Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Top

Top Quotes (96 quotes)

... I should think that anyone who considered it more reasonable for the whole universe to move in order to let the Earth remain fixed would be more irrational than one who should climb to the top of your cupola just to get a view of the city and its environs, and then demand that the whole countryside should revolve around him so that he would not have to take the trouble to turn his head.
In Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632).
Science quotes on:  |  City (78)  |  Consider (416)  |  Demand (123)  |  Earth (996)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Order (632)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

Question: Explain why, in order to cook food by boiling, at the top of a high mountain, you must employ a different method from that used at the sea level.
Answer: It is easy to cook food at the sea level by boiling it, but once you get above the sea level the only plan is to fry it in its own fat. It is, in fact, impossible to boil water above the sea level by any amount of heat. A different method, therefore, would have to be employed to boil food at the top of a high mountain, but what that method is has not yet been discovered. The future may reveal it to a daring experimentalist.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 178-9, Question 11. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Answer (366)  |  Boil (23)  |  Boiling (3)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Daring (17)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Easy (204)  |  Employ (113)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fat (11)  |  Food (199)  |  Frying (2)  |  Future (429)  |  Heat (174)  |  High (362)  |  Howler (15)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Method (505)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Plan (117)  |  Question (621)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)

Question: On freezing water in a glass tube, the tube sometimes breaks. Why is this? An iceberg floats with 1,000,000 tons of ice above the water line. About how many tons are below the water line?
Answer: The water breaks the tube because of capallarity. The iceberg floats on the top because it is lighter, hence no tons are below the water line. Another reason is that an iceberg cannot exceed 1,000,000 tons in weight: hence if this much is above water, none is below. Ice is exceptional to all other bodies except bismuth. All other bodies have 1090 feet below the surface and 2 feet extra for every degree centigrade. If it were not for this, all fish would die, and the earth be held in an iron grip.
P.S.—When I say 1090 feet, I mean 1090 feet per second.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179-80, Question 13. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Above (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Below (24)  |  Bismuth (7)  |  Break (99)  |  Centigrade (2)  |  Death (388)  |  Degree (276)  |  Earth (996)  |  Examination (98)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Extra (6)  |  Fish (120)  |  Float (30)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grip (9)  |  Howler (15)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iceberg (4)  |  Iron (96)  |  Lighter (2)  |  Mean (809)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Surface (209)  |  Ton (21)  |  Tube (5)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)

A discovery is like falling in love and reaching the top of a mountain after a hard climb all in one, an ecstasy not induced by drugs but by the revelation of a face of nature that no one has seen before and that often turns out to be more subtle and wonderful than anyone had imagined.
'True Science', review of Peter Medawar, Advice to a Young Scientist (1980). In The London Review of Books (Mar 1981), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Climb (35)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Drug (57)  |  Ecstasy (9)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  Hard (243)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inducement (3)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reach (281)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)

A Dr van’t Hoff of the veterinary college at Utrecht, appears to have no taste for exact chemical investigation. He finds it a less arduous task to mount Pegasus (evidently borrowed from the veterinary school) and to proclaim in his La Chemie dans l’espace how, during his bold fight to the top of the chemical Parnassus, the atoms appeared to him to have grouped themselves together throughout universal space. … I should have taken no notice of this matter had not Wislicenus oddly enough written a preface to the pamphlet, and not by way of a joke but in all seriousness recommended it a worthwhile performance.
'Signs of the Times', Journal fur Praktische Chemie, 15, 473. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bold (22)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Chemical (292)  |  College (66)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joke (83)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mount (42)  |  Notice (77)  |  Performance (48)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Recommend (24)  |  School (219)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Space (500)  |  Task (147)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Together (387)  |  Universal (189)  |  Way (1217)  |  Johannes Wislicenus (4)  |  Worthwhile (18)

A human without a cosmology is like a pebble lying near the top of a great mountain, in contact with its little indentation in the dirt and pebbles immediately surrounding it, but oblivious to its stupendous view.
As co-author with Nancy Ellen Abrams, in The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos (2006), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Contact (65)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Little (707)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Stupendous (13)  |  View (488)

A small cabin stands in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, about a hundred yards off a trail that crosses the Cascade Range. In midsummer, the cabin looked strange in the forest. It was only twelve feet square, but it rose fully two stories and then had a high and steeply peaked roof. From the ridge of the roof, moreover, a ten-foot pole stuck straight up. Tied to the top of the pole was a shovel. To hikers shedding their backpacks at the door of the cabin on a cold summer evening—as the five of us did—it was somewhat unnerving to look up and think of people walking around in snow perhaps thirty-five feet above, hunting for that shovel, then digging their way down to the threshold.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabin (4)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cross (16)  |  Dig (21)  |  Digging (11)  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Five (16)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fully (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Look (582)  |  Midsummer (2)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Peak (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Pole (46)  |  Range (99)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roof (13)  |  Rose (34)  |  Shed (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  Square (70)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stick (24)  |  Story (118)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strange (157)  |  Summer (54)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thirty-Five (2)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Tie (38)  |  Trail (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Yard (7)

All that passes for knowledge can be arranged in a hierarchy of degrees of certainty, with arithmetic and the facts of perception at the top.
From 'Philosophy For Laymen', collected in Unpopular Essays (1950, 1996), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arranged (4)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Degree (276)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Perception (97)

Anyone who sits on top of the largest hydrogen-oxygen fueled system in the world; knowing they’re going to light the bottom, and doesn’t get a little worried, does not fully understand the situation.
Response to question whether he was worried about embarking on the first space shuttle flight. As quoted on the nmspacemuseum.org website of the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Fully (21)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Sit (48)  |  Situation (113)  |  System (537)  |  Understand (606)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

Anyway, I'm sort of glad they’ve got the atomic bomb invented. If there’s ever another war. I’m going to sit right the hell on top of it. I’ll volunteer for it, I swear to God I will.
Spoken by fictional character Holden Caulfield, in Catcher in the Rye (1951), 183.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Gladness (5)  |  God (757)  |  Invention (369)  |  Right (452)  |  Swear (6)  |  Volunteer (7)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)

As he sat alone in a garden, he [Isaac Newton in 1666, age 24] fell into a speculation on the power of gravity; that as this power is not found sensibly diminished at the remotest distance from the centre of the earth to which we can rise, neither at the tops of the loftiest buildings, nor even on the summits of the highest mountains, it appeared to him reasonable to conclude that this power must extend much further than was usually thought: why not as high as the moon? said he to himself; and if so, her motion must be influenced by it; perhaps she is retained in her orbit thereby.
View of Newton's Philosophy (1728), preface. In William Whewell, History of the Inductive Sciences (1847), Vol. 2, 166. Pemberton's narrative is based on firsthand conversations with Newton himself.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alone (311)  |  Building (156)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Extend (128)  |  Garden (60)  |  Gravity (132)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Moon (237)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Power (746)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rise (166)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Summit (25)  |  Thought (953)  |  Usually (176)  |  Why (491)

At the entrance to the observatory Stjerneborg located underground, Tycho Brahe built a Ionic portal. On top of this were three sculptured lions. On both sides were inscriptions and on the backside was a longer inscription in gold letters on a porfyr stone: Consecrated to the all-good, great God and Posterity. Tycho Brahe, Son of Otto, who realized that Astronomy, the oldest and most distinguished of all sciences, had indeed been studied for a long time and to a great extent, but still had not obtained sufficient firmness or had been purified of errors, in order to reform it and raise it to perfection, invented and with incredible labour, industry, and expenditure constructed various exact instruments suitable for all kinds of observations of the celestial bodies, and placed them partly in the neighbouring castle of Uraniborg, which was built for the same purpose, partly in these subterranean rooms for a more constant and useful application, and recommending, hallowing, and consecrating this very rare and costly treasure to you, you glorious Posterity, who will live for ever and ever, he, who has both begun and finished everything on this island, after erecting this monument, beseeches and adjures you that in honour of the eternal God, creator of the wonderful clockwork of the heavens, and for the propagation of the divine science and for the celebrity of the fatherland, you will constantly preserve it and not let it decay with old age or any other injury or be removed to any other place or in any way be molested, if for no other reason, at any rate out of reverence to the creator’s eye, which watches over the universe. Greetings to you who read this and act accordingly. Farewell!
(Translated from the original in Latin)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Both (493)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Constant (144)  |  Construct (124)  |  Creator (91)  |  Decay (53)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Divine (112)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Error (321)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Finish (59)  |  Glorious (48)  |  God (757)  |  Gold (97)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Honour (56)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Industry (137)  |  Injury (36)  |  Inscription (11)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Island (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Labour (98)  |  Letter (109)  |  Lion (22)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Monument (45)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Portal (7)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rare (89)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reform (22)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Underground (11)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useful (250)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)

