Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Plastic

Plastic Quotes (28 quotes)

Ah, the architecture of this world. Amoebas may not have backbones, brains, automobiles, plastic, television, Valium or any other of the blessings of a technologically advanced civilization; but their architecture is two billion years ahead of its time.
In The Center of Life: A Natural History of the Cell (1977), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Advanced (11)  |  Ahead (19)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Backbone (9)  |  Billion (95)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Brain (270)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Technology (257)  |  Television (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Believe me, this planet has put up with much worse than us. It’s been through earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, solar flares, sun-spots, magnetic storms, pole reversals, planetary floods, worldwide fires, tidal waves, wind and water erosion, cosmic rays, ice ages, and hundreds of thousands of years of bombardment by comets, asteroids, and meteors. And people think a few plastic bags and aluminum cans are going to make a difference?
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 97.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Bombardment (3)  |  Comet (54)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmic Ray (7)  |  Difference (337)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Environment (216)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flood (50)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Meteor (18)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Plastic Bag (2)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Pole (46)  |  Ray (114)  |  Solar Flare (2)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunspot (5)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tidal Wave (2)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worldwide (16)  |  Worse (24)  |  Year (933)

Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 451.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Bundle (7)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fate (72)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  Heed (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Realize (147)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spinning (18)  |  State (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

Exercising the right of occasional suppression and slight modification, it is truly absurd to see how plastic a limited number of observations become, in the hands of men with preconceived ideas.
Meteorographica (1863), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Become (815)  |  Idea (843)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Modification (55)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Preconception (13)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Suppression (9)  |  Truly (116)

For the evolution of science by societies the main requisite is the perfect freedom of communication between each member and anyone of the others who may act as a reagent.
The gaseous condition is exemplified in the soiree, where the members rush about confusedly, and the only communication is during a collision, which in some instances may be prolonged by button-holing.
The opposite condition, the crystalline, is shown in the lecture, where the members sit in rows, while science flows in an uninterrupted stream from a source which we take as the origin. This is radiation of science. Conduction takes place along the series of members seated round a dinner table, and fixed there for several hours, with flowers in the middle to prevent any cross currents.
The condition most favourable to life is an intermediate plastic or colloidal condition, where the order of business is (1) Greetings and confused talk; (2) A short communication from one who has something to say and to show; (3) Remarks on the communication addressed to the Chair, introducing matters irrelevant to the communication but interesting to the members; (4) This lets each member see who is interested in his special hobby, and who is likely to help him; and leads to (5) Confused conversation and examination of objects on the table.
I have not indicated how this programme is to be combined with eating.
Letter to William Grylls Adams (3 Dec 1873). In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 949-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Business (149)  |  Chair (24)  |  Collision (15)  |  Colloid (5)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conduction (8)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Current (118)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Examination (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Flower (106)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Gas (83)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Hobby (5)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Program (52)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Remark (28)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Short (197)  |  Show (346)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Something To Say (4)  |  Special (184)  |  Stream (81)  |  Table (104)  |  Talk (100)  |  Uninterrupted (7)

From packaging materials, through fibers, foams and surface coatings, to continuous extrusions and large-scale moldings, plastics have transformed almost every aