  |  Contain (37)  |  Content (39)  |  Correct (53)  |  Critical (34)  |  Deduce (8)  |  Discover (115)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Find (248)  |  Former (18)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Immanently (2)  |  Imply (12)  |  Kind (99)  |  Know (321)  |  Latter (13)  |  Long (95)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Possible (100)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Regard (58)  |  Say (126)  |  Search (85)  |  Set (56)  |  True (120)  |  Truth (750)  |  Various (25)

The earth's becoming at a particular period the residence of human beings, was an era in the moral, not in the physical world, that our study and contemplation of the earth, and the laws which govern its animate productions, ought no more to be considered in the light of a disturbance or deviation from the system, than the discovery of the satellites of Jupiter should be regarded as a physical event in the history of those heavenly bodies, however influential they may have become from that time in advancing the progress of sound philosophy among men.
In Principles of Geology, Being an Attempt to Explain the Former Changes of the of the Earth's Surface, by Reference to Causes Now in Operation(1830), Vol. 1, 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Deviation (11)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  History (302)  |  Jupiter (17)  |  Law (418)  |  Moral (100)  |  Progress (317)  |  Satellite (22)  |  Study (331)  |  World (667)

The electric age ... established a global network that has much the character of our central nervous system.
Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man? (2nd Ed.,1964), 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Character (82)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Global (14)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Network (10)

The famous balance of nature is the most extraordinary of all cybernetic systems. Left to itself, it is always self-regulated.
Saturday Review (8 Jun 1963).
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (43)  |  Cybernetics (3)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Fame (30)  |  Nature (1029)

The fundamental essence of science, which I think we've lost in our education system, is poking something with a stick and seeing what happens. Embrace that process of inquiry.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (280)  |  Embrace (22)  |  Essence (42)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Happen (63)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Lose (53)  |  Poke (3)  |  Process (201)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Stick (19)  |  Think (205)

The Gaia Hypothesis asserts that Earth’s atmosphere is continually interacting with geology (the lithosphere). Earth’s cycling waters (the hydrosphere), and everything that lives (the biosphere). … The image is that the atmosphere is a circulatory system for life’s bio-chemical interplay. If the atmosphere is pan of a larger whole that has some of the qualities of an organism, one of those qualities we must now pray for is resilience.
In Praise of Nature
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (11)  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Biosphere (10)  |  Continually (14)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Gaia (3)  |  Geology (187)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Image (38)  |  Interact (5)  |  Interplay (5)  |  Large (82)  |  Life (917)  |  Lithosphere (2)  |  Live (186)  |  Organism (126)  |  Pray (13)  |  Quality (65)  |  Resilience (2)  |  Water (244)  |  Whole (122)

The goal is nothing other than the coherence and completeness of the system not only in respect of all details, but also in respect of all physicists of all places, all times, all peoples, and all cultures.
Acht Vorlesungen (1910), 'Vorwort': 4. Translated in J. L. Heilbron, The Dilemmas of an Upright Man (1986), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Coherence (8)  |  Completeness (9)  |  Culture (85)  |  Detail (65)  |  Goal (81)  |  People (269)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Place (111)  |  Respect (57)  |  Time (439)

The great horde of physicians are always servile imitators, who can neither perceive nor correct the faults of their system, and are always ready to growl at and even to worry the ingenious person that could attempt it. Thus was the system of Galen secured in the possession of the schools of physic.
In Lectures Introductory to the Practice of Physic, Collected in The Works of William Cullen: Containing his Physiology, Nosology, and first lines of the practice of physic (1827), Vol. 1, 386.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Correct (53)  |  Fault (27)  |  Galen (19)  |  Great (300)  |  Growl (3)  |  Horde (2)  |  Imitator (3)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Perceive (18)  |  Person (114)  |  Physic (5)  |  Physician (232)  |  Possession (37)  |  Ready (16)  |  School (87)  |  Secure (13)  |  Servile (3)  |  Worry (27)

