Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Painter

Painter Quotes (15 quotes)

A mathematician, like a painter or a poet, is a maker of patterns. If his patterns are more permanent than theirs, it is because they are made with ideas.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (440)  |  Making (26)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Permanence (15)  |  Poet (59)

All frescoes are as high finished as miniatures or enamels, and they are known to be unchangeable; but oil, being a body itself, will drink or absorb very little colour, and changing yellow, and at length brown, destroys every colour it is mixed with, especially every delicate colour. It turns every permanent white to a yellow and brown putty, and has compelled the use of that destroyer of colour, white lead, which, when its protecting oil is evaporated, will become lead again. This is an awful thing to say to oil painters ; they may call it madness, but it is true. All the genuine old little pictures, called cabinet pictures, are in fresco and not in oil. Oil was not used except by blundering ignorance till after Vandyke’s time ; but the art of fresco painting being lost, oil became a fetter to genius and a dungeon to art.
In 'Opinions', The Poems: With Specimens of the Prose Writings of William Blake (1885), 276-277.
Science quotes on:  |  Blunder (13)  |  Brown (4)  |  Change (291)  |  Color (78)  |  Compel (14)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Evaporate (3)  |  Genuine (19)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Lead (101)  |  Madness (26)  |  Miniature (5)  |  Oil (37)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Picture (55)  |  Unchangeable (7)  |  White (38)  |  Yellow (11)

As we cannot use physician for a cultivator of physics, I have called him a physicist. We need very much a name to describe a cultivator of science in general. I should incline to call him a Scientist. Thus we might say, that as an Artist is a Musician, Painter or Poet, a Scientist is a Mathematician, Physicist, or Naturalist.
The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840), Vol. I, cxiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (46)  |  Description (72)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Musician (11)  |  Name (118)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Need (211)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Physician (232)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Physics (301)  |  Poet (59)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)

It has hitherto been a serious impediment to the progress of knowledge, that is in investigating the origin or causes of natural productions, recourse has generally been had to the examination, both by experiment and reasoning, of what might be rather than what is. The laws or processes of nature we have every reason to believe invariable. Their results from time to time vary, according to the combinations of influential circumstances; but the process remains the same. Like the poet or the painter, the chemist may, and no doubt often' does, create combinations which nature never produced; and the possibility of such and such processes giving rise to such and such results, is no proof whatever that they were ever in natural operation.
Considerations on Volcanoes (1825), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Cause (231)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Combination (69)  |  Examination (60)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Impediment (7)  |  Influence (110)  |  Invariability (4)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law (418)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Operation (96)  |  Origin (77)  |  Poet (59)  |  Process (201)  |  Production (105)  |  Progress (317)  |  Proof (192)  |  Reason (330)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Recourse (6)  |  Result (250)  |  Variation (50)

It is sometimes asserted that a surgical operation is or should be a work of art … fit to rank with those of the painter or sculptor. … That proposition does not admit of discussion. It is a product of the intellectual innocence which I think we surgeons may fairly claim to possess, and which is happily not inconsistent with a quite adequate worldly wisdom.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (6)  |  Admission (10)  |  Art (205)  |  Assertion (23)  |  Claim (52)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Innocence (10)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Operation (96)  |  Possession (37)  |  Product (72)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Rank (19)  |  Sculptor (8)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Surgery (39)  |  Wisdom (151)

Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion. Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way the peace and security which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience.
Address at The Physical Society, Berlin (1918) for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research', collected in Essays in Science (1934, 2004) 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Construction (69)  |  Cosmos (39)  |  Emotional (13)  |  Experience (268)  |  Extent (30)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Intelligible (10)  |  Life (917)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Overcome (8)  |  Peace (58)  |  Personal (49)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Picture (55)  |  Poet (59)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Security (27)  |  Speculative (4)  |  Substitute (23)  |  Suit (7)  |  Try (103)  |  World (667)

Nursing is an art: and if it is to be made an art, it requires an exclusive devotion as hard a preparation as any painter’s or sculptor’s work; for what is the having to do with dead canvas or dead marble, compared with having to do with the living body, the temple of God’s spirit? It is one of the Fine Arts: I had almost said, the finest of Fine Arts.
First published as a eulogy to an unnamed nurse in 'Una and the Lion', Good Words (1 Jun 1868), 360-366. Reprinted in Una and the Lion (1871), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Body (193)  |  Canvas (2)  |  Dead (45)  |  Devotion (24)  |  Exclusive (9)  |  Fine (24)  |  God (454)  |  Hard (70)  |  Life (917)  |  Make (23)  |  Marble (10)  |  Nursing (3)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Sculptor (8)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Temple (22)  |  Work (457)

