Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Appear

Appear Quotes (55 quotes)

“Pieces” almost always appear 'as parts' in whole processes. ... To sever a “'part” from the organized whole in which it occurs—whether it itself be a subsidiary whole or an “element”—is a very real process usually involving alterations in that “part”. Modifications of a part frequently involve changes elsewhere in the whole itself. Nor is the nature of these alterations arbitrary, for they too are determined by whole-conditions.
From 'Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt, I', Psychol. Forsch. (1922), 1, 47-58. As translated in 'The General Theoretical Situation' (1922), collected in W. D. Ellis (ed.), A Source Book of Gestalt Psychology (1938, 1967), Vol. 2, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Change (291)  |  Determine (45)  |  Element (129)  |  Frequently (13)  |  Involve (27)  |  Modification (31)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Organized (9)  |  Part (146)  |  Piece (32)  |  Process (201)  |  Real (95)  |  Subsidiary (2)  |  Whole (122)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Accord (21)  |  Accordingly (3)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Ascertain (7)  |  Aspiration (19)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Become (100)  |  Best (129)  |  Buddha (4)  |  Capable (26)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Cling (4)  |  Completely (19)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Constantly (19)  |  Content (39)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Count (34)  |  Definition (152)  |  Depth (32)  |  Desire (101)  |  Devout (4)  |  Divine (42)  |  Domain (21)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Effect (133)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Enlightened (4)  |  Exist (89)  |  Extend (20)  |  Feelings (11)  |  Fetter (3)  |  Force (194)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Goal (81)  |  Important (124)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Kind (99)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Object (110)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Outside (37)  |  Person (114)  |  Personality (40)  |  Possible (100)  |  Rational (42)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religion And Science (6)  |  Religious (44)  |  Remain (77)  |  Require (33)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seem (89)  |  Selfish (2)  |  Sense (240)  |  Significance (60)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Strengthen (13)  |  Thought (374)  |  Unite (13)  |  Value (180)

All parts of the material universe are in constant motion and though some of the changes may appear to be cyclical, nothing ever exactly returns, so far as human experience extends, to precisely the same condition.
Address (Jul 1874) at the grave of Joseph Priestley, in Joseph Henry and Arthur P. Molella, et al. (eds.), A Scientist in American Life: Essays and Lectures of Joseph Henry (1980), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Constant (40)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Experience (268)  |  Material (124)  |  Motion (127)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Return (35)  |  Universe (563)

Among all the occurrences possible in the universe the a priori probability of any particular one of them verges upon zero. Yet the universe exists; particular events must take place in it, the probability of which (before the event) was infinitesimal. At the present time we have no legitimate grounds for either asserting or denying that life got off to but a single start on earth, and that, as a consequence, before it appeared its chances of occurring were next to nil. ... Destiny is written concurrently with the event, not prior to it.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Assert (11)  |  Chance (122)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Deny (29)  |  Destiny (26)  |  Earth (487)  |  Event (97)  |  Exist (89)  |  Infinitesimal (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Occur (26)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Particular (54)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prior (5)  |  Probability (83)  |  Start (68)  |  Universe (563)  |  Write (87)  |  Zero (15)

As far as we know in the universe, man is unique. He happens to represent the highest form of organization of matter and energy that has ever appeared.
In The Meaning of Evolution (Rev.Ed. 1967), 345.
Science quotes on:  |  Energy (185)  |  Highest (16)  |  Know (321)  |  Matter (270)  |  Unique (24)  |  Universe (563)

Astronomy was thus the cradle of the natural sciences and the starting point of geometrical theories. The stars themselves gave rise to the concept of a ‘point’; triangles, quadrangles and other geometrical figures appeared in the constellations; the circle was realized by the disc of the sun and the moon. Thus in an essentially intuitive fashion the elements of geometrical thinking came into existence.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Circle (28)  |  Concept (102)  |  Constellation (9)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Element (129)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Figure (32)  |  Geometrical (3)  |  Give (117)  |  Intuitive (7)  |  Moon (132)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Point (72)  |  Quadrangle (2)  |  Realize (43)  |  Rise (51)  |  Star (251)  |  Starting Point (6)  |  Sun (211)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Triangle (7)

Curves that have no tangents are the rule. … Those who hear of curves without tangents, or of functions without derivatives, often think at first that Nature presents no such complications. … The contrary however is true. … Consider, for instance, one of the white flakes that are obtained by salting a solution of soap. At a distance its contour may appear sharply defined, but as we draw nearer its sharpness disappears. The eye can no longer draw a tangent at any point. … The use of a magnifying glass or microscope leaves us just as uncertain, for fresh irregularities appear every time we increase the magnification. … An essential characteristic of our flake … is that we suspect … that any scale involves details that absolutely prohibit the fixing of a tangent.
(1906). As quoted “in free translation” in Benoit B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Complication (20)  |  Contour (2)  |  Curve (16)  |  Defined (3)  |  Derivative (4)  |  Detail (65)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Distance (54)  |  Essential (87)  |  Eye (159)  |  Fixing (2)  |  Flake (5)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Increase (107)  |  Involve (27)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Magnification (8)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nearer (8)  |  Rule (135)  |  Scale (49)  |  Sharply (3)  |  Sharpness (4)  |  Soap (11)  |  Solution (168)  |  Suspect (12)  |  Tangent (3)  |  Uncertain (11)