The great object of all knowledge is to enlarge and purify the soul, to fill the mind with noble contemplations, to furnish a refined pleasure, and to lead our feeble reason from the works of nature up to its great Author and Sustainer. Considering this as the ultimate end of science, no branch of it can surely claim precedence of Astronomy. No other science furnishes such a palpable embodiment of the abstractions which lie at the foundation of our intellectual system; the great ideas of time, and space, and extension, and magnitude, and number, and motion, and power. How grand the conception of the ages on ages required for several of the secular equations of the solar system; of distances from which the light of a fixed star would not reach us in twenty millions of years, of magnitudes compared with which the earth is but a foot-ball; of starry hosts—suns like our own—numberless as the sands on the shore; of worlds and systems shooting through the infinite spaces.
Oration at Inauguration of the Dudley Astronomical Observatory, Albany (28 Jul 1856). Text published as The Uses of Astronomy (1856), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Age (137)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Author (39)  |  Branch (61)  |  Conception (63)  |  Considering (6)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Distance (54)  |  Earth (487)  |  Embodiment (5)  |  End (141)  |  Enlarge (15)  |  Equation (69)  |  Extension (20)  |  Feeble (21)  |  Fill (35)  |  Fixed (11)  |  Football (3)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Furnish (18)  |  Host (9)  |  Idea (440)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lead (101)  |  Light (246)  |  Magnitude (21)  |  Million (89)  |  Mind (544)  |  Motion (127)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Noble (41)  |  Number (179)  |  Numberless (3)  |  Object (110)  |  Palpable (2)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Power (273)  |  Precedence (2)  |  Purify (5)  |  Reason (330)  |  Refined (6)  |  Sand (25)  |  Science (1699)  |  Secular (8)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Shore (11)  |  Solar System (48)  |  Soul (139)  |  Space (154)  |  Star (251)  |  Sun (211)  |  Time (439)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

The hostility of the state would be assured toward any system or science that might not strengthen its arm.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (17)  |  Assure (11)  |  Hostility (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Politics (13)  |  State (96)  |  Strengthen (13)

The laws expressing the relations between energy and matter are, however, not solely of importance in pure science. They necessarily come first in order ... in the whole record of human experience, and they control, in the last resort, the rise or fall of political systems, the freedom or bondage of nations, the movements of commerce and industry, the origin of wealth and poverty, and the general physical welfare of the race.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Commerce (14)  |  Control (93)  |  Energy (185)  |  Experience (268)  |  Expression (82)  |  First (174)  |  Freedom (76)  |  General (92)  |  Human (445)  |  Importance (183)  |  Industry (91)  |  Law (418)  |  Matter (270)  |  Movement (65)  |  Nation (111)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Origin (77)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Politics (77)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Pure Science (18)  |  Race (76)  |  Record (56)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rise And Fall (2)  |  Solely (6)  |  Wealth (50)  |  Welfare (16)  |  Whole (122)

The major gift of science to the world is a mighty increase of power. Did science then create that power? Not a bit of it! Science discovered that power in the universe and set it free. Science found out the conditions, fulfilling which, the endless dynamic forces of the cosmos are liberated. Electricity is none of man’s making, but man has learned how to fulfill the conditions that release it. Atomic energy is a force that man did not create, but that some day man may liberate. Man by himself is still a puny animal; a gorilla is much the stronger. Man's significance lies in another realm—he knows how to fulfill conditions so that universal power not his own is set free. The whole universe as man now sees it is essentially a vast system of power waiting to be released.
In 'When Prayer Means Power', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 78-79.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Atomic Energy (21)  |  Condition (119)  |  Cosmos (39)  |  Create (98)  |  Discover (115)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Endless (20)  |  Energy (185)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Force (194)  |  Free (59)  |  Fulfill (11)  |  Gift (47)  |  Gorilla (16)  |  Increase (107)  |  Know (321)  |  Learned (20)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Major (24)  |  Making (26)  |  Man (345)  |  Power (273)  |  Puny (5)  |  Realm (40)  |  Release (15)  |  Science (1699)  |  Significance (60)  |  Stronger (4)  |  Universal (70)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vast (56)  |  Waiting (9)

