Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Morning

Morning Quotes (94 quotes)

But how shall we this union well expresse?
Naught tyes the soule: her subtiltie is such
She moves the bodie, which she doth possesse.
Yet no part toucheth, but by Vertue's touch.
Then dwels she not therein as in a tent;
Nor as a pilot in his Ship doth sit;
Nor as the spider in his web is pent;
Nor as the Waxe retaines the print in it;
Nor as a Vessell water doth containe;
Nor as one Liquor in another shed;
Nor as the heate dath in the fire remaine;
Nor as a voice throughout the ayre is spred;
But as the faire and cheerfull morning light,
Doth here, and there, her silver beames impart,
And in an instant doth her selfe unite
To the transparent Aire, in all, and part:
Still resting whole, when blowes the Aire devide;
Abiding pure, when th' Aire is most corrupted;
Throughout the Aire her beames dispersing wide,
And when the Aire is tost, not interrupted:
So doth the piercing Soule the body fill;
Being all in all, and all in part diffus'd;
Indivisible, incorruptible still,
Not forc't, encountred, troubled or confus'd.
And as the Sunne above the light doth bring,
Tough we behold it in the Aire below;
So from th'eternall light the Soule doth spring,
Though in the Bodie she her powers do show.
From 'Nosce Teipsum' (1599), in Claire Howard (ed.), The Poems of Sir John Davies (1941), 151-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fire (189)  |  Impart (23)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Instant (45)  |  Light (607)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Naught (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Pure (291)  |  Ship (62)  |  Show (346)  |  Silver (46)  |  Spider (14)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tent (11)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Union (51)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)

Question: What is the difference between a “real” and a “virtual” image? Give a drawing showing the formation of one of each kind.
Answer: You see a real image every morning when you shave. You do not see virtual images at all. The only people who see virtual images are those people who are not quite right, like Mrs. A. Virtual images are things which don't exist. I can't give you a reliable drawing of a virtual image, because I never saw one.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 177-8, Question 6. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Examination (98)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Formation (96)  |  Howler (15)  |  Image (96)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Right (452)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Shave (2)  |  Showing (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Virtual (5)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Despair (40)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

A carriage (steam) will set out from Washington in the morning, the passengers will breakfast at Baltimore, dine at Philadelphia, and sup in New York the same day.
(about 1804). As quoted in Henry Howe, 'Oliver Evans', Memoirs of the Most Eminent American Mechanics: (1840), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Dine (5)  |  Eat (104)  |  New (1216)  |  New York (15)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Set (394)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Washington (5)  |  Will (2355)

A fox looked at his shadow at sunrise and said, “I will have a camel for lunch today.” And all morning he went about looking for camels. But at noon he saw his shadow again - and he said, “A mouse will do.”
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Camel (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fox (9)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Noon (14)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Today (314)  |  Will (2355)

A light supper, a good night’s sleep, and a fine morning have often made a hero of the same man, who, by indigestion, a restless night, and a rainy morning would have proved a coward.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Coward (4)  |  Diet (54)  |  Good (889)  |  Hero (42)  |  Indigestion (5)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Supper (10)

A story about the Jack Spratts of medicine [was] told recently by Dr. Charles H. Best, co-discoverer of insulin. He had been invited to a conference of heart specialists in North America. On the eve of the meeting, out of respect for the fat-clogs-the-arteries theory, the delegates sat down to a special banquet served without fats. It was unpalatable but they all ate it as a duty. Next morning Best looked round the breakfast room and saw these same specialists—all in the 40-60 year old, coronary age group—happily tucking into eggs, bacon, buttered toast and coffee with cream.
'Objections To High-Fat Diets', Eat Fat And Grow Slim (1958), Ch. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Artery (10)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Banquet (2)  |  Best (459)  |  Charles Best (3)  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Butter (8)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Conference (17)  |  Cream (6)  |  Delegate (3)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Down (456)  |  Duty (68)  |  Eat (104)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fat (11)  |  Heart (229)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Look (582)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Respect (207)  |  Saw (160)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Story (118)  |  Theory (970)  |  Toast (8)  |  Year (933)

All people dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their mind, wake in the morning to find that it was vanity. But the dreamers of the day are dangerous people, for they dream their dreams with open eyes, and make them come true.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Dream (208)  |  Dreamer (13)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Equally (130)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  People (1005)  |  Recess (8)  |  True (212)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Wake (13)

All the summer long is the swallow a most instructive pattern of unwearied industry and affection; for, from morning to night, while there is a family to be supported, she spends the whole day in skimming close to the ground, and exerting the most sudden turns and quick evolutions. Avenues, and long walks under hedges, and pasture-fields, and mown meadows where cattle graze, are her delight, especially if there are trees interspersed; because in such spots insects most abound. When a fly is taken a smart snap from her bill is heard, resembling the noise at the shutting of a watch case; but the motion of the mandibles are too quick for the eye.
In Letter to Daines Barrington (29 Jan 1774), in In The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 169-170.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Avenue (14)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Delight (108)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Family (94)  |  Field (364)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Ground (217)  |  Industry (137)  |  Insect (77)  |  Long (790)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Noise (37)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Smart (26)  |  Snap (7)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Summer (54)  |  Support (147)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turn (447)  |  Walk (124)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whole (738)

Among those whom I could never pursuade to rank themselves with idlers, and who speak with indignation of my morning sleeps and nocturnal rambles, one passes the day in catching spiders, that he may count their eyes with a microscope; another exhibits the dust of a marigold separated from the flower with a dexterity worthy of Leuwenhoweck himself. Some turn the wheel of electricity; some suspend rings to a lodestone, and find that what they did yesterday, they can do again to-day.—Some register the changes of the wind, and die fully convinced that the wind is changeable.—There are men yet more profound, who have heard that two colorless liquors may produce a color by union, and that two cold bodies will grow hot of they are mingled: they mingle them, and produce the effect expected, say it is strange, and mingle them again.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Count (105)  |  Dexterity (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dust (64)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Entomologist (6)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heat (174)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hot (60)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mingle (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Profound (104)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Register (21)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strange (157)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yesterday (36)

An extra yawn one morning in the springtime, an extra snooze one night in the autumn is all that we ask in return for dazzling gifts. We borrow an hour one night in April; we pay it back with golden interest five months later.
As quoted in David Prerau, Seize the Daylight: The Curious And Contentious Story of Daylight (2006).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  April (9)  |  Ask (411)  |  Autumn (9)  |  Back (390)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Extra (6)  |  Gift (104)  |  Golden (45)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interest (386)  |  Month (88)  |  Night (120)  |  Pay (43)  |  Return (124)  |  Springtime (5)  |  Yawn (2)

And God said, “Let the earth put forth vegetation, plants yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind.” And God saw that it was good. And there was evening and there was morning, a third day.
Bible
(circa 725 B.C.)
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Creation (327)  |  Day (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evening (12)  |  Fruit (102)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Kind (557)  |  Plant (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seed (93)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vegetation (23)

Birds sing sweetly; but someone awakened by them at 5 A.M. of a summer morning might dispute the adverb.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Adverb (2)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bird (149)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Sing (26)  |  Summer (54)

Common sense always speaks too late. Common sense is the guy who tells you you ought to have had your brakes relined last week before you smashed a front end this week. Common sense is the Monday morning quarterback who could have won the ball game if he had been on the team. But he never is. He’s high up in the stands with a flask on his hip. Common sense is the little man in a grey suit who never makes a mistake in addition. But it’s always somebody else’s money he’s adding up.
In novel, Playback (1958), Chap. 14, 95.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Ball (62)  |  Brake (2)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  End (590)  |  Front (16)  |  Game (101)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Hip (3)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Money (170)  |  Never (1087)  |  Repair (11)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smash (4)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Suit (11)  |  Team (15)  |  Tell (340)  |  Week (70)  |  Win (52)

