Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Mere

Mere Quotes (41 quotes)

A man does not attain the status of Galileo merely because he is persecuted; he must also be right.
In essay 'Velikovsky in Collision', Natural History (Mar 1975), collected in Ever Since Darwin: Reflections in Natural History (1977, 1992), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Attainment (35)  |  Correctness (11)  |  Galileo Galilei (101)  |  Persecution (9)  |  Right (144)  |  Status (18)

All material Things seem to have been composed of the hard and solid Particles … variously associated with the first Creation by the Counsel of an intelligent Agent. For it became him who created them to set them in order: and if he did so, it is unphilosophical to seek for any other Origin of the World, or to pretend that it might arise out of a Chaos by the mere Laws of Nature.
From Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 377-378.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Arise (32)  |  Associated (2)  |  Big Bang (38)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Composed (3)  |  Counsel (5)  |  Creation (211)  |  Hard (70)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Law (418)  |  Material (124)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Origin (77)  |  Origin Of Earth (8)  |  Origin Of The Universe (13)  |  Particle (90)  |  Pretend (14)  |  Seek (57)  |  Solid (34)  |  World (667)

Although my Aachen colleagues and students at first regarded the “pure mathematician” with suspicion, I soon had the satisfaction of being accepted a useful member not merely in teaching but also engineering practice; thus I was requested to render expert opinions and to participate in the Ingenieurverein [engineering association].
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 527. Cited from 'Autobiographische Skizze', Gesammelte Schriften, Vol 4, 673–682.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Association (15)  |  Colleague (19)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Expert (42)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Member (27)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Participate (4)  |  Practice (67)  |  Regard (58)  |  Render (17)  |  Request (2)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Student (131)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Useful (66)

Contingency is rich and fascinating; it embodies an exquisite tension between the power of individuals to modify history and the intelligible limits set by laws of nature. The details of individual and species’s lives are not mere frills, without power to shape the large-scale course of events, but particulars that can alter entire futures, profoundly and forever.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (19)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Course (57)  |  Detail (65)  |  Embody (13)  |  Entire (29)  |  Event (97)  |  Exquisite (12)  |  Fascinating (17)  |  Forever (42)  |  Future (229)  |  History (302)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intelligible (10)  |  Law (418)  |  Limit (86)  |  Live (186)  |  Modify (11)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Power (273)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Rich (48)  |  Set (56)  |  Shape (52)  |  Tension (7)

He who attempts to draw any conclusion whatever as to the nation's wealth or poverty from the mere fact of a favorable or unfavorable Balance of Trade, has not grasped the first fundamental principle of Political Economy.
As quoted by Richard Theodore Ely in 'Transfers of Economic Goods, Including, as Agents of Transfers, Money, Credit, and Banking', Political Economy, Political Science and Sociology: a Practical and Scientific Presentation of Social and Economic Subjects (1899), 485. Engel's statement is presented in quotation marks, but since the author, Ely, qualifies it with 'Dr. Ernst Engel, once made the following observation at a meeting of a "Seminary," of which the writer was a member at the time.' This suggests the quote is only given as a recollection, and not Engel's exact words.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Fact (609)  |  Favorable (7)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Nation (111)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Principle (228)  |  Unfavorable (3)  |  Wealth (50)

How often things occur by mere chance which we dared not even hope for.
Terence
In Phormio, v.1, 31, as quoted and cited in (1908), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (122)  |  Hope (129)  |  Occur (26)  |  Probability (83)

I wanted to be a scientist from my earliest school days. The crystallizing moment came when I first caught on that stars are mighty suns, and how staggeringly far away they must be to appear to us as mere points of light. I’m not sure I even knew the word science then, but I was gripped by the prospect of understanding how things work, of helping to uncover deep mysteries, of exploring new worlds.
In 'With Science on Our Side', Washington Post (9 Jan 1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Biography (227)  |  Deep (81)  |  Earliest (3)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Far (77)  |  Light (246)  |  Mystery (125)  |  New (340)  |  Point (72)  |  Prospect (19)  |  School (87)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Staggering (2)  |  Star (251)  |  Sun (211)  |  Uncover (6)  |  Understand (189)  |  World (667)