Debate is an art form. It is about the winning of arguments. It is not about the discovery of truth. There are certain rules and procedures to debate that really have nothing to do with establishing fact–which creationists have mastered. Some of those rules are: never say anything positive about your own position because it can be attacked, but chip away at what appear to be the weaknesses in your opponent’s position. They are good at that. I don’t think I could beat the creationists at debate. I can tie them. But in courtrooms they are terrible, because in courtrooms you cannot give speeches. In a courtroom you have to answer direct questions about the positive status of your belief. We destroyed them in Arkansas. On the second day of the two-week trial we had our victory party!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Argument (59)  |  Arkansas (2)  |  Art (205)  |  Attack (29)  |  Beat (15)  |  Belief (400)  |  Certain (84)  |  Chip (3)  |  Creationist (15)  |  Debate (19)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Direct (44)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Establish (30)  |  Fact (609)  |  Form (210)  |  Give (117)  |  Good (228)  |  Master (55)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Opponent (10)  |  Party (16)  |  Position (54)  |  Positive (28)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Question (315)  |  Really (50)  |  Rule (135)  |  Say (126)  |  Second (33)  |  Speech (40)  |  Status (18)  |  Terrible (14)  |  Think (205)  |  Tie (21)  |  Trial (23)  |  Truth (750)  |  Victory (24)  |  Weakness (31)  |  Win (25)

Despite the recurrence of events in which the debris-basin system fails in its struggle to contain the falling mountains, people who live on the front line are for the most part calm and complacent. It appears that no amount of front-page or prime-time attention will ever prevent such people from masking out the problem.
The Control of Nature
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Attention (76)  |  Calm (13)  |  Complacent (4)  |  Contain (37)  |  Despite (3)  |  Event (97)  |  Fail (34)  |  Fall (89)  |  Front (10)  |  Line (44)  |  Live (186)  |  Mask (7)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Part (146)  |  People (269)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Problem (362)  |  Recurrence (3)  |  Struggle (60)  |  System (141)

Energy is the measure of that which passes from one atom to another in the course of their transformations. A unifying power, then, but also, because the atom appears to become enriched or exhausted in the course of the exchange, the expression of structure.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 42. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Course (57)  |  Energy (185)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Exhaust (12)  |  Expression (82)  |  Measure (70)  |  Pass (60)  |  Power (273)  |  Structure (191)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Unify (4)

For the sake of persons of ... different types, scientific truth should be presented in different forms, and should be regarded as equally scientific, whether it appears in the robust form and the vivid coloring of a physical illustration, or in the tenuity and paleness of a symbolic expression.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Different (110)  |  Equally (18)  |  Expression (82)  |  Form (210)  |  Illustration (24)  |  Person (114)  |  Physical (94)  |  Present (103)  |  Regard (58)  |  Robust (5)  |  Sake (17)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Scientific Truth (2)  |  Symbolic (6)  |  Type (34)  |  Vivid (16)

From this fountain (the free will of God) it is those laws, which we call the laws of nature, have flowed, in which there appear many traces of the most wise contrivance, but not the least shadow of necessity. These therefore we must not seek from uncertain conjectures, but learn them from observations and experimental. He who is presumptuous enough to think that he can find the true principles of physics and the laws of natural things by the force alone of his own mind, and the internal light of his reason, must either suppose the world exists by necessity, and by the same necessity follows the law proposed; or if the order of Nature was established by the will of God, the [man] himself, a miserable reptile, can tell what was fittest to be done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Call (68)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Establish (30)  |  Exist (89)  |  Experimental (12)  |  Find (248)  |  Fit (31)  |  Flow (31)  |  Follow (66)  |  Force (194)  |  Fountain (14)  |  Free Will (11)  |  God (454)  |  Internal (18)  |  Law (418)  |  Learn (160)  |  Least (43)  |  Light (246)  |  Mind (544)  |  Miserable (6)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Physics (301)  |  Presumptuous (2)  |  Principle (228)  |  Propose (11)  |  Reason (330)  |  Reptile (23)  |  Same (92)  |  Seek (57)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Tell (67)  |  Think (205)  |  Trace (39)  |  True (120)  |  Uncertain (11)  |  Wise (43)  |  World (667)

Geology is part of that remarkable dynamic process of the human mind which is generally called science and to which man is driven by an inquisitive urge. By noticing relationships in the results of his observations, he attempts to order and to explain the infinite variety of phenomena that at first sight may appear to be chaotic. In the history of civilization this type of progressive scientist has been characterized by Prometheus stealing the heavenly fire, by Adam eating from the tree of knowledge, by the Faustian ache for wisdom.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 454.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (6)  |  Adam (6)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Characterize (9)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Eating (21)  |  Explain (61)  |  Faustian (2)  |  Fire (117)  |  First Sight (3)  |  Geology (187)  |  Heavenly (5)  |  History (302)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Inquisitive (3)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Process (201)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Prometheus (5)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Result (250)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (7)  |  Urge (10)  |  Variety (53)  |  Wisdom (151)

I am an adherent of the ideal of democracy, although I well know the weaknesses of the democratic form of government. Social equality and economic protection of the individual appeared to me always as the important communal aims of the state.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  Aim (58)  |  Communal (7)  |  Democracy (21)  |  Democratic (7)  |  Economic (21)  |  Equality (21)  |  Form (210)  |  Government (85)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Important (124)  |  Individual (177)  |  Know (321)  |  Protection (23)  |  Social (93)  |  State (96)  |  Weakness (31)