The nature of the atoms, and the forces called into play in their chemical union; the interactions between these atoms and the non-differentiated ether as manifested in the phenomena of light and electricity; the structures of the molecules and molecular systems of which the atoms are the units; the explanation of cohesion, elasticity, and gravitation—all these will be marshaled into a single compact and consistent body of scientific knowledge.
In Light Waves and Their Uses? (1902), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Body (193)  |  Call (68)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Cohesion (5)  |  Compact (3)  |  Consistent (10)  |  Elasticity (2)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Ether (24)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Force (194)  |  Gravitation (27)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Light (246)  |  Manifest (11)  |  Molecular (3)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Play (60)  |  Scientific Knowledge (5)  |  Single (72)  |  Structure (191)  |  Union (16)  |  Unit (25)

The observing mind is not a physical system, it cannot interact with any physical system. And it might be better to reserve the term ‘subject ‘ for the observing mind ... For the subject, if anything, is the thing that senses and thinks. Sensations and thoughts do not belong to the ‘world of energy.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (33)  |  Better (131)  |  Energy (185)  |  Interact (5)  |  Mind (544)  |  Observe (48)  |  Physical (94)  |  Reserve (7)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Sense (240)  |  Subject (129)  |  Term (87)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  World (667)

The oceans are the life support system of this planet, providing us with up to 70 percent of our oxygen, as well as a primary source of protein for billions of people, not to mention the regulation of our climate.
In 'Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind’s Next Giant Leap', contributed to CNN 'Lightyears Blog' (13 Mar 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (52)  |  Climate (38)  |  Life (917)  |  Mention (12)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Oxygen (49)  |  People (269)  |  Planet (199)  |  Primary (29)  |  Protein (43)  |  Provide (48)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Source (71)  |  Support (63)

The pace of science forces the pace of technique. Theoretical physics forces atomic energy on us; the successful production of the fission bomb forces upon us the manufacture of the hydrogen bomb. We do not choose our problems, we do not choose our products; we are pushed, we are forced—by what? By a system which has no purpose and goal transcending it, and which makes man its appendix.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appendix (4)  |  Atomic Energy (21)  |  Bomb (17)  |  Choose (35)  |  Fission (7)  |  Force (194)  |  Goal (81)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (7)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Pace (4)  |  Problem (362)  |  Product (72)  |  Production (105)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Push (22)  |  Science (1699)  |  Successful (20)  |  Technique (41)  |  Theoretical Physics (15)  |  Transcend (9)

The process of discovery is very simple. An unwearied and systematic application of known laws to nature, causes the unknown to reveal themselves. Almost any mode of observation will be successful at last, for what is most wanted is method.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1873), 384.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law (418)  |  Method (154)  |  Mode (29)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Process (201)  |  Revelation (29)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Success (202)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Want (120)  |  Weariness (5)

The science of medicine is a barbarous jargon and the effects of our medicine on the human system are in the highest degree uncertain, except indeed that they have already destroyed more lives than war, pestilence, and famine combined.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Already (16)  |  Barbarous (3)  |  Combine (15)  |  Degree (48)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Effect (133)  |  Famine (8)  |  High (78)  |  Human (445)  |  Jargon (6)  |  Live (186)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Pestilence (8)  |  Science (1699)  |  Uncertain (11)  |  War (144)

The starting-point for all systems of æsthetics must be the personal experience of a peculiar emotion. The objects that provoke this emotion we callworks of art.
In Art (1913), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Aelig (3)  |  Art (205)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Experience (268)  |  Object (110)  |  Peculiar (24)  |  Personal (49)  |  Provoke (5)

The study of geometry is a petty and idle exercise of the mind, if it is applied to no larger system than the starry one. Mathematics should be mixed not only with physics but with ethics; that is mixed mathematics.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1873), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Ethics (30)  |  Exercise (35)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Idleness (8)  |  Larger (8)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mix (13)  |  Petty (5)  |  Physics (301)  |  Star (251)  |  Study (331)