I wept when I saw the color of the sea—how can a mere color make one cry? Or moonlight, or the luminescence of the sea in a pitch black night? … But if there is one thing which is more worthy of our admiration than natural beauty, it is the art of men who have conquered this never-ending sea so Fully in a struggle that has been going since the time of the Phoenicians.
In an article 'Voyage of a German Professor to Eldorado' describing his summer 1905 travels for a series of lectures at Berkeley in America. As quoted in, George Greenstein, 'The Bulldog: A Profile of Ludwig Boltzmann', The American Scholar (1 Jan 1999), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (34)  |  Black (27)  |  Color (78)  |  Conquer (12)  |  Cry (13)  |  Moonlight (2)  |  Natural Beauty (2)  |  Night (73)  |  Sea (143)  |  See (197)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Time (439)  |  Weep (2)

If there is one thing I’ve learned in my years on this planet, it’s that the happiest and most fulfilled people I’ve known are those who devoted themselves to something bigger and more profound than merely their own self interest.
From speech (3 Oct 1977) announcing he was donating his papers to Ohio State University. As quoted on the OSU website.
Science quotes on:  |  Bigger (3)  |  Devoted (8)  |  Fulfilled (2)  |  Happiest (2)  |  Interest (170)  |  Learn (160)  |  Profound (46)  |  Self (39)

In the celestial spaces above the Earth’s atmosphere; in which spaces, where there is no air to resist their motions, all bodies will move with the greatest freedom; and the Planets and Comets will constantly pursue their revolutions in orbits … by the mere laws of gravity.
In 'General Scholium' from The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1729), Vol. 2, Book 3, 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Air Resistance (2)  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Celestial (15)  |  Comet (43)  |  Earth (487)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Law Of Gravity (8)  |  Motion (127)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Planet (199)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Space (154)

In the history of science and throughout the whole course of its progress we see certain epochs following one another more or less rapidly. Some important view is expressed, it may be original or only revived; sooner or later it receives recognition; fellow-Workers spring up; the outcome of it finds its way into the schools; it is taught and handed down; and we observe, unhappily, that it does not in the least matter whether the view be true or false. In either case its course is the same; in either case it comes in the end to he a mere phrase, a lifeless word stamped on the memory.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (64)  |  Epoch (12)  |  Express (32)  |  False (79)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Important (124)  |  Lifeless (10)  |  Memory (81)  |  Original (36)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Progress (317)  |  Recognition (62)  |  School (87)  |  Teach (102)  |  True (120)  |  View (115)  |  Word (221)

It is childish to rest in the discovery of mere coincidences, or of partial and extraneous laws.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1873), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Childish (5)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Extraneous (2)  |  Law (418)  |  Part (146)  |  Rest (64)

It is the man of science, eager to have his every opinion regenerated, his every idea rationalised, by drinking at the fountain of fact, and devoting all the energies of his life to the cult of truth, not as he understands it, but as he does not understand it, that ought properly to be called a philosopher. To an earlier age knowledge was power—merely that and nothing more—to us it is life and the summum bonum.
As quoted in Sir Richard Gregory, Discovery: Or, The Spirit and Service of Science (1916), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Cult (3)  |  Devote (23)  |  Drink (27)  |  Eager (7)  |  Early (39)  |  Energy (185)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fountain (14)  |  Idea (440)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Power (273)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understand (189)

It was a reaction from the old idea of protoplasm, a name which was a mere repository of ignorance.
In 'The Biochemistry of the Individual' (1937), collected in Neurath Hans (ed.), Perspectives in Biochemistry (1989), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (440)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Name (118)  |  Protoplasm (12)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Repository (3)

Learning science, learning about nature, is more than the mere right of taxpayers; it is more than the mere responsibility of voters. It is the privilege of the human being.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 202.
Science quotes on:  |  Human Being (54)  |  Learn (160)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Privilege (16)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Right (144)  |  Science (1699)  |  Taxpayer (2)  |  Voter (3)

Mere knowledge is comparatively worthless unless digested into practical wisdom and common sense as applied to the affairs of life.
As quoted, without citation, in John Walker, A Fork in the Road: Answers to Daily Dilemmas from the Teachings of Jesus Christ (2005), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (24)  |  Apply (38)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Comparatively (6)  |  Digest (5)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Practical (93)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Worthless (15)

No more harmful nonsense exists than the common supposition that deepest insight into great questions about the meaning of life or the structure of reality emerges most readily when a free, undisciplined, and uncluttered (read, rather, ignorant and uneducated) mind soars above mere earthly knowledge and concern.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Common (92)  |  Concern (76)  |  Deep (81)  |  Earthly (7)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Exist (89)  |  Free (59)  |  Great (300)  |  Harmful (10)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Insight (57)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Question (315)  |  Read (83)  |  Readily (6)  |  Reality (140)  |  Soar (8)  |  Structure (191)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Undisciplined (2)  |  Uneducated (4)

