Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Significant

Significant Quotes (26 quotes)

Surtout l’astronomie et l’anatomie sont les deux sciences qui nous offrent le plus sensiblement deux grands caractères du Créateur; l’une, son immensité, par les distances, la grandeur, et le nombre des corps célestes; l’autre, son intelligence infinie, par la méchanique des animaux.
Above all, astronomy and anatomy are the two sciences which present to our minds most significantly the two grand characteristics of the Creator; the one, His immensity, by the distances, size, and number of the heavenly bodies; the other, His infinite intelligence, by the mechanism of animate beings.
Original French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage (ed.) Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 119-120.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Animate (6)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Being (39)  |  Body (193)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Creator (40)  |  Heavenly (5)  |  Immensity (17)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Number (179)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Size (47)

As for the search for truth, I know from my own painful searching, with its many blind alleys, how hard it is to take a reliable step, be it ever so small, towards the understanding of that which is truly significant.
Letter to an interested layman (13 Feb 1934). In Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Albert Einstein: The Human Side: New Glipses From His Archives (1981), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Blind Alley (2)  |  Reliability (14)  |  Search (85)  |  Small (97)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understanding (317)

As I review the nature of the creative drive in the inventive scientists that have been around me, as well as in myself, I find the first event is an urge to make a significant intellectual contribution that can be tangible embodied in a product or process.
Quoted in New York Times (2 Mar 1991), 1 and 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (227)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Creativity (66)  |  Drive (38)  |  Embody (13)  |  Event (97)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Inventive (5)  |  Process (201)  |  Product (72)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Urge (10)

Both social and biosocial factors are necessary to interpret crosscultural studies, with the general proviso that one’s research interest determines which elements, in what combinations, are significant for the provision of understanding.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Both (52)  |  Combination (69)  |  Determine (45)  |  Element (129)  |  Factor (34)  |  General (92)  |  Interest (170)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Provision (15)  |  Research (517)  |  Social (93)  |  Study (331)  |  Understand (189)

Forests and trees make significant direct contributions to the nutrition of poor households ... [as] rural communities in Central Africa obtained a critical portion of protein and fat in their diets through hunting wildlife from in and around forests. The five to six million tonnes of bushmeat eaten yearly in the Congo Basin is roughly equal to the total amount of beef produced annually in Brazil – without the accompanying need to clear huge swathes of forest for cattle.
In 'Forests and food security: What we know and need to know', Forest News online blog by the Center for International Forestry Research (20 Apr 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (18)  |  Africa (15)  |  Annual (5)  |  Beef (4)  |  Brazil (3)  |  Cattle (13)  |  Community (65)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Critical (34)  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Diet (41)  |  Direct (44)  |  Fat (10)  |  Forest (88)  |  Household (6)  |  Hunting (7)  |  Nutrition (15)  |  Poor (46)  |  Production (105)  |  Protein (43)  |  Rural (5)  |  Tree (143)  |  Wildlife (11)

I know few significant questions of public policy which can safely be confided to computers. In the end, the hard decisions inescapably involve imponderables of intuition, prudence, and judgment.
From Address to the Centennial Convocation of the National Academy of Sciences (22 Oct 1963), 'A Century of Scientific Conquest.' Online at The American Presidency Project.
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (84)  |  Confide (2)  |  Decision (58)  |  Imponderable (2)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Involve (27)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Policy (23)  |  Prudence (4)  |  Public (82)  |  Question (315)  |  Safely (3)

In primitive art you will find no accurate representation: you will find only significant form. Yet no other art moves us so profoundly.
In Art (1913), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (21)  |  Art (205)  |  Find (248)  |  Form (210)  |  Move (58)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Representation (27)

In the world of physics we watch a shadowgraph performance of the drama of familiar life. The shadow of my elbow rests on the shadow table as the shadow ink flows over the shadow paper. It is all symbolic, and as a symbol the physicist leaves it. ... The frank realization that physical science is concerned with a world of shadows is one of the most significant of recent advances.
In The Nature of the Physical World (1928, 2005), xiv-xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Concern (76)  |  Drama (10)  |  Elbow (2)  |  Ink (7)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Physics (301)  |  Realization (33)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Symbol (35)