I wanted to be a scientist from my earliest school days. The crystallizing moment came when I first caught on that stars are mighty suns, and how staggeringly far away they must be to appear to us as mere points of light. I’m not sure I even knew the word science then, but I was gripped by the prospect of understanding how things work, of helping to uncover deep mysteries, of exploring new worlds.
In 'With Science on Our Side', Washington Post (9 Jan 1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (227)  |  Deep (81)  |  Earliest (3)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Far (77)  |  Light (246)  |  Mere (41)  |  Mystery (125)  |  New (340)  |  Point (72)  |  Prospect (19)  |  School (87)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Staggering (2)  |  Star (251)  |  Sun (211)  |  Uncover (6)  |  Understand (189)  |  World (667)

If I were a physician I would try my patients thus. I would wheel them to a window and let Nature feel their pulse. It will soon appear if their sensuous existence is sound. The sounds are but the throbbing of some pulse in me.
(26 Feb 1841). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Existence (254)  |  Feel (93)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Patient (116)  |  Physician (232)  |  Pulse (8)  |  Sensuous (3)  |  Sound (59)  |  Throb (4)  |  Window (25)

If you fix a piece of solid phosphorus in a quill, and write with it upon paper, the writing in a dark room will appear beautifully luminous.
From 'Artist and Mechanic', The artist & Tradesman’s Guide: embracing some leading facts & principles of science, and a variety of matter adapted to the wants of the artist, mechanic, manufacturer, and mercantile community (1827), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Dark (49)  |  Luminous (9)  |  Paper (52)  |  Phosphorus (15)  |  Write (87)

In long intervals I have expressed an opinion on public issues whenever they appeared to be so bad and unfortunate that silence would have made me feel guilty of complicity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (78)  |  Express (32)  |  Feel (93)  |  Guilty (4)  |  Interval (8)  |  Issue (37)  |  Long (95)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Public (82)  |  Silence (32)  |  Unfortunate (6)  |  Whenever (8)

In the social production of their life, men enter into definite relations that are indispensable and independent of their will; these relations of production correspond to a definite stage of development of their material forces of production. The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society - the real foundation, on which rises a legal and political superstructure and to which correspond definite forms of social consciousness. The mode of production of material life determines the social, political and intellectual life process in general. It is not the consciousness of men that determines their being, but, on the contrary, their social being that determines their consciousness. At a certain stage of their development, the material productive forces in society come in conflict with the existing relations of production, or - what is but a legal expression for the same thing - with the property relations within which they have been at work before. From forms of development of the productive forces these relations turn into fetters. Then begins an epoch of social revolution. With the change of the economic foundation the entire immense superstructure is more or less rapidly transformed. In considering such transformations a distinction should always be made between the material transformation of the economic conditions of production, which can be determined with the precision of natural science, and the legal, political, religious, aesthetic or philosophic - in short, ideological forms in which men become conscious of this conflict and fight it out. Just as our opinion of an individual is not based on what he thinks of himself, so we can not judge of such a period of transformation by its own consciousness; on the contrary, this consciousness must be explained rather from the contradictions of material life, from the existing conflict between the social productive forces and the relations of production. No social order ever disappears before all the productive forces for which there is room in it have been developed; and new, higher relations of production never appear before the material conditions of their existence have matured in the womb of the old society itself. Therefore, mankind always sets itself only such tasks as it can solve; since, looking at the matter more closely, we will always find that the task itself arises only when the material conditions necessary for its solution already exist or are at least in the process of formation. In broad outlines we can designate the Asiatic, the ancient, the feudal, and the modern bourgeois modes of production as so many progressive epochs in the economic formation of society. The bourgeois relations of production are the last antagonistic form of the social process of production - antagonistic not in the sense of individual antagonism, but of one arising from the social conditions of life of the individuals; at the same time the productive forces developing in the womb of bourgeois society create the material conditions for the solution of that antagonism. This social formation constitutes, therefore, the closing chapter of the prehistoric stage of human society.
Karl Marx
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Already (16)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Antagonism (5)  |  Antagonistic (2)  |  Arise (32)  |  Base (43)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bourgeois (2)  |  Broad (18)  |  Certain (84)  |  Change (291)  |  Chapter (7)  |  Close (40)  |  Closely (8)  |  Condition (119)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Consider (45)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Contrary (22)  |  Correspond (5)  |  Create (98)  |  Definite (27)  |  Designation (10)  |  Determine (45)  |  Develop (55)  |  Development (228)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Economic (21)  |  Enter (20)  |  Entire (29)  |  Epoch (12)  |  Exist (89)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fetter (3)  |  Fight (37)  |  Find (248)  |  Force (194)  |  Form (210)  |  Formation (54)  |  Foundation (75)  |  General (92)  |  High (78)  |  Human Society (6)  |  Ideological (3)  |  Immense (28)  |  Independent (41)  |  Indispensable (8)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Judge (43)  |  Least (43)  |  Legal (6)  |  Life (917)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Material (124)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mature (7)  |  Mode (29)  |  Modern (104)  |  More Or Less (4)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Necessary (89)  |  New (340)  |  Old (104)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Outline (6)  |  Period (49)  |  Philosophic (3)  |  Political (31)  |  Precision (38)  |  Prehistoric (5)  |  Process (201)  |  Production (105)  |  Productive (10)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Property (96)  |  Rapidly (10)  |  Real (95)  |  Relation (96)  |  Religious (44)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Rise (51)  |  Room (29)  |  Same (92)  |  Sense (240)  |  Set (56)  |  Short (31)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (188)  |  Solution (168)  |  Solve (41)  |  Stage (39)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sum (30)  |  Task (68)  |  Think (205)  |  Time (439)  |  Total (29)  |  Transform (20)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Turn (72)  |  Womb (13)  |  Work (457)