The system of nature, of which man is a part, tends to be self-balancing, self-adjusting, self-cleansing. Not so with technology.
Small is Beautiful (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Nature (1029)  |  Part (146)  |  Technology (199)  |  Tend (23)

The truth is that other systems of geometry are possible, yet after all, these other systems are not spaces but other methods of space measurements. There is one space only, though we may conceive of many different manifolds, which are contrivances or ideal constructions invented for the purpose of determining space.
In Science (1903), 18, 106. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Construction (69)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Determine (45)  |  Different (110)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Invention (283)  |  Manifold (7)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Space (154)  |  Truth (750)

The weight of our civilization has become so great, it now ranks as a global force and a significant wild card in the human future along with the Ice Ages and other vicissitudes of a volatile and changeable planetary system
Rethinking Environmentalism (13 Dec 1998).
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Earth (487)  |  Future (229)  |  Global (14)  |  Great (300)  |  Human (445)  |  Ice Age (7)  |  Rank (19)  |  Vicissitude (4)  |  Volatility (3)  |  Weight (61)

The wonderful structure of the animal system will probably never permit us to look upon it as a merely physical apparatus, yet the demands of science require that the evidently magnified principles of vitality should be reduced to their natural spheres, or if truth requires, wholly subverted in favor of those more cognizable by the human understanding. The spirit of the age will not tolerate in the devotee of science a quiet indifference. ...
In 'An Inquiry, Analogical and Experimental, into the Different Electrical conditions of Arterial and Venous Blood', New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal (1853-4), 10, 584-602 & 738-757. As cited in George B. Roth, 'Dr. John Gorrie—Inventor of Artificial Ice and Mechanical Refrigeration', The Scientific Monthly (May 1936) 42 No. 5, 464-469.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Human (445)  |  Indifference (12)  |  Merely (35)  |  Physical (94)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Structure (191)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Vitality (10)  |  Wonderful (37)

The words are strung together, with their own special grammar—the laws of quantum theory—to form sentences, which are molecules. Soon we have books, entire libraries, made out of molecular “sentences.” The universe is like a library in which the words are atoms. Just look at what has been written with these hundred words! Our own bodies are books in that library, specified by the organization of molecules—but the universe and literature are organizations of identical, interchangeable objects; they are information systems.
In The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the Language of Nature (1983), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Body (193)  |  Book (181)  |  Element (129)  |  Entire (29)  |  Formation (54)  |  Grammar (10)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Identical (17)  |  Information (102)  |  Library (37)  |  Literature (64)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Object (110)  |  Organization (79)  |  Quantum Theory (55)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Special (51)  |  Specification (5)  |  String (17)  |  Universe (563)  |  Word (221)  |  Writing (72)

There are living systems; there is no living “matter.” No substance, no single molecule, extracted and isolated from a living being possess, of its own, the aforementioned paradoxical properties. They are present in living systems only; that is to say, nowhere below the level of the cell.
Inaugural lecture on taking the chair of molecular biology, Collège de France (3 Nov 1967). From Biology to Ethics (1969), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Cell (125)  |  Life (917)  |  Molecular Biology (23)

There are two kinds of biologists, those who are looking to see if there is one thing that can be understood and those who keep saying it is very complicated and that nothing can be understood. ... You must study the simplest system you think has the properties you are interested in.
As quoted, without source, by John R. Platt in 'Science, Strong Inference', Science (16 Oct 1964), 146, No. 3642, 349.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (31)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Interest (170)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Property (96)  |  Say (126)  |  Simplest (9)  |  Study (331)  |  Think (205)  |  Understanding (317)

There is a hidden healthcare system with clear definitions and roles. Eighty-five percent of healthcare takes place in a big pool without the ‘benefit’ of ‘medical clergy’.
As quoted in 'Aphorism of the Month', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (Nov 2005), 59, No. 11, 933.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (54)  |  Clear (52)  |  Clergy (3)  |  Definition (152)  |  Health Care (7)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Medical (18)  |  Pool (10)  |  Role (35)