By felling the trees which cover the tops and sides of mountains, men in all climates seem to bring upon future generations two calamities at once; want of fuel and a scarcity of water.
In Alexander von Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland and Thomasina Ross (trans. and ed.) Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America: During the Years 1799-1804 (1852), Vol. 2, 9. (Translated from the original in French.)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Climate (97)  |  Cover (37)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Felling (2)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Scarcity (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Tree (246)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Water (481)

Chemistry is like a majestic skyscraper. The concrete secure foundation of chemistry consists of countless experimentally observed facts. The theories, principles and laws developed from these observations are like an elevator which runs from the bottom to the top of the edifice.
Ernest R. Toon and George L. Ellis (eds.), Foundations of Chemistry (1968), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Consist (223)  |  Countless (36)  |  Develop (268)  |  Developed (11)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Elevator (2)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Law (894)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Principle (507)  |  Run (174)  |  Secure (22)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Theory (970)

Daylight Saving Time: Only the government would believe that you could cut a foot off the top of a blanket, sew it to the bottom, and have a longer blanket.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cut (114)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Government (110)  |  Longer (10)  |  Sewing (3)  |  Time (1877)

Dibdin said: 'I see you've put your own name at the top of your paper, Mr Woods.' His eyes looked sad and thoughtful. 'I always make it a matter of principle to put my name as well on every paper that comes out of the department.' 'Yours?' Albert said incredulously. 'Yes,' said Dibdin, still sad and thoughtful. 'I make it a matter of principle, Mr Woods. And I like my name to come first—it makes it easier for purposes of identification.' He rounded it off. 'First come, first served'.
The Struggles of Albert Woods (1952), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Department (92)  |  Easier (53)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Identification (16)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Name (333)  |  Paper (182)  |  Principle (507)  |  Publication (101)  |  Purpose (317)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Wood (92)

Each has his own tree of ancestors, but at the top of all sits probably Arboreal.
'Pastoral'. Memories and Portraits (1887, 1915), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Tree (246)

Egg and bacon. Egg, sausage and bacon. Egg and Spam. Egg, bacon and Spam. Egg, bacon, sausage and Spam. Spam, bacon, sausage and Spam. Spam, egg, Spam, Spam, bacon and Spam. Spam, Spam, Spam, egg and Spam. Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, baked beans, Spam, Spam, Spam and Spam. Lobster Thermidor aux crevettes with a Mornay sauce, garnished with truffle pâté, brandy and a fried egg on top, and Spam.
Menu of the Green Midget Café recited by the waitress (Terry Jones) in TV sketch, 25th show, Monty Python’s Flying Circus (15 Dec 1970). The word spam was also repeated in a song. Terry Jones co-wrote the script with Michael Palin. The term “spam” in e-mail is traced back to the popularity of this skit, which deteriorated into nonsense with the excessive repetition of “spam”.
Science quotes on:  |  Communication (94)  |  Egg (69)  |  Email (3)  |  Garnish (3)  |  Truffle (2)

Every physical fact, every expression of nature, every feature of the earth, the work of any and all of those agents which make the face of the world what it is, and as we see it, is interesting and instructive. Until we get hold of a group of physical facts, we do not know what practical bearings they may have, though right-minded men know that they contain many precious jewels, which science, or the expert hand of philosophy will not fail top bring out, polished, and bright, and beautifully adapted to man's purposes.
In The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 209-210. Maury was in particular referring to the potential use of deep-sea soundings.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bright (79)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Expert (65)  |  Expression (175)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feature (44)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Polish (15)  |  Practical (200)  |  Precious (41)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Fifty years ago the successful doctor was said to need three things; a top hat to give him Authority, a paunch to give him Dignity, and piles to give him an Anxious Expression.
Anonymous
Lancet (1951), 1, 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (95)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Expression (175)  |  Physician (273)  |  Piles (7)  |  Successful (123)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Year (933)

Fractals are patterns which occur on many levels. This concept can be applied to any musical parameter. I make melodic fractals, where the pitches of a theme I dream up are used to determine a melodic shape on several levels, in space and time. I make rhythmic fractals, where a set of durations associated with a motive get stretched and compressed and maybe layered on top of each other. I make loudness fractals, where the characteristic loudness of a sound, its envelope shape, is found on several time scales. I even make fractals with the form of a piece, its instrumentation, density, range, and so on. Here I’ve separated the parameters of music, but in a real piece, all of these things are combined, so you might call it a fractal of fractals.
Interview (1999) on The Discovery Channel. As quoted by Benoit B. Manelbrot and Richard Hudson in The (Mis)Behaviour of Markets: A Fractal View of Risk, Ruin and Reward (2010), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Associated (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Combined (3)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Concept (221)  |  Density (25)  |  Determine (144)  |  Dream (208)  |  Duration (10)  |  Envelope (6)  |  Form (959)  |  Fractal (9)  |  Instrumentation (4)  |  Layer (40)  |  Layered (2)  |  Level (67)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (129)  |  Musical (10)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parameter (4)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Piece (38)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Range (99)  |  Real (149)  |  Rhythmic (2)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Separate (143)  |  Set (394)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Stretched (2)  |  Theme (17)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)

He scarce had ceased when the superior fiend
Was moving toward the shore; his ponderous shield
Ethereal temper, massy, large and round,
Behind him cast; the broad circumference
Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb
Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views
At evening from the top of Fésolè,
Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands,
Rivers or mountains in her spotty globe.
Paradise Lost, Books I and II (1667), edited by Anna Baldwin (1998), lines 283-91, p. 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Behind (137)  |  Cast (66)  |  Circumference (23)  |  Ethereal (8)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Glass (92)  |  Globe (47)  |  Large (394)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mountain (185)  |  New (1216)  |  Orb (20)  |  River (119)  |  Shield (6)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Superior (81)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  View (488)

He who designs an unsafe structure or an inoperative machine is a bad Engineer; he who designs them so that they are safe and operative, but needlessly expensive, is a poor Engineer, and … he who does the best work at lowest cost sooner or later stands at the top of his profession.
From Address on 'Industrial Engineering' at Purdue University (24 Feb 1905). Reprinted by Yale & Towne Mfg Co of New York and Stamford, Conn. for the use of students in its works.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Best (459)  |  Cost (86)  |  Design (195)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Lowest (10)  |  Machine (257)  |  Needless (4)  |  Operative (10)  |  Poor (136)  |  Profession (99)  |  Safe (54)  |  Stand (274)  |  Structure (344)  |  Unsafe (5)  |  Work (1351)

Hieron asked Archimedes to discover, without damaging it, whether a certain crown or wreath was made of pure gold, or if the goldsmith had fraudulently alloyed it with some baser metal. While Archimedes was turning the problem over in his mind, he chanced to be in the bath house. There, as he was sitting in the bath, he noticed that the amount of water that was flowing over the top of it was equal in volume to that part of his body that was immersed. He saw at once a way of solving the problem. He did not delay, but in his joy leaped out of the bath. Rushing naked through the streets towards his home, he cried out in a loud voice that he had found what he sought. For, as he ran, he repeatedly shouted in Greek; “Eureka! Eurekal I’ve found it! I’ve found it!”
Vitrivius Pollio, De Architectura, ix, prologue, section 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Alloy (4)  |  Amount (151)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ask (411)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Crown (38)  |  Delay (20)  |  Discover (553)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Gold (97)  |  Greek (107)  |  Home (170)  |  House (140)  |  Joy (107)  |  Leap (53)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure (291)  |  Research (664)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shout (25)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Through (849)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

How hard to realize that every camp of men or beast has this glorious starry firmament for a roof! In such places standing alone on the mountain-top it is easy to realize that whatever special nests we make - leaves and moss like the marmots and birds, or tents or piled stone - we all dwell in a house of one room - the world with the firmament for its roof - and are sailing the celestial spaces without leaving any track.
John Muir
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Beast (55)  |  Bird (149)  |  Camp (10)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Easy (204)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Hard (243)  |  House (140)  |  Leave (130)  |  Moss (10)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nest (23)  |  Pile (12)  |  Place (177)  |  Realize (147)  |  Roof (13)  |  Room (40)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sailing (14)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stone (162)  |  Tent (11)  |  Track (38)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)