Every 12 years Jupiter returns to the same position in the sky; every 370 days it disappears in the fire of the Sun in the evening to the west, 30 days later it reappears in the morning to the east...[Observation in 4th century B.C.]
Gan De
In the lost book Suixing Jing (Treatise on Jupiter), quoted in the extensive compilation Kaiyuan Zhanjing, (The Kaiyuan Treatise on Astrology (compiled 718-726). Quotation as given in Norman K. Glendenning, Our Place in the Universe (2007), 126. Source cited in Helaine Selin, Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures (1997), 342.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Day (42)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  East (18)  |  Evening (12)  |  Fire (189)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Observation (555)  |  Position (77)  |  Return (124)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sun (385)  |  West (17)  |  Year (933)

Every leaf and twig was this morning covered with a sparkling ice armor; even the grasses in exposed fields were hung with innumerable diamond pendants, which jingled merrily when brushed by the foot of the traveler. It was literally the wreck of jewels and the crash of gems.
(21 Jan 1838). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Armor (3)  |  Cover (37)  |  Crash (9)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Field (364)  |  Foot (60)  |  Gem (16)  |  Grass (46)  |  Ice (54)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Literally (30)  |  Pendant (2)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Twig (14)  |  Wreck (7)

Every morning in Africa, a Gazelle wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest lion or it will be killed. Every morning a Lion wakes up. It knows it must outrun the slowest Gazelle or it will starve to death. It doesn't matter whether you are a Lion or a Gazelle; when the sun comes up, you'd better be running.
Anonymous
As seen in The Economist (1985), 296, 37. Sometimes cited in other sources as an African proverb. For example, referred as from a poster of an old African proverb in Venise T. Berry, So Good (1996), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  Better (486)  |  Death (388)  |  Faster (50)  |  Gazelle (2)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lion (22)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Outrun (2)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Starvation (13)  |  Sun (385)  |  Waking (17)  |  Will (2355)

Four college students taking a class together, had done so well through the semester, and each had an “A”. They were so confident, the weekend before finals, they went out partying with friends. Consequently, on Monday, they overslept and missed the final. They explained to the professor that they had gone to a remote mountain cabin for the weekend to study, but, unfortunately, they had a flat tire on the way back, didn’t have a spare, and couldn’t get help for a long time. As a result, they missed the final. The professor kindly agreed they could make up the final the following day. When they arrived the next morning, he placed them each in separate rooms, handed each one a test booklet, and told them to begin. The the first problem was simple, worth 5 points. Turning the page they found the next question, written: “(For 95 points): Which tire?”
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Class (164)  |  College (66)  |  Confident (25)  |  Education (378)  |  Exam (5)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Explain (322)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Flat (33)  |  Friend (168)  |  Joke (83)  |  Long (790)  |  Miss (51)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Next (236)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Remote (83)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Simple (406)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tire (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Way (1217)  |  Worth (169)

Here is the distinct trail of a fox stretching [a] quarter of a mile across the pond…. The pond his journal, and last night’s snow made a tabula rasa for him. I know which way a mind wended this morning, what horizon it faced, by the setting of these tracks; whether it moved slowly or rapidly, by the greater or less intervals and distinctness, for the swiftest step leaves yet a lasting trace.
(30 Jan 1841). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 185.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Fox (9)  |  Greater (288)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Journal (30)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pond (15)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Setting (44)  |  Snow (37)  |  Step (231)  |  Tabula Rasa (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Track (38)  |  Trail (10)  |  Way (1217)  |  Zoology (36)

Holding then to science with one hand—the left hand—we give the right hand to religion, and cry: ‘Open Thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things, more wondrous than the shining worlds can tell.’ Obedient to the promise, religion does awaken faculties within us, does teach our eyes to the beholding of more wonderful things. Those great worlds blazing like suns die like feeble stars in the glory of the morning, in the presence of this new light. The soul knows that an infinite sea of love is all about it, throbbing through it, everlasting arms of affection lift it, and it bathes itself in the clear consciousness of a Father’s love.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bathe (3)  |  Behold (18)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Clear (100)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cry (29)  |  Die (86)  |  Everlasting (8)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Father (110)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Give (202)  |  Glory (58)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hold (95)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lift (55)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Mine (76)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Open (274)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promise (67)  |  Religion (361)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Teach (277)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thou (9)  |  Throb (6)  |  Through (849)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  World (1774)

How is it, one fine morning, Duchenne discovered a disease which probably existed in the time of Hippocrates.
In Fielding Hudson Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine (1929), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hippocrates (49)  |  Time (1877)

I am only a physicist with nothing material to show for my labours. I have never even seen the ionosphere, although I have worked on the subject for thirty years. That does show how lucky people can be. If there had been no ionosphere I would not have been standing here this morning.
Response to receiving an honour from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers. As quoted in New Scientist (22 Nov 1956), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Labour (98)  |  Luck (42)  |  Material (353)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Show (346)  |  Subject (521)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I begin my work at about nine or ten o'clock in the evening and continue until four or five in the morning. Night is a more quiet time to work. It aids thought.
In Orison Swett Marden, 'Bell Telephone Talk: Hints on Success by Alexander G. Bell', How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (1901), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Begin (260)  |  Clock (47)  |  Continue (165)  |  Evening (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

I carried this problem around in my head basically the whole time. I would wake up with it first thing in the morning, I would be thinking about it all day, and I would be thinking about it when I went to sleep. Without distraction I would have the same thing going round and round in my mind.
Recalling the degree of focus and determination that eventually yielded the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem.
Quoted in interview for PBS TV program Nova. In William Byers, How Mathematicians Think (2007), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determination (78)  |  Distraction (6)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Focus (35)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proof (287)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whole (738)  |  Yield (81)

I have been arranging certain experiments in reference to the notion that Gravity itself may be practically and directly related by experiment to the other powers of matter and this morning proceeded to make them. It was almost with a feeling of awe that I went to work, for if the hope should prove well founded, how great and mighty and sublime in its hitherto unchangeable character is the force I am trying to deal with, and how large may be the new domain of knowledge that may be opened up to the mind of man.
In ‎Thomas Martin (ed.) Faraday’s Diary: Sept. 6, 1847 - Oct. 17, 1851 (1934), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Deal (188)  |  Domain (69)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Force (487)  |  Founded (20)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mind Of Man (7)  |  New (1216)  |  Notion (113)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Prove (250)  |  Relate (21)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Work (1351)

I have tried to show why I believe that the biologist is the most romantic figure on earth at the present day. At first sight he seems to be just a poor little scrubby underpaid man, groping blindly amid the mazes of the ultra-microscopic, engaging in bitter and lifelong quarrels over the nephridia of flatworms, waking perhaps one morning to find that someone whose name he has never heard has demolished by a few crucial experiments the work which he had hoped would render him immortal.
Daedalus or Science and the Future (1924), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (69)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Demolish (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Lifelong (9)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poor (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Render (93)  |  Research (664)  |  Romantic (13)  |  Show (346)  |  Sight (132)  |  Waking (17)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

I know each conversation with a psychiatrist in the morning made me want to hang myself because I knew I could not strangle him.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Conversation (43)  |  Hang (45)  |  Know (1518)  |  Myself (212)  |  Psychiatrist (15)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Want (497)

I ought to say that one of our first joint researches, so far as publication was concerned, had the peculiar effect of freeing me forever from the wiles of college football, and if that is a defect, make the most of it! Dr. Noyes and I conceived an idea on sodium aluminate solutions on the morning of the day of a Princeton-Harvard game (as I recall it) that we had planned to attend. It looked as though a few days' work on freezing-point determinations and electrical conductivities would answer the question. We could not wait, so we gave up the game and stayed in the laboratory. Our experiments were successful. I think that this was the last game I have ever cared about seeing. I mention this as a warning, because this immunity might attack anyone. I find that I still complainingly wonder at the present position of football in American education.
Address upon receiving the Perkin Medal Award, 'The Big Things in Chemistry', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Feb 1921), 13, No. 2, 162-163.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Answer (366)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attend (65)  |  Car (71)  |  Care (186)  |  College (66)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conductivity (4)  |  Defect (31)  |  Determination (78)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Football (10)  |  Forever (103)  |  Freeing (6)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Freezing Point (3)  |  Game (101)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immunity (8)  |  Joint (31)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Mention (82)  |  Most (1731)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Present (619)  |  Publication (101)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wait (58)  |  Warning (17)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)

