Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Treatise

Treatise Quotes (44 quotes)

Doubtless many can recall certain books which have greatly influenced their lives, and in my own case one stands out especially—a translation of Hofmeister's epoch-making treatise on the comparative morphology of plants. This book, studied while an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, was undoubtedly the most important factor in determining the trend of my botanical investigation for many years.
D.H. Campbell, 'The Centenary of Wilhelm Hofmeister', Science (1925), 62, No. 1597, 127-128. Cited in William C. Steere, Obituary, 'Douglas Houghton Campbell', American Bryological and Lichenological Society, The Bryologist (1953), 127. The book to which Cambell refers is W. Hofmeister, On the Germination, Development, and Fructification of the Higher Cryptogamia, and on the Fructification of the Coniferae, trans. by Frederick Currey (1862).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Book (392)  |  Botany (57)  |  Certain (550)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Live (628)  |  Making (300)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Most (1731)  |  Plant (294)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Stand (274)  |  Study (653)  |  Translation (21)  |  Trend (22)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)

For even they who compose treatises of medicine or natural philosophy in verse are denominated Poets: yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common except their metre; the former, therefore, justly merits the name of the Poet; while the other should rather be called a Physiologist than a Poet.
Aristotle
Aristotle’s Treatise on Poetry, I:2, trans. Thomas Twining (1957), 103
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Empedocles (10)  |  Former (137)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Merit (50)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Verse (11)

For some months the astronomer Halley and other friends of Newton had been discussing the problem in the following precise form: what is the path of a body attracted by a force directed toward a fixed point, the force varying in intensity as the inverse of the distance? Newton answered instantly, “An ellipse.” “How do you know?” he was asked. “Why, I have calculated it.” Thus originated the imperishable Principia, which Newton later wrote out for Halley. It contained a complete treatise on motion.
In The Handmaiden of the Sciences (1937), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Complete (204)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Friend (168)  |  Edmond Halley (9)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Know (1518)  |  Month (88)  |  Motion (310)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Principia (13)  |  Problem (676)  |  Why (491)

For, in mathematics or symbolic logic, reason can crank out the answer from the symboled equations—even a calculating machine can often do so—but it cannot alone set up the equations. Imagination resides in the words which define and connect the symbols—subtract them from the most aridly rigorous mathematical treatise and all meaning vanishes. Was it Eddington who said that we once thought if we understood 1 we understood 2, for 1 and 1 are 2, but we have since found we must learn a good deal more about “and”?
In 'The Biological Basis of Imagination', American Thought: 1947 (1947), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arid (6)  |  Calculating Machine (3)  |  Connect (125)  |  Crank (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Define (49)  |  Do (1908)  |  Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (130)  |  Equation (132)  |  Good (889)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Learn (629)  |  Logic (287)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reside (25)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Up (3)  |  Subtract (2)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Word (619)

Geometric writings are not rare in which one would seek in vain for an idea at all novel, for a result which sooner or later might be of service, for anything in fact which might be destined to survive in the science; and one finds instead treatises on trivial problems or investigations on special forms which have absolutely no use, no importance, which have their origin not in the science itself but in the caprice of the author; or one finds applications of known methods which have already been made thousands of times; or generalizations from known results which are so easily made that the knowledge of the latter suffices to give at once the former. Now such work is not merely useless; it is actually harmful because it produces a real incumbrance in the science and an embarrassment for the more serious investigators; and because often it crowds out certain lines of thought which might well have deserved to be studied.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Author (167)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Destined (42)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Latter (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Novel (32)  |  Origin (239)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serious (91)  |  Service (110)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vain (83)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

Have you ever plunged into the immensity of space and time by reading the geological treatises of Cuvier? Borne away on the wings of his genius, have you hovered over the illimitable abyss of the past as if a magician’s hand were holding you aloft?
From 'La Peau de Chagrin' (1831). As translated by Herbert J. Hunt in The Wild Ass’s Skin (1977), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Aloft (5)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geological (11)  |  Hover (8)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Magician (14)  |  Past (337)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wing (75)

I am particularly fond of (Emmanuel Mendes da Costa’s) Natural History of Fossils because treatise, more than any other work written in English, records a short episode expressing one of the grand false starts in the history of natural science–and nothing can be quite so informative and instructive as a juicy mistake.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  English (35)  |  Episode (5)  |  Express (186)  |  False (100)  |  Fond (12)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Grand (27)  |  History (673)  |  Informative (2)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Record (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Start (221)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

I confess, that after I began … to discern how useful mathematicks may be made to physicks, I have often wished that I had employed about the speculative part of geometry, and the cultivation of the specious Algebra I had been taught very young, a good part of that time and industry, that I had spent about surveying and fortification (of which I remember I once wrote an entire treatise) and other parts of practick mathematicks.
In 'The Usefulness of Mathematiks to Natural Philosophy', Works (1772), Vol. 3, 426.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Begin (260)  |  Confess (42)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Discern (33)  |  Employ (113)  |  Entire (47)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Good (889)  |  Industry (137)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practical (200)  |  Remember (179)  |  Specious (2)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Survey (33)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wish (212)  |  Write (230)  |  Young (227)