There is an insistent tendency among serious social scientists to think of any institution which features rhymed and singing commercials, intense and lachrymose voices urging highly improbable enjoyment, caricatures of the human esophagus in normal and impaired operation, and which hints implausibly at opportunities for antiseptic seduction as inherently trivial. This is a great mistake. The industrial system is profoundly dependent on commercial television and could not exist in its present form without it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Antiseptic (5)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Commercial (25)  |  Dependent (14)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Exist (89)  |  Feature (34)  |  Form (210)  |  Great (300)  |  Highly (8)  |  Hint (6)  |  Human (445)  |  Impair (2)  |  Improbable (9)  |  Industrial (11)  |  Inherently (5)  |  Insistent (2)  |  Institution (32)  |  Intense (11)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Normal (21)  |  Operation (96)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Present (103)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Seduction (2)  |  Serious (37)  |  Sing (9)  |  Television (27)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Think (205)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Urge (10)  |  Voice (41)

There is no such thing as a good nuclear weapons system. There is no way to achieve, in the sound sense, national security through nuclear weapons.
Quoted from interview (1983) in 'Herbert York dies at 87', L.A. Times (21 May 2009)
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  National Security (2)  |  Nuclear (24)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sound (59)  |  Way (36)  |  Weapon (57)

This irrelevance of molecular arrangements for macroscopic results has given rise to the tendency to confine physics and chemistry to the study of homogeneous systems as well as homogeneous classes. In statistical mechanics a great deal of labor is in fact spent on showing that homogeneous systems and homogeneous classes are closely related and to a considerable extent interchangeable concepts of theoretical analysis (Gibbs theory). Naturally, this is not an accident. The methods of physics and chemistry are ideally suited for dealing with homogeneous classes with their interchangeable components. But experience shows that the objects of biology are radically inhomogeneous both as systems (structurally) and as classes (generically). Therefore, the method of biology and, consequently, its results will differ widely from the method and results of physical science.
Atom and Organism: A New Approach to Theoretical Biology (1966), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Statistical Mechanics (5)

This most beautiful system of the sun, planets, and comets could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent and powerful Being.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 39
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Comet (43)  |  Counsel (5)  |  Dominion (6)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Planet (199)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Sun (211)

This spontaneous emergence of order at critical points of instability, which is often referred to simply as “emergence,” is one of the hallmarks of life. It has been recognized as the dynamic origin of development, learning, and evolution. In other words, creativity—the generation of new forms—is a key property of all living systems.
From 'Complexity and Life', in Fritjof Capra, Alicia Juarrero, Pedro Sotolongo (eds.) Reframing Complexity: Perspectives From the North and South (2007), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Creativity (66)  |  Critical (34)  |  Critical Point (2)  |  Development (228)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Emergence (21)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Form (210)  |  Generation (111)  |  Hallmark (4)  |  Instability (3)  |  Key (38)  |  Learning (174)  |  Life (917)  |  Origin (77)  |  Point (72)  |  Property (96)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Spontaneity (4)

This topic brings me to that worst outcrop of the herd nature, the military system, which I abhor. That a man can take pleasure in marching in formation to the strains of a band is enough to make me despise him. He has only been given his big brain by mistake; a backbone was all he needed. This plague-spot of civilisation ought to be abolished with all possible speed. Heroism by order, senseless violence, and all the pestilent nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism–how I hate them! War seems to me a mean, contemptible thing: I would rather be hacked in pieces than take part in such an abominable business.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abhor (3)  |  Abolish (11)  |  Abominable (4)  |  Backbone (8)  |  Bad (78)  |  Band (2)  |  Big (33)  |  Brain (181)  |  Bring (53)  |  Business (71)  |  Civilisation (18)  |  Contemptible (7)  |  Despise (7)  |  Formation (54)  |  Give (117)  |  Hack (3)  |  Hate (26)  |  Herd (12)  |  Heroism (7)  |  March (15)  |  Mean (63)  |  Military (24)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Order (167)  |  Part (146)  |  Patriotism (6)  |  Pestilent (2)  |  Piece (32)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Possible (100)  |  Seem (89)  |  Senseless (3)  |  Speed (27)  |  Strain (8)  |  Topic (6)  |  Violence (20)  |  War (144)