I was just so interested in what I was doing I could hardly wait to get up in the morning and get at it. One of my friends, a geneticist, said I was a child, because only children can't wait to get up in the morning to get at what they want to do.
Quoted in Evelyn Fox Keller, A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock (1984), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Career (75)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Friend (168)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Interest (386)  |  Research (664)  |  Want (497)

If a solution fails to appear … and yet we feel success is just around the corner, try resting for a while. … Like the early morning frost, this intellectual refreshment withers the parasitic and nasty vegetation that smothers the good seed. Bursting forth at last is the flower of truth.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Burst (39)  |  Corner (57)  |  Early (185)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flower (106)  |  Frost (14)  |  Good (889)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Last (426)  |  Nasty (7)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Refreshment (3)  |  Rest (280)  |  Seed (93)  |  Solution (267)  |  Success (302)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Vegetation (23)

If some great Power would agree to make me always think what is true and do what is right, on condition of being turned into a sort of clock and wound up every morning before I got out of bed, I should instantly close with the offer.
'On Descartes' "Discourse Touching the Method of Using One's Reason Rightly and of Seeking Scientific Truth'" (1870). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 1, 192-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Clock (47)  |  Condition (356)  |  Do (1908)  |  Great (1574)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Offer (141)  |  Power (746)  |  Right (452)  |  Think (1086)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wound (26)

If there were some deep principle that drove organic systems towards living systems, the operation of the principle should easily be demonstrable in a test tube in half a morning. Needless to say, no such demonstration has ever been given. Nothing happens when organic materials are subjected to the usual prescription of showers of electrical sparks or drenched in ultraviolet light, except the eventual production of a tarry sludge.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (233)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Drench (2)  |  Drive (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Give (202)  |  Half (56)  |  Happen (274)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Needless (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Operation (213)  |  Organic (158)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Principle (507)  |  Production (183)  |  Say (984)  |  Shower (6)  |  Sludge (3)  |  Spark (31)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Ultraviolet (2)

If we lived on a planet where nothing ever changed, there would be little to do. There would be nothing to figure out. There would be no impetus for science. And if we lived in an unpredictable world, where things changed in random or very complex ways, we would not be able to figure things out. But we live in an in-between universe, where things change, but according to patterns, rules, or as we call them, laws of nature. If I throw a stick up in the air, it always falls down. If the sun sets in the west, it always rises again the next morning in the east. And so it becomes possible to figure things out. We can do science, and with it we can improve our lives.
Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  According (237)  |  Air (347)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  East (18)  |  Fall (230)  |  Figure (160)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Impetus (5)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Planet (356)  |  Possible (552)  |  Random (41)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Stick (24)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throw (43)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Unpredictable (17)  |  Way (1217)  |  West (17)  |  World (1774)

If you don’t wake up at three in the morning and want to do something, you’re wasting your time.
As quoted in J. Kim Vandiver and Pagan Kennedy, 'Harold Eugene Edgerton', Biographical Memoirs (National Academy of Sciences, 2005), Vol. 86, 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Waking (17)  |  Want (497)  |  Waste (101)

In the month of August 678, in the eighth year of Egfrid’s reign, there appeared a star known as a comet, which remained visible for three months, rising in the morning and emitting what seemed to be a tall column of bright flame.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII., as translated by Leo Sherley-Price, revised by R.E. Latham, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (1955, 1990), 224.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bright (79)  |  Column (15)  |  Comet (54)  |  Emit (15)  |  Flame (40)  |  Known (454)  |  Month (88)  |  Reign (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Star (427)  |  Tall (11)  |  Visible (84)  |  Year (933)

In the morning, we carry the world like Atlas; at noon, we stoop and bend beneath it; and at night, it crushes us flat to the ground.
In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Atlas (3)  |  Bend (12)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Carry (127)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Crush (18)  |  Flat (33)  |  Ground (217)  |  Man (2251)  |  Night (120)  |  Noon (14)  |  Stoop (3)  |  World (1774)

In the pure mathematics we contemplate absolute truths which existed in the divine mind before the morning stars sang together, and which will continue to exist there when the last of their radiant host shall have fallen from heaven.
From Address (22 Apr 1857) for Inauguration of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, collected in 'Academical Education', Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions (1870), Vol. 3, 514. This is seen misattributed to Eric Temple Bell, who only quoted it, attributing it to Everett, in for example, Mathematics: Queen and Servant of Sciences (1938), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Continue (165)  |  Divine (112)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fall (230)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Host (16)  |  Last (426)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Sing (26)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

In the year of chan yan..., Jupiter was in [the Zodiacal Division of] Zi, it rose in the morning and went under in the evening together with the Lunar Mansions Xunu, Xu and Wei. It was very large and bright. Apparently, there was a small reddish (chi) star appended (fu) to its side. This is called “an alliance” (tong meng).
Gan De
As given in Chinese Astronomy and Astrophysics (1981), 5, 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Alliance (5)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Chi (2)  |  Division (65)  |  Evening (12)  |  Ganymede (2)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Large (394)  |  Moon (237)  |  Red (35)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rose (34)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Star (427)  |  Together (387)  |  Year (933)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 678, which is the eighth of the reign of Egfrid, in the month of August, appeared a star, called a comet, which continued for three months, rising in the morning, and darting out, as it were, a pillar of radiant flame.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum: The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, Book IV, Chap. XII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede (1843), Vol. 3, 57.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  Comet (54)  |  Flame (40)  |  Lord (93)  |  Month (88)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Reign (23)  |  Rising (44)  |  Star (427)  |  Year (933)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 729, two comets appeared about the sun, to the great terror of the beholders. One of them went before the rising sun in the morning, the other followed him when he set at night, as it were presaging much destruction to the east and west; one was the forerunner of the day, and the other of the night, to signify that mortals were threatened with calamities at both times. They carried their flaming tails towards the north, as it were ready to set the world on fire. They appeared in January, and continued nearly a fortnight. At which time a dreadful plague of Saracens ravaged France with miserable slaughter; … the beginning and progress of Ceolwulf’s reign were so filled with commotions, that it cannot yet be known what is to be said concerning them, or what end they will have.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of England. Also the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1894), 291-292. The editor reprinted the translation based on the 1723 work of John Stevens into modern English. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appear (118)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beholder (2)  |  Both (493)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comet (54)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  End (590)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Fortnight (3)  |  France (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Known (454)  |  Lord (93)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plague (41)  |  Progress (465)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reign (23)  |  Rising (44)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Set (394)  |  Signify (17)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tail (18)  |  Terror (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It is a good morning exercise for a research scientist to discard a pet hypothesis every day before breakfast. It keeps him young.
On Aggression, trans. M. Latzke (1966), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Discard (29)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Good (889)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Young (227)

It is impossible not to feel stirred at the thought of the emotions of man at certain historic moments of adventure and discovery—Columbus when he first saw the Western shore, Pizarro when he stared at the Pacific Ocean, Franklin when the electric spark came from the string of his kite, Galileo when he first turned his telescope to the heavens. Such moments are also granted to students in the abstract regions of thought, and high among them must be placed the morning when Descartes lay in bed and invented the method of co-ordinate geometry.
Quoted in James Roy Newman, The World of Mathematics (2000), Vol. 1, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Certain (550)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Coordinate Geometry (2)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grant (73)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  High (362)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kite (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pacific Ocean (5)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shore (24)  |  Spark (31)  |  Star (427)  |  String (21)  |  Student (300)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)  |  Western (45)

It is not so long since, during one of the meetings of the Association, one of the leading English newspapers briefly described a sitting of this Section in the words, “Saturday morning was devoted to pure mathematics, and so there was nothing of any general interest:” still, such toleration is better than undisguised and ill-informed hostility.
In Report of the 67th meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Better (486)  |  Brief (36)  |  Describe (128)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  English (35)  |  General (511)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Inform (47)  |  Interest (386)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Section (11)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Still (613)  |  Toleration (6)  |  Word (619)