I have said that mathematics is the oldest of the sciences; a glance at its more recent history will show that it has the energy of perpetual youth. The output of contributions to the advance of the science during the last century and more has been so enormous that it is difficult to say whether pride in the greatness of achievement in this subject, or despair at his inability to cope with the multiplicity of its detailed developments, should be the dominant feeling of the mathematician. Few people outside of the small circle of mathematical specialists have any idea of the vast growth of mathematical literature. The Royal Society Catalogue contains a list of nearly thirty- nine thousand papers on subjects of Pure Mathematics alone, which have appeared in seven hundred serials during the nineteenth century. This represents only a portion of the total output, the very large number of treatises, dissertations, and monographs published during the century being omitted.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 285.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Advance (280)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appear (118)  |  Being (1278)  |  Catalogue (5)  |  Century (310)  |  Circle (110)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Cope (6)  |  Despair (40)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dissertation (2)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Glance (34)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inability (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  List (10)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monograph (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nineteenth (6)  |  Number (699)  |  Oldest (8)  |  Omit (11)  |  Output (10)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Portion (84)  |  Pride (78)  |  Publish (36)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Recent (77)  |  Represent (155)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serial (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Society (326)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Total (94)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

I regarded as quite useless the reading of large treatises of pure analysis: too large a number of methods pass at once before the eyes. It is in the works of application that one must study them; one judges their utility there and appraises the manner of making use of them.
As reported by J. F. Maurice in Moniteur Universel (1814), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Application (242)  |  Eye (419)  |  Judge (108)  |  Large (394)  |  Making (300)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reading (133)  |  Regard (305)  |  Study (653)  |  Use (766)  |  Utility (49)  |  Work (1351)

I remember my first look at the great treatise of Maxwell’s when I was a young man… I saw that it was great, greater and greatest, with prodigious possibilities in its power… I was determined to master the book and set to work. I was very ignorant. I had no knowledge of mathematical analysis (having learned only school algebra and trigonometry which I had largely forgotten) and thus my work was laid out for me. It took me several years before I could understand as much as I possibly could. Then I set Maxwell aside and followed my own course. And I progressed much more quickly… It will be understood that I preach the gospel according to my interpretation of Maxwell.
From translations of a letter (24 Feb 1918), cited in Paul J. Nahin, Oliver Heaviside: The Life, Work, and Times of an Electrical Genius of the Victorian Age (2002), 24. Nahin footnotes that the words are not verbatim, but are the result of two translations. Heaviside's original letter in English was quoted, translated in to French by J. Bethenode, for the obituary he wrote, "Oliver Heaviside", in Annales des Posies Telegraphs (1925), 14, 521-538. The quote was retranslated back to English in Nadin's book. Bethenode footnoted that he made the original translation "as literally as possible in order not to change the meaning." Nadin assures that the retranslation was done likewise. Heaviside studyied Maxwell's two-volume Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Book (392)  |  Course (409)  |  Determination (78)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  More (2559)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Power (746)  |  Preach (11)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remember (179)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

I use the word “attraction” here in a general sense for any endeavor whatever of bodies to approach one another, whether that endeavor occurs as a result of the action of the bodies either drawn toward one other or acting on one another by means of spirits emitted or whether it arises from the action of aether or of air or of any medium whatsoever—whether corporeal or incorporeal—in any way impelling toward one another the bodies floating therein. I use the word “impulse” in the same general sense, considering in this treatise not the species of forces and their physical qualities but their quantities and mathematical proportions, as I have explained in the definitions.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Book I, Section II, Scholium, 588.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aether (13)  |  Air (347)  |  Approach (108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Definition (221)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Explain (322)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Species (401)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Word (619)

Iamblichus in his treatise On the Arithmetic of Nicomachus observes p. 47- “that certain numbers were called amicable by those who assimilated the virtues and elegant habits to numbers.” He adds, “that 284 and 220 are numbers of this kind; for the parts of each are generative of each other according to the nature of friendship, as was shown by Pythagoras. For some one asking him what a friend was, he answered, another I (ετεϑος εγω) which is demonstrated to take place in these numbers.” [“Friendly” thus: Each number is equal to the sum of the factors of the other.]
In Theoretic Arithmetic (1816), 122. (Factors of 284 are 1, 2, 4 ,71 and 142, which give the sum 220. Reciprocally, factors of 220 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11 ,22, 44, 55 and 110, which give the sum 284.) Note: the expression “alter ego” is Latin for “the other I.”
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Addition (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Asking (73)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Factor (46)  |  Friend (168)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Generative (2)  |  Habit (168)  |  Kind (557)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Sum (102)  |  Virtue (109)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Domain (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geology (220)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Master (178)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialize (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stream (81)  |  Striking (48)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

In fact, whenever energy is transmitted from one body to another in time, there must be a medium or substance in which the energy exists after it leaves one body and before it reaches the other ... and if we admit this medium as an hypothesis, I think it ought to occupy a prominent place in our investigations, and that we ought to endeavour to construct a mental representation of all the details of its action, and this has been my constant aim in this treatise.
A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism (1873), Vol. 2, 438.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Constant (144)  |  Construct (124)  |  Detail (146)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Medium (12)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Representation (53)  |  Substance (248)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Whenever (81)

Inexact method of observation, as I believe, is one flaw in clinical pathology to-day. Prematurity of conclusion is another, and in part follows from the first; but in chief part an unusual craving and veneration for hypothesis, which besets the minds of most medical men, is responsible. Except in those sciences which deal with the intangible or with events of long past ages, no treatises are to be found in which hypothesis figures as it does in medical writings. The purity of a science is to be judged by the paucity of its recorded hypotheses. Hypothesis has its right place, it forms a working basis; but it is an acknowledged makeshift, and, at the best, of purpose unaccomplished. Hypothesis is the heart which no man with right purpose wears willingly upon his sleeve. He who vaunts his lady love, ere yet she is won, is apt to display himself as frivolous or his lady a wanton.
The Mechanism and Graphic Registration of the Heart Beat (1920), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Basis (173)  |  Best (459)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Craving (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Display (56)  |  Event (216)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inexact (3)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Past (337)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Paucity (3)  |  Physician (273)  |  Premature (20)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Record (154)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Wanton (2)  |  Writing (189)