In the year of our Lord 729, two comets appeared around the sun, striking terror into all who saw them. One comet rose early and preceded the sun, while the other followed the setting sun at evening, seeming to portend awful calamity to east and west alike. Or else, since one comet was the precursor of day and the other of night, they indicated that mankind was menaced by evils at both times. They appeared in the month of January, and remained visible for about a fortnight, pointing their fiery torches northward as though to set the welkin aflame. At this time, a swarm of Saracens ravaged Gaul with horrible slaughter; … Both the outset and course of Ceolwulfs reign were filled by so many grave disturbances that it is quite impossible to know what to write about them or what the outcome will be.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII., as translated by Leo Sherley-Price, revised by R.E. Latham, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (1955, 1990), 323. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |  Awful (7)  |  Calamity (8)  |  Comet (43)  |  Day (38)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Evil (67)  |  Fiery (5)  |  Fortnight (2)  |  Horrible (7)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Menace (4)  |  Night (73)  |  Precursor (2)  |  Ravage (6)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Sun (211)  |  Swarm (11)  |  Terror (16)  |  Torch (7)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 678, which is the eighth of the reign of Egfrid, in the month of August, appeared a star, called a comet, which continued for three months, rising in the morning, and darting out, as it were, a pillar of radiant flame.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum: The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, Book IV, Chap. XII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede (1843), Vol. 3, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Comet (43)  |  Flame (23)  |  Month (21)  |  Pillar (7)  |  Radiant (5)  |  Star (251)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 729, two comets appeared about the sun, to the great terror of the beholders. One of them went before the rising sun in the morning, the other followed him when he set at night, as it were presaging much destruction to the east and west; one was the forerunner of the day, and the other of the night, to signify that mortals were threatened with calamities at both times. They carried their flaming tails towards the north, as it were ready to set the world on fire. They appeared in January, and continued nearly a fortnight. At which time a dreadful plague of Saracens ravaged France with miserable slaughter; … the beginning and progress of Ceolwulf’s reign were so filled with commotions, that it cannot yet be known what is to be said concerning them, or what end they will have.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of England. Also the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1894), 291-292. The editor reprinted the translation based on the 1723 work of John Stevens into modern English. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |  Beholder (2)  |  Calamity (8)  |  Comet (43)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Dreadful (5)  |  Fire (117)  |  Flame (23)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Fortnight (2)  |  France (21)  |  Great (300)  |  Miserable (6)  |  Morning (31)  |  Mortal (19)  |  Night (73)  |  Plague (34)  |  Ravage (6)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Signify (4)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Sun (211)  |  Tail (13)  |  Terror (16)  |  Threaten (6)  |  World (667)

It appears to be law that you cannot have a deep sympathy with both man and nature.
Journal entry (11 Apr 1852).
Science quotes on:  |  Both (52)  |  Deep (81)  |  Law (418)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sympathy (15)

It is a good thing for a physician to have prematurely grey hair and itching piles. The first makes him appear to know more than he does, and the second gives him an expression of concern which the patient interprets as being on his behalf.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Behalf (2)  |  Concern (76)  |  Expression (82)  |  First (174)  |  Give (117)  |  Good (228)  |  Grey (6)  |  Hair (19)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Itch (5)  |  Know (321)  |  Patient (116)  |  Physician (232)  |  Pile (8)  |  Premature (17)  |  Second (33)

It seems to me that the idea of a personal God is an anthropological concept which I cannot take seriously. I also cannot imagine some will or goal outside the human sphere has been cited as a statement that precedes the last three sentences here, but this might have originated in a paraphrase, a transcription error, or a misquotation; it does not appear in any editions of the essay which have thus far been checked.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropological (2)  |  Check (16)  |  Cite (5)  |  Concept (102)  |  Edition (2)  |  Error (230)  |  Essay (9)  |  Far (77)  |  Goal (81)  |  God (454)  |  Human (445)  |  Idea (440)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Misquotation (2)  |  Originate (14)  |  Outside (37)  |  Paraphrase (3)  |  Personal (49)  |  Precede (11)  |  Seem (89)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Seriously (13)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Statement (56)

Men first appeared as fish. When they were able to help themselves they took to land.
These are certainly not exact words from Anaximander, though it summarizes Plutarch’s version of what Anaximander believed. Although the subject quote is widely seen, no original of Anaximander’s writings survived on this hypothesis. What we know of Anaximander is what other, later, ancient Greek writers handed down in a kind of ancient Greek telephone game. These include Hippolytus, Aetius and Plutarch. Their expressions of what Anaximander believed relate by a general theme, but notably differ in specifics. For the fragmentary evidence, see Felix M. Cleve, The Giants of Pre-Sophistic Greek Philosophy: An Attempt to Reconstruct Their Thoughts (2012), 145-148. An example of the subject quote is given by David M. Neuberger, without quotation marks: Anaximander said men were produced first in fishes and, that when they were able to help themselves, they were thrown up on the land. Opening sentence 'A Call to the Chemist to Purge Industry of its Contamination of Our Coast and Inland Waters', Chemical Age (Oct 1923), 31, No. 10, 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (482)  |  First (174)  |  Fish (85)  |  Land (83)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Survive (28)

