Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Clinical

Clinical Quotes (15 quotes)

A physician’s subject of study is necessarily the patient, and his first field for observation is the hospital. But if clinical observation teaches him to know the form and course of diseases, it cannot suffice to make him understand their nature; to this end he must penetrate into the body to find which of the internal parts are injured in their functions. That is why dissection of cadavers and microscopic study of diseases were soon added to clinical observation. But to-day these various methods no longer suffice; we must push investigation further and, in analyzing the elementary phenomena of organic bodies, must compare normal with abnormal states. We showed elsewhere how incapable is anatomy alone to take account of vital phenenoma, and we saw that we must add study of all physico-chemical conditions which contribute necessary elements to normal or pathological manifestations of life. This simple suggestion already makes us feel that the laboratory of a physiologist-physician must be the most complicated of all laboratories, because he has to experiment with phenomena of life which are the most complex of all natural phenomena.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Already (222)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organic (158)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Patient (199)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Push (62)  |  Saw (160)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Understand (606)  |  Various (200)  |  Vital (85)  |  Why (491)

As soon as we got rid of the backroom attitude and brought our apparatus fully into the Department with an inexhaustible supply of living patients with fascinating clinical problems, we were able to get ahead really fast. Any new technique becomes more attractive if its clinical usefulness can be demonstrated without harm, indignity or discomfort to the patient... Anyone who is satisfied with his diagnostic ability and with his surgical results is unlikely to contribute much to the launching of a new medical science. He should first be consumed with a divine discontent with things as they are. It greatly helps, of course, to have the right idea at the right time, and quite good ideas may come, Archimedes fashion, in one's bath..
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Become (815)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Divine (112)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Living (491)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Problem (676)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Supply (93)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usefulness (86)

AZT stood up and said, 'Stop your pessimism. Stop your sense of futility. Go back to the lab. Go back to development. Go back to clinical trials. Things will work.'
[On the impact of AZT emerging as the long-sought first significant AIDS drug.]
As quoted in Emily Langer, 'Researcher Jerome P. Horwitz, 93, created AZT, the first approved treatment for HIV/AIDS' Washington Post (19 Sep 2012). The article was excerpted on blogs, sometimes referring to this quote by saying "AZT was more a cure for fatalism than for AIDS."
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  AIDS (3)  |  AZT (2)  |  Back (390)  |  Clinic (4)  |  Clinical Trial (3)  |  Development (422)  |  Drug (57)  |  First (1283)  |  Futility (7)  |  Impact (42)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Pessimism (4)  |  Research (664)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significant (74)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trial (57)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Clinical ecology [is] a new branch of medicine aimed at helping people made sick by a failure to adapt to facets of our modern, polluted environment. Adverse reactions to processed foods and their chemical contaminants, and to indoor and outdoor air pollution with petrochemicals, are becoming more and more widespread and so far these reactions are being misdiagnosed by mainstream medical practitioners and so are not treated effectively.
Quoted in article 'Richard Mackarness', Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Adverse (2)  |  Aim (165)  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  Allergy (2)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Effectiveness (12)  |  Environment (216)  |  Facet (8)  |  Failure (161)  |  Food (199)  |  Illness (34)  |  Mainstream (3)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Sick (81)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Widespread (22)

Clinical science has as good a claim to the name and rights and self-subsistence of a science as any other department of biology.
Address by the President. Transactions of the Clinical Society of London (1870), 3, xxxii.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Claim (146)  |  Department (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Name (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Subsistence (9)

Inexact method of observation, as I believe, is one flaw in clinical pathology to-day. Prematurity of conclusion is another, and in part follows from the first; but in chief part an unusual craving and veneration for hypothesis, which besets the minds of most medical men, is responsible. Except in those sciences which deal with the intangible or with events of long past ages, no treatises are to be found in which hypothesis figures as it does in medical writings. The purity of a science is to be judged by the paucity of its recorded hypotheses. Hypothesis has its right place, it forms a working basis; but it is an acknowledged makeshift, and, at the best, of purpose unaccomplished. Hypothesis is the heart which no man with right purpose wears willingly upon his sleeve. He who vaunts his lady love, ere yet she is won, is apt to display himself as frivolous or his lady a wanton.
The Mechanism and Graphic Registration of the Heart Beat (1920), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Basis (173)  |  Best (459)  |  Chief (97)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Craving (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Display (56)  |  Event (216)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inexact (3)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Past (337)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Paucity (3)  |  Physician (273)  |  Premature (20)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Record (154)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Wanton (2)  |  Writing (189)

Nowadays the clinical history too often weighs more than the man.
In Jess M. Brallier, Medical Wit & Wisdom (1993), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  History (673)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Weigh (49)