It was to Hofmeister, working as a young man, an amateur and enthusiast, in the early morning hours of summer months, before business, at Leipzig in the years before 1851, that the vision first appeared of a common type of Life-Cycle, running through Mosses and Ferns to Gymnosperms and Flowering Plants, linking the whole series in one scheme of reproduction and life-history.
(1919). As quoted in E.J.H. Corner, The Life of Plants (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (19)  |  Business (149)  |  Common (436)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Early (185)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Fern (9)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  History (673)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Hour (186)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  Life History (2)  |  Linking (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Month (88)  |  Moss (10)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Running (61)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Summer (54)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

It you’re bored with life-if you don’t get up every morning with a burning desire to do things-you don’t have enough goals.
Lou Holtz
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bored (4)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Desire (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Get Up (5)  |  Goal (145)  |  Life (1795)  |  Thing (1915)

Many Americans are trying to conserve energy as never before—they're now burning their morning toast on only one side.
Anonymous
In E.C. McKenzie, 14,000 Quips and Quotes for Speakers, Writers, Editors, Preachers, and Teachers (1990), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Energy (344)  |  Never (1087)  |  Side (233)  |  Toast (8)  |  Trying (144)

My eureka moment was in the dead of night, the early hours of the morning, on a cold, cold night, and my feet were so cold, they were aching. But when the result poured out of the charts, you just forget all that. You realize instantly how significant this is—what it is you’ve really landed on—and it’s great!
[About her discovery of the first pulsar radio signals.]
From BBC TV program, Journeys in Time and Space: Invisible Universe (28 Feb 2001).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ache (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Chart (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Early (185)  |  Eureka (11)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Moment (253)  |  Night (120)  |  Pouring (3)  |  Pulsar (3)  |  Radio (50)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Signal (27)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)

On Breaking Habits. To begin knocking off the habit in the evening, then the afternoon as well and, finally, the morning too is better than to begin cutting it off in the morning and then go on to the afternoon and evening. I speak from experience as regards smoking and can say that when one comes to within an hour or two of smoke-time one begins to be impatient for it, whereas there will be no impatience after the time for knocking off has been confirmed as a habit.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Cut Off (2)  |  Evening (12)  |  Experience (467)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Regard (305)  |  Say (984)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Speak (232)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

On one occasion, when he was giving a dinner to some friends at the university, he left the table to get them a bottle of wine; but, on his way to the cellar, he fell into reflection, forgot his errand and his company, went to his chamber, put on his surplice, and proceeded to the chapel. Sometimes he would go into the street half dressed, and on discovering his condition, run back in great haste, much abashed. Often, while strolling in his garden, he would suddenly stop, and then run rapidly to his room, and begin to write, standing, on the first piece of paper that presented itself. Intending to dine in the public hall, he would go out in a brown study, take the wrong turn, walk a while, and then return to his room, having totally forgotten the dinner. Once having dismounted from his horse to lead him up a hill, the horse slipped his head out of the bridle; but Newton, oblivious, never discovered it till, on reaching a tollgate at the top of the hill, he turned to remount and perceived that the bridle which he held in his hand had no horse attached to it. His secretary records that his forgetfulness of his dinner was an excellent thing for his old housekeeper, who “sometimes found both dinner and supper scarcely tasted of, which the old woman has very pleasantly and mumpingly gone away with”. On getting out of bed in the morning, he has been discovered to sit on his bedside for hours without dressing himself, utterly absorbed in thought.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Back (390)  |  Bedside (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Both (493)  |  Brown (23)  |  Cellar (4)  |  Chapel (3)  |  Company (59)  |  Condition (356)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Discover (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Friend (168)  |  Garden (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Paper (182)  |  Present (619)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Record (154)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Secretary (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Street (23)  |  Stroll (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supper (10)  |  Table (104)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Top (96)  |  Turn (447)  |  University (121)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wine (38)  |  Woman (151)  |  Write (230)  |  Wrong (234)

On the 20th of May 1747, I took twelve patients in the scurvy, on board the Salisbury at sea. Their cases were as similar as I could have them. They all in general had putrid gums, the spots and lassitude, with weakness of their knees. They lay together in one place, being a proper apartment for the sick in the fore-hold; and had one diet common to all, viz, water-gruel sweetened with sugar in the morning; fresh mutton-broth often times for dinner; at other times puddings, boiled biscuit with sugar, &c.; and for supper, barley and raisins, rice and currents, sago and wine, or the like.
Two of these were ordered each a quart of cider a-day. Two others took twenty-five gutta of elixir vitriol three times a-day, upon an empty stomach; using a gargle strongly acidulated with it for their mouths. Two others took two spoonfuls of vinegar three times a-day, upon an empty stomach; having their gruels and their other food well acidulated with it, as also the gargle for their mouth. Two of the worst patients, with the tendons in the ham rigid, (a symptom none of the rest had), were put under a course of sea-water. Of this they drank half a pint every day, and sometimes more or less as it operated, by way of gentle physics. The others had each two oranges and one lemon given them every day. These they eat with greediness, at different times, upon an empty stomach. They continued but six days under this course, having consumed the quantity that could be spared. The two remaining patients, took the bigness of a nutmeg three times a-day, of an electuary recommended by an hospital-surgeon, made of garlic, mustard-seed, rad. raphan. balsam of Peru, and gum myrrh; using for common drink, barley-water well acidulated with tamarinds; by a decoction of which, with the addition of cremor tartar, they were gently purged three or four times during the course.
The consequence was, that the most sudden and visible good effects were perceived from the use of the oranges and lemons; one of those who had taken them, being at the end of six days fit for duty. …
Next to the oranges, I thought the cider had the best effects.
A Treatise of the Scurvy (1753), 191-193. Quoted in Carleton Ellis and Annie Louise Macleod, Vital Factors of Foods: Vitamins and Nutrition (1922), 229-230.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cider (3)  |  Common (436)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Current (118)  |  Diet (54)  |  Different (577)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elixir (5)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Fit (134)  |  Food (199)  |  Fresh (67)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Lemon (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Mutton (4)  |  Next (236)  |  Nutmeg (2)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Orange (14)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rice (4)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seaman (3)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sick (81)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supper (10)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vitamin C (3)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wine (38)  |  Worst (57)

On the morning of 1 November 1956 the US physicist John Bardeen dropped the frying-pan of eggs that he was cooking for breakfast, scattering its contents on the kitchen floor. He had just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics along with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for their invention of the transistor. That evening Bardeen was startled again, this time by a parade of his colleagues from the University of Illinois marching to the door of his home bearing champagne and singing “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow”.
In Abstract for 'John Bardeen: An Extraordinary Physicist', Physics World (2008), 21, No. 4, 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  John Bardeen (6)  |  Biography (240)  |  Walter H. Brattain (3)  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Cook (17)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Door (93)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Home (170)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Parade (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Scattering (4)  |  William B. Shockley (4)  |  Sing (26)  |  Singing (19)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transistor (5)  |  University (121)  |  Win (52)

On Tuesday evening at Museum, at a ball in the gardens. The night was chill, I dropped too suddenly from Differential Calculus into ladies’ society, and could not give myself freely to the change. After an hour’s attempt so to do, I returned, cursing the mode of life I was pursuing; next morning I had already shaken hands, however, with Diff. Calculus, and forgot the ladies….
From his diary for 10 Aug 1851, as quoted in J. Helen Gardner and Robin J. Wilson, 'Thomas Archer Hirst—Mathematician Xtravagant II: Student Days in Germany', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jun-Jul 1993), 6, No. 100, 534.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Ball (62)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Change (593)  |  Chill (9)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Forget (115)  |  Garden (60)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lady (11)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mode (41)  |  Museum (31)  |  Myself (212)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Return (124)  |  Shake (41)  |  Society (326)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)