No matter how correct a mathematical theorem may appear to be, one ought never to be satisfied that there was not something imperfect about it until it also gives the impression of being beautiful.
As quoted in Desmond MacHale. Comic Sections (1993), 107, without citation. Please contact the Webmaster if you know the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Correct (53)  |  Imperfect (10)  |  Impression (51)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Theorem (46)

Nobody in the world of policy appears to be asking what is best for society, wild fish or farmed fish. And what sort of farmed fish, anyway? Were this question to be asked, and answered honestly, we might find that our interests lay in prioritizing wild fish and making their ecosystems more productive by leaving them alone enough of the time.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (2008), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Ask (99)  |  Best (129)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Ecosystem (21)  |  Farm (17)  |  Fish (85)  |  Honest (26)  |  Interest (170)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Policy (23)  |  Productive (10)  |  Question (315)  |  Society (188)  |  Time (439)  |  Wild (39)  |  World (667)

Our situation on this earth seems strange. Every one of us appears here involuntarily and uninvited for a short stay, without knowing the whys and the wherefore. In our daily lives we only feel that man is here for the sake of others, for those whom we love and for many other beings whose fate is connected with our own. I am often worried at the thought that my life is based to such a large extent on the work of my fellow human beings and I am aware of my great indebtedness to them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aware (18)  |  Base (43)  |  Connect (15)  |  Daily (19)  |  Earth (487)  |  Extent (30)  |  Fate (38)  |  Feel (93)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Great (300)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Indebtedness (3)  |  Know (321)  |  Large (82)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Love (164)  |  Often (69)  |  Sake (17)  |  Seem (89)  |  Short (31)  |  Situation (41)  |  Stay (15)  |  Strange (61)  |  Thought (374)  |  Work (457)  |  Worry (27)

Part of the charm in solving a differential equation is in the feeling that we are getting something for nothing. So little information appears to go into the solution that there is a sense of surprise over the extensive results that are derived.
Co-author with Jules Alphonse Larrivee, Mathematics and Computers (1957), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Charm (18)  |  Derived (5)  |  Differential Equation (9)  |  Extensive (10)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Information (102)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Result (250)  |  Solution (168)  |  Solve (41)  |  Surprise (44)

Scientists should not be ashamed to admit, as many of them apparently are ashamed to admit, that hypotheses appear in their minds along uncharted by-ways of thought; that they are imaginative and inspirational in character; that they are indeed adventures of the mind.
In 'Is the Scientific Paper Fraudulent?', The Saturday Review (1 Aug 1964), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Adventure (36)  |  Apparent (26)  |  Character (82)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inspiration (50)  |  Mind (544)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Shame (12)  |  Thought (374)  |  Uncharted (5)

So when, by various turns of the Celestial Dance,
In many thousand years,
A Star, so long unknown, appears,
Tho’ Heaven itself more beauteous by it grow,
It troubles and alarms the World below,
Does to the Wise a Star, to Fools a Meteor show.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (9)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Celestial (15)  |  Dance (14)  |  Fool (70)  |  Grow (66)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Meteor (14)  |  Nova (2)  |  Show (55)  |  Star (251)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Wise (43)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

Sooner or later in every talk, [David] Brower describes the creation of the world. He invites his listeners to consider the six days of Genesis as a figure of speech for what has in fact been 4 billion years. On this scale, one day equals something like six hundred and sixty-six million years, and thus, all day Monday and until Tuesday noon, creation was busy getting the world going. Life began Tuesday noon, and the beautiful organic wholeness of it developed over the next four days. At 4 p.m. Saturday, the big reptiles came on. At three minutes before midnight on the last day, man appeared. At one-fourth of a second before midnight Christ arrived. At one-fortieth of a second before midnight, the Industrial Revolution began. We are surrounded with people who think that what we have been doing for that one-fortieth of a second can go on indefinitely. They are considered normal, but they are stark. raving mad.
Encounters with the Archdruid
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (17)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Begin (52)  |  Big (33)  |  Billion (52)  |  Brower (2)  |  Busy (21)  |  Christ (4)  |  Consider (45)  |  Creation (211)  |  David (5)  |  Describe (38)  |  Develop (55)  |  Equal (53)  |  Fact (609)  |  Figure (32)  |  Genesis (13)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Indefinitely (9)  |  Industrial Revolution (8)  |  Invite (8)  |  Late (28)  |  Life (917)  |  Listener (2)  |  Mad (15)  |  Midnight (7)  |  Million (89)  |  Minute (25)  |  Monday (2)  |  Next (23)  |  Noon (6)  |  Normal (21)  |  Organic (48)  |  P (2)  |  People (269)  |  Reptile (23)  |  Saturday (3)  |  Scale (49)  |  Second (33)  |  Sooner (4)  |  Speech (40)  |  Surround (17)  |  Talk (61)  |  Think (205)  |  Tuesday (2)  |  Wholeness (7)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