Thought once awakened does not again slumber; unfolds itself into a System of Thought; grows, in man after man, generation after generation,—till its full stature is reached, and such System of Thought can grow no farther, and must give place to another.
Lecture, 'The Hero As Divinity' (5 May 1840). In On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History: Six Lectures (1857), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Awake (6)  |  Generation (111)  |  Growth (111)  |  Replace (16)  |  Slumber (3)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Thought (374)  |  Unfold (7)

Thus the system of the world only oscillates around a mean state from which it never departs except by a very small quantity. By virtue of its constitution and the law of gravity, it enjoys a stability that can be destroyed only by foreign causes, and we are certain that their action is undetectable from the time of the most ancient observations until our own day. This stability in the system of the world, which assures its duration, is one of the most notable among all phenomena, in that it exhibits in the heavens the same intention to maintain order in the universe that nature has so admirably observed on earth for the sake of preserving individuals and perpetuating species.
'Sur l'Équation Séculaire de la Lune' (1786, published 1788). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 11, 248-9, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Cause (231)  |  Certainty (97)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Duration (9)  |  Exhibit (12)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intention (25)  |  Law (418)  |  Maintain (22)  |  Mean (63)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Oscillation (6)  |  Perpetuate (5)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Species (181)  |  Stability (17)  |  State (96)  |  Time (439)  |  Undetectable (2)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

Two impressions remaining, after a life of scientific research:
1. The inexhaustible oddity of nature.
2. The capacity of the human system for recovery.
Unverified. Found as an epigraph, without citation, in Boris A Kupershmidt, The Variational Principles of Dynamics (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (42)  |  Human (445)  |  Impression (51)  |  Inexhaustible (10)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Research (517)

We are just beginning to understand how molecular reaction systems have found a way to “organize themselves”. We know that processes of this nature ultimately led to the life cycle, and that (for the time being?) Man with his central nervous system, i.e. his memory, his mind, and his soul, stands at the end of this development and feels compelled to understand this development. For this purpose he must penetrate into the smallest units of time and space, which also requires new ideas to make these familiar concepts from physics of service in understanding what has, right into our century, appeared to be beyond the confines of space and time.
Answering “Where Now?” as the conclusion of his Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1967) on 'Immeasurably Fast Reactions', published in Nobel Lectures, Chemistry 1963-1970 (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (102)  |  Confine (9)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Idea (440)  |  Life Cycle (3)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Nervous System (11)  |  New (340)  |  Organize (14)  |  Penetrate (21)  |  Physics (301)  |  Process (201)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Small (97)  |  Soul (139)  |  Space (154)  |  Time (439)  |  Understand (189)  |  Unit (25)

We expect that the study of lunar geology will help to answer some longstanding questions about the early evolution of the earth. The moon and the earth are essentially a two-planet system, and the two bodies are probably closely related in origin. In this connection the moon is of special interest because its surface has not been subjected to the erosion by running water that has helped to shape the earth's surface.
In Scientific American (Sep 1964). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 Years Ago', Scientific American (Dec 2014), 311, No. 6, 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Body (193)  |  Connection (86)  |  Early (39)  |  Earth (487)  |  Erosion (18)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Geology (187)  |  Help (68)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lunar (5)  |  Moon (132)  |  Origin (77)  |  Planet (199)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Running (8)  |  Shape (52)  |  Special (51)  |  Study (331)  |  Surface (74)  |  Two (13)  |  Water (244)

We have the satisfaction to find, that in nature there is wisdom, system and consistency. For having, in the natural history of this earth, seen a succession of worlds, we may from this conclude that, there is a system in nature; in like manner as, from seeing revolutions of the planets, it is concluded, that there is a system by which they are intended to continue those revolutions. But if the succession of worlds is established in the system of nature, it is vain to look for anything higher in the origin of the earth. The result, therefore, of our present enquiry is, that we find no vestige of a beginning,-no prospect of an end.
'Theory of the Earth', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1788, 1, 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  End (141)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Origin Of Earth (8)  |  Planet (199)  |  Theory (582)