It is said that the composing of the Lilavati was occasioned by the following circumstance. Lilavati was the name of the author’s daughter, concerning whom it appeared, from the qualities of the ascendant at her birth, that she was destined to pass her life unmarried, and to remain without children. The father ascertained a lucky hour for contracting her in marriage, that she might be firmly connected and have children. It is said that when that hour approached, he brought his daughter and his intended son near him. He left the hour cup on the vessel of water and kept in attendance a time-knowing astrologer, in order that when the cup should subside in the water, those two precious jewels should be united. But, as the intended arrangement was not according to destiny, it happened that the girl, from a curiosity natural to children, looked into the cup, to observe the water coming in at the hole, when by chance a pearl separated from her bridal dress, fell into the cup, and, rolling down to the hole, stopped the influx of water. So the astrologer waited in expectation of the promised hour. When the operation of the cup had thus been delayed beyond all moderate time, the father was in consternation, and examining, he found that a small pearl had stopped the course of the water, and that the long-expected hour was passed. In short, the father, thus disappointed, said to his unfortunate daughter, I will write a book of your name, which shall remain to the latest times—for a good name is a second life, and the ground-work of eternal existence.
In Preface to the Persian translation of the Lilavati by Faizi (1587), itself translated into English by Strachey and quoted in John Taylor (trans.) Lilawati, or, A Treatise on Arithmetic and Geometry by Bhascara Acharya (1816), Introduction, 3. [The Lilavati is the 12th century treatise on mathematics by Indian mathematician, Bhaskara Acharya, born 1114.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approach (108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Author (167)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chance (239)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Coming (114)  |  Compose (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contract (11)  |  Course (409)  |  Cup (7)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Delay (20)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Dress (9)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Examine (78)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fall (230)  |  Father (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hole (16)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indian (27)  |  Influx (2)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Late (118)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Precious (41)  |  Promise (67)  |  Quality (135)  |  Remain (349)  |  Roll (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  Son (24)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subside (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  United (14)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wait (58)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

J. J. Sylvester was an enthusiastic supporter of reform [in the teaching of geometry]. The difference in attitude on this question between the two foremost British mathematicians, J. J. Sylvester, the algebraist, and Arthur Cayley, the algebraist and geometer, was grotesque. Sylvester wished to bury Euclid “deeper than e’er plummet sounded” out of the schoolboy’s reach; Cayley, an ardent admirer of Euclid, desired the retention of Simson’s Euclid. When reminded that this treatise was a mixture of Euclid and Simson, Cayley suggested striking out Simson’s additions and keeping strictly to the original treatise.
In History of Elementary Mathematics (1910), 285.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Admirer (9)  |  Ardent (6)  |  Attitude (82)  |  British (41)  |  Bury (16)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Deep (233)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Foremost (11)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  Keep (101)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Original (58)  |  Plummet (2)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reform (22)  |  Remind (13)  |  Retention (5)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Sound (183)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Striking (48)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supporter (4)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)

Know, oh Brother (May God assist thee and us by the Spirit from Him) that God, Exalted Be His Praise, when He created all creatures and brought all things into being, arranged them and brought them into existence by a process similar to the process of generation of numbers from one, so that the multiplicity [of numbers] should be a witness to his Oneness, and their classification and order an indication of the perfection of His wisdom in creation. And this would be a witness to the fact, too, that they [creatures] are related to Him who created them, in the same way as the numbers are related to the One which is prior to two, and which is the principle, origin and source of numbers, as we have shown in our treatise on arithmetic.
Rasa'il. In Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Science and Civilisation in Islam (1968), 155-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brother (43)  |  Classification (97)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Generation (242)  |  God (757)  |  Indication (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Number (699)  |  Oneness (6)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Witness (54)

Maxwell, like every other pioneer who does not live to explore the country he opened out, had not had time to investigate the most direct means of access to the country, or the most systematic way of exploring it. This has been reserved for Oliver Heaviside to do. Maxwell’s treatise is cumbered with the débris of his brilliant lines of assault, of his entrenched camps, of his battles. Oliver Heaviside has cleared those away, has opened up a direct route, has made a broad road, and has explored a considerable tract of country.
Book Review of Heaviside’s Electrical Papers in The Electrician (11 Aug 1893). Collected in Joseph Larmore (ed.), The Scientific Writings of the Late George Francis FitzGerald (1902), 294.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Access (20)  |  Assault (12)  |  Battle (34)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Camp (10)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Country (251)  |  Debris (7)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Encumber (4)  |  Entrench (2)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Oliver Heaviside (25)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Live (628)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Route (15)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