The antagonism between science and religion, about which we hear so much, appears to me purely factitious, fabricated on the one hand by short-sighted religious people, who confound theology with religion; and on the other by equally short-sighted scientific people who forget that science takes for its province only that which is susceptible of clear intellectual comprehension.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Antagonism (5)  |  Clear (52)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Confound (9)  |  Equally (18)  |  Fabricate (3)  |  Forget (40)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hear (33)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  People (269)  |  Province (11)  |  Purely (15)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Short-Sighted (2)  |  Susceptible (3)  |  Theology (35)

The canyon country does not always inspire love. To many it appears barren, hostile, repellent—a fearsome, mostly waterless land of rock and heat, sand dunes and quicksand. cactus, thornbush, scorpion, rattlesnake, and agoraphobic distances. To those who see our land in that manner, the best reply is, yes, you are right, it is a dangerous and terrible place. Enter at your own risk. Carry water. Avoid the noon-day sun. Try to ignore the vultures. Pray frequently.
The Journey Home
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (34)  |  Barren (9)  |  Best (129)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Canyon (8)  |  Carry (35)  |  Country (121)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Desert (27)  |  Distance (54)  |  Dune (3)  |  Enter (20)  |  Frequently (13)  |  Heat (90)  |  Hostile (4)  |  Ignore (22)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Land (83)  |  Love (164)  |  Manner (35)  |  Place (111)  |  Pray (13)  |  Repellent (2)  |  Reply (18)  |  Right (144)  |  Risk (29)  |  Rock (107)  |  Sand (25)  |  See (197)  |  Sun (211)  |  Terrible (14)  |  Thornbush (2)  |  Try (103)  |  Vulture (5)  |  Water (244)

The final results [of his work on the theory of relativity] appear almost simple; any intelligent undergraduate can understand them without much trouble. But the years of searching in the dark for a truth that one feels, but cannot express; the intense effort and the alternations of confidence and misgiving, until one breaks through to clarity and understanding, are only known to him who has himself experienced them.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternation (5)  |  Break (33)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Dark (49)  |  Effort (94)  |  Experience (268)  |  Express (32)  |  Feel (93)  |  Final (33)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Intense (11)  |  Know (321)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Search (85)  |  Simple (111)  |  Theory Of Relativity (12)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Truth (750)  |  Undergraduate (8)  |  Understand (189)  |  Work (457)  |  Year (214)

The harmony of the universe knows only one musical form - the legato; while the symphony of number knows only its opposite - the staccato. All attempts to reconcile this discrepancy are based on the hope that an accelerated staccato may appear to our senses as a legato.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerate (5)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Base (43)  |  Discrepancy (5)  |  Form (210)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Hope (129)  |  Know (321)  |  Musical (3)  |  Number (179)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Reconcile (10)  |  Sense (240)  |  Symphony (4)  |  Universe (563)

The history of most fossil species includes two features particularly inconsistent with gradualism: 1. Stasis. Most species exhibit no directional change during their tenure on earth. They appear in the fossil record looking much the same as when they disappear; morphological change is usually limited and directionless. 2. Sudden appearance. In any local area, a species does not arise gradually by the steady transformation of its ancestors; it appears all at once and ‘fully formed.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Area (18)  |  Arise (32)  |  Change (291)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Earth (487)  |  Exhibit (12)  |  Feature (34)  |  Form (210)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Fossil Record (4)  |  Fully (11)  |  Gradually (13)  |  History (302)  |  Include (27)  |  Inconsistent (7)  |  Limit (86)  |  Local (15)  |  Morphological (2)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Same (92)  |  Species (181)  |  Steady (12)  |  Sudden (21)  |  Tenure (6)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Usually (20)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Aim (58)  |  Akin (3)  |  Already (16)  |  Atheist (13)  |  Base (43)  |  Beginnings (2)  |  Both (52)  |  Case (64)  |  Central (23)  |  Church (30)  |  Closely (8)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Contain (37)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  David (5)  |  Democritus of Abdera (16)  |  Desire (101)  |  Development (228)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Early (39)  |  Element (129)  |  Especially (18)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Feel (93)  |  Fill (35)  |  Find (248)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (5)  |  Genius (186)  |  God (454)  |  Heretic (5)  |  High (78)  |  Human (445)  |  Image (38)  |  Impress (9)  |  Individual (177)  |  Kind (99)  |  Know (321)  |  Learn (160)  |  Light (246)  |  Marvelous (13)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Prison (7)  |  Prophet (8)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (58)  |  Religious (44)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Saint (10)  |  Significant (26)  |  Single (72)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Sort (32)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Stage (39)  |  Strong (47)  |  Sublimity (4)  |  Teachings (2)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thought (374)  |  Universe (563)  |  Want (120)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wonderful (37)  |  World (667)  |  Writings (2)

The job of theorists, especially in biology, is to suggest new experiments. A good theory makes not only predictions, but surprising predictions that then turn out to be true. (If its predictions appear obvious to experimentalists, why would they need a theory?)
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (150)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Experimenter (18)  |  Good (228)  |  Need (211)  |  New (340)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Suggest (15)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Theorist (24)  |  Theory (582)  |  True (120)

The kind of lecture which I have been so kindly invited to give, and which now appears in book form, gives one a rare opportunity to allow the bees in one's bonnet to buzz even more noisily than usual.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (24)  |  Bee (21)  |  Buzz (2)  |  Give (117)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Kind (99)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Rare (31)