I am above the forest region, amongst grand rocks & such a torrent as you see in Salvator Rosa's paintings vegetation all a scrub of rhodods. with Pines below me as thick & bad to get through as our Fuegian Fagi on the hill tops, & except the towering peaks of P. S. [perpetual snow] that, here shoot up on all hands there is little difference in the mt scenery—here however the blaze of Rhod. flowers and various colored jungle proclaims a differently constituted region in a naturalists eye & twenty species here, to one there, always are asking me the vexed question, where do we come from?
Letter to Charles Darwin (24 Jun 1849). Quoted in The Correspondence of Charles Darwin (1988), Vol. 4, 1847-1850, 242.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Asking (73)  |  Bad (180)  |  Botany (57)  |  Color (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forest (150)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Little (707)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Pine (9)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Question (621)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Snow (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Through (849)  |  Towering (11)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Vex (9)

I cannot serve as an example for younger scientists to follow. What I teach cannot be learned. I have never been a “100 percent scientist.” My reading has always been shamefully nonprofessional. I do not own an attaché case, and therefore cannot carry it home at night, full of journals and papers to read. I like long vacations, and a catalogue of my activities in general would be a scandal in the ears of the apostles of cost-effectiveness. I do not play the recorder, nor do I like to attend NATO workshops on a Greek island or a Sicilian mountain top; this shows that I am not even a molecular biologist. In fact, the list of what I have not got makes up the American Dream. Readers, if any, will conclude rightly that the Gradus ad Parnassum will have to be learned at somebody else’s feet.
In Heraclitean Fire: Sketches from a Life before Nature (1978), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attend (65)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Carry (127)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Cost (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Ear (68)  |  Effectiveness (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Greek (107)  |  Home (170)  |  Island (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Long (790)  |  Molecular Biologist (2)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Paper (182)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Teach (277)  |  Will (2355)  |  Workshop (14)  |  Younger (21)

I do hate sums. There is no greater mistake than to call arithmetic an exact science. There are permutations and aberrations discernible to minds entirely noble like mine; subtle variations which ordinary accountants fail to discover; hidden laws of number which it requires a mind like mine to perceive. For instance, if you add a sum from the bottom up, and then from the top down, the result is always different. Again if you multiply a number by another number before you have had your tea, and then again after, the product will be different. It is also remarkable that the Post-tea product is more likely to agree with other people’s calculations than the Pre-tea result.
Letter to Mrs Arthur Severn (Jul 1878), collected in The Letters of a Noble Woman (Mrs. La Touche of Harristown) (1908), 50. Also in 'Gleanings Far and Near', Mathematical Gazette (May 1924), 12, 95.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aberration (8)  |  Accountant (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Different (577)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Fail (185)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hate (64)  |  Hide (69)  |  Law (894)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Noble (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Product (160)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Sum (102)  |  Tea (12)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)

I do not think there should be a limit on the rig's liability, because they are sitting on top of unlimited amounts of oil, and thus, there could be an explosion occur that could do untold damage. ... The amount of damage that an offshore oil rig can do is infinite.
Senate Floor Debate, 135 Cong. Rec. S9689-S9716 (3 Aug 1989). Reproduced in Russell V. Randle, Oil Pollution Deskbook (1991), 432.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Amount (151)  |  Damage (34)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Liability (6)  |  Limit (280)  |  Occur (150)  |  Offshore (3)  |  Oil (59)  |  Oil Spill (5)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Untold (6)

I felt exactly how you would feel if you were getting ready to launch and knew you were sitting on top of two million parts—all built by the lowest bidder on a government contract.
His reply to the question, often asked, “When you were sitting in that capsule listening to the count-down, how did you feel?” From speech announcing his Senate retirement (20 Feb 1997). As recorded in 'A Genuine American Hero Says He'll Retire', Tributes Delivered in Congress: John Glenn (1998) in U.S. Government Printing Office, U.S. Congress: Senate, Vol 105, Issue 34, 52. (A similar reference to “the lowest bidder on a government contract” has also been attributed to Alan Shepard.)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bidder (2)  |  Capsule (6)  |  Contract (11)  |  Countdown (2)  |  Feel (367)  |  Government (110)  |  Launch (20)  |  Lowest (10)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Two (937)

I fully support the goal of species protection and conservation and believe that recovery and ultimately delisting of species should be the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s top priority under ESA.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fully (21)  |  Goal (145)  |  Priority (10)  |  Protection (36)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Service (110)  |  Species (401)  |  Support (147)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Wildlife (14)

I have never really had dreams to fulfil…. You just want to go on looking at these ecosystems and trying to understand them and they are all fascinating. To achieve a dream suggests snatching a prize from the top of a tree and running off with it, and that’s the end of it. It isn’t like that. … What you are trying to achieve is understanding and you don’t do that just by chasing dreams.
From interview with Michael Bond, 'It’s a Wonderful Life', New Scientist (14 Dec 2002), 176, No. 2373, 52.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Chase (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  End (590)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Looking (189)  |  Never (1087)  |  Prize (13)  |  Running (61)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)

I hear one day the word “mountain,” and I ask someone “what is a mountain? I have never seen one.”
I join others in discussions of mountains.
One day I see in a book a picture of a mountain.
And I decide I must climb one.
I travel to a place where there is a mountain.
At the base of the mountain I see there are lots of paths to climb.
I start on a path that leads to the top of the mountain.
I see that the higher I climb, the more the paths join together.
After much climbing the many paths join into one.
I climb till I am almost exhausted but I force myself and continue to climb.
Finally I reach the top and far above me there are stars.
I look far down and the village twinkles far below.
It would be easy to go back down there but it is so beautiful up here.
I am just below the stars.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Base (117)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Below (24)  |  Book (392)  |  Climb (35)  |  Continue (165)  |  Decide (41)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Down (456)  |  Easy (204)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Far (154)  |  Finally (26)  |  Force (487)  |  Hear (139)  |  High (362)  |  Join (26)  |  Lead (384)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Picture (143)  |  Place (177)  |  Reach (281)  |  See (1081)  |  Someone (22)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Start (221)  |  Together (387)  |  Travel (114)  |  Twinkle (5)  |  Village (7)  |  Word (619)

I waited for Rob and, linking arms, we took our final steps together onto the rooftop of the world. It was 8.15 am on 24 May 2004; there was nowhere higher on the planet that we could go, the world lay at our feet. Holding each other tightly, we tried to absorb where we were. To be standing here, together, exactly three years since Rob’s cancer treatment, was nothing short of a miracle. Standing on top of Everest was more than just climbing a mountain - it was a gift of life. With Pemba and Nawang we crowded together, wrapping our arms around each other. They had been more than Sherpas, they had been our guardian angels.
Jo Gambi
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Angel (44)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Climb (35)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Final (118)  |  Foot (60)  |  Gift (104)  |  Guardian (3)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rob (6)  |  Short (197)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Together (387)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Try (283)  |  Wait (58)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrap (7)  |  Year (933)

I want to argue that the ‘sudden’ appearance of species in the fossil record and our failure to note subsequent evolutionary change within them is the proper prediction of evolutionary theory as we understand it ... Evolutionary ‘sequences’ are not rungs on a ladder, but our retrospective reconstruction of a circuitous path running like a labyrinth, branch to branch, from the base of the bush to a lineage now surviving at its top.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argue (23)  |  Base (117)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bush (9)  |  Change (593)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fossil Record (10)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Lineage (3)  |  Note (34)  |  Path (144)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Record (154)  |  Retrospective (3)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Species (401)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Survive (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understand (606)  |  Want (497)

I went to the trash pile at Tuskegee Institute and started my laboratory with bottles, old fruit jars and any other thing I found I could use. ... [The early efforts were] worked out almost wholly on top of my flat topped writing desk and with teacups, glasses, bottles and reagents I made myself.
Manuscript fragment, no date, Box 1, George Washington Carver Papers. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottle (15)  |  Desk (13)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Flat (33)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Jar (9)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Made (14)  |  Myself (212)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Start (221)  |  Teacup (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trash (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