One feature which will probably most impress the mathematician accustomed to the rapidity and directness secured by the generality of modern methods is the deliberation with which Archimedes approaches the solution of any one of his main problems. Yet this very characteristic, with its incidental effects, is calculated to excite the more admiration because the method suggests the tactics of some great strategist who foresees everything, eliminates everything not immediately conducive to the execution of his plan, masters every position in its order, and then suddenly (when the very elaboration of the scheme has almost obscured, in the mind of the spectator, its ultimate object) strikes the final blow. Thus we read in Archimedes proposition after proposition the bearing of which is not immediately obvious but which we find infallibly used later on; and we are led by such easy stages that the difficulties of the original problem, as presented at the outset, are scarcely appreciated. As Plutarch says: “It is not possible to find in geometry more difficult and troublesome questions, or more simple and lucid explanations.” But it is decidedly a rhetorical exaggeration when Plutarch goes on to say that we are deceived by the easiness of the successive steps into the belief that anyone could have discovered them for himself. On the contrary, the studied simplicity and the perfect finish of the treatises involve at the same time an element of mystery. Though each step depends on the preceding ones, we are left in the dark as to how they were suggested to Archimedes. There is, in fact, much truth in a remark by Wallis to the effect that he seems “as it were of set purpose to have covered up the traces of his investigation as if he had grudged posterity the secret of his method of inquiry while he wished to extort from them assent to his results.” Wallis adds with equal reason that not only Archimedes but nearly all the ancients so hid away from posterity their method of Analysis (though it is certain that they had one) that more modern mathematicians found it easier to invent a new Analysis than to seek out the old.
In The Works of Archimedes (1897), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Add (40)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approach (108)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Assent (12)  |  Bear (159)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blow (44)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conducive (3)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cover (37)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Decidedly (2)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easiness (4)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Equal (83)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execution (25)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extort (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feature (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Generality (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grudge (2)  |  Hide (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impress (64)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involve (90)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Main (28)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Outset (7)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plutarch (15)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Precede (23)  |  Present (619)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remark (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Secret (194)  |  Secure (22)  |  Secured (18)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Strike (68)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  John Wallis (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Philosophers say, that Man is a Microcosm, or little World, resembling in Miniature every Part of the Great: And, in my Opinion, the Body Natural may be compared to the Body Politic: and if this be so, how can the Epicureans Opinion be true, that the Universe was formed by a fortuitous Concourse of Atoms; which I will no more believe, than that the accidental Jumbling of the Letters of the Alphabet, could fall by Chance into a most ingenious and learned Treatise of Philosophy. Risum teneatis Amici, Hor.
In 'A Tritical Essay Upon the Faculties of the Mind' (6 Aug 1707), collected in various volumes and editions, for example, The Works of J.S, D.D, D.S.P.D.: Volume 1: Miscellanies in Prose (1739), 173. An earlier, undated, fourth volume of Miscellanies gives the 6 Aug 1707 date the essay was written. The final Latin phrase can be translated as, “Can you help laughing, friends?” attributed to Horace. In Jonathan Swift and Temple Scott (ed.), The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift: A Tale of a Tub: the Battle of the Books, and Other Early Works (1897, reprint 1907), Vol. 1, 291, the editor footnotes that “this essay is a parody on the pseudo-philosophical essays of the time, in which all sense was lost in the maze of inconsequential quotations.” Indeed, the rest of the essay is, by design, a jumble of disjointed thoughts and makes next to no sense.
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (27)  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Body (537)  |  Chance (239)  |  Compared (8)  |  Concourse (5)  |  Epicurean (2)  |  Fall (230)  |  Form (959)  |  Formed (5)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Jumbling (2)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microcosm (8)  |  Miniature (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Resembling (2)  |  Say (984)  |  True (212)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Quite distinct from the theoretical question of the manner in which mathematics will rescue itself from the perils to which it is exposed by its own prolific nature is the practical problem of finding means of rendering available for the student the results which have been already accumulated, and making it possible for the learner to obtain some idea of the present state of the various departments of mathematics. … The great mass of mathematical literature will be always contained in Journals and Transactions, but there is no reason why it should not be rendered far more useful and accessible than at present by means of treatises or higher text-books. The whole science suffers from want of avenues of approach, and many beautiful branches of mathematics are regarded as difficult and technical merely because they are not easily accessible. … I feel very strongly that any introduction to a new subject written by a competent person confers a real benefit on the whole science. The number of excellent text-books of an elementary kind that are published in this country makes it all the more to be regretted that we have so few that are intended for the advanced student. As an example of the higher kind of text-book, the want of which is so badly felt in many subjects, I may mention the second part of Prof. Chrystal’s Algebra published last year, which in a small compass gives a great mass of valuable and fundamental knowledge that has hitherto been beyond the reach of an ordinary student, though in reality lying so close at hand. I may add that in any treatise or higher text-book it is always desirable that references to the original memoirs should be given, and, if possible, short historic notices also. I am sure that no subject loses more than mathematics by any attempt to dissociate it from its history.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Approach (108)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Available (78)  |  Avenue (14)  |  Badly (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Branch (150)  |  George Chrystal (8)  |  Close (69)  |  Compass (34)  |  Competent (20)  |  Confer (11)  |  Contain (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Department (92)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Historic (7)  |  History (673)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intend (16)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Journal (30)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Literature (103)  |  Lose (159)  |  Lying (55)  |  Making (300)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Mention (82)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Original (58)  |  Part (222)  |  Peril (9)  |  Person (363)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practical (200)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prof (2)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Publish (36)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Real (149)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reference (33)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regret (30)  |  Render (93)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Technical (43)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)  |  Various (200)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

So why fret and care that the actual version of the destined deed was done by an upper class English gentleman who had circumnavigated the globe as a vigorous youth, lost his dearest daughter and his waning faith at the same time, wrote the greatest treatise ever composed on the taxonomy of barnacles, and eventually grew a white beard, lived as a country squire just south of London, and never again traveled far enough even to cross the English Channel? We care for the same reason that we love okapis, delight in the fossil evidence of trilobites, and mourn the passage of the dodo. We care because the broad events that had to happen, happened to happen in a certain particular way. And something unspeakably holy –I don’t know how else to say this–underlies our discovery and confirmation of the actual details that made our world and also, in realms of contingency, assured the minutiae of its construction in the manner we know, and not in any one of a trillion other ways, nearly all of which would not have included the evolution of a scribe to record the beauty, the cruelty, the fascination, and the mystery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Assure (15)  |  Beard (7)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Broad (27)  |  Care (186)  |  Certain (550)  |  Channel (21)  |  Class (164)  |  Compose (17)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Country (251)  |  Cross (16)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Deed (34)  |  Delight (108)  |  Destined (42)  |  Detail (146)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dodo (5)  |  English (35)  |  Enough (340)  |  Event (216)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Faith (203)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fret (2)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Holy (34)  |  Include (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Live (628)  |  London (12)  |  Lose (159)  |  Love (309)  |  Manner (58)  |  Minutiae (7)  |  Mourn (2)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Passage (50)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Record (154)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Scribe (3)  |  Something (719)  |  South (38)  |  Taxonomy (18)  |  Time (1877)  |  Travel (114)  |  Trillion (4)  |  Trilobite (6)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Underly (2)  |  Unspeakably (3)  |  Upper (4)  |  Version (7)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)  |  Youth (101)