It has been stated that the research should be discontinued because it involved “meddling with evolution.” Homo sapiens has been meddling with evolution in many ways and for a long time. We started in a big way when we domesticated plants and animals. We continue every time we alter the environment. In general, recombinant DNA research docs not seem to represent a significant increase in the risks associated with such meddling—although it may significantly increase the rate at which we meddle.
In letter to the Board of Directors of Friends of the Earth, published in The Coevolutionary Quarterly (Spring 1978), as abstracted and cited in New Scientist (6 Jul 1978), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Altering (3)  |  Animal (309)  |  DNA (67)  |  Domestication (2)  |  Environment (138)  |  Evolution (482)  |  General (92)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Increase (107)  |  Meddling (2)  |  Plant (173)  |  Rate (22)  |  Research (517)  |  Risk (29)

It is not by his mixing and choosing, but by the shapes of his colors, and the combination of those shapes, that we recognize the colorist. Color becomes significant only when it becomes form.
In Art (1958), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (100)  |  Choose (35)  |  Color (78)  |  Combination (69)  |  Form (210)  |  Mix (13)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Shape (52)

It would follow that “significant form” was form behind which we catch a sense of ultimate reality.
In Art (1913), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (25)  |  Catch (21)  |  Follow (66)  |  Form (210)  |  Reality (140)  |  Sense (240)  |  Ultimate (61)

Obviously, what our age has in common with the age of the Reformation is the fallout of disintegrating values. What needs explaining is the presence of a receptive audience. More significant than the fact that poets write abstrusely, painters paint abstractly, and composers compose unintelligible music is that people should admire what they cannot understand; indeed, admire that which has no meaning or principle.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (10)  |  Age (137)  |  Audience (13)  |  Common (92)  |  Compose (7)  |  Composer (2)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Explain (61)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fallout (2)  |  Mean (63)  |  Music (66)  |  Need (211)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Paint (17)  |  Painter (15)  |  People (269)  |  Poet (59)  |  Presence (26)  |  Principle (228)  |  Receptive (3)  |  Reformation (4)  |  Understand (189)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Write (87)

One of the most important choices any researcher makes is picking a significant topic to study. If you choose the right problem, you get important results that transform our perception of the underlying structure of the universe. If you don’t choose the right problem, you may work very hard but only get an interesting result.
Unverified - source citation needed. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (35)  |  Important (124)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Perception (53)  |  Pick (14)  |  Problem (362)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Structure (191)  |  Study (331)  |  Topic (6)  |  Transform (20)  |  Universe (563)  |  Work (457)

Science is not gadgetry. The desirable adjuncts of modern living, although in many instances made possible by science, certainly do not constitute science. Basic scientific knowledge often (but not always) is a prerequisite to such developments, but technology primarily deserves the credit for having the financial courage, the ingenuity, and the driving energy to see to it that so-called ‘pure knowledge’ is in fact brought to the practical service of man. And it should also be recognized that those who have the urge to apply knowledge usefully have themselves often made significant contribution to pure knowledge and have even more often served as a stimulation to the activities of a pure researcher.
Warren Weaver (1894–1978), U.S. mathematician, scientist, educator. Science and Imagination, ch. 1, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Adjunct (3)  |  Apply (38)  |  Basic (52)  |  Bring (53)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Courage (39)  |  Credit (16)  |  Deserve (14)  |  Desirable (5)  |  Development (228)  |  Drive (38)  |  Energy (185)  |  Fact (609)  |  Financial (5)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Instance (18)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Live (186)  |  Modern (104)  |  Often (69)  |  Possible (100)  |  Practical (93)  |  Prerequisite (4)  |  Primarily (9)  |  Pure (62)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Knowledge (5)  |  See (197)  |  Serve (34)  |  Service (54)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Stimulation (12)  |  Technology (199)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Urge (10)