Once early in the morning, at two or three in the morning, when the master was asleep, the books in the library began to quarrel with each other as to which was the king of the library. The dictionary contended quite angrily that he was the master of the library because without words there would be no communication at all. The book of science argued stridently that he was the master of the library for without science there would have been no printing press or any of the other wonders of the world. The book of poetry claimed that he was the king, the master of the library, because he gave surcease and calm to his master when he was troubled. The books of philosophy, the economic books, all put in their claims, and the clamor was great and the noise at its height when a small low voice was heard from an old brown book lying in the center of the table and the voice said, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.” And all of the noise and the clamor in the library ceased, and there was a hush in the library, for all of the books knew who the real master of the library was.
'Ministers of Justice', address delivered to the Eighty-Second Annual Convention of the Tennessee Bar Association at Gatlinburg (5 Jun 1963). In Tennessee Law Review (Fall 1963), 31, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anger (20)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Brown (23)  |  Calm (31)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Communication (94)  |  Dictionary (15)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  King (35)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Library (48)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Master (178)  |  Noise (37)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Printing (22)  |  Printing Press (3)  |  Quarrel (10)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Small (477)  |  Table (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Voice (52)  |  Want (497)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Once you have learned to fly your plane, it is far less fatiguing to fly than it is to drive a car. You don’t have to watch every second for cats, dogs, children, lights, road signs, ladies with baby carriages and citizens who drive out in the middle of the block against the lights... Nobody who has not been up in the sky on a glorious morning can possibly imagine the way a pilot feels in free heaven.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Baby (28)  |  Block (12)  |  Car (71)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Cat (47)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Dog (70)  |  Drive (55)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fly (146)  |  Free (232)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Lady (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Middle (16)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Plane (20)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Road (64)  |  Second (62)  |  Sign (58)  |  Sky (161)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1217)

One day when the whole family had gone to a circus to see some extraordinary performing apes, I remained alone with my microscope, observing the life in the mobile cells of a transparent star-fish larva, when a new thought suddenly flashed across my brain. It struck me that similar cells might serve in the defence of the organism against intruders. Feeling that there was in this something of surpassing interest, I felt so excited that I began striding up and down the room and even went to the seashore in order to collect my thoughts.
I said to myself that, if my supposition was true, a splinter introduced into the body of a star-fish larva, devoid of blood-vessels or of a nervous system, should soon be surrounded by mobile cells as is to be observed in a man who runs a splinter into his finger. This was no sooner said than done.
There was a small garden to our dwelling, in which we had a few days previously organised a 'Christmas tree' for the children on a little tangerine tree; I fetched from it a few rose thorns and introduced them at once under the skin of some beautiful star-fish larvae as transparent as water.
I was too excited to sleep that night in the expectation of the result of my experiment, and very early the next morning I ascertained that it had fully succeeded.
That experiment formed the basis of the phagocyte theory, to the development of which I devoted the next twenty-five years of my life.
In Olga Metchnikoff, Life of Elie Metchnikoff 1845-1916 (1921), 116-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Alone (311)  |  Ape (53)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cell (138)  |  Children (200)  |  Christmas (11)  |  Circus (3)  |  Defence (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Family (94)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flash (49)  |  Form (959)  |  Garden (60)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Larva (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Phagocyte (2)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Rose (34)  |  Run (174)  |  Seashore (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Skin (47)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Star (427)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

One evening at a Joint Summer Research Congerence in the early 1990’s Nicholai Reshetikhin and I [David Yetter] button-holed Flato, and explained at length Shum’s coherence theorem and the role of categories in “quantum knot invariants”. Flato was persistently dismissive of categories as a “mere language”. I retired for the evening, leaving Reshetikhin and Flato to the discussion. At the next morning’s session, Flato tapped me on the shoulder, and, giving a thumbs-up sign, whispered, “Hey! Viva les categories! These new ones, the braided monoidal ones.”
In David N. Yetter, Functorial Knot Theory: Categories of Tangles, Coherence, Categorical Deformations, and Topological Invariants (2001), 8. Yetter writes this personal anecdote is given as a narrative in his own words. Presumable the phrases in quotation marks are based on recollection when written years later.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Category (18)  |  Coherence (13)  |  David (6)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Explain (322)  |  Give (202)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Joint (31)  |  Knot (11)  |  Language (293)  |  Leave (130)  |  Length (23)  |  Mere (84)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Research (664)  |  Retire (3)  |  Role (86)  |  Session (3)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sign (58)  |  Summer (54)  |  Tap (10)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Whisper (11)

One morning a great noise proceeded from one of the classrooms [of the Braunsberger gymnasium] and on investigation it was found that Weierstrass, who was to give the recitation, had not appeared. The director went in person to Weierstrass’ dwelling and on knocking was told to come in. There sat Weierstrass by a glimmering lamp in a darkened room though it was daylight outside. He had worked the night through and had not noticed the approach of daylight. When the director reminded him of the noisy throng of students who were waiting for him, his only reply was that he could impossibly interrupt his work; that he was about to make an important discovery which would attract attention in scientific circles.
In Karl Weierstrass: Jahrbuch der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung (1897), 6), 88-89. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attract (23)  |  Circle (110)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Glimmering (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Home (170)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interrupt (6)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Night (120)  |  Noise (37)  |  Notice (77)  |  Outside (141)  |  Person (363)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reply (56)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Student (300)  |  Through (849)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Work (1351)

Over increasingly large areas of the United States, spring now comes unheralded by the return of the birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of bird song.
On the effect of chemical insecticides and fertilizers, Silent Spring, Houghton Mifflin (1962)
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bird (149)  |  Early (185)  |  Environment (216)  |  Large (394)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Return (124)  |  Song (37)  |  Spring (133)  |  State (491)

Painting the desert, sun-setting the tone
Starving backstage, morning-stars are jaded
The moonshine murmur still shivers alone
Curved slice of sliver, shear breath shadows stone
Suspending twilight shiny and shaded
Painting the desert, sun-setting the tone
Carving solace into silver in June
On horizons’ glow from forgotten gold
The moonshine’s’ shilling delivers alone
Gleaming duels of knights, pierce deathly silence
Steel tines of starlight, clashing swords they hold
Painting the desert, sun-setting the tone
Dimples aware, sparkle sand on the dune
Winking at comets, after tails are told
The moon-sand whispers, sift rivers alone
Sharpness they hone, filing skills onto stone
Starlight dazzles, its own space created
Painting the desert, sun-setting the tone
From owls’ talon, moonlight shimmers alone
Earth Man
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aware (31)  |  Breath (59)  |  Carve (5)  |  Clash (8)  |  Comet (54)  |  Create (235)  |  Curve (49)  |  Dazzle (3)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Desert (56)  |  Duel (4)  |  Dune (4)  |  File (6)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Gleam (12)  |  Glow (14)  |  Gold (97)  |  Hold (95)  |  Hone (3)  |  Horizon (45)  |  June (2)  |  Knight (6)  |  Moon (237)  |  Moonlight (5)  |  Moonshine (4)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Owl (3)  |  Painting (44)  |  Pierce (3)  |  River (119)  |  Sand (62)  |  Setting (44)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Shear (2)  |  Shilling (4)  |  Shiny (3)  |  Shiver (2)  |  Sift (3)  |  Silence (56)  |  Silver (46)  |  Skill (109)  |  Slice (2)  |  Sliver (2)  |  Solace (7)  |  Space (500)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Star (427)  |  Starlight (5)  |  Stars (304)  |  Starvation (13)  |  Steel (21)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Sword (15)  |  Tail (18)  |  Talon (2)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tone (22)  |  Twilight (6)  |  Whisper (11)  |  Wink (3)

People, houses, streets, animals, flowers—everything in Holland looks as if it were washed and ironed each night in order to glisten immaculately and newly starched the next morning.
In The Mirror of Souls, and Other Essays (1966), 334.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Everything (476)  |  Flower (106)  |  Holland (2)  |  House (140)  |  Immaculate (2)  |  Iron (96)  |  Look (582)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Street (23)  |  Wash (21)  |  Washed (2)

Professor Tyndall once said the finest inspiration he ever received was from an old man who could scarcely read. This man acted as his servant. Each morning the old man would knock on the door of the scientist and call, “Arise, Sir: it is near seven o'clock and you have great work to do today.”
A Thousand & One Epigrams: Selected from the Writings of Elbert Hubbard (1911), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Arise (158)  |  Call (769)  |  Clock (47)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Knock (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Old (481)  |  Professor (128)  |  Read (287)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Servant (39)  |  Today (314)  |  John Tyndall (48)  |  Work (1351)