If people are constantly falling off a cliff, you could place ambulances under the cliff or build a fence on the top of the cliff. We are placing all too many ambulances under the cliff.
Burkitt did not originate this idea; it is a paraphrase of lines from a poem (1895) by Joseph Malins, which ends: “Better put a strong fence ’round the top of the cliff/Than an ambulance down in the valley”. See 'The Ambulance Down in the Valley' (1895). Webmaster has not yet found a primary source for the wording in the paraphrase used by Burkitt. Can you help? Another early use of the metaphor is in 'The Efficient Human Machine', Scientific American (16 Oct 1915), 334.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Build (204)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fence (11)  |  People (1005)  |  Prevention (35)

If there is a small rocket on top of a big one, and if the big one is jettisoned and the small one is ignited, then their speeds are added.
In 'My Contributions to Astronautics' (1967), collected in Smithsonian Annals of Flight (1971), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Big (48)  |  Ignite (3)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Small (477)  |  Speed (65)

If we want an answer from nature, we must put our questions in acts, not words, and the acts may take us to curious places. Some questions were answered in the laboratory, others in mines, others in a hospital where a surgeon pushed tubes in my arteries to get blood samples, others on top of Pike’s Peak in the Rocky Mountains, or in a diving dress on the bottom of the sea. That is one of the things I like about scientific research. You never know where it will take you next.
From essay 'Some Adventures of a Biologist', as quoted in Ruth Moore, Man, Time, And Fossils (1953), 174.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Answer (366)  |  Artery (10)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Curious (91)  |  Dive (11)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Sample (19)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sea (308)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tube (5)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

If you're overfishing at the top of the food chain, and acidifying the ocean at the bottom, you're creating a squeeze that could conceivably collapse the whole system.
As quoted by Mark Bittman in 'What's Worse Than an Oil Spill?', New York Times (20 Apr 2011), A23.
Science quotes on:  |  Acidification (4)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Creation (327)  |  Food (199)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Squeeze (6)  |  System (537)  |  Whole (738)

In comparison with the great size of the earth the protrusion of mountains is not sufficient to deprive it of its spherical shape or to invalidate measurements based on its spherical shape. For Eratosthenes shows that the perpendicular distance from the highest mountain tops to the lowest regions is ten stades [c.5,000-5,500 feet]. This he shows with the help of dioptras which measure magnitudes at a distance.
Simplicius, Commentary On Aristotle's De Caelo, pp. 549.32-550.4 (Heiberg). Quoted in Morris R. Cohen and I. E. Drabkin, A Sourcebook in Greek Science (1948), 160 n.2.
Science quotes on:  |  Comparison (102)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Great (1574)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Show (346)  |  Sufficient (128)

In the benzene nucleus we have been given a soil out of which we can see with surprise the already-known realm of organic chemistry multiply, not once or twice but three, four, five or six times just like an equivalent number of trees. What an amount of work had suddenly become necessary, and how quickly were busy hands found to carry it out! First the eye moves up the six stems opening out from the tremendous benzene trunk. But already the branches of the neighbouring stems have become intertwined, and a canopy of leaves has developed which becomes more spacious as the giant soars upwards into the air. The top of the tree rises into the clouds where the eye cannot yet follow it. And to what an extent is this wonderful benzene tree thronged with blossoms! Everywhere in the sea of leaves one can spy the slender hydroxyl bud: hardly rarer is the forked blossom [Gabelblüte] which we call the amine group, the most frequent is the beautiful cross-shaped blossom we call the methyl group. And inside this embellishment of blossoms, what a richness of fruit, some of them shining in a wonderful blaze of color, others giving off an overwhelming fragrance.
A. W. Hofmann, after-dinner speech at Kekulé Benzolfest (Mar 1890). Trans. in W. H. Brock, O. Theodor Benfrey and Susanne Stark, 'Hofmann's Benzene Tree at the Kekulé Festivities', Journal of Chemical Education (1991), 68, 887-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Amine (2)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Develop (268)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Giant (67)  |  Known (454)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Radical (25)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stem (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

It is supposed that the ancients were ignorant of the law in hydraulics, by which water, in a tube, will rise as high as the fountain-head; and hence they carried their stupendous aqueducts horizontally, from hill-top to hill-top, upon lofty arches, with an incredible expenditure of labor and money. The knowledge of a single law, now familiar to every well-instructed school-boy,— namely, that water seeks a level, and, if not obstructed, will find it,—enables the poorest man of the present day to do what once demanded the wealth of an empire. The beautiful fragments of the ancient Roman aqueducts, which have survived the ravage of centuries, are often cited to attest the grandeur and power of their builders. To me, they are monuments, not of their power, but of their weakness.
In Thoughts Selected From the Writings of Horace Mann (1872), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Aqueduct (4)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Boy (94)  |  Demand (123)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  High (362)  |  Hydraulic (5)  |  Hydraulics (2)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Man (2251)  |  Money (170)  |  Monument (45)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roman (36)  |  School (219)  |  Seek (213)  |  Single (353)  |  Stupendous (13)  |  Water (481)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Will (2355)

It must be admitted that science has its castes. The man whose chief apparatus is the differential equation looks down upon one who uses a galvanometer, and he in turn upon those who putter about with sticky and smelly things in test tubes. But all of these, and most biologists too, join together in their contempt for the pariah who, not through a glass darkly, but with keen unaided vision, observes the massing of a thundercloud on the horizon, the petal as it unfolds, or the swarming of a hive of bees. And yet sometimes I think that our laboratories are but little earthworks which men build about themselves, and whose puny tops too often conceal from view the Olympian heights; that we who work in these laboratories are but skilled artisans compared with the man who is able to observe, and to draw accurate deductions from the world about him.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 170- 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Bee (40)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Build (204)  |  Caste (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Equation (132)  |  Flower (106)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Puny (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It was about three o’clock at night when the final result of the calculation [which gave birth to quantum mechanics] lay before me ... At first I was deeply shaken ... I was so excited that I could not think of sleep. So I left the house ... and awaited the sunrise on top of a rock.
[That was “the night of Heligoland”.]
Quoted in Abraham Pais, Niels Bohr’s Times: in Physics, Philosophy, and Polity (1991), 275. Cited in Mauro Dardo, Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics (2004), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Clock (47)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  House (140)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Night (120)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Result (677)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Think (1086)

It was noted long ago that the front row of burlesque houses was occupied predominantly by bald-headed men. In fact, such a row became known as the bald-headed row. It might be assumed from this on statistical evidence that the continued close observation of chorus girls in tights caused loss of hair from the top of the head.
[Disputing a statistical study for the American Cancer Society showing smoking to be a cancer causative.]
In Bess Furman, '2 Cite Extraction of Cigarette Tar', New York Times (26 Jul 1957), 21. The article reported on testimony before the Legal and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee of the House Government Operations Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Burlesque (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Front (16)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hair (25)  |  Head (81)  |  House (140)  |  Known (454)  |  Long (790)  |  Loss (110)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Row (9)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Society (326)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)

I’ve met a lot of people in important positions, and he [Wernher von Braun] was one that I never had any reluctance to give him whatever kind of credit they deserve. He owned his spot, he knew what he was doing, and he was very impressive when you met with him. He understood the problems. He could come back and straighten things out. He moved with sureness whenever he came up with a decision. Of all the people, as I think back on it now, all of the top management that I met at NASA, many of them are very, very good. But Wernher, relative to the position he had and what he had to do, I think was the best of the bunch.
From interview with Ron Stone (24 May 1999) for NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project on NASA website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Best (459)  |  Wernher von Braun (29)  |  Credit (20)  |  Decision (91)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Good (889)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lot (151)  |  Management (21)  |  Manager (6)  |  NASA (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Spot (17)  |  Sureness (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understood (156)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whenever (81)