The art of writing history is the art of emphasizing the significant facts at the expense of the insignificant. And it is the same in every field of knowledge. Knowledge is power only if a man knows what facts not to bother about.
In The Orange Tree: A Volume of Essays (1926), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Emphasize (6)  |  Fact (609)  |  History (302)  |  Insignificant (11)  |  Know (321)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Power (273)  |  Write (87)

The discovery of the famous original [Rosetta Stone] enabled Napoleon’s experts to begin the reading of Egypt’s ancient literature. In like manner the seismologists, using the difficult but manageable Greek of modern physics, are beginning the task of making earthquakes tell the nature of the earth’s interior and translating into significant speech the hieroglyphics written by the seismograph.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Egypt (18)  |  Expert (42)  |  Geology (187)  |  Hieroglyphic (3)  |  Interior (13)  |  Literature (64)  |  Napoleon (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physics (301)  |  Read (83)  |  Rosetta Stone (4)  |  Seismograph (4)  |  Seismologist (2)  |  Speech (40)  |  Task (68)  |  Translate (6)  |  Write (87)

The education explosion is producing a vast number of people who want to live significant, important lives but lack the ability to satisfy this craving for importance by individual achievement. The country is being swamped with nobodies who want to be somebodies.
From address to employees of the Phillips Petroleum Co. In Bartlesville, Oklahoma, excerpted in the Franklin, Indiana, The Daily Journal (23 Jan 1978), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Country (121)  |  Crave (6)  |  Education (280)  |  Explosion (24)  |  Importance (183)  |  Important (124)  |  Individual (177)  |  Lack (52)  |  Live (186)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Number (179)  |  People (269)  |  Produce (63)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Somebody (6)  |  Swamp (5)  |  Vast (56)  |  Want (120)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Aim (58)  |  Akin (3)  |  Already (16)  |  Appear (55)  |  Atheist (13)  |  Base (43)  |  Beginnings (2)  |  Both (52)  |  Case (64)  |  Central (23)  |  Church (30)  |  Closely (8)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Contain (37)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  David (5)  |  Democritus of Abdera (16)  |  Desire (101)  |  Development (228)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Early (39)  |  Element (129)  |  Especially (18)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Feel (93)  |  Fill (35)  |  Find (248)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (5)  |  Genius (186)  |  God (454)  |  Heretic (5)  |  High (78)  |  Human (445)  |  Image (38)  |  Impress (9)  |  Individual (177)  |  Kind (99)  |  Know (321)  |  Learn (160)  |  Light (246)  |  Marvelous (13)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Prison (7)  |  Prophet (8)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (58)  |  Religious (44)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Saint (10)  |  Single (72)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Sort (32)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Stage (39)  |  Strong (47)  |  Sublimity (4)  |  Teachings (2)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thought (374)  |  Universe (563)  |  Want (120)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wonderful (37)  |  World (667)  |  Writings (2)

The only solid piece of scientific truth about which I feel totally confident is that we are profoundly ignorant about nature. Indeed, I regard this as the major discovery of the past hundred years of biology. It is, in its way, an illuminating piece of news. … It is this sudden confrontation with the depth and scope of ignorance that represents the most significant contribution of twentieth-century science to the human intellect.
Essay, 'The Hazards of Science', collected in The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1979), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (25)  |  Biology (150)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Confrontation (6)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Depth (32)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Human (445)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Illuminating (3)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Major (24)  |  Nature (1029)  |  News (12)  |  Piece (32)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Representing (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scope (13)  |  Solid (34)  |  Sudden (21)  |  Truth (750)  |  Year (214)