Several times every day I observed the portions of the polyp with a magnifying glass. On the 4th December, that is to say on the ninth day after having cut the polyp, I seemed in the morning to be able to perceive, on the edges of the anterior end of the second part (the part that had neither head nor arms), three little points arising from those edges. They immediately made me think of the horns that serve as the legs and arms of the polyp. Nevertheless I did not want to decide at once that these were actually arms that were beginning to grow. Throughout the next day I continually observed these points: this excited me extremely, and awaited with impatience the moment when I should know with certainty what they were. At last, on the following day, they were so big that there was no longer any room for doubt that they were actually arms growing at the anterior extremity of this second part. The next day two more arms started to grow out, and a few days later three more. The second part thus had eight of them, and they were all in a short time as long as those of the first part, that is to say as long as those the polyp possessed before it was cut. I then no longer found any difference between the second part and a polyp that had never been cut. I had remarked the same thing about the first part since the day after the operation. When I observed them with the magnifying glass with all the attention of which I was capable, each of the two appeared perceptibly to be a complete polyp, and they performed all the functions that were known to me: they extended, contracted, and walked.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Appeared (4)  |  Arising (22)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difference (337)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Edge (47)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extremity (7)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Horn (18)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Leg (34)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Magnifying Glass (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (213)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performed (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Remark (28)  |  Room (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Short (197)  |  Start (221)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Want (497)

Some beliefs may be subject to such instant, brutal and unambiguous rejection. For example: no left-coiling periwinkle has ever been found among millions of snails examined. If I happen to find one during my walk on Nobska beach tomorrow morning, a century of well nurtured negative evidence will collapse in an instant.
'A Foot Soldier for Evolution', In Eight Little Piggies (1994), 452.
Science quotes on:  |  Beach (21)  |  Belief (578)  |  Century (310)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Find (998)  |  Happen (274)  |  Instant (45)  |  Negative (63)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Snail (10)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Walk (124)  |  Will (2355)

Successful—four flights on Thursday morning—took off with motors from level ground—average speed thirty miles an hour—longest flight 59 seconds—inform press—home for Christmas—Orville.
Telegram (17 Dec 1903) to his father, Bishop Wright, about the first flight in an airplane, at Kitty Hawk, N.C. As quoted in Heinz Gartmann, Rings Around the World: Man’s Progress From Steam Engine to Satellite (1959), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Christmas (11)  |  Flight (98)  |  Ground (217)  |  Home (170)  |  Hour (186)  |  Inform (47)  |  Level (67)  |  Motor (23)  |  Press (21)  |  Speed (65)  |  Successful (123)  |  Telegram (3)

The Atomic Age began at exactly 5.30 Mountain War Time on the morning of July 15, 1945, on a stretch of semi-desert land about 50 airline miles from Alamogordo, New Mexico. And just at that instance there rose from the bowels of the earth a light not of this world, the light of many suns in one. ... At first it was a giant column that soon took the shape of a supramundane mushroom.
On the first atomic explosion in New Mexico, 16 Jul 1945.
From 'Drama of the Atomic Bomb Found Climax in July 16 Test', in New York Times (26 Sep 1945), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Atomic Age (6)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Desert (56)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explosion (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Giant (67)  |  Light (607)  |  Mountain (185)  |  New (1216)  |  Rose (34)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)

The brain is a wonderful organ. It starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office.
Attributed. In Peter McDonald Slop, Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Moment (253)  |  Office (71)  |  Organ (115)  |  Quip (80)  |  Start (221)  |  Wonderful (149)

The childhood shows the man
As morning shows the day.
From 'Paradise Regain’d', Book 4, collected in Samuel Johnson (ed.), The Works of the English Poets: Volume the Fourth: The Poems of Milton: Volume II (1779), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Childhood (38)  |  Day (42)  |  Man (2251)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Show (346)

The great secret, known to internists…, but still hidden from the general public, is that most things get better by themselves. Most things, in fact, are better by morning.
In 'Aspects of Biomedical Science Policy', The New England Journal of Medicine (12 Oct 1972), 3. Also published as Occasional Paper of the Institute of Medicine.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  General Public (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Internist (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Most (1731)  |  Recover (11)  |  Secret (194)  |  Still (613)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)

The great truths with which it [mathematics] deals, are clothed with austere grandeur, far above all purposes of immediate convenience or profit. It is in them that our limited understandings approach nearest to the conception of that absolute and infinite, towards which in most other things they aspire in vain. In the pure mathematics we contemplate absolute truths, which existed in the divine mind before the morning stars sang together, and which will continue to exist there, when the last of their radiant host shall have fallen from heaven. They existed not merely in metaphysical possibility, but in the actual contemplation of the supreme reason. The pen of inspiration, ranging all nature and life for imagery to set forth the Creator’s power and wisdom, finds them best symbolized in the skill of the surveyor. "He meted out heaven as with a span;" and an ancient sage, neither falsely nor irreverently, ventured to say, that “God is a geometer”.
In Orations and Speeches (1870), Vol. 3, 614.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Austere (7)  |  Best (459)  |  Conception (154)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continue (165)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Creator (91)  |  Deal (188)  |  Divine (112)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fall (230)  |  Falsely (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Forth (13)  |  Geometer (24)  |  God (757)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Host (16)  |  Imagery (3)  |  Immediate (95)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Irreverent (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pen (20)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (746)  |  Profit (52)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Range (99)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sage (23)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Sing (26)  |  Skill (109)  |  Span (5)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vain (83)  |  Venture (18)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

The means by which I preserve my own health are, temperance, early rising, and spunging the body every morning with cold water, a practice I have pursued for thirty years ; and though I go from this heated theatre into the squares of the Hospital, in the severest winter nights, with merely silk stockings on my legs, yet I scarcely ever have a cold...
'Lecture 3, Treatment of Inflammation', The Lectures of Sir Astley Cooper (1825), Vol. 1, 58.Lectures on surgery, Lect. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Body (537)  |  Cold (112)  |  Early (185)  |  Health (193)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Leg (34)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Silk (13)  |  Square (70)  |  Water (481)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

The morning stars sang together.
And a person of delicate ear and nice judgment discussed the singing at length, and showed how and wherein one star differed from another, and which was great and which was not.
And still the morning stars sang together.
'Classification' in Little Stings (1907, 1908), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Classification (97)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Differ (85)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Ear (68)  |  Great (1574)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Nice (13)  |  Person (363)  |  Show (346)  |  Singing (19)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Together (387)

The night before Easter Sunday of that year (1920) I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory, and performed a simple experiment on a frog heart according to the nocturnal design. I have to describe this experiment briefly since its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse. The hearts of two frogs were isolated, the first with its nerves, the second without. Both hearts were attached to Straub cannulas filled with a little Ringer solution. The vagus nerve of the first heart was stimulated for a few minutes. Then the Ringer solution that had been in the first heart during the stimulation of the vagus was transferred to the second heart. It slowed and its beats diminished just as if its vagus had been stimulated. Similarly, when the accelerator nerve was stimulated and the Ringer from this period transferred, the second heart speeded up and its beats increased. These results unequivocally proved that the nerves do not influence the heart directly but liberate from their terminals specific chemical substances which, in their turn, cause the well-known modifications of the function of the heart characteristic of the stimulation of its nerves.
'An Autobiographic Sketch', Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (1960), 4, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerator (10)  |  According (237)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Beat (41)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Clock (47)  |  Describe (128)  |  Design (195)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Easter (4)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Frog (38)  |  Function (228)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Influence (222)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Minute (125)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Next (236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perform (121)  |  Period (198)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Scrawl (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speed (65)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)

The sun is not a-bed, when I
At night upon my pillow lie;
Still round the earth his way he takes,
And morning after morning makes.
In poem, 'The Sun’s Travels', A Child's Garden of Verses (1885), 36
Science quotes on:  |  Around (7)  |  Bed (23)  |  Earth (996)  |  Lie (364)  |  Night (120)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Travel (114)  |  Way (1217)