We live in an essential and unresolvable tension between our unity with nature and our dangerous uniqueness. Systems that attempt to place and make sense of us by focusing exclusively either on the uniqueness or the unity are doomed to failure. But we must not stop asking and questing because the answers are complex and ambiguous.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguous (4)  |  Answer (201)  |  Ask (99)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Complex (78)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Doom (9)  |  Essential (87)  |  Exclusively (8)  |  Failure (118)  |  Focus (21)  |  Live (186)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Place (111)  |  Quest (24)  |  Sense (240)  |  Stop (56)  |  Tension (7)  |  Uniqueness (7)  |  Unity (43)

We reverence ancient Greece as the cradle of western science. Here for the first time the world witnessed the miracle of a logical system which proceeded from step to step with such precision that every single one of its propositions was absolutely indubitable—I refer to Euclid’s geometry. This admirable triumph of reasoning gave the human intellect the necessary confidence in itself for its subsequent achievements. If Euclid failed to kindle your youthful enthusiasm, then you were not born to be a scientific thinker.
From 'On the Method of Theoretical Physics', in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Admirable (11)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Born (14)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Enthusiasm (28)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Failed (3)  |  First (174)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Greece (7)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Kindle (4)  |  Logic (187)  |  Miracle (55)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Precision (38)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Single (72)  |  Step (67)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)  |  Western (14)  |  World (667)

We thus begin to see that the institutionalized practice of citations and references in the sphere of learning is not a trivial matter. While many a general reader–that is, the lay reader located outside the domain of science and scholarship–may regard the lowly footnote or the remote endnote or the bibliographic parenthesis as a dispensable nuisance, it can be argued that these are in truth central to the incentive system and an underlying sense of distributive justice that do much to energize the advancement of knowledge.
In ''he Matthew Effect in Science, II: Cumulative Advantage and the Symbolism of Intellectual Property', Isis (1988), 79, 621.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Argument (59)  |  Bibliography (2)  |  Central (23)  |  Citation (4)  |  Dispense (7)  |  Domain (21)  |  Energize (2)  |  Footnote (4)  |  Incentive (6)  |  Institution (32)  |  Justice (24)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Nuisance (3)  |  Parenthesis (2)  |  Practice (67)  |  Reader (22)  |  Reference (17)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Truth (750)  |  Underlying (14)

What we do see through geological time is the emergence of more complex worlds. ... [W]hen within the animal we see the emergence of larger and more complex brains, sophisticated vocalizations, echolocation, electrical perception, advanced social systems including eusociality, viviparity, warm-bloodedness, and agriculture—all of which are convergent—then to me that sounds like progress.
Life's Solution, 307. In Vinoth Ramachandra, Subverting Global Myths: Theology and the Public Issues Shaping our World (2008), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Animal (309)  |  Brain (181)  |  Complex (78)  |  Electrical (10)  |  Emergence (21)  |  Geological (11)  |  Include (27)  |  Large (82)  |  Perception (53)  |  Progress (317)  |  See (197)  |  Social (93)  |  Sophisticated (11)  |  Sound (59)  |  Time (439)  |  World (667)

Where there is dirt there is a system. Dirt is the by-product of a systematic ordering and classification of matter, in so far as ordering involves rejecting inappropriate elements.
In Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo (1966), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  By-Product (2)  |  Classification (79)  |  Dirt (8)  |  Inappropriate (3)  |  Matter (270)  |  Order (167)  |  Rejection (24)