Tait dubbed Maxwell dp/dt, for according to thermodynamics dp/dt = JCM (where C denotes Carnot’s function) the initials of (J.C.) Maxwell’s name. On the other hand Maxwell denoted Thomson by T and Tait by T'; so that it became customary to quote Thomson and Tait’s Treatise on Natural Philosophy as T and T'.
In Bibliotheca Mathematica (1903), 3, 187. As cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 178. [Note: Thomson is William Thomson, later Lord Kelvin. —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Customary (18)  |  Function (228)  |  Initial (17)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nickname (3)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Quote (42)  |  Peter Guthrie Tait (10)  |  Thermodynamics (40)

That the Universe was formed by a fortuitous Concourse of Atoms, I will no more believe than that the accidental Jumbling of the Letters of the Alphabet would fall by Chance into a most ingenious and learned Treatise of Philosophy, Risum teneatis Amici, Hor.
In 'A Tritical Essay Upon the Faculties of the Mind' (6 Aug 1707), collected in various volumes and editions, for example, The Works of J.S, D.D, D.S.P.D.: Volume 1: Miscellanies in Prose (1739), 173. An earlier, undated, fourth volume of Miscellanies gives the 6 Aug 1707 date the essay was written. The final Latin phrase can be translated as, “Can you help laughing, friends?” attributed to Horace.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Chance (239)  |  Concourse (5)  |  Fall (230)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Jumbling (2)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Letter (109)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

The enthusiasm of Sylvester for his own work, which manifests itself here as always, indicates one of his characteristic qualities: a high degree of subjectivity in his productions and publications. Sylvester was so fully possessed by the matter which for the time being engaged his attention, that it appeared to him and was designated by him as the summit of all that is important, remarkable and full of future promise. It would excite his phantasy and power of imagination in even a greater measure than his power of reflection, so much so that he could never marshal the ability to master his subject-matter, much less to present it in an orderly manner.
Considering that he was also somewhat of a poet, it will be easier to overlook the poetic flights which pervade his writing, often bombastic, sometimes furnishing apt illustrations; more damaging is the complete lack of form and orderliness of his publications and their sketchlike character, … which must be accredited at least as much to lack of objectivity as to a superfluity of ideas. Again, the text is permeated with associated emotional expressions, bizarre utterances and paradoxes and is everywhere accompanied by notes, which constitute an essential part of Sylvester’s method of presentation, embodying relations, whether proximate or remote, which momentarily suggested themselves. These notes, full of inspiration and occasional flashes of genius, are the more stimulating owing to their incompleteness. But none of his works manifest a desire to penetrate the subject from all sides and to allow it to mature; each mere surmise, conceptions which arose during publication, immature thoughts and even errors were ushered into publicity at the moment of their inception, with utmost carelessness, and always with complete unfamiliarity of the literature of the subject. Nowhere is there the least trace of self-criticism. No one can be expected to read the treatises entire, for in the form in which they are available they fail to give a clear view of the matter under contemplation.
Sylvester’s was not a harmoniously gifted or well-balanced mind, but rather an instinctively active and creative mind, free from egotism. His reasoning moved in generalizations, was frequently influenced by analysis and at times was guided even by mystical numerical relations. His reasoning consists less frequently of pure intelligible conclusions than of inductions, or rather conjectures incited by individual observations and verifications. In this he was guided by an algebraic sense, developed through long occupation with processes of forms, and this led him luckily to general fundamental truths which in some instances remain veiled. His lack of system is here offset by the advantage of freedom from purely mechanical logical activity.
The exponents of his essential characteristics are an intuitive talent and a faculty of invention to which we owe a series of ideas of lasting value and bearing the germs of fruitful methods. To no one more fittingly than to Sylvester can be applied one of the mottos of the Philosophic Magazine:
“Admiratio generat quaestionem, quaestio investigationem investigatio inventionem.”
In Mathematische Annalen (1898), 50, 155-160. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 176-178.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Applied (177)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conception (154)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creative (137)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Develop (268)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expect (200)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genius (284)  |  Germ (53)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inception (3)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lack (119)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mature (16)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Owe (71)  |  Owing (39)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Production (183)  |  Promise (67)  |  Proximate (4)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Read (287)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surmise (7)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Value (365)  |  Veil (26)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

The Excellence of Modern Geometry is in nothing more evident, than in those full and adequate Solutions it gives to Problems; representing all possible Cases in one view, and in one general Theorem many times comprehending whole Sciences; which deduced at length into Propositions, and demonstrated after the manner of the Ancients, might well become the subjects of large Treatises: For whatsoever Theorem solves the most complicated Problem of the kind, does with a due Reduction reach all the subordinate Cases.
In 'An Instance of the Excellence of Modern Algebra, etc', Philosophical Transactions, 1694, 960.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Due (141)  |  Evident (91)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Full (66)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Length (23)  |  Manner (58)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Represent (155)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Solve (130)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subordinate (9)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)

The Grand Duke [of Tuscany] …after observing the Medicaean plants several times with me … has now invited me to attach myself to him with the annual salary of one thousand florins, and with the title of Philosopher and Principal Mathematicial to His Highness; without the duties of office to perform, but with the most complete leisure; so that I can complete my Treatises...
From a letter to Kepler. Quoted in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei (1832), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Complete (204)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Office (71)  |  Patronage (3)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plant (294)  |  Principal (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Salary (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)