There has never been an age so full of humbug. Humbug everywhere, even in science. For years now the scientists have been promising us every morning a new miracle, a new element, a new metal, guaranteeing to warm us with copper discs immersed in water, to feed us with nothing, to kill us at no expense whatever on a grand scale, to keep us alive indefinitely, to make iron out of heaven knows what. And all this fantastic, scientific humbugging leads to membership of the Institut, to decorations, to influence, to stipends, to the respect of serious people. In the meantime the cost of living rises, doubles, trebles; there is a shortage of raw materials; even death makes no progress—as we saw at Sebastopol, where men cut each other to ribbons—and the cheapest goods are still the worst goods in the world.
With co-author Jules de Goncourt (French writer, 1830-70)
Diary entry, 7 Jan 1857. In R. Baldick (ed. & trans.), Pages from the Goncourt Journal (1978), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Copper (25)  |  Cost (86)  |  Cut (114)  |  Death (388)  |  Element (310)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Good (889)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Humbug (5)  |  Influence (222)  |  Iron (96)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Metal (84)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Progress (465)  |  Raw (28)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rise (166)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Serious (91)  |  Still (613)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)  |  Worst (57)  |  Writer (86)  |  Year (933)

These days at ten o’clock at night a most alarming wonder has manifested itself in the skies. The firmament was rent asunder and through this gap one could distinguish chariots and armies, riders with yellow, white, red and black standards, though to do battle against each other. This awesome and unusual vision continued from ten at night till about two of the morning, and was witnessed with alarm and dismay by many honest and trustworthy people. The significance thereof is known but to God Almighty, Who may graciously prevent the shedding of innocent blood.
Anonymous
'Frightful Apparition in the Sky at Vienna. From Vienna, the 11th day of August 1590'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) News and Rumor in Renaissance Europe: The Fugger Newsletters (1959), 188. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Alarm (18)  |  Alarming (4)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Army (33)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Awesome (14)  |  Battle (34)  |  Black (42)  |  Blood (134)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Clock (47)  |  Dismay (5)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Do (1908)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Gap (33)  |  God (757)  |  Graciously (2)  |  Honest (50)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Known (454)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Most (1731)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Red (35)  |  Rent (2)  |  Rider (3)  |  Shedding (3)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sky (161)  |  Standard (57)  |  Through (849)  |  Trustworthy (11)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Vision (123)  |  White (127)  |  Witness (54)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Yellow (30)

These days I am not bothering about
Getting enlightenment all the time.
And the result is that
I wake up in the morning feeling fine.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 249
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bother (7)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fine (33)  |  Result (677)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wake (13)

Those of us who saw the dawn of the Atomic Age that early morning at Alamogordo … know now that when man is willing to make the effort, he is capable of accomplishing virtually anything.
In And Now It Can Be Told: The Story Of The Manhattan Project (1962), 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Age (499)  |  Alamogordo (2)  |  Anything (9)  |  Atomic Age (6)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Capable (168)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manhattan Project (12)  |  Saw (160)  |  Willing (44)

To the days of the aged it addeth length;
To the might of the strong it addeth strength;
It freshens the heart, It brightens the sight;
’Tis like quaffing a goblet of morning light.
So, water, I will drink nothing but thee,
Thou parent of health and energy!
Anonymous
From 'Song of the Water Drinker', The Metropolitan Magazine (1835), 15, 283. Attributed to E. Johnson, but without a full name with which to find more biographical information, Webmaster is putting these lines under Anonymous.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Drink (53)  |  Energy (344)  |  Freshen (2)  |  Health (193)  |  Heart (229)  |  Length (23)  |  Light (607)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Parent (76)  |  Sight (132)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

We are living now, not in the delicious intoxication induced by the early successes of science, but in a rather grisly morning-after, when it has become apparent that what triumphant science has done hitherto is to improve the means for achieving unimproved or actually deteriorated ends.
Ends and Means: an Inquiry into the Nature of Ideals and into Methods Employed for their Realization (1937), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Delicious (3)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Induction (77)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Triumphant (10)  |  Unimproved (2)

We sleep, and at length awake to the still reality of a winter morning. The snow lies warm as cotton or down upon the window-sill; the broadened sash and frosted panes admit a dim and private light, which enhances the snug cheer within. The stillness of the morning is impressive... From the eaves and fences hang stalactites of snow, and in the yard stand stalagmites covering some concealed core. The trees and shrubs rear white arms to the sky on every side; and where were walls and fences we see fantastic forms stretching in the frolic gambols across the dusky landscape, as if nature had strewn her fresh designs over the fields by night as models for man’s art.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  Admit (45)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Art (657)  |  Awake (19)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Core (18)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Cover (37)  |  Covering (14)  |  Design (195)  |  Dim (8)  |  Down (456)  |  Dusky (4)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Fence (11)  |  Field (364)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Frost (14)  |  Gambol (2)  |  Hang (45)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Length (23)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Model (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Night (120)  |  Pane (2)  |  Private (23)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rear (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Side (233)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Snow (37)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strew (3)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wall (67)  |  Warm (69)  |  White (127)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)  |  Yard (7)

We think our civilization near its meridian, but we are yet only at the cock-crowing and the morning star.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (204)  |  Cock (6)  |  Meridian (4)  |  Star (427)  |  Think (1086)

We were very privileged to leave on the Moon a plaque ... saying, ‘For all Mankind’. Perhaps in the third millennium a wayward stranger will read the plaque at Tranquility Base. We’ll let history mark that this was the age in which that became a fact. I was struck this morning in New York by a proudly waved but uncarefully scribbled sign. It said, ‘Through you we touched the Moon.’ It was our privilege today to touch America. I suspect perhaps the most warm, genuine feeling that all of us could receive came through the cheers and shouts and, most of all, the smiles of our fellow Americans. We hope and think that those people shared our belief that this is the beginning of a new era—the beginning of an era when man understands the universe around him, and the beginning of the era when man understands himself.
Acceptance speech (13 Aug 1969), upon receiving the Medal of Freedom as a member of the first manned moon-landing mission. In James R. Hansen, First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong (2005), 569.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Base (117)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belief (578)  |  Era (51)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Hope (299)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mark (43)  |  Moon (237)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Plaque (2)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Read (287)  |  Receive (114)  |  Scribble (5)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Shout (25)  |  Sign (58)  |  Smile (31)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Touch (141)  |  Touching (16)  |  Tranquility Base (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wayward (3)  |  Will (2355)

Weather forecast for tonight: dark. Continued dark overnight, with widely scattered light by morning.
On recorded album, as character Al Sleet, weatherman, FM & AM: The 11 O'Clock News. Also found in a number of books, without citation, for example, Manoranjan Kumar (ed.), Dictionary of Quotations (2008), 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Dark (140)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Light (607)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Weather (44)

Well beyond the tropostrata
There is a region stark and stellar
Where, on a streak of anti-matter
Lived Dr. Edward anti-Teller.

Remote from Fusion’s origin,

He lived unguessed and unawares
With all his antikith and kin,
And kept macassars on his chairs.

One morning, idling by the sea,
He spied a tin of monstrous girth
That bore three letters: A. E. C.
Out stepped a visitor from Earth.

