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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Lawyer

Lawyer Quotes (18 quotes)

Certainlie these things agree,
The Priest, the Lawyer, & Death all three:
Death takes both the weak and the strong.
The lawyer takes from both right and wrong,
And the priest from living and dead has his Fee.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1737).
Science quotes on:  |  Both (52)  |  Death (270)  |  Fee (9)  |  Living (44)  |  Priest (16)  |  Right (144)  |  Strong (47)  |  Taking (9)  |  Three (10)  |  Weak (36)  |  Wrong (116)

Computer science … jobs should be way more interesting than even going to Wall Street or being a lawyer--or, I can argue, than anything but perhaps biology, and there it's just a tie.
From interview (24 May 2004) in Scientific American (Jun 2004), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (150)  |  Computer Science (10)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Tie (21)

Doctors are just the same as lawyers; the only difference is that lawyers merely rob you, whereas doctors rob you and kill you, too.
ĵIvanovĵ (1887), Act I.
Science quotes on:  |  Physician (232)  |  Robbery (5)

Don't go to the doctor with every distemper, nor to the lawyer with every quarrel, nor to the pot for every thirst.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1737).
Science quotes on:  |  Distemper (5)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Going (6)  |  Pot (2)  |  Quarrel (9)  |  Thirst (9)

Don't misinform your Doctor nor your Lawyer.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1737).
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (100)  |  Misinformation (3)

Good lawyers know that in many cases where the decisions are correct, the reasons that are given to sustain them may be entirely wrong. This is a thousand times more likely to be true in the practice of medicine than in that of the law, and hence the impropriety, not to say the folly, in spending your time in the discussion of medical belief and theories of cure that are more ingenious and seductive than they are profitable.
Introductory lecture (22 Sep 1885), Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, printed in United States Medical Investigator (1885), 21, 526.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Correct (53)  |  Cure (88)  |  Decision (58)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Folly (27)  |  Impropriety (3)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Profitable (6)  |  Reason (330)  |  Seductive (4)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Wrong (116)

I mean the word proof not in the sense of the lawyers, who set two half proofs equal to a whole one, but in the sense of a mathematician, where half proof = 0, and it is demanded for proof that every doubt becomes impossible.
Quoted in G. Simmons, Calculus Gems (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Proof (192)

If there is a regulation that says you have to do something—whether it be putting in seat belts, catalytic converters, clean air for coal plants, clean water—the first tack that the lawyers use, among others things, and that companies use, is that it's going to drive the electricity bill up, drive the cost of cars up, drive everything up. It repeatedly has been demonstrated that once the engineers start thinking about it, it's actually far less than the original estimates. We should remember that when we hear this again, because you will hear it again.
Talk (Apr 2007) quoted in 'Obama's Energy and Environment Team Includes a Nobel Laureate', Kent Garber, US News website (posted 11 Dec 2008).
Science quotes on:  |  Engineer (72)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Money (125)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Technology (199)

If you have a lawsuit, and you get one bad lawyer, you lose your suit, but you can appeal; but if you have one bad doctor, and he kills you, then there can be no appeal.
In Stephen Wickes and Jonathan Dickinson, History of Medicine in New Jersey: And of Its Medical Men, from the Settlement of the Province to A.D. 1800 (1879), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (270)  |  Physician (232)

In the company of friends, writers can discuss their books, economists the state of the economy, lawyers their latest cases, and businessmen their latest acquisitions, but mathematicians cannot discuss their mathematics at all. And the more profound their work, the less understandable it is.
Reflections: Mathematics and Creativity', New Yorker (1972), 47, No. 53, 39-45. In Douglas M. Campbell, John C. Higgins (eds.), Mathematics: People, Problems, Results (1984), Vol. 2, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Author (39)  |  Book (181)  |  Businessman (3)  |  Company (28)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Economist (13)  |  Friend (63)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Profound (46)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Writer (35)

In those days in the South, the only professional jobs that seemed to be open to a black man were a teacher, a preacher, a doctor or a lawyer.
About his youth. Quoted in Johns Hopkins University News Release (9 Jan 2003) on jh.edu web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Black-American (2)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Job (33)  |  Preacher (9)  |  Profession (54)  |  South (8)  |  Teacher (90)