Jupiter is the largest of all the solar system’s planets, more than ten times bigger and three hundred times as massive as Earth. Jupiter is so immense it could swallow all the other planets easily. Its Great Red Spot, a storm that has raged for centuries, is itself wider than Earth. And the Spot is merely one feature visible among the innumerable vortexes and streams of Jupiter’s frenetically racing cloud tops. Yet Jupiter is composed mainly of the lightest elements, hydrogen and helium, more like a star than a planet. All that size and mass, yet Jupiter spins on its axis in less than ten hours, so fast that the planet is clearly not spherical: Its poles are noticeably flattened. Jupiter looks like a big, colorfully striped beach ball that’s squashed down as if some invisible child were sitting on it. Spinning that fast, Jupiter’s deep, deep atmosphere is swirled into bands and ribbons of multihued clouds: pale yellow, saffron orange, white, tawny yellow-brown, dark brown, bluish, pink and red. Titanic winds push the clouds across the face of Jupiter at hundreds of kilometers per hour.
Ben Bova
Jupiter
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Axis (9)  |  Ball (62)  |  Band (9)  |  Beach (21)  |  Big (48)  |  Brown (23)  |  Century (310)  |  Child (307)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Compose (17)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deep (233)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easily (35)  |  Element (310)  |  Face (212)  |  Fast (45)  |  Feature (44)  |  Great (1574)  |  Helium (11)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hundreds (6)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Immense (86)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Mass (157)  |  Massive (9)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Orange (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pale (9)  |  Pink (4)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pole (46)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rage (9)  |  Red (35)  |  Ribbon (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Size (60)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solar Systems (3)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Spot (17)  |  Squash (4)  |  Star (427)  |  Storm (51)  |  Stream (81)  |  Stripe (4)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Swirl (10)  |  System (537)  |  Tawny (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Titanic (4)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vortex (9)  |  White (127)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yellow (30)

Just a rock, a dome of snow, the deep blue sky, and a hunk of orange-painted metal from which a shredded American flag cracked in the wind. Nothing more. Except two tiny figures walking together those last few feet to the top of the Earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Blue (56)  |  Crack (15)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dome (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Figure (160)  |  Flag (11)  |  Foot (60)  |  Last (426)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Orange (14)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shred (7)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snow (37)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wind (128)

Life has found ways to flourish in boiling hot springs and on icy mountain tops, to fly, glow in the dark, put forth leaves in a rainless desert, or plumb the ocean, reproducing and adapting, reincarnating itself in new forms in defiance of time and death.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Death (388)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Desert (56)  |  Find (998)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Fly (146)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Glow (14)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Icy (3)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mountain (185)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Reincarnation (2)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Spring (133)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

Many of the nobles and senators, although of great age, mounted more than once to the top of the highest church in Venice, in order to see sails and shipping … so far off that it was two hours before they were seen without my spy-glass …, for the effect of my instrument is such that it makes an object fifty miles off appear as large as if it were only five miles away. ... The Senate, knowing the way in which I had served it for seventeen years at Padua, ... ordered my election to the professorship for life.
Quoted in Will Durant, Ariel Duran, The Age of Reason Begins (1961), 604. From Charles Singer, Studies in the History and Method of Science (1917), Vol. 1, 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Church (56)  |  Effect (393)  |  Glass (92)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnification (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Mount (42)  |  Noble (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Sail (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Spy (8)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

Moreover, within the hollows of the earth,
When from one quarter the wind builds up, lunges,
Muscles the deep caves with its headstrong power,
The earth leans hard where the force of wind has pressed it;
Then above ground, the higher the house is built,
The nearer it rises to the sky, the worse
Will it lean that way and jut out perilously,
The beams wrenched loose and hanging ready to fall.
And to think, men can't believe that for this world
Some time of death and ruin lies in wait,
Yet they see so great a mass of earth collapse!
And the winds pause for breath—that's lucky, for else
No force could rein things galloping to destruction.
But since they pause for breath, to rally their force,
Come building up and then fall driven back,
More often the earth will threaten ruin than
Perform it. The earth will lean and then sway back,
Its wavering mass restored to the right poise.
That explains why all houses reel, top floor
Most then the middle, and ground floor hardly at all.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 6, lines 558-77, 216.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Beam (24)  |  Breath (59)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Cave (15)  |  Death (388)  |  Deep (233)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hard (243)  |  House (140)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Perform (121)  |  Power (746)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Ruin (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  World (1774)

My dear nephew was only in his sixth year when I came to be detached from the family circle. But this did not hinder John and I from remaining the most affectionate friends, and many a half or whole holiday he was allowed to spend with me, was dedicated to making experiments in chemistry, where generally all boxes, tops of tea-canisters, pepper-boxes, teacups, &c., served for the necessary vessels, and the sand-tub furnished the matter to be analysed. I only had to take care to exclude water, which would have produced havoc on my carpet.
Letter to Lady Herschel, 6 Sep 1833. Quoted in Memoir and Correspondence of Caroline Herschel (1876), 259.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Care (186)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Circle (110)  |  Dedicated (19)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Family (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Havoc (7)  |  Hinder (12)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Produced (187)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Sand (62)  |  Spend (95)  |  Tea (12)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  April (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (127)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Church (56)  |  Close (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Course (409)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Early (185)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Farm (26)  |  Father (110)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Music (129)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Note (34)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Poet (83)  |  Political (121)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (31)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (49)  |  Protect (58)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Scary (3)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

Natural Magick is taken to be nothing else, but the chief power of all the natural Sciences; which therefore they call the top and perfection of Natural Philosophy, and which is indeed the active part of the same; which by the assistance of natural forces and faculties, through their mutual & opportune application, performs those things that are above Humane Reason.
In The Vanity of the Arts and Sciences (1530), translation (1676), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Call (769)  |  Chief (97)  |  Force (487)  |  Humane (18)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Forces (6)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)

No man can run up the natural line of Evolution without coming to Christianity at the top.
The Ascent of Man (1894), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Coming (114)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Religion (361)  |  Run (174)

Now the whole earth had one language and few words… . Then they said, Come, let us build ourselves a city, and a tower with its top in the heavens, and let us make a name for ourselves, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.” And the Lord came down to see the city and the tower, which the sons of men had built. And the Lord said, “Behold, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; and nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them. Come, let us go down, and there confuse their language, that they may not understand one another’s speech.” So the Lord scattered them abroad from there over the face of all the earth, and they left off building the city. Therefore its name was called Babel, because there the Lord confused the language of all the earth… .
Bible
(circa 725 B.C.)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abroad (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Babel (3)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Call (769)  |  City (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Language (293)  |  Lord (93)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  People (1005)  |  Scatter (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Speech (61)  |  Tower (42)  |  Understand (606)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
and danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
of sun-split clouds and done a hundred things
you have not dreamed of wheeled and soared and swung
high in the sunlit silence. Hovering there,
I’ve chased the shouting wind along, and flung
my eager craft through footless halls of air.
Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
I’ve topped the windswept heights with easy grace
where never lark, or even eagle flew
and, while with silent, lifting mind I’ve trod
the high untrespassed sanctity of space,
put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Blue (56)  |  Bond (45)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Chase (14)  |  Climb (35)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Craft (10)  |  Dance (32)  |  Delirious (2)  |  Dream (208)  |  Eager (15)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Face (212)  |  Fling (5)  |  Fly (146)  |  God (757)  |  Grace (31)  |  Hall (5)  |  Hand (143)  |  Height (32)  |  High (362)  |  Hover (8)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Join (26)  |  Lark (2)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Lift (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sanctity (4)  |  Shout (25)  |  Silence (56)  |  Silent (29)  |  Silver (46)  |  Sky (161)  |  Slip (5)  |  Soar (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunlit (2)  |  Sunward (2)  |  Swing (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tread (17)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Tumbling (2)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wing (75)

On one occasion, when he was giving a dinner to some friends at the university, he left the table to get them a bottle of wine; but, on his way to the cellar, he fell into reflection, forgot his errand and his company, went to his chamber, put on his surplice, and proceeded to the chapel. Sometimes he would go into the street half dressed, and on discovering his condition, run back in great haste, much abashed. Often, while strolling in his garden, he would suddenly stop, and then run rapidly to his room, and begin to write, standing, on the first piece of paper that presented itself. Intending to dine in the public hall, he would go out in a brown study, take the wrong turn, walk a while, and then return to his room, having totally forgotten the dinner. Once having dismounted from his horse to lead him up a hill, the horse slipped his head out of the bridle; but Newton, oblivious, never discovered it till, on reaching a tollgate at the top of the hill, he turned to remount and perceived that the bridle which he held in his hand had no horse attached to it. His secretary records that his forgetfulness of his dinner was an excellent thing for his old housekeeper, who “sometimes found both dinner and supper scarcely tasted of, which the old woman has very pleasantly and mumpingly gone away with”. On getting out of bed in the morning, he has been discovered to sit on his bedside for hours without dressing himself, utterly absorbed in thought.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Back (390)  |  Bedside (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Both (493)  |  Brown (23)  |  Cellar (4)  |  Chapel (3)  |  Company (59)  |  Condition (356)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Discover (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Friend (168)  |  Garden (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Paper (182)  |  Present (619)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Record (154)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Secretary (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Street (23)  |  Stroll (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supper (10)  |  Table (104)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)  |  University (121)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wine (38)  |  Woman (151)  |  Write (230)  |  Wrong (234)