Then, shouting gladly o’er the sands,
Met two who in their alien ways
Were like as lentils. Their right hands
Clasped, and the rest was gamma rays.
In 'Perils of Modern Living', The New Yorker (10 Nov 1956), 56. Reprinted in Edward Teller with Judith Schoolery, Memoirs: A Twentieth Century Journey in Science and Politics (2002), 428. Webmaster supposes the initials 'A.E.C.' might be for the Atomic Energy Commission.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Anti-Matter (4)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Chair (24)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Gamma Ray (3)  |  Kin (10)  |  Letter (109)  |  Matter (798)  |  Origin (239)  |  Ray (114)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  Edward Teller (44)  |  Tin (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)

When I saw the alpha-helix and saw what a beautiful, elegant structure it was, I was thunderstruck and was furious with myself for not having built this, but on the other hand, I wondered, was it really right?
So I cycled home for lunch and was so preoccupied with the turmoil in my mind that didn’t respond to anything. Then I had an idea, so I cycled back to the lab. I realized that I had a horse hair in a drawer. I set it up on the X-ray camera and gave it a two hour exposure, then took the film to the dark room with my heart in my mouth, wondering what it showed, and when I developed it, there was the 1.5 angstrom reflection which I had predicted and which excluded all structures other than the alpha-helix.
So on Monday morning I stormed into my professor’s office, into Bragg’s office and showed him this, and Bragg said, 'Whatever made you think of that?' And I said, 'Because I was so furious with myself for having missed that beautiful structure.' To which Bragg replied coldly, 'I wish I had made you angry earlier.'
From transcript of audio of Max Perutz in BBC programme, 'Lifestory: Linus Pauling' (1997). On 'Linus Pauling and the Race for DNA' webpage 'I Wish I Had Made You Angry Earlier.'
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anger (20)  |  Back (390)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Sir William Bragg (9)  |  Dark (140)  |  Develop (268)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Fury (6)  |  Heart (229)  |  Helix (10)  |  Home (170)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miss (51)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Myself (212)  |  Office (71)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predict (79)  |  Professor (128)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Right (452)  |  Saw (160)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Storm (51)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turmoil (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonder (236)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

When I was reading Mathematics for University honours, I would sometimes, after working a week or two at some new book, and mastering ten or twenty pages, get into a hopeless muddle, and find it just as bad the next morning. My rule was to begin the book again. And perhaps in another fortnight I had come to the old difficulty with impetus enough to get over it. Or perhaps not. I have several books that I have begun over and over again.
From letter to Edith Rix with hints for studying (about Mar 1885), in Stuart Dodgson Collingwood, The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll (1898), 240-241.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Fortnight (3)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Impetus (5)  |  Master (178)  |  Mastering (11)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Muddle (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rule (294)  |  Study (653)  |  Two (937)  |  University (121)  |  Week (70)  |  Work (1351)

When I went to the scientific doctor
I realised what a lust there was in him to wreak his so-called science on me
and reduce me to the level of a thing.
So I said: Good-morning! and left him.
'Scientific Doctor', David Herbert Lawrence, The Works of D.H. Lawrence (1994), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Good (889)  |  Lust (7)  |  Poem (96)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Thing (1915)

When the morning breezes blow toward the town at sunrise, if they bring with them mists from marshes and, mingled with the mist, the poisonous breath of the creatures of the marshes to be wafted into the bodies of the inhabitants, they will make the site unhealthy.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 4, Sec. 1. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Blow (44)  |  Body (537)  |  Breath (59)  |  Breeze (6)  |  Creature (233)  |  Disease (328)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Marsh (6)  |  Mingle (9)  |  Mist (14)  |  Poisonous (3)  |  Site (14)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Town (27)  |  Unhealthy (2)  |  Will (2355)

When you have made a thorough and reasonably long effort, to understand a thing, and still feel puzzled by it, stop, you will only hurt yourself by going on. Put it aside till the next morning; and if then you can’t make it out, and have no one to explain it to you, put it aside entirely, and go back to that part of the subject which you do understand.
From letter to Edith Rix with hints for studying (about Mar 1885), in Stuart Dodgson Collingwood, The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll (1898), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Can’t (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Explain (322)  |  Feel (367)  |  Learning (274)  |  Long (790)  |  Next (236)  |  Puzzled (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Stop (80)  |  Studying (70)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

Work is a prayer. And I start off every morning dedicating it to our Creator.
As quoted in Martin Childs, 'Professor Joseph Murray: Surgeon who performed the first successful kidney transplant', Independent (28 Nov 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Creator (91)  |  Dedicate (10)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Start (221)  |  Work (1351)

Yet in this my stars were not Mercury as morning star in the angle of the seventh house, in quartile with Mars, but they were Copernicus, they were Tycho Brahe, without whose books of observations everything which has now been brought by me into the brightest daylight would lie buried in darkness.
Harmonice Mundi, The Harmony of the World (1619), book IV, Epilogue on Sublunary Nature. Trans. E. J. Aiton, A. M. Duncan and J. V. Field (1997), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Tycho Brahe (23)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Everything (476)  |  House (140)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mars (44)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Observation (555)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)

[1665-09-14] ...my finding that although the Bill [total of dead] in general is abated, yet the City within the walls is encreasd and likely to continue so (and is close to our house there) - my meeting dead corps's of the plague, carried to be buried close to me at noonday through the City in Fanchurch-street - to see a person sick of the sores carried close by me by Grace-church in a hackney-coach - my finding the Angell tavern at the lower end of Tower-hill shut up; and more then that, the alehouse at the Tower-stairs; and more then that, that the person was then dying of the plague when I was last there, a little while ago at night, to write a short letter there, and I overheard the mistress of the house sadly saying to her husband somebody was very ill, but did not think it was of the plague - to hear that poor Payne my waterman hath buried a child and is dying himself - to hear that a labourer I sent but the other day to Dagenhams to know how they did there is dead of the plague and that one of my own watermen, that carried me daily, fell sick as soon as he had landed me on Friday morning last, when I had been all night upon the water ... is now dead of the plague - to hear ... that Mr Sidny Mountagu is sick of a desperate fever at my Lady Carteret's at Scott's hall - to hear that Mr. Lewes hath another daughter sick - and lastly, that both my servants, W Hewers and Tom Edwards, have lost their fathers, both in St. Sepulcher's parish, of the plague this week - doth put me into great apprehensions of melancholy, and with good reason. But I put off the thoughts of sadness as much as I can, and the rather to keep my wife in good heart and family also.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (14 Sep 1665)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Both (493)  |  Child (307)  |  Church (56)  |  City (78)  |  Continue (165)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daughter (29)  |  End (590)  |  Family (94)  |  Father (110)  |  Fever (29)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Grace (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  House (140)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Plague (41)  |  Poor (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Servant (39)  |  Short (197)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sick (81)  |  Soon (186)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Total (94)  |  Tower (42)  |  Wall (67)  |  Water (481)  |  Week (70)  |  Wife (41)  |  Write (230)

[Blackett] came one morning, deep in thought, into the G (technical) Office at Stanmore. It was a bitterly cold day, and the staff were shivering in a garret warmed over only with an oil-stove. Without a word of greeting, Blackett stepped silently up on to the table and stood there pondering with his feet among the plans. After ten minutes somebody coughed uneasily and said, diffidently: “Wouldn’t you like a chair, sir … or something?” “No, thank you,” said Professor Blackett, “it is necessary to apply scientific methods. Hot air rises. The warmest spot in this room, therefore, will be near the ceiling.” At this, Colonel Krohn, my technical G.S.O., stepped up on the table beside the Professor, and for the next half-hour, the two stayed there in silence. At the end of this period Professor Blackett stepped down from the table saying: “Well! That’s that problem solved.” And so it was.
Anecdote as told by General Sir Frederick Pile, in Frederick Pile, Ack-Ack: Britain’s Defence Against Air Attack During Second World War (1949), 161. As cited by Maurice W. Kirby and Jonathan Rosenhead, 'Patrick Blackett (1897)' in Arjang A. Assad (ed.) and Saul I. Gass (ed.),Profiles in Operations Research: Pioneers and Innovators (2011), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Apply (160)  |  Ceiling (5)  |  Chair (24)  |  Cold (112)  |  Deep (233)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hour (186)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Minute (125)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Next (236)  |  Office (71)  |  Oil (59)  |  Period (198)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Silence (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stove (2)  |  Table (104)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

’Tis late; the astronomer in his lonely height
Exploring all the dark, descries from far
Orbs that like distant isles of splendor are,
And mornings whitening in the infinite.…
He summons one disheveled, wandering star,—
Return ten centuries hence on such a night.
That star will come. It dare not by one hour
Cheat science, or falsify her calculation;
Men will have passed, but watchful in the tower
Man shall remain in sleepless contemplation;
And should all men have perished there in turn,
Truth in their stead would watch that star’s return.
From poem, 'The Appointment', as translated by Arthur O’Shaughnessy, collected in Samuel Waddington (ed.), The Sonnets of Europe (1886), 154.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Century (310)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Comet (54)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Dare (50)  |  Dark (140)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Falsify (3)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Late (118)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Orb (20)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perish (50)  |  Remain (349)  |  Return (124)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Star (427)  |  Summon (10)  |  Tower (42)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wander (35)  |  Watch (109)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.