Who can estimate the value to civilization of the Copernican system of the sun and planets? A round earth, an earth not the centre of the universe, an earth obeying law, an earth developed by processes of evolution covering tens of millions of years, is incomparably grander than the earth which ante-Copernican imagination pictured.
In 'The Nature of the Astronomer’s Work', North American Review (Jun 1908), 187, No. 631, 915.
Science quotes on:  |  Centre (19)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Copernican (2)  |  Develop (55)  |  Earth (487)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Grand (15)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Incomparable (7)  |  Law (418)  |  Millions (13)  |  Obey (13)  |  Planet (199)  |  Process (201)  |  Research (517)  |  Round (15)  |  Sun (211)  |  Universe (563)  |  Value (180)  |  Year (214)

Who sees with equal eye, as God of all,
A hero perish or a sparrow fall,
Atoms or systems into ruin hurl'd,
And now a bubble burst, and now a world.
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 507.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Bubble (12)  |  Burst (17)  |  Equality (21)  |  Eye (159)  |  Fall (89)  |  God (454)  |  Hero (29)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Sparrow (6)  |  World (667)

Your remarks upon chemical notation with the variety of systems which have arisen, &c., &c., had almost stirred me up to regret publicly that such hindrances to the progress of science should exist. I cannot help thinking it a most unfortunate thing that men who as experimentalists & philosophers are the most fitted to advance the general cause of science & knowledge should by promulgation of their own theoretical views under the form of nomenclature, notation, or scale, actually retard its progress.
Letter to William Whewell (21 Feb 1831). In Isaac Todhunter, William Whewell, An Account of his Writings (1876), Vol. 1., 307. Faraday may have been referring to a paper by Whewell published in the Journal of the Royal Institution of England (1831), 437-453.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Cause (231)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Experimentalist (11)  |  Hindrance (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Notation (9)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Progress (317)  |  Progress Of Science (20)  |  Promulgation (3)  |  Regret (16)  |  Remark (14)  |  Retardation (4)  |  Scale (49)  |  Stir (11)  |  Theory (582)  |  Variety (53)  |  View (115)

You’re aware the boy failed my grade school math class, I take it? And not that many years later he’s teaching college. Now I ask you: Is that the sorriest indictment of the American educational system you ever heard? [pauses to light cigarette.] No aptitude at all for long division, but never mind. It’s him they ask to split the atom. How he talked his way into the Nobel prize is beyond me. But then, I suppose it’s like the man says, it’s not what you know...
Karl Arbeiter (former teacher of Albert Einstein)
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Aptitude (10)  |  Ask (99)  |  Atom (251)  |  Aware (18)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Boy (33)  |  Cigarette (22)  |  Class (64)  |  College (27)  |  Educational (6)  |  Fail (34)  |  Grade (10)  |  Hear (33)  |  Know (321)  |  Late (28)  |  Light (246)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nobel Prize (26)  |  Say (126)  |  School (87)  |  Sorry (16)  |  Split (11)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Talk (61)  |  Teach (102)  |  Year (214)

[Am I vegetarian?] No. If you understand about the natural world, we’re a part of the system and you can’t feed lions grass. But because we have the intelligence to choose… But we haven’t got the gut to allow us to be totally vegetarian for a start. You can tell by the shape of our guts and the shape of our teeth that we evolved to be omnivores. We aren’t carnivores like lions but neither are we elephants.
Interview by Simon Gage in 'David Attenborough: I’m not an animal lover', Metro (29 Jan 2013, London).
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (35)  |  Digest (5)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Feed (22)  |  Grass (30)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Lion (15)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Shape (52)  |  Tooth (23)  |  Understand (189)  |  Vegetarian (9)

“Cradle to Cradle” is in counterpoint to “Cradle to Grave.” It basically says that if we look at everything as a take, make and waste system, then it’s a one-way system. Whereas If we think about things having multiple lives, cradle to cradle, we could design things that can go back to either nature or back to industry forever.
In audio segment, 'William McDonough: Godfather of Green', WNYC, Studio 360 broadcast on NPR radio (18 Mar 2008) and archived on the station website.
Science quotes on:  |  Cradle To Grave (2)  |  Design (92)  |  Forever (42)  |  Industry (91)  |  Life (917)  |  Multiple (9)  |  Nature (1029)  |  One-Way (2)  |  Recycle (2)  |  Waste (57)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.