The Himalayas are the crowning achievement of the Indo-Australian plate. India in the Oligocene crashed head on into Tibet, hit so hard that it not only folded and buckled the plate boundaries but also plowed into the newly created Tibetan plateau and drove the Himalayas five and a half miles into the sky. The mountains are in some trouble. India has not stopped pushing them, and they are still going up. Their height and volume are already so great they are beginning to melt in their own self-generated radioactive heat. When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in a warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as 20,000 feet below the sea floor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth.
If by some fiat, I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence; this is the one I would choose: the summit of Mount Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Below (24)  |  Blank (11)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clear (100)  |  Climber (7)  |  Crash (9)  |  Create (235)  |  Creature (233)  |  Crown (38)  |  Drive (55)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Five (16)  |  Flag (11)  |  Floor (20)  |  Fold (8)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Half (56)  |  Hard (243)  |  Head (81)  |  Heat (174)  |  Height (32)  |  High (362)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Hit (20)  |  India (16)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine (9)  |  Melt (16)  |  Mile (39)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Newly (4)  |  North (11)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plate (6)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Plow (7)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Push (62)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Self (267)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Set (394)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snow (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Stop (80)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tibet (4)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Turn (447)  |  Volume (19)  |  Warm (69)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

The large collection of problems which our modern Cambridge books supply will be found to be almost an exclusive peculiarity of these books; such collections scarcely exist in foreign treatises on mathematics, nor even in English treatises of an earlier date. This fact shows, I think, that a knowledge of mathematics may be gained without the perpetual working of examples. … Do not trouble yourselves with the examples, make it your main business, I might almost say your exclusive business, to understand the text of your author.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Book (392)  |  Business (149)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Collection (64)  |  Date (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Early (185)  |  English (35)  |  Example (94)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gain (145)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Main (28)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Problem (676)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Show (346)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Supply (93)  |  Text (14)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The opinion of Bacon on this subject [geometry] was diametrically opposed to that of the ancient philosophers. He valued geometry chiefly, if not solely, on account of those uses, which to Plato appeared so base. And it is remarkable that the longer Bacon lived the stronger this feeling became. When in 1605 he wrote the two books on the Advancement of Learning, he dwelt on the advantages which mankind derived from mixed mathematics; but he at the same time admitted that the beneficial effect produced by mathematical study on the intellect, though a collateral advantage, was “no less worthy than that which was principal and intended.” But it is evident that his views underwent a change. When near twenty years later, he published the De Augmentis, which is the Treatise on the Advancement of Learning, greatly expanded and carefully corrected, he made important alterations in the part which related to mathematics. He condemned with severity the pretensions of the mathematicians, “delidas et faslum mathematicorum.” Assuming the well-being of the human race to be the end of knowledge, he pronounced that mathematical science could claim no higher rank than that of an appendage or an auxiliary to other sciences. Mathematical science, he says, is the handmaid of natural philosophy; she ought to demean herself as such; and he declares that he cannot conceive by what ill chance it has happened that she presumes to claim precedence over her mistress.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appendage (2)  |  Assume (38)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Base (117)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Book (392)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Chance (239)  |  Change (593)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Claim (146)  |  Collateral (4)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Correct (86)  |  De (3)  |  Declare (45)  |  Derive (65)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Evident (91)  |  Expand (53)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Handmaid (6)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Important (209)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intend (16)  |  It Is Evident (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Less (103)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Mix (19)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Precedence (4)  |  Presume (9)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Principal (63)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Pronounce (10)  |  Publish (36)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Relate (21)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Severity (6)  |  Solely (9)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

The origin of a science is usually to be sought for not in any systematic treatise, but in the investigation and solution of some particular problem. This is especially the case in the ordinary history of the great improvements in any department of mathematical science. Some problem, mathematical or physical, is proposed, which is found to be insoluble by known methods. This condition of insolubility may arise from one of two causes: Either there exists no machinery powerful enough to effect the required reduction, or the workmen are not sufficiently expert to employ their tools in the performance of an entirely new piece of work. The problem proposed is, however, finally solved, and in its solution some new principle, or new application of old principles, is necessarily introduced. If a principle is brought to light it is soon found that in its application it is not necessarily limited to the particular question which occasioned its discovery, and it is then stated in an abstract form and applied to problems of gradually increasing generality.
Other principles, similar in their nature, are added, and the original principle itself receives such modifications and extensions as are from time to time deemed necessary. The same is true of new applications of old principles; the application is first thought to be merely confined to a particular problem, but it is soon recognized that this problem is but one, and generally a very simple one, out of a large class, to which the same process of investigation and solution are applicable. The result in both of these cases is the same. A time comes when these several problems, solutions, and principles are grouped together and found to produce an entirely new and consistent method; a nomenclature and uniform system of notation is adopted, and the principles of the new method become entitled to rank as a distinct science.
In A Treatise on Projections (1880), Introduction, xi. Published as United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, Treasury Department Document, No. 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Add (40)  |  Adopt (19)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Class (164)  |  Condition (356)  |  Confine (26)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Deem (6)  |  Department (92)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enough (340)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Entitle (3)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expert (65)  |  Extension (59)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Generality (45)  |  Generally (15)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  History (673)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Insoluble (15)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Notation (27)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  Original (58)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physical (508)  |  Piece (38)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Produce (104)  |  Propose (23)  |  Question (621)  |  Rank (67)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Several (32)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Solve (130)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Tool (117)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)