Lawyers have to make a living and can only do so by inducing people to believe that a straight line is crooked. This accounts for their penchant for politics, where they can usually find everything crooked enough to delight their hearts.
As quoted in Harry Black, Canada and the Nobel Prize: Biographies, Portraits and Fascinating Facts (2002), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Delight (51)  |  Heart (110)  |  Politics (77)  |  Straight Line (7)

One-story intellects, two-story intellects, three-story intellects with skylights. All fact-collectors, who have no aim beyond their facts, are one-story men. Two-story men compare, reason, generalize, using the labors of the fact-collectors as well as their own. Three-story men idealize, imagine, predict; their best illumination comes from above, through the skylight. There are minds with large ground-floors, that can store an infinite amount of knowledge; some librarians, for instance, who know enough of books to help other people, without being able to make much other use of their knowledge, have intellects of this class. Your great working lawyer has two spacious stories; his mind is clear, because his mental floors are large, and he has room to arrange his thoughts so that lie can get at them,—facts below, principles above, and all in ordered series; poets are often narrow below, incapable of clear statement, and with small power of consecutive reasoning, but full of light, if sometimes rather bare of furniture, in the attics.
The Poet at the Breakfast Table (1883), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Collector (9)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Fact (609)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Idealization (2)  |  Illumination (12)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Labor (53)  |  Librarian (2)  |  Light (246)  |  Mind (544)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Order (167)  |  Poet (59)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Store (17)  |  Story (58)  |  Thought (374)

Science is the study of the admitted laws of existence, which cannot prove a universal negative about whether those laws could ever be suspended by something admittedly above them. It is as if we were to say that a lawyer was so deeply learned in the American Constitution that he knew there could never be a revolution in America..
From 'The Early Bird in History',The Thing: Why I Am Catholic (1929), 207. In Collected Works (1990), Vol. 3, 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Above (4)  |  Admitted (3)  |  Admittedly (2)  |  America (74)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Existence (254)  |  Law (418)  |  Learned (20)  |  Negative (24)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Science (1699)  |  Study (331)  |  Suspended (4)  |  Universal (70)

The suppression of crime is not entirely a legal question. It is a problem for the physician, the economist and the lawyer. We, as physicians, should encourage the criminologist by lending to him the surgeon, the internist and all of the rest of the resources of medicine, just as we have done in the case of the flea man, the fly man, the mosquito man, the bed-bug man and all the other ologists.
From paper read at the Section on State Medicine and Public Hygiene of the State Medical Association of Texas at El Paso (11 May 1922), 'The Use Of Scopolamine In Criminology', published in Texas State Journal of Medicine (Sep 1922). Reprinted in The American Journal of Police Science (Jul-Aug 1931), 2, No. 4, 328.
Science quotes on:  |  Bedbug (2)  |  Case (64)  |  Crime (20)  |  Economist (13)  |  Entirely (23)  |  Flea (8)  |  Fly (65)  |  Legal (6)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mosquito (12)  |  Physician (232)  |  Problem (362)  |  Question (315)  |  Resource (47)  |  Suppression (6)  |  Surgeon (43)

Two-thirds of all preachers, doctors and lawyers are hanging on to the coat tails of progress, shouting, whoa! while a good many of the rest are busy strewing banana peels along the line of march.
In Elbert Hubbard (ed. and publ.), The Philistine (May 1908), 26, No. 6, 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Banana (3)  |  Busy (21)  |  Clergyman (5)  |  Coattails (2)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Hanging (4)  |  March (15)  |  Peel (2)  |  Preacher (9)  |  Progress (317)  |  Rest (64)  |  Shout (9)  |  Strewing (2)

We often observe in lawyers, who as Quicquid agunt homines is the matter of law suits, are sometimes obliged to pick up a temporary knowledge of an art or science, of which they understood nothing till their brief was delivered, and appear to be much masters of it.
In The Life of Samuel Johnson (1820), Vol. 1, 218. The Latin phrase translates as “what people do.”
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Brief (14)  |  Delivery (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mastery (20)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Obligation (13)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Temporary (13)  |  Understanding (317)

With the exception of lawyers, there is no profession which, considers itself above the law so widely as the medical profession.
The Health Master (1913), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Physician (232)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
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Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
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Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
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Karl Popper
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Avicenna
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- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
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Rachel Carson
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Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
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JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
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Archimedes
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- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
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Richard Feynman
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- 20 -
Carl Sagan
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- 10 -
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