One thing was clear: I’d had a great life in research. It wasn’t broken, so why fix it? So I set up interviews with 10 universities, and Johns Hopkins came out on top.
Quoted in Johns Hopkins University News Release (9 Jan 2003) after he retired from Bell Labs in 2001 and joined the faculty in Fall 2002. On jh.edu web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Broken (56)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interview (5)  |  Johns Hopkins (7)  |  Johns Hopkins University (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Research (664)  |  Set (394)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)

Perhaps the central problem we face in all of computer science is how we are to get to the situation where we build on top of the work of others rather than redoing so much of it in a trivially different way.
From Turing Award lecture (1968), 'One Man's View of Computer Science', collected in ACM Turing Award Lectures: The First Twenty Years, 1966 to 1985 (1987), 216. ACM is the Association for Computing Machinery. The lecture is also published in Journal of the ACM (Jan 1969), 16, No. 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Center (33)  |  Central (80)  |  Computer (127)  |  Computer Science (11)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Face (212)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Situation (113)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Scientists should be on tap, but not on top.
Quoted in Randolph S. Churchill, Twenty-One Years (1964), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Scientist (820)

She has the sort of body you go to see in marble. She has golden hair. Quickly, deftly, she reaches with both hands behind her back and unclasps her top. Setting it on her lap, she swivels ninety degrees to face the towboat square. Shoulders back, cheeks high, she holds her pose without retreat. In her ample presentation there is defiance of gravity. There is no angle of repose. She is a siren and these are her songs.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ample (4)  |  Angle (20)  |  Back (390)  |  Behind (137)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Cheek (3)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Degree (276)  |  Face (212)  |  Golden (45)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Hair (25)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Lap (9)  |  Marble (20)  |  Ninety (2)  |  Pose (9)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Reach (281)  |  Repose (6)  |  Retreat (11)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Siren (4)  |  Song (37)  |  Sort (49)  |  Square (70)

Some one once asked Rutherford how it was that he always managed to keep on the crest of the wave. “Well” said Rutherford “that isn’t difficult. I made the wave, why shouldn’t I be at the top of it.” I hasten to say that my own subject is a very minor ripple compared to Rutherford’s.
From Speech (10 Dec 1963) at the Nobel Banquet in Stockholm, Sweden. Collected inGöran Liljestrand (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1963, (1964).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Crest (2)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Minor (10)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Say (984)  |  Subject (521)  |  Wave (107)  |  Why (491)

Space has no top, no bottom; in fact, it is bottomless both at the bottom and the top.
In Lily Splane, Quantum Consciousness (2004),307
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Bottomless (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Space (500)

Technique and ability alone do not get you to the top; it is the willpower that is the most important. This willpower you cannot buy with money or be given by others...it rises from your heart.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Alone (311)  |  Buy (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Give (202)  |  Heart (229)  |  Important (209)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rise (166)  |  Technique (80)  |  Will Power (3)

The art of healing is like an unroofed temple, uncovered at the top and cracked at the foundation.
Quoted by Isaac Jennings, in Medical Reform; a Treatise on Man's Physical Being and Disorders (1847), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Healing (25)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Temple (42)  |  Uncover (20)

The end of the ridge and the end of the world... then nothing but that clear, empty air. There was nowhere else to climb. I was standing on the top of the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Clear (100)  |  Climb (35)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  End Of The World (6)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Stand (274)  |  World (1774)

The fact that death from cancer is on the increase is not only a problem of medicine, but its at the same time testifies to the wonderful efficiency of medical science... [as it] enables more persons top live long enough to develop some kind of cancer in old and less resistant tissues.
Charles H. Mayo and William A. Hendricks, 'Carcinoma of the Right Segment of the Colon', presented to Southern Surgical Assoc. (15 Dec 1925). In Annals of Surgery (Mar 1926), 83, 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Death (388)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Increase (210)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Person (363)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)

The first drizzling shower is born...
[Then] the flood comes down,
Threatening with deluge this devoted town. ...
Now from all parts the swelling kennels flow,
And bear their trophies with them as they go:
Filth of all hues and odors seem to tell
What street they sailed from, by their sight and smell.
They, as each torrent drives with rapid force,
From Smithfield or St. Pulchre’s shape their course,
And in huge confluence joined at Snow Hill ridge,
Fall from the conduit prone to Holborn Bridge.
Sweepings from butchers’ stalls, dung, guts, and blood.
Drowned puppies, stinking sprats, all drenched in mud,
Dead cats, and turnip tops, come tumbling down the flood.
Poem, 'A Description of a City Shower', first published in the Tatler, No. 238 (17 Oct 1710). Reprinted in Pope and Swift's Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711, 1721), 225-227. Swift wrote at the time in London that the street surface open gutters (kennels) were the primary means for handling stormwater flows and disposing of every kind of human and animal waste. “Devoted” means overwhelmed. Smithfield was a market with butchers' shops and cattle and sheep pens. St. Sepulchre refers to a church in Holborn. The Holborn Conduit was taken down in 1746. Below Holborn Bridge ran the Fleet Ditch (a stagnant remnant of the former Fleet River after its water supply had been diverted). It was joined by a stream called Snow Hill. Notes printed with the poem collected in Jay Parini, The Wadsworth Anthology Of Poetry (2005), 723-724.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Cat (47)  |  Conduit (3)  |  Course (409)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Down (456)  |  Dung (7)  |  Fall (230)  |  Filth (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Flood (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Force (487)  |  Guts (2)  |  Mud (26)  |  Odor (10)  |  Puppy (2)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sewer (5)  |  Shower (6)  |  Sight (132)  |  Smell (27)  |  Snow (37)  |  Stall (3)  |  Sweeping (2)  |  Tell (340)  |  Torrent (5)  |  Tumbling (2)  |  Turnip (3)  |  Water (481)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Basement (3)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dog (70)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inner (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Thomas Lewis (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Low (80)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peak (20)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Summer (54)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Warm (69)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)

The last few meters up to the summit no longer seem so hard. On reaching the top, I sit down and let my legs dangle into space. I don’t have to climb anymore. I pull my camera from my rucksack and, in my down mittens, fumble a long time with the batteries before I have it working properly. Then I film Peter. Now, after the hours of torment, which indeed I didn’t recognize as torment, now, when the monotonous motion of plodding upwards is at an end, and I have nothing more to do than breathe, a great peace floods my whole being. I breathe like someone who has run the race of his life and knows that he may now rest forever. I keep looking all around, because the first time I didn’t see anything of the panorama I had expected from Everest, neither indeed did I notice how the wind was continually chasing snow across the summit. In my state of spiritual abstraction, I no longer belong to myself and to my eyesight. I am nothing more than a single, narrow, gasping lung, floating over the mists and the summits.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Battery (12)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Camera (6)  |  Chase (14)  |  Climb (35)  |  Continually (16)  |  Dangle (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Everest (10)  |  Expect (200)  |  Eyesight (5)  |  Film (10)  |  First (1283)  |  First Time (10)  |  Float (30)  |  Flood (50)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Leg (34)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Lung (34)  |  Meter (9)  |  Mist (14)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myself (212)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Panorama (5)  |  Peace (108)  |  Plod (2)  |  Properly (20)  |  Pull (43)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Run (174)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Single (353)  |  Sit (48)  |  Snow (37)  |  Someone (22)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  State (491)  |  Summit (25)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torment (18)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wind (128)  |  Work (1351)

The man of true genius never lives before his time, he never undertakes impossibilities, and always embarks on his enterprise at the suitable place and period. Though he may catch a glimpse of the coming light as it gilds the mountain top long before it reaches the eyes of his contemporaries, and he may hazard a prediction as to the future, he acts with the present.
Closing Address (19 Mar 1858) at the Exhibition of the Metropolitan Mechanics' Institute, of Washington. Published as a pamphlet by the M.M. Institute (1853). Collected in Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol. 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Coming (114)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Embark (7)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Eye (419)  |  Future (429)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Hazard (18)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Period (198)  |  Place (177)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Undertake (33)