The pre-Darwinian age had come to be regarded as a Dark Age in which men still believed that the book of Genesis was a standard scientific treatise, and that the only additions to it were Galileo's demonstration of Leonardo da Vinci’s simple remark that the earth is a moon of the sun, Newton’s theory of gravitation, Sir Humphry Davy's invention of the safety-lamp, the discovery of electricity, the application of steam to industrial purposes, and the penny post.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), viii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Age (499)  |  Application (242)  |  Belief (578)  |  Book (392)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (87)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Industry (137)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Penny (5)  |  Post (6)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remark (28)  |  Safety (54)  |  Safety Lamp (3)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Standard (57)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Power (8)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (6)

The prominent reason why a mathematician can be judged by none but mathematicians, is that he uses a peculiar language. The language of mathesis is special and untranslatable. In its simplest forms it can be translated, as, for instance, we say a right angle to mean a square corner. But you go a little higher in the science of mathematics, and it is impossible to dispense with a peculiar language. It would defy all the power of Mercury himself to explain to a person ignorant of the science what is meant by the single phrase “functional exponent.” How much more impossible, if we may say so, would it be to explain a whole treatise like Hamilton’s Quaternions, in such a wise as to make it possible to judge of its value! But to one who has learned this language, it is the most precise and clear of all modes of expression. It discloses the thought exactly as conceived by the writer, with more or less beauty of form, but never with obscurity. It may be prolix, as it often is among French writers; may delight in mere verbal metamorphoses, as in the Cambridge University of England; or adopt the briefest and clearest forms, as under the pens of the geometers of our Cambridge; but it always reveals to us precisely the writer’s thought.
In North American Review (Jul 1857), 85, 224-225.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adopt (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Brief (36)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Cambridge University (2)  |  Clear (100)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Corner (57)  |  Defy (11)  |  Delight (108)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Dispense (9)  |  England (40)  |  Exact (68)  |  Explain (322)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Expression (175)  |  Form (959)  |  French (20)  |  Function (228)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Hamilton_William (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Judge (108)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Metamorphose (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pen (20)  |  Person (363)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prolix (2)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Quaternion (9)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Right (452)  |  Right Angle (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Special (184)  |  Square (70)  |  Thought (953)  |  Translate (19)  |  University (121)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Wise (131)  |  Writer (86)

The treatises [of Archimedes] are without exception, monuments of mathematical exposition; the gradual revelation of the plan of attack, the masterly ordering of the propositions, the stern elimination of everything not immediately relevant to the purpose, the finish of the whole, are so impressive in their perfection as to create a feeling akin to awe in the mind of the reader.
In A History of Greek Mathematics (1921), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Attack (84)  |  Awe (43)  |  Create (235)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Finish (59)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monument (45)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Plan (117)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reader (40)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

This Academy [at Lagado] is not an entire single Building, but a Continuation of several Houses on both Sides of a Street; which growing waste, was purchased and applied to that Use.
I was received very kindly by the Warden, and went for many Days to the Academy. Every Room hath in it ' one or more Projectors; and I believe I could not be in fewer than five Hundred Rooms.
The first Man I saw was of a meagre Aspect, with sooty Hands and Face, his Hair and Beard long, ragged and singed in several Places. His Clothes, Shirt, and Skin were all of the same Colour. He had been Eight Years upon a Project for extracting Sun-Beams out of Cucumbers, which were to be put into Vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the Air in raw inclement Summers. He told me, he did not doubt in Eight Years more, that he should be able to supply the Governor's Gardens with Sunshine at a reasonable Rate; but he complained that his Stock was low, and interested me to give him something as an Encouragement to Ingenuity, especially since this had been a very dear Season for Cucumbers. I made him a small Present, for my Lord had furnished me with Money on purpose, because he knew their Practice of begging from all who go to see them.
I saw another at work to calcine Ice into Gunpowder; who likewise shewed me a Treatise he had written concerning the Malleability of Fire, which he intended to publish.
There was a most ingenious Architect who had contrived a new Method for building Houses, by beginning at the Roof, and working downwards to the Foundation; which he justified to me by the life Practice of those two prudent Insects the Bee and the Spider.
In another Apartment I was highly pleased with a Projector, who had found a device of plowing the Ground with Hogs, to save the Charges of Plows, Cattle, and Labour. The Method is this: In an Acre of Ground you bury at six Inches Distance, and eight deep, a quantity of Acorns, Dates, Chestnuts, and other Masts or Vegetables whereof these Animals are fondest; then you drive six Hundred or more of them into the Field, where in a few Days they will root up the whole Ground in search of their Food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their Dung. It is true, upon Experiment they found the Charge and Trouble very great, and they had little or no Crop. However, it is not doubted that this Invention may be capable of great Improvement.
I had hitherto seen only one Side of the Academy, the other being appropriated to the Advancers of speculative Learning.
Some were condensing Air into a dry tangible Substance, by extracting the Nitre, and letting the acqueous or fluid Particles percolate: Others softening Marble for Pillows and Pin-cushions. Another was, by a certain Composition of Gums, Minerals, and Vegetables outwardly applied, to prevent the Growth of Wool upon two young lambs; and he hoped in a reasonable Time to propagate the Breed of naked Sheep all over the Kingdom.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 5, 223.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Acorn (4)  |  Acre (12)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Architect (29)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bee (40)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Breed (24)  |  Building (156)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chestnut (2)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Date (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dung (7)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Garden (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Hermetic Seal (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mast (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plow (7)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Publish (36)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raw (28)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seal (18)  |  Search (162)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soot (9)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Spider (14)  |  Substance (248)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Supply (93)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vial (4)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wool (4)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

This incomparable Author having at length been prevailed upon to appear in public, has in this Treatise given a most notable instance of the extent of the powers of the Mind; and has at once shown what are the Principles of Natural Philosophy, and so far derived from them their consequences, that he seems to have exhausted his Argument, and left little to be done by those that shall succeed him.a
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Author (167)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Extent (139)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Principle (507)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Theory (970)

