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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Effectiveness

Effectiveness Quotes (10 quotes)

On se persuade mieux, pour l’ordinaire, par les raisons qu’on a soi-même trouvées, que par celles qui sont venues dans l’esprit des autres.
We are generally more effectually persuaded by reasons we have ourselves discovered than by those which have occurred to others.
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 18. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal's Pensées (1950), 11. Original French text in Pensées de Pascal: publiées dans leur texte authentique (1866), Vol. 1, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (591)  |  Generality (22)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Other (25)  |  Ourself (9)  |  Persuation (2)  |  Reason (330)

Clinical ecology [is] a new branch of medicine aimed at helping people made sick by a failure to adapt to facets of our modern, polluted environment. Adverse reactions to processed foods and their chemical contaminants, and to indoor and outdoor air pollution with petrochemicals, are becoming more and more widespread and so far these reactions are being misdiagnosed by mainstream medical practitioners and so are not treated effectively.
Quoted in article 'Richard Mackarness', Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Adverse (2)  |  Air Pollution (4)  |  Allergy (2)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Environment (138)  |  Facet (5)  |  Failure (118)  |  Food (139)  |  Illness (22)  |  Mainstream (3)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Modern (104)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Practitioner (12)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Sickness (20)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Widespread (9)

It's much more effective to allow solutions to problems to emerge from the people close to the problem rather than to impose them from higher up.
Interviewed in 'Simple, Yet Complex', CIO (15 Apr 1998), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (24)  |  Close (40)  |  Emergence (21)  |  Higher (28)  |  Imposition (5)  |  People (269)  |  Problem (362)  |  Solution (168)

Method means that arrangement of subject matter which makes it most effective in use. Never is method something outside of the material.
Democracy and Education: an Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Education (280)  |  Material (124)  |  Method (154)  |  Outside (37)  |  Subject (129)

Science is a field which grows continuously with ever expanding frontiers. Further, it is truly international in scope. … Science is a collaborative effort. The combined results of several people working together is often much more effective than could be that of an individual scientist working alone.
From his second Nobel Prize Banquet speech (10 Dec 1972). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1972 (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Collaboration (10)  |  Combination (69)  |  Effort (94)  |  Frontier (16)  |  Individual (177)  |  International (18)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Scope (13)  |  Work (457)

The inherent unpredictability of future scientific developments—the fact that no secure inference can be drawn from one state of science to another—has important implications for the issue of the limits of science. It means that present-day science cannot speak for future science: it is in principle impossible to make any secure inferences from the substance of science at one time about its substance at a significantly different time. The prospect of future scientific revolutions can never be precluded. We cannot say with unblinking confidence what sorts of resources and conceptions the science of the future will or will not use. Given that it is effectively impossible to predict the details of what future science will accomplish, it is no less impossible to predict in detail what future science will not accomplish. We can never confidently put this or that range of issues outside “the limits of science”, because we cannot discern the shape and substance of future science with sufficient clarity to be able to say with any assurance what it can and cannot do. Any attempt to set “limits” to science—any advance specification of what science can and cannot do by way of handling problems and solving questions—is destined to come to grief.
The Limits of Science (1984), 102-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Advance (123)  |  Assurance (8)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Future (229)  |  Handling (7)  |  Implication (14)  |  Importance (183)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Inference (26)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Issue (37)  |  Limit (86)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Present (103)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Range (38)  |  Science (1699)  |  Security (27)  |  Shape (52)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Specification (5)  |  State (96)  |  Substance (73)  |  Unpredictability (5)

The teacher who is attempting to teach without inspiring the pupil to learn is hammering on cold iron.
Thoughts Selected from the Writings of Horace Mann (1872), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Inspiration (50)  |  Iron (53)  |  Pupil (16)  |  Teacher (90)

The three most effective incentives to human action may be … classified as creed, greed and dread. … In examining the scientist it is perhaps worth while to examine how far he is moved by these three incentives. I think that, rather peculiarly and rather exceptionally, he is very little moved by dread. … He is in fact essentially a person who has been taught he must be fearless in his dealing with facts.
'Scientist and Citizen', Speech to the Empire Club of Canada (29 Jan 1948), The Empire Club of Canada Speeches (29 Jan 1948), 209-221.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Classification (79)  |  Creed (10)  |  Dread (10)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fearless (5)  |  Greed (5)  |  Human (445)  |  Incentive (6)

To produce any given motion, to spin a certain weight of cotton, or weave any quantity of linen, there is required steam; to produce the steam, fuel; and thus the price of fuel regulates effectively the cost of mechanical power. Abundance and cheapness of fuel are hence main ingredients in industrial success. It is for this reason that in England the active manufacturing districts mark, almost with geological accuracy, the limits of the coal fields.
In The Industrial Resources of Ireland (1844), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (15)  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Coal (41)  |  Cost (31)  |  Cotton (6)  |  District (7)  |  England (31)  |  Fuel (27)  |  Geography (25)  |  Geology (187)  |  Industrial Revolution (8)  |  Limit (86)  |  Linen (4)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Mark (28)  |  Price (26)  |  Production (105)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Spinning (7)  |  Steam (24)  |  Steam Power (6)  |  Weight (61)

To teach effectively a teacher must develop a feeling for his subject; he cannot make his students sense its vitality if he does not sense it himself. He cannot share his enthusiasm when he has no enthusiasm to share. How he makes his point may be as important as the point he makes; he must personally feel it to be important.
Mathematical Methods in Science (1963, 1977), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Development (228)  |  Enthusiasm (28)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Importance (183)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sharing (7)  |  Subject (129)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Vitality (10)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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- 90 -
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- 80 -
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- 70 -
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- 60 -
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- 40 -
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- 30 -
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- 20 -
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