The significance of a fact is relative to [the general body of scientific] knowledge. To say that a fact is significant in science, is to say that it helps to establish or refute some general law; for science, though it starts from observation of the particular, is not concerned essentially with the particular, but with the general. A fact, in science, is not a mere fact, but an instance. In this the scientist differs from the artist, who, if he deigns to notice facts at all, is likely to notice them in all their particularity.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (46)  |  Difference (208)  |  Establish (30)  |  Fact (609)  |  General (92)  |  Instance (18)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law (418)  |  Notice (20)  |  Observation (418)  |  Particular (54)  |  Refute (3)  |  Relative (24)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Significance (60)

The significant chemicals of living tissue are rickety and unstable, which is exactly what is needed for life.
As shown, without citation, in Randy Moore, Writing to Learn Science (1997), 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (72)  |  Exactly (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Living (44)  |  Need (211)  |  Rickety (2)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Unstable (8)

The significant thing about the Darbys and coke-iron is not that the first Abraham Darby “invented” a new process but that five generations of the Darby connection were able to perfect it and develop most of its applications.
In Essays on Culture Change (2003), Vol. 2, 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Coke (3)  |  Connection (86)  |  Develop (55)  |  Generation (111)  |  Invent (30)  |  Iron (53)  |  New (340)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Process (201)

The story of scientific discovery has its own epic unity—a unity of purpose and endeavour—the single torch passing from hand to hand through the centuries; and the great moments of science when, after long labour, the pioneers saw their accumulated facts falling into a significant order—sometimes in the form of a law that revolutionised the whole world of thought—have an intense human interest, and belong essentially to the creative imagination of poetry.
In Prefactory Note, Watchers of the Sky (1922), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Century (94)  |  Creative (41)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Epic (5)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fact (609)  |  Falling (6)  |  Hand (103)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Intense (11)  |  Interest (170)  |  Labour (36)  |  Law (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Passing (5)  |  Pioneer (23)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Story (58)  |  Thought (374)  |  Torch (7)  |  Unity (43)  |  World (667)

What quality is shared by all objects that provoke our aesthetic emotions? Only one answer seems possible—significant form. In each, lines and colors combined in a particular way; certain forms and relations of forms, stir our aesthetic emotions. These relations and combinations of lines and colours, these æsthetically moving forms, I call “Significant Form”; and “Significant Form” is the one quality common to all works of visual art.
In Art (1913), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Aelig (3)  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Answer (201)  |  Art (205)  |  Call (68)  |  Certain (84)  |  Color (78)  |  Combination (69)  |  Combine (15)  |  Common (92)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Form (210)  |  Line (44)  |  Move (58)  |  Object (110)  |  Particular (54)  |  Possible (100)  |  Provoke (5)  |  Quality (65)  |  Relation (96)  |  Seem (89)  |  Share (30)  |  Stir (11)  |  Visual (9)  |  Work (457)

When I was 9, my parents gave me a Commodore 64, which was fun. At the time, the opportunity to program your own computer was easier than it is today. Today there are significantly larger barriers because of the complexity built into computing.
From address at a conference on Google campus, co-hosted with Common Sense Media and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop 'Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age'. As quoted in Technology blog report by Dan Fost, 'Google co-founder Sergey Brin wants more computers in schools', Los Angeles Times (28 Oct 2009). On latimesblogs.latimes.com website. As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrier (19)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Computer (84)  |  Easier (8)  |  Fun (28)  |  Larger (8)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Program (32)  |  Today (86)

When scientists discovered that liquid water, which brought forth life on Earth, exists nowhere else in great quantities in the solar system, the most significant lesson they taught was not that water, or the life that depends on it, is necessarily the result of some chemical accident in space; their most important revelation was that water is rare in infinity, that we should prize it, preserve it, conserve it.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 201-202.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Conserve (5)  |  Depend (56)  |  Discover (115)  |  Earth (487)  |  Exist (89)  |  Important (124)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Life (917)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Nowhere (19)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Prize (9)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Rare (31)  |  Result (250)  |  Revelation (29)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Solar System (48)  |  Space (154)  |  Teach (102)  |  Water (244)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.