Obviously, what our age has in common with the age of the Reformation is the fallout of disintegrating values. What needs explaining is the presence of a receptive audience. More significant than the fact that poets write abstrusely, painters paint abstractly, and composers compose unintelligible music is that people should admire what they cannot understand; indeed, admire that which has no meaning or principle.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (10)  |  Age (137)  |  Audience (13)  |  Common (92)  |  Compose (7)  |  Composer (2)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Explain (61)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fallout (2)  |  Mean (63)  |  Music (66)  |  Need (211)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Paint (17)  |  People (269)  |  Poet (59)  |  Presence (26)  |  Principle (228)  |  Receptive (3)  |  Reformation (4)  |  Significant (26)  |  Understand (189)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Write (87)

The anatomist presents to the eye the most hideous and disagreeable objects, but his science is useful to the painter in delineating even a Venus or a Helen.
Inquiry Concerning the Human Understanding collected in The Philosophical Works of David Hume (1826), Vol. 4, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Delineate (2)  |  Disagreeable (2)  |  Eye (159)  |  Hideous (5)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Useful (66)  |  Venus (12)

The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas, like the colours or the words must fit together in a harmonious way.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Color (78)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Poet (59)  |  Word (221)

The private motives of scientists are not the trend of science. The trend of science is made by the needs of society: navigation before the eighteenth century, manufacture thereafter; and in our age I believe the liberation of personality. Whatever the part which scientists like to act, or for that matter which painters like to dress, science shares the aims of our society just as art does.
From The Common Sense of Science (1951), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  19th Century (22)  |  20th Century (25)  |  Act (80)  |  Aim (58)  |  Liberation (8)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Motive (26)  |  Navigation (12)  |  Need (211)  |  Personality (40)  |  Private (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Society (188)  |  Trend (16)

There was a painter became a physician: whereupon one said to him; “You have done well; for before the faults of your work were seen; but now they are unseen.”
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 149, 308.
Science quotes on:  |  Fault (27)  |  Physician (232)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Unseen (7)  |  Work (457)

Time will soon destroy the works of famous painters and sculptors, but the Indian arrowhead will balk his efforts and Eternity will have to come to his aid. They are not fossil bones, but, as it were, fossil thoughts, forever reminding me of the mind that shaped them… . Myriads of arrow-points lie sleeping in the skin of the revolving earth, while meteors revolve in space. The footprint, the mind-print of the oldest men.
(28 Mar 1859). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: XII: March, 2, 1859-November 30, 1859 (1906), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrowhead (3)  |  Bone (57)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Earth (487)  |  Eternity (44)  |  Famous (4)  |  Footprint (12)  |  Forever (42)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Indian (17)  |  Lie (80)  |  Meteor (14)  |  Mind (544)  |  Myriad (18)  |  Print (9)  |  Remind (5)  |  Revolving (2)  |  Sculptor (8)  |  Shape (52)  |  Skin (17)  |  Sleeping (2)  |  Space (154)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Work (457)

You have all heard of that celebrated painter who would never allow any one to mix his colors for him. He always insisted on doing that himself, and at last one of his students, whose curiosity had been aroused, said: “Professor, what do you mix your colors with?” “With brains, sir,” said the professor. Now, that is what we have to do with our observations.
From Address (22 May 1914) to the graduating class of the Friends’ School, Washington, D.C. Printed in 'Discovery and Invention', The National Geographic Magazine (1914), 25, 650.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Color (78)  |  Mix (13)  |  Observation (418)

Your true inventor has a yen to invent, just as a painter or musician is impelled to create something in his art. I began wanting to invent when I was in short pants. At the age of eight—and that was forty years ago—I invented a rock-thrower. Later I found that the Romans had done a much better job some two thousand years before me.
Anonymous
Attributed to an unnamed “holder of many patents,” as quoted by Stacy V. Jones, in You Ought to Patent That (1962), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Better (131)  |  Creation (211)  |  Impelled (2)  |  Inventor (49)  |  Musician (11)  |  Rock (107)  |  Roman (16)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Throwing (3)  |  Year (214)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.