Our laboratory work involved close contact with many non-clinical scientists. Sir Peter Medawar, 1960 Nobel Laureate, was a frequent visitor to our lab and to the hospital. He once commented, after visiting an early renal transplant patient, that it was the first time he had been in a hospital ward.
In Tore Frδngsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Comment (11)  |  Contact (65)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Involved (90)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Sir Peter B. Medawar (57)  |  Nobel Laureate (3)  |  Patient (199)  |  Renal (4)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transplant (12)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Ward (7)  |  Work (1351)

Rudolf Virchow, often referred to as the father of modern pathology, broke sharply with such traditional concepts by proposing that the basis of all disease is injury to the smallest living unit of the body, namely, the cell. More than a century later, both clinical and experimental pathology remain rooted in Virchow’s cellular pathology.
In Emanuel Rubin and John L. Farber (eds.), Pathology (1944), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Break (99)  |  Cell (138)  |  Century (310)  |  Concept (221)  |  Disease (328)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Father (110)  |  Injury (36)  |  Living (491)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Propose (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Root (120)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Unit (33)  |  Rudolf Virchow (50)

The air of caricature never fails to show itself in the products of reason applied relentlessly and without correction. The observation of clinical facts would seem to be a pursuit of the physician as harmless as it is indispensable. [But] it seemed irresistibly rational to certain minds that diseases should be as fully classifiable as are beetles and butterflies. This doctrine … bore perhaps its richest fruit in the hands of Boissier de Sauvauges. In his Nosologia Methodica published in 1768 … this Linnaeus of the bedside grouped diseases into ten classes, 295 genera, and 2400 species.
In 'General Ideas in Medicine', The Lloyd Roberts lecture at House of the Royal Society of Medicine (30 Sep 1935), British Medical Journal (5 Oct 1935), 2, 609. In The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Bedside (3)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Correction (40)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Genus (25)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physician (273)  |  Product (160)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Richness (14)  |  Seem (145)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)

The only sure foundations of medicine are, an intimate knowledge of the human body, and observation on the effects of medicinal substances on that. The anatomical and clinical schools, therefore, are those in which the young physician should be formed. If he enters with innocence that of the theory of medicine, it is scarcely possible he should come out untainted with error. His mind must be strong indeed, if, rising above juvenile credulity, it can maintain a wise infidelity against the authority of his instructors, and the bewitching delusions of their theories.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph (ed.), Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 4, 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Authority (95)  |  Body (537)  |  Clinic (4)  |  Credulity (14)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enter (141)  |  Error (321)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infidelity (3)  |  Innocence (13)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Juvenile (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physician (273)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  School (219)  |  Strong (174)  |  Substance (248)  |  Taint (10)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Young (227)

The statistical method is required in the interpretation of figures which are at the mercy of numerous influences, and its object is to determine whether individual influences can be isolated and their effects measured. The essence of the method lies in the determination that we are really comparing like with like, and that we have not overlooked a relevant factor which is present in Group A and absent from Group B. The variability of human beings in their illnesses and in their reactions to them is a fundamental reason for the planned clinical trial and not against it.
Principles of Medical Statistics (1971), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clinical Trial (3)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Effect (393)  |  Essence (82)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Lie (364)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Object (422)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Present (619)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reason (744)  |  Required (108)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Trial (57)

These hormones still belong to the physiologist and to the clinical investigator as much as, if not more than, to the practicing physician. But as Professor Starling said many years ago, 'The physiology of today is the medicine of tomorrow'.
'The Reversibility of Certain Rheumatic and Non-rheumatic Conditions by the use of Cortisone or of the Pituitary Adrenocorticotropic Hormone', Nobel Lecture, 11 Dec 1950. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1942- 1962 (1964), 334.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Hormone (10)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Professor (128)  |  Still (613)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Year (933)

When you're talking deaths in clinical trials, mistakes are not an option. It's just an area where we have to have absolute, foolproof reporting in place.
Stephanie Saul, 'U.S. Not Told of 2 Deaths During Study of Heart Drug ', New York Times (4 Jan 2006).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Bioethics (12)  |  Clinical Trial (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Error (321)  |  Foolproof (4)  |  Medical Ethics (2)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Reporting (9)  |  Talking (76)  |  Trial (57)

While up to this time contrary sexual instinct has had but an anthropological, clinical, and forensic interest for science, now, as a result of the latest investigations, there is some thought of therapy in this incurable condition, which so heavily burdens its victims, socially, morally, and mentally. A preparatory step for the application of therapeutic measures is the exact differentiation of the acquired from the congenital cases; and among the latter again, the assignment of the concrete case to its proper position in the categories that have been established empirically.
Psychopathia Sexualis: With Special Reference to Contrary Sexual Instinct: A Medico-Legal Study (1886), trans. Charles Gilbert Chaddock (1892), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Application (242)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Condition (356)  |  Congenital (4)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Measure (232)  |  Proper (144)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Step (231)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Victim (35)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.