No physician, in so far as he is a physician, considers his own good in what he prescribes, but the good of his patient; for the true physician is also a ruler having the human body as a subject, and is not a mere money-maker.
Plato
In Plato and B. Jowett (trans.), The Dialogues of Plato (1875), Vol. 3, 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Consideration (65)  |  Good (228)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Patient (116)  |  Physician (232)  |  Ruler (12)  |  Subject (129)  |  True (120)

No self is of itself alone. It has a long chain of intellectual ancestors. The ‘I’ is chained to ancestry by many factors ... This is not mere allegory, but an eternal memory.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Allegory (6)  |  Alone (61)  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Ancestry (4)  |  Chain (38)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Factor (34)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Long (95)  |  Memory (81)  |  Self (39)

Observe the practice of many physicians; do not implicitly believe the mere assertion of your master; be something better than servile learner; go forth yourselves to see and compare!
In Armand Trousseau, as translated by P. Victor and John Rose Cormack, Lectures on Clinical Medicine: Delivered at the Hôtel-Dieu, Paris (1873), Vol. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (23)  |  Belief (400)  |  Compare (15)  |  Implicit (4)  |  Learner (4)  |  Master (55)  |  Observe (48)  |  Physician (232)  |  Practice (67)  |  See (197)  |  Servile (3)  |  Yourself (5)

Of all the trees that have ever been cultivated by man, the genealogical tree is the driest. It is one, we may be sure, that had no place in the garden of Eden. Its root is in the grave; its produce mere Dead Sea fruit—apples of dust and ashes.
In novel, Half a Million of Money (1865), Vol. 1, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (33)  |  Ash (16)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Dry (12)  |  Dust (42)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Genealogy (4)  |  Grave (20)  |  Produce (63)  |  Root (48)  |  Tree (143)

One evening at a Joint Summer Research Congerence in the early 1990’s Nicholai Reshetikhin and I [David Yetter] button-holed Flato, and explained at length Shum’s coherence theorem and the role of categories in “quantum knot invariants”. Flato was persistently dismissive of categories as a “mere language”. I retired for the evening, leaving Reshetikhin and Flato to the discussion. At the next morning’s session, Flato tapped me on the shoulder, and, giving a thumbs-up sign, whispered, “Hey! Viva les categories! These new ones, the braided monoidal ones.”
In David N. Yetter, Functorial Knot Theory: Categories of Tangles, Coherence, Categorical Deformations, and Topological Invariants (2001), 8. Yetter writes this personal anecdote is given as a narrative in his own words. Presumable the phrases in quotation marks are based on recollection when written years later.
Science quotes on:  |  Category (10)  |  Coherence (8)  |  David (5)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Early (39)  |  Explain (61)  |  Give (117)  |  Invariant (3)  |  Joint (11)  |  Knot (4)  |  Language (155)  |  Leave (63)  |  Length (13)  |  Morning (31)  |  New (340)  |  Next (23)  |  Quantum (12)  |  Research (517)  |  Retire (3)  |  Role (35)  |  Session (2)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Sign (36)  |  Summer (26)  |  Tap (8)  |  Theorem (46)  |  Whisper (5)

Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise. Without them your theories are vain surmises. But while you are studying, observing, experimenting, do not remain content with the surface of things. Do not become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin. Seek obstinately for the laws that govern them.
Translation of a note, 'Bequest of Pavlov to the Academic Youth of his Country', written a few days before his death for a student magazine, The Generation of the Victors. As published in 'Pavlov and the Spirit of Science', Nature (4 Apr 1936), 137, 572.
Science quotes on:  |  Content (39)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Law (418)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Observe (48)  |  Obstinately (2)  |  Origin (77)  |  Penetrate (21)  |  Recorder (3)  |  Remain (77)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seek (57)  |  Study (331)  |  Surface (74)  |  Surmise (2)  |  Theory (582)  |  Vain (26)

Physiology is the experimental science par excellence of all sciences; that in which there is least to be learnt by mere observation, and that which affords the greatest field for the exercise of those faculties which characterize the experimental philosopher.
In 'Educational Value of Natural History Sciences', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (543)  |  Learn (160)  |  Observation (418)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Science (1699)

Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars—mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is “mere.” I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination—stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern—of which I am a part. … What is the pattern, or the meaning, or the “why?” It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined it. Why do the poets of the present not speak of it? What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?
In 'Astronomy', The Feynman Lectures on Physics (1961), Vol. 1, 3-6, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Ammonia (11)  |  Artist (46)  |  Atom (251)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Desert (27)  |  Eye (159)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Gas (46)  |  Harm (31)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Immense (28)  |  Jupiter (17)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Light (246)  |  Marvelous (13)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Methane (6)  |  Million (89)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Night (73)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Part (146)  |  Past (109)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Poet (59)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Silent (18)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Spinning (7)  |  Star (251)  |  Stretch (8)  |  Truth (750)  |  Vast (56)  |  Vastness (9)  |  Year (214)

Research! A mere excuse for idleness; it has never achieved, and will never achieve any results of the slightest value.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Excuse (15)  |  Idleness (8)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Slight (18)  |  Value (180)

Science has thus, most unexpectedly, placed in our hands a new power of great but unknown energy. It does not wake the winds from their caverns; nor give wings to water by the urgency of heat; nor drive to exhaustion the muscular power of animals; nor operate by complicated mechanism; nor summon any other form of gravitating force, but, by the simplest means—the mere contact of metallic surfaces of small extent, with feeble chemical agents, a power everywhere diffused through nature, but generally concealed from our senses, is mysteriously evolved, and by circulation in insulated wires, it is still more mysteriously augmented, a thousand and a thousand fold, until it breaks forth with incredible energy.
Comment upon 'The Notice of the Electro-Magnetic Machine of Mr. Thomas Davenport, of Brandon, near Rutland, Vermont, U.S.', The Annals of Electricity, Magnetism, & Chemistry; and Guardian of Experimental Science (1838), 2, 263.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Cavern (3)  |  Circulation (17)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Concealment (8)  |  Contact (24)  |  Dynamo (2)  |  Electromagnetism (17)  |  Energy (185)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Heat (90)  |  Insulation (2)  |  Means (109)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Metal (38)  |  Muscle (32)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Operation (96)  |  Power (273)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Summon (4)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Water (244)  |  Wind (52)  |  Wing (36)  |  Wire (18)

So many people today–and even professional scientists–seem to me like someone who has seen thousands of trees but has never seen a forest . A knowledge of the historic and philosophical background gives that kind of independence from prejudices of his generation from which most scientists are suffering. This independence created by philosophical insight is–in my opinion–the mark of distinction between a mere artisan or specialist and a real seeker after truth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Artisan (7)  |  Background (24)  |  Create (98)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Forest (88)  |  Generation (111)  |  Give (117)  |  Historic (2)  |  Independence (32)  |  Insight (57)  |  Kind (99)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mark (28)  |  Opinion (146)  |  People (269)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Professional (27)  |  Real (95)  |  Scientist (447)  |  See (197)  |  Seeker (8)  |  Seem (89)  |  Someone (13)  |  Specialist (20)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Today (86)  |  Tree (143)  |  Truth (750)

The child asks, “What is the moon, and why does it shine?” “What is this water and where does it run?” “What is this wind?” “What makes the waves of the sea?” “Where does this animal live, and what is the use of this plant?” And if not snubbed and stunted by being told not to ask foolish questions, there is no limit to the intellectual craving of a young child; nor any bounds to the slow, but solid, accretion of knowledge and development of the thinking faculty in this way. To all such questions, answers which are necessarily incomplete, though true as far as they go, may be given by any teacher whose ideas represent real knowledge and not mere book learning; and a panoramic view of Nature, accompanied by a strong infusion of the scientific habit of mind, may thus be placed within the reach of every child of nine or ten.
In 'Scientific Education', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 71. https://books.google.com/books?id=13cJAAAAIAAJ Thomas Henry Huxley - 1870
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (18)  |  Accretion (4)  |  Animal (309)  |  Answer (201)  |  Ask (99)  |  Book (181)  |  Child (189)  |  Crave (6)  |  Development (228)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Foolish (16)  |  Habit (78)  |  Idea (440)  |  Incomplete (14)  |  Infusion (3)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Limit (86)  |  Live (186)  |  Mind (544)  |  Moon (132)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Plant (173)  |  Question (315)  |  Reach (68)  |  Real (95)  |  Represent (27)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Sea (143)  |  Shine (22)  |  Slow (36)  |  Solid (34)  |  Strong (47)  |  Stunt (2)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Tell (67)  |  Thinking (222)  |  True (120)  |  View (115)  |  Water (244)  |  Wave (55)  |  Wind (52)  |  Young (72)