The necessary has never been man’s top priority. The passionate pursuit of the nonessential and the extravagant is one of the chief traits of human uniqueness. Unlike other forms of life, man’s greatest exertions are made in the pursuit not of necessities but of superfluities. Man is the only creature that strives to surpass himself, and yearns for the impossible.
Commenting on the first moon landing. In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Chief (97)  |  Creature (233)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Form (959)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Priority (10)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Strive (46)  |  Superfluity (2)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Trait (22)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Unlike (8)  |  Yearn (12)

The poetic Wheeler is a prophet, standing like Moses on the top of Mount Pisgah, looking out over the promised land that his people will one day inherit.
Spoken at a 90th birthday celebration. Quoted in Dennis Overbye, 'John A. Wheeler, Physicist Who Coined the Term Black Hole, Is Dead at 96', New York Times (14 Apr 2008).
Science quotes on:  |  Inherit (33)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mount (42)  |  People (1005)  |  Prophet (21)  |  John Wheeler (39)  |  Will (2355)

The ruins of Machu Picchu are perched on top of a steep ridge in the most inaccessible corner of the most inaccessible section of the central Andes. No part of the highlands of Peru has been better defended by natural bulwarks—a stupendous canyon whose rim is more than a mile above the river, whose rock is granite, and whose precipices are frequently a thousand feet sheer.
As quoted in Mark Collins Jenkins (ed.), National Geographic 125 Years: Legendary Photographs, Adventures, and Discoveries (2012), 70, citing Machu Picchu: A Citadel of the Incas (1930).
Science quotes on:  |  Andes (2)  |  Better (486)  |  Canyon (9)  |  Central (80)  |  Corner (57)  |  Foot (60)  |  Granite (7)  |  Highland (2)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Mile (39)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Perch (7)  |  Peru (3)  |  Precipice (3)  |  Ridge (7)  |  River (119)  |  Rock (161)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sheer (9)  |  Steep (5)  |  Stupendous (13)  |  Thousand (331)

The study of the mathematics is like climbing up a steep and craggy mountain; when once you reach the top, it fully recompenses your trouble, by opening a fine, clear, and extensive prospect.
Anonymous
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 337.
Science quotes on:  |  Crag (4)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recompense (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Trouble (107)

The true order of learning should be first, what is necessary; second, what is useful, and third, what is ornamental. To reverse this arrangement is like beginning to build at the top of the edifice.
Tryon Edwards and William Buell Sprague, The World’s Laconics: or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors (1853), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Build (204)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Education (378)  |  First (1283)  |  Learning (274)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Order (632)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Reversal (2)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

There are children playing in the street who could solve some of my top problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mode (41)  |  Perception (97)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Solve (130)  |  Street (23)

To the east was our giant neighbor Makalu, unexplored and unclimbed, and even on top of Everest the mountaineering instinct was sufficient strong to cause me to spend some moments conjecturing as to whether a route up that mountain might not exist. Far away across the clouds the great bulk of Kangchenjunga loomed on the horizon. To the west, Cho Oyu, our old adversary from 1952, dominated the scene and we could see the great unexplored ranges of Nepal stretching off into the distance. The most important photograph, I felt, was a shot down the north ridge, showing the North Col and the old route that had been made famous by the struggles of those great climbers of the 1920s and 1930s. I had little hope of the results being particularly successful, as I had a lot of difficulty in holding the camera steady in my clumsy gloves, but I felt that they would at least serve as a record. After some ten minutes of this, I realized that I was becoming rather clumsy-fingered and slow-moving, so I quickly replaced my oxygen set and experience once more the stimulating effect of even a few liters of oxygen. Meanwhile, Tenzing had made a little hole in the snow and in it he placed small articles of food – a bar of chocolate, a packet of biscuits and a handful of lollies. Small offerings, indeed, but at least a token gifts to the gods that all devoted Buddhists believe have their home on this lofty summit. While we were together on the South Col two days before, Hunt had given me a small crucifix that he had asked me to take to the top. I, too, made a hole in the snow and placed the crucifix beside Tenzing’s gifts.
As quoted in Whit Burnett, The Spirit of Adventure: The Challenge (1955), 349.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  Adversary (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Article (22)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bar (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Camera (6)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Climb (35)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Down (456)  |  East (18)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Famous (10)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Food (199)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gift (104)  |  Give (202)  |  Glove (4)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handful (13)  |  Hold (95)  |  Hole (16)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Important (209)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Least (75)  |  Little (707)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Loom (20)  |  Lot (151)  |  Meanwhile (2)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mountaineering (2)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Nepal (2)  |  North (11)  |  Offering (2)  |  Old (481)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Packet (3)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Range (99)  |  Realize (147)  |  Record (154)  |  Replace (31)  |  Result (677)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Route (15)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Serve (59)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Show (346)  |  Slow (101)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  South (38)  |  Spend (95)  |  Steady (44)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strong (174)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Summit (25)  |  Together (387)  |  Token (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  West (17)

We are fishing out the top of the food chain, and it’s pretty crucial because about 200 million people depend on fish and fishing for their livelihood, and about a billion people, mostly in poorer countries, depend on fish for their protein. So this is a big problem. Good news is, it’s fixable.
From transcript of PBS TV interview by Tavis Smiley (28 Mar 2011).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Big (48)  |  Billion (95)  |  Country (251)  |  Crucial (9)  |  Depend (228)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Food (199)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Good (889)  |  Good News (3)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Million (114)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  People (1005)  |  Poorer (2)  |  Problem (676)  |  Protein (54)

We live in a democracy and I do not understand why highly respected scientists from top international branches are not able express themselves!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (150)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Do (1908)  |  Express (186)  |  Highly (16)  |  International (37)  |  Live (628)  |  Respect (207)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Understand (606)  |  Why (491)

What can you conceive more silly and extravagant than to suppose a man racking his brains, and studying night and day how to fly? ... wearying himself with climbing upon every ascent, ... bruising himself with continual falls, and at last breaking his neck? And all this, from an imagination that it would be glorious to have the eyes of people looking up at him, and mighty happy to eat, and drink, and sleep, at the top of the highest trees in the kingdom.
In A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life (1732), 168. This was written before Montgolfier brothers, pioneer balloonists, were born.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Climb (35)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Continual (43)  |  Day (42)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Glory (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Highest (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Neck (15)  |  Night (120)  |  People (1005)  |  Silly (17)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tree (246)

What is it, that makes a man willing to sit up on top of an enormous Roman candle, such as a Redstone, Atlas, Titan or Saturn rocket, and wait for someone to light the fuse? (1979)
Tom Wolfe
The Right Stuff (2001), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Candle (30)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Roman (36)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Willing (44)

When asked what it was like to set about proving something, the mathematician likened proving a theorem to seeing the peak of a mountain and trying to climb to the top. One establishes a base camp and begins scaling the mountain’s sheer face, encountering obstacles at every turn, often retracing one’s steps and struggling every foot of the journey. Finally when the top is reached, one stands examining the peak, taking in the view of the surrounding countryside and then noting the automobile road up the other side!
Space-filler in The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal (Nov 1980), 11, No. 5, 295.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Base (117)  |  Begin (260)  |  Camp (10)  |  Climb (35)  |  Countryside (5)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Establish (57)  |  Examine (78)  |  Face (212)  |  Journey (42)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peak (20)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reach (281)  |  Retrace (3)  |  Road (64)  |  Scale (121)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Set (394)  |  Sheer (9)  |  Side (233)  |  Something (719)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  View (488)

When I read an Italian letter [Saggio by Voltaire] on changes which had occurred on the surface of the earth, published in Paris this year (1746), I believed that these facts were reported by La Loubère. Indeed, they correspond perfectly with the author’s ideas. Petrified fish are according to him merely rare fish thrown away by Roman cooks because they were spoiled; and with respect to shells, he said that they were from the sea of the Levant and brought back by pilgrims from Syria at the time of the crusades. These shells are found today petrified in France, in Italy and in other Christian states. Why did he not add that monkeys transported shells on top of high mountains and to every place where humans cannot live? It would not have harmed his story but made his explanation even more plausible.
In 'Preuves de la Théorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particuliere, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. I, 281. Trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Author (167)  |  Back (390)  |  Change (593)  |  Christian (43)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fossil (136)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Italian (12)  |  Letter (109)  |  Live (628)  |  Merely (316)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Rare (89)  |  Read (287)  |  Respect (207)  |  Roman (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shell (63)  |  State (491)  |  Story (118)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Transport (30)  |  Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire (38)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