This whole theory of electrostatics constitutes a group of abstract ideas and general propositions, formulated in the clear and precise language of geometry and algebra, and connected with one another by the rules of strict logic. This whole fully satisfies the reason of a French physicist and his taste for clarity, simplicity and order. The same does not hold for the Englishman. These abstract notions of material points, force, line of force, and equipotential surface do not satisfy his need to imagine concrete, material, visible, and tangible things. 'So long as we cling to this mode of representation,' says an English physicist, 'we cannot form a mental representation of the phenomena which are really happening.' It is to satisfy the need that he goes and creates a model.
The French or German physicist conceives, in the space separating two conductors, abstract lines of force having no thickness or real existence; the English physicist materializes these lines and thickens them to the dimensions of a tube which he will fill with vulcanised rubber. In place of a family of lines of ideal forces, conceivable only by reason, he will have a bundle of elastic strings, visible and tangible, firmly glued at both ends to the surfaces of the two conductors, and, when stretched, trying both to contact and to expand. When the two conductors approach each other, he sees the elastic strings drawing closer together; then he sees each of them bunch up and grow large. Such is the famous model of electrostatic action imagined by Faraday and admired as a work of genius by Maxwell and the whole English school.
The employment of similar mechanical models, recalling by certain more or less rough analogies the particular features of the theory being expounded, is a regular feature of the English treatises on physics. Here is a book* [by Oliver Lodge] intended to expound the modern theories of electricity and to expound a new theory. In it are nothing but strings which move around pulleys, which roll around drums, which go through pearl beads, which carry weights; and tubes which pump water while others swell and contract; toothed wheels which are geared to one another and engage hooks. We thought we were entering the tranquil and neatly ordered abode of reason, but we find ourselves in a factory.
*Footnote: O. Lodge, Les Théories Modernes (Modern Views on Electricity) (1889), 16.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Approach (108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contact (65)  |  Create (235)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drum (8)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Engage (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Factory (20)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  German (36)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happening (58)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Materialize (2)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mental (177)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Representation (53)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Those who knew that the judgements of many centuries had reinforced the opinion that the Earth is placed motionless in the middle of heaven, as though at its centre, if I on the contrary asserted that the Earth moves, I hesitated for a long time whether to bring my treatise, written to demonstrate its motion, into the light of day, or whether it would not be better to follow the example of the Pythagoreans and certain others, who used to pass on the mysteries of their philosophy merely to their relatives and friends, not in writing but by personal contact, as the letter of Lysis to Hipparchus bears witness. And indeed they seem to me to have done so, not as some think from a certain jealousy of communicating their doctrines, but so that their greatest splendours, discovered by the devoted research of great men, should not be exposed to the contempt of those who either find it irksome to waste effort on anything learned, unless it is profitable, or if they are stirred by the exhortations and examples of others to a high-minded enthusiasm for philosophy, are nevertheless so dull-witted that among philosophers they are like drones among bees.
'To His Holiness Pope Paul III', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Bear (159)  |  Bee (40)  |  Better (486)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contact (65)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drone (4)  |  Dull (54)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Heaven (258)  |  High (362)  |  Hipparchus (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Letter (109)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Waste (101)  |  Witness (54)  |  Writing (189)

Whatever may happen to the latest theory of Dr. Einstein, his treatise represents a mathematical effort of overwhelming proportions. It is the more remarkable since Einstein is primarily a physicist and only incidentally a mathematician. He came to mathematics rather of necessity than by predilection, and yet he has here developed mathematical formulae and calculations springing from a colossal knowledge.
In 'Marvels at Einstein For His Mathematics', New York Times (4 Feb 1929), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (127)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Develop (268)  |  Effort (227)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Formula (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Predilection (4)  |  Primary (80)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Represent (155)  |  Spring (133)  |  Theory (970)  |  Whatever (234)

When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in the warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as twenty thousand feet below the seafloor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth. If by some fiat I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence, this is the one I would choose: The summit of Mt. Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Below (24)  |  Blank (11)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clear (100)  |  Climber (7)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everest (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Flag (11)  |  Foot (60)  |  High (362)  |  India (16)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine (9)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  North (11)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Seafloor (2)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Set (394)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Snow (37)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Turn (447)  |  Warm (69)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

[Concerning] mr Kirwan’s charming treatise on manures. Science never appears so beautiful as when applied to the uses of human life, nor any use of it so engaging as agriculture & domestic economy.
Letter (23 Mar 1798) from Jefferson in Philadelphia to William Strickland. In The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: 1 January 1798 to 31 January 1799 (2003), 211. Jefferson was thanking Strickland, who had sent him a copy of Kirwan’s treatise.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applied (177)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Charming (3)  |  Concern (228)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Economy (55)  |  Human (1468)  |  Richard Kirwan (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manure (8)  |  Never (1087)  |  Science (3879)  |  Use (766)

[The Book of Genesis is] [p]rofoundly interesting and indeed pathetic to me are those attempts of the opening mind of man to appease its hunger for a Cause. But the Book of Genesis has no voice in scientific questions. It is a poem, not a scientific treatise. In the former aspect it is for ever beautiful; in the latter it has been, and it will continue to be, purely obstructive and hurtful.'
In 'Professor Virchow and Evolution', Fragments of Science (1879), Vol. 2, 377. Tyndall is quoting himself from “four years ago”&mdashthus c.1875.
Science quotes on:  |  Appease (6)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Cause (541)  |  Continue (165)  |  Early (185)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Former (137)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Hurtful (8)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obstruction (4)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Pathetic (4)  |  Poem (96)  |  Profound (104)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.