The history of Science is not a mere record of isolated discoveries; it is a narrative of the conflict of two contending powers, the expansive force of the human intellect on one side, and the compression arising from traditionary faith and human interests on the other.
In History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science (1875), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Arising (3)  |  Compression (4)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Expansive (2)  |  Faith (131)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Human (445)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Interest (170)  |  Isolated (12)  |  Narrative (6)  |  Record (56)  |  Traditional (9)

The living human being seems to consist of nothing more than matter and energy. Spirit is merely an assumption.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Consist (22)  |  Energy (185)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Matter (270)  |  Spirit (113)

The mere existence of nuclear weapons by the thousands is an incontrovertible sign of human insanity.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Existence (254)  |  Human (445)  |  Incontrovertible (5)  |  Insanity (7)  |  Nuclear Weapon (5)  |  Sign (36)  |  Thousand (106)

The ordinary scientific man is strictly a sentimentalist. He is a sentimentalist in this essential sense, that he is soaked and swept away by mere associations.
In Orthodoxy (1918, 2008), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (15)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Strictly (6)

The so-called science of poll-taking is not a science at all but mere necromancy. People are unpredictable by nature, and although you can take a nation's pulse, you can't be sure that the nation hasn't just run up a flight of stairs, and although you can take a nation's blood pressure, you can’t be sure that if you came back in twenty minutes you’d get the same reading. This is a damn fine thing. .
In 'Polling' (13 Nov 1948), collected in Writings from The New Yorker, 1925-1976 (1976, 2006), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (230)  |  Nation (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necromancy (2)  |  People (269)  |  Pulse (8)  |  Reading (51)  |  Run (33)  |  Same (92)  |  Stairs (2)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Unpredictable (10)

The spirit of man is more important than mere physical strength, and the spiritual fiber of a nation than its wealth.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 17
Science quotes on:  |  Fiber (10)  |  Important (124)  |  Nation (111)  |  Physical (94)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Strength (63)  |  Wealth (50)

The world is a construct of our sensations, perceptions, memories. It is convenient to regard it as existing objectively on its own. But it certainly does not become manifest by its mere existence.
Opening remark in first Tarner Lecture, at Trinity College, Cambridge (Oct 1956), 'The Physical Basis of Consciousness', printed in Mind and Matter (1958), 1. Also collected in What is Life?: With Mind and Matter and Autobiographical Sketches (1992, 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (18)  |  Construct (25)  |  Convenience (25)  |  Existence (254)  |  Manifest (11)  |  Memory (81)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Perception (53)  |  Regard (58)  |  Sensation (22)  |  World (667)

There is no need to worry about mere size. We do not necessarily respect a fat man more than a thin man. Sir Isaac Newton was very much smaller than a hippopotamus, but we do not on that account value him less.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Fat (10)  |  Hippopotamus (2)  |  Less (54)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Need (211)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Respect (57)  |  Size (47)  |  Small (97)  |  Thin (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Worry (27)

Until now, physical theories have been regarded as merely models with approximately describe the reality of nature. As the models improve, so the fit between theory and reality gets closer. Some physicists are now claiming that supergravity is the reality, that the model and the real world are in mathematically perfect accord.
Superforce (1984, 1985), 149.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Approximation (16)  |  Claim (52)  |  Description (72)  |  Fit (31)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Model (64)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Physics (301)  |  Reality (140)  |  Regard (58)  |  Theory (582)

What was at first merely by-the-way may become the very heart of a matter. Flints were long flaked into knives, arrowheads, spears. Incidentally it was found that they struck fire; to-day that is their one use.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrowhead (3)  |  Become (100)  |  By The Way (2)  |  Find (248)  |  Fire (117)  |  First (174)  |  Flake (5)  |  Flint (6)  |  Heart (110)  |  Incidental (8)  |  Knife (10)  |  Matter (270)  |  Spear (4)  |  Strike (21)  |  Today (86)

Your breathing. The beating of your heart. The expansion of your lungs. Your mere presence is all that is needed to establish your worth.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 247
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (15)  |  Breathe (22)  |  Establish (30)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Heart (110)  |  Lung (17)  |  Need (211)  |  Presence (26)  |  Worth (74)

“Endow scientific research and we shall know the truth, when and where it is possible to ascertain it;” but the counterblast is at hand: “To endow research is merely to encourage the research for endowment; the true man of science will not be held back by poverty, and if science is of use to us, it will pay for itself.” Such are but a few samples of the conflict of opinion which we find raging around us.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (49)  |  Encouragement (17)  |  Endowment (7)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Men Of Science (97)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Payment (6)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Rage (4)  |  Research (517)  |  Sample (8)  |  Truth (750)  |  Usefulness (70)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.