The majority of evolutive movements are degenerative. Progressive cases are exceptional. Characters appear suddenly that have no meaning in the atavistic series. Evolution in no way shows a general tendency toward progress… . The only thing that could be accomplished by slow changes would be the accumulation of neutral characteristics without value for survival. Only important and sudden mutations can furnish the material which can be utilized by selection.
As quoted in Isaac Asimov's Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 91. Please contact Webmaster if you know the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Change (291)  |  Character (82)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Degeneration (5)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Exception (33)  |  Furnish (18)  |  Important (124)  |  Majority (32)  |  Material (124)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Movement (65)  |  Mutation (25)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Neutral (7)  |  Progress (317)  |  Reversion (3)  |  Slow (36)  |  Sudden (21)  |  Survival (49)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Value (180)

The one quality that seems to be so universal among eccentrics is … so subjective as to be incapable of being proved or disproved, yet … eccentrics appear to be happier than the rest of us.
From a summary his study of 1,000 people, done at Royal Edinburgh Hospital in Scotland. In David Weeks, David Joseph Weeks and Jamie James, Eccentrics (1995), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Disprove (15)  |  Eccentric (10)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Happy (22)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Prove (60)  |  Quality (65)  |  Research (517)  |  Rest (64)  |  Seem (89)  |  Subjective (9)  |  Universal (70)

The sun alone appears, by virtue of his dignity and power, suited for this motive duty (of moving the planets) and worthy to become the home of God himself.
As quoted in Änne Bäumer-Schleinkofer, Science and Religion (1989), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Dignity (18)  |  Duty (51)  |  God (454)  |  Home (58)  |  Move (58)  |  Planet (199)  |  Power (273)  |  Suited (2)  |  Sun (211)  |  Virtue (55)  |  Worthy (21)

There are, as we have seen, a number of different modes of technological innovation. Before the seventeenth century inventions (empirical or scientific) were diffused by imitation and adaption while improvement was established by the survival of the fittest. Now, technology has become a complex but consciously directed group of social activities involving a wide range of skills, exemplified by scientific research, managerial expertise, and practical and inventive abilities. The powers of technology appear to be unlimited. If some of the dangers may be great, the potential rewards are greater still. This is not simply a matter of material benefits for, as we have seen, major changes in thought have, in the past, occurred as consequences of technological advances.
Concluding paragraph of "Technology," in Dictionary of the History of Ideas (1973), Vol. 4, 364.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (10)  |  Ability (75)  |  Activity (97)  |  Advance (123)  |  Become (100)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Change (291)  |  Complex (78)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Danger (62)  |  Different (110)  |  Diffuse (2)  |  Direct (44)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Establish (30)  |  Exemplify (2)  |  Expertise (5)  |  Great (300)  |  Group (52)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Invention (283)  |  Inventive (5)  |  Involve (27)  |  Major (24)  |  Material (124)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mode (29)  |  Number (179)  |  Occur (26)  |  Past (109)  |  Potential (34)  |  Power (273)  |  Practical (93)  |  Range (38)  |  Research (517)  |  Reward (38)  |  Scientific (169)  |  See (197)  |  Simply (34)  |  Skill (50)  |  Social (93)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (34)  |  Technological (15)  |  Technology (199)  |  Thought (374)  |  Unlimited (11)  |  Wide (14)

There might have been a hundred or a thousand life-bearing planets, had the course of evolution of the universe been a little different, or there might have been none at all. They would probably add, that, as life and man have been produced, that shows that their production was possible; and therefore, if not now then at some other time, if not here then in some other planet of some other sun, we should be sure to have come into existence; or if not precisely the same as we are, then something a little better or a little worse.
From Conclusion to Man's Place in the Universe: A Study of the Results of Scientific Research (1903), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (14)  |  Belief (400)  |  Body (193)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Control (93)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Force (194)  |  Hold (56)  |  Holding (3)  |  Larger (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Marvellous (5)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Probably (21)  |  Product (72)  |  Superior (30)

This also explains how it is that truths which have been recognised are at first tacitly admitted, and then gradually spread, so that the very thing which was obstinately denied appears at last as something quite natural.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Deny (29)  |  First (174)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Natural (128)  |  Obstinately (2)  |  Spread (19)  |  Truth (750)

This sense of the unfathomable beautiful ocean of existence drew me into science. I am awed by the universe, puzzled by it and sometimes angry at a natural order that brings such pain and suffering, Yet an emotion or feeling I have toward the cosmos seems to be reciprocated by neither benevolence nor hostility but just by silence. The universe appears to be a perfectly neutral screen unto which I can project any passion or attitude, and it supports them all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Angry (5)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Awe (24)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Benevolence (5)  |  Bring (53)  |  Cosmos (39)  |  Draw (25)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Existence (254)  |  Feel (93)  |  Hostility (10)  |  Natural Order (3)  |  Neutral (7)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Pain (82)  |  Passion (54)  |  Perfectly (8)  |  Project (22)  |  Puzzle (30)  |  Science (1699)  |  Screen (6)  |  Seem (89)  |  Sense (240)  |  Silence (32)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Support (63)  |  Toward (29)  |  Unfathomable (3)  |  Universe (563)  |  Unto (6)

To write the true natural history of the world, we should need to be able to follow it from within. It would thus appear no longer as an interlocking succession of structural types replacing one another, but as an ascension of inner sap spreading out in a forest of consolidated instincts. Right at its base, the living world is constituted by conscious clothes in flesh and bone.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 151. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Ascension (2)  |  Base (43)  |  Bone (57)  |  Clothes (8)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Flesh (22)  |  Follow (66)  |  Forest (88)  |  Inner (27)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Living (44)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Need (211)  |  Sap (3)  |  Spreading (5)  |  Structural (8)  |  Succession (39)  |  True (120)  |  Type (34)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)