When I undertake the dissection of a human cadaver I pass a stout rope tied like a noose beneath the lower jaw and through the two zygomas up to the top of the head, either more toward the forehead or more toward the occiput according as I want the cadaver to hang with its head up or down. The longer end of the noose I run through a pulley fixed to a beam in the room so that I may raise or lower the cadaver as it hangs there or may turn it round in any direction to suit my purpose; and should I so wish I can allow it to recline at an angle upon a table, since a table can easily be placed underneath the pulley. This is how the cadaver was suspended for drawing all the muscle tables... though while that one was being drawn the rope was passed around the occiput so as to show the muscles in the neck. If the lower jaw has been removed in the course of dissection, or the zygomas have been broken, the hollows for the temporal muscles will nonetheless hold the noose sufficiently firmly. You must take care not to put the noose around the neck, unless some of the muscles connected to the occipital bone have already been cut away. It is best to suspend the cadaver like this because a human body lying on a table is very difficult to turn over on to its chest or its back.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem (1543), Book II, 268, as translated by William Frank Richardson and John Burd Carman, in 'How the Cadaver Can Be Held Erect While These Muscles are Dissected', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book II: The Ligaments and Muscles (1998), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Back (390)  |  Beam (24)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cadaver (2)  |  Care (186)  |  Connect (125)  |  Course (409)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Down (456)  |  Drawing (56)  |  End (590)  |  Hang (45)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jaw (4)  |  Lying (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neck (15)  |  Noose (2)  |  Pass (238)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rope (7)  |  Run (174)  |  Show (346)  |  Suspended (5)  |  Table (104)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

When I was growing up, I always knew I’d be in the top of my class in math, and that gave me a lot of self-confidence. [But now that students can see beyond their own school, they see that] there are always going to be a million people better than you at times, or someone will always be far better than you. I feel there’s an existential angst among young people. I didn’t have that. They see enormous mountains, where I only saw one little hill to climb.
From address at a conference on Google campus, co-hosted with Common Sense Media and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop 'Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age'. As quoted in Technology blog report by Dan Fost, 'Google co-founder Sergey Brin wants more computers in schools', Los Angeles Times (28 Oct 2009). On latimesblogs.latimes.com website. As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 280.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Angst (2)  |  Better (486)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Class (164)  |  Climb (35)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Existential (2)  |  Feel (367)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hill (20)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mountain (185)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Confidence (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

When the most abstract and “useless” disciplines have been cultivated for a time, they are often seized upon as practical tools by other departments of science. I conceive that this is no accident, as if one bought a top hat for a wedding, and discovered later when a fire broke out, that it could be used as a water bucket.
In James R. Newman (ed.), 'Commentary on The Use of a Top Hat as a Water Bucket', The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol.4, 2051.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accident (88)  |  Bucket (4)  |  Buy (20)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conceiving (3)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Department (92)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fire (189)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practical (200)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seized (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Useless (33)  |  Water (481)  |  Wedding (7)

While a glacier is moving, it rubs and wears down the bottom on which it moves, scrapes its surface (now smooth), triturates the broken-off material that is found between the ice and the rock, pulverizes or reduces it to a clayey paste, rounds angular blocks that resist its pressure, and polishes those having a larger surface. At the surface of the glacier, other processes occur. Fragments of rocks that are broken-off from the neighbouring walls and fall on the ice, remain there or can be transported to the sides; they advance in this way on the top of the glacier, without moving or rubbing against each other … and arrive at the extremity of the glacier with their angles, sharp edges, and their uneven surfaces intact.
La théorie des glaciers et ses progrès les plus récents. Bibl. universelle de Genève, (3), Vol. 41, p.127. Trans. Karin Verrecchia.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  Broken (56)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Edge (47)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Geology (220)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Ice (54)  |  Intact (8)  |  Material (353)  |  Move (216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paste (4)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rock (161)  |  Side (233)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Surface (209)  |  Transport (30)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)

Why are the bones of great fishes, and oysters and corals and various other shells and sea-snails, found on the high tops of mountains that border the sea, in the same way in which they are found in the depths of the sea?
'Physical Geography', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Bone (95)  |  Coral (10)  |  Depth (94)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea-Snail (2)  |  Shell (63)  |  Snail (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

You see, if the height of the mercury [barometer] column is less on the top of a mountain than at the foot of it (as I have many reasons for believing, although everyone who has so far written about it is of the contrary opinion), it follows that the weight of the air must be the sole cause of the phenomenon, and not that abhorrence of a vacuum, since it is obvious that at the foot of the mountain there is more air to have weight than at the summit, and we cannot possibly say that the air at the foot of the mountain has a greater aversion to empty space than at the top.
In letter to brother-in-law Perier (Nov 1647) as given in Daniel Webster Hering, Physics: the Science of the Forces of Nature (1922), 114. As also stated by Hering, Perier conducted an experiment on 19 Sep 1648 comparing readings on two barometers, one at the foot, and another at the top of 4,000-ft Puy-de-Dôme neighboring mountain.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  Air (347)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Barometer (5)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Column (15)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Empty (80)  |  Follow (378)  |  Greater (288)  |  Height (32)  |  Mercury (49)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Sole (49)  |  Space (500)  |  Summit (25)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Weight (134)

[It was] a lot of fun and we were so absorbed trying to do a good job that we didn’t think of the dangers. Until later on when people were saying, “You were sitting on top of all that hydrogen and oxygen.” Those tanks were right outside, the control room’s right there. I mean now, like up at Plum Brook, the control room for B-2 is like half a mile away. We were fifty feet away.
Recalling his experience with rocket engine tests using liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, while working as an engineer at the Propulsion Systems Laboratory. From Interview (1 Sep 2009), for the NASA Glenn History Collection, Oral History Collection, Cleveland, Ohio. As quoted an cited in Robert S. Arrighi, Pursuit of Power: NASA’s Propulsion and Systems Laboratory No. 1 and 2 (2012), 91.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Control (167)  |  Danger (115)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Foot (60)  |  Good (889)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Job (82)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mile (39)  |  Outside (141)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  People (1005)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Tank (6)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trying (144)

[Radium emits electrons with a velocity so great that] one gram is enough to lift the whole of the British fleet to the top of Ben Nevis; and I am not quite certain that we could not throw in the French fleet as well.
As quoted in 'Radium', New York Times (22 Feb 1903), 6. The reporter clarifies that this statement is “popular not scientific.” However, it is somewhat prescient, since only two years later (1905) Einstein published his E=mc² formula relating mass and energy. The top of Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in Britain, is 1344-m high. As energy, one gram mass would lift about 68 million tonnes there—over a thousand modern battleships.
Science quotes on:  |  Britain (24)  |  British (41)  |  Certain (550)  |  Electron (93)  |  Emission (17)  |  Emit (15)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fleet (4)  |  France (27)  |  Gram (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lift (55)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radium (25)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Whole (738)

[Richard Feynman] would be standing in front of the hall smiling at us all as we came in, his fingers tapping out a complicated rhythm on the black top of the demonstration bench that crossed the front of the lecture hall. As latecomers took their seats, he picked up the chalk and began spinning it rapidly through his fingers in a manner of a professional gambler playing with a poker chip, still smiling happily as if at some secret joke. And then—still smiling—he talked to us about physics, his diagrams and equations helping us to share his understanding. It was no secret joke that brought the smile and the sparkle in his eye, it was physics. The joy of physics!
Describing his experience as a student attending Feynman lectures, in Introduction to Richard P. Feynman Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! : Adventures of a Curious Character (1986, 2010), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bench (8)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Equation (132)  |  Eye (419)  |  Joke (83)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Playing (42)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Secret (194)  |  Share (75)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Understanding (513)

“In order to ascertain the height of the tree I must be in such a position that the top of the tree is exactly in a line with the top of a measuring-stick—or any straight object would do, such as an umbrella—which I shall secure in an upright position between my feet. Knowing then that the ratio that the height of the tree bears to the length of the measuring stick must equal the ratio that the distance from my eye to the base of the tree bears to my height, and knowing (or being able to find out) my height, the length of the measuring stick and the distance from my eye to the base of the tree, I can, therefore, calculate the height of the tree.”
“What is an umbrella?”
In Mr. Fortune’s Maggot (1927), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Base (117)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Height (32)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Measure (232)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Straight (73)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Tree (246)  |  Umbrella (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.