We must therefore bear the undoubtedly bad effect s of the weak surviving and propagating their kind; but there appears to be at least one check in steady action, namely that the weaker and inferior members of society do not marry so freely as the sound; and this check might be indefinitely increased by the weak in body or mind refraining from marriage, though this is more to be hoped for than expected.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Bad (78)  |  Bear (28)  |  Body (193)  |  Check (16)  |  Effect (133)  |  Expect (27)  |  Freely (7)  |  Hope (129)  |  Increase (107)  |  Indefinitely (9)  |  Inferior (14)  |  Kind (99)  |  Least (43)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Marry (6)  |  Member (27)  |  Mind (544)  |  Namely (10)  |  Propagate (4)  |  Refrain (6)  |  Society (188)  |  Sound (59)  |  Steady (12)  |  Survive (28)  |  Undoubtedly (2)  |  Weak (36)

Yet the widespread [planetary theories], advanced by Ptolemy and most other [astronomers], although consistent with the numerical [data], seemed likewise to present no small difficulty. For these theories were not adequate unless they also conceived certain equalizing circles, which made the planet appear to move at all times with uniform velocity neither on its deferent sphere nor about its own [epicycle's] center … Therefore, having become aware of these [defects], I often considered whether there could perhaps be found a more reasonable arrangement of circles, from which every apparent irregularity would be derived while everything in itself would move uniformly, as is required by the rule of perfect motion.
From Nicholaus Copernicus, Edward Rosen (trans.), Pawel Czartoryski (ed.) 'Commentariolus', in Nicholas Copernicus: Minor Works (1985), 81-83. Excerpted in Lisa M. Dolling, Arthur F. Gianelli and Glenn N. Statile (eds.) The Tests of Time: Readings in the Development of Physical Theory (2003), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Advanced (10)  |  Apparent (26)  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Aware (18)  |  Center (30)  |  Circle (28)  |  Considered (10)  |  Defect (14)  |  Derived (5)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Epicycle (2)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Motion (127)  |  Move (58)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Planet (199)  |  Planetary (5)  |  Ptolemy (13)  |  Reasonable (18)  |  Required (4)  |  Rule (135)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Theory (582)  |  Time (439)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Velocity (14)  |  Widespread (9)

[Alchemists] enrich the ears of men with vain words, but empty their Pockets of their Money. Whence it appears to be no Art, but a Composition of Trifles, and inventions of mad brains.
In The Vanity of the Arts and Sciences (1530), translation (1676), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (14)  |  Art (205)  |  Brain (181)  |  Composition (52)  |  Ear (21)  |  Empty (26)  |  Enrich (6)  |  Invention (283)  |  Mad (15)  |  Money (125)  |  Pocket (5)  |  Trifle (10)  |  Vain (26)  |  Word (221)

[An outsider views a scientist] as a type of unscrupulous opportunist: he appears as a realist, insofar as he seeks to describe the world independent of the act of perception; as idealist insofar as he looks upon the concepts and theories as the free inventions of the human spirit (not logically derivable from that which is empirically given); as positivist insofar as he considers his concepts and theories justified only to the extent to which they furnish a logical representation of relations among sense experiences. He may even appear as Platonist or Pythagorean insofar as he considers the viewpoint of logical simplicity as an indispensable and effective tool of his research.
In 'Reply to Critcisms', Paul Arthur Schilpp (ed.), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949, 1959), Vol. 2, 684.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (102)  |  Consider (45)  |  Describe (38)  |  Effective (20)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Experience (268)  |  Human Spirit (8)  |  Idealist (3)  |  Independent (41)  |  Indispensable (8)  |  Invention (283)  |  Justify (19)  |  Logical (20)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Outsider (5)  |  Perception (53)  |  Positivist (2)  |  Realist (2)  |  Relation (96)  |  Representation (27)  |  Research (517)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sense (240)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Theory (582)  |  Tool (70)  |  Unscrupulous (2)  |  Viewpoint (6)  |  World (667)

[Concerning] mr Kirwan’s charming treatise on manures. Science never appears so beautiful as when applied to the uses of human life, nor any use of it so engaging as agriculture & domestic economy.
Letter (23 Mar 1798) from Jefferson in Philadelphia to William Strickland. In The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: 1 January 1798 to 31 January 1799 (2003), 211. Jefferson was thanking Strickland, who had sent him a copy of Kirwan’s treatise.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Applied (15)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Charming (2)  |  Concern (76)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Economy (46)  |  Human (445)  |  Richard Kirwan (3)  |  Life (917)  |  Manure (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Use (70)

[To] mechanical progress there is apparently no end: for as in the past so in the future, each step in any direction will remove limits and bring in past barriers which have till then blocked the way in other directions; and so what for the time may appear to be a visible or practical limit will turn out to be but a bend in the road.
Opening address to the Mechanical Science Section, Meeting of the British Association, Manchester. In Nature (15 Sep 1887), 36, 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (26)  |  Barrier (19)  |  Bend (8)  |  Block (8)  |  Bring (53)  |  Direction (56)  |  End (141)  |  Future (229)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Past (109)  |  Practical (93)  |  Progress (317)  |  Remove (18)  |  Road (47)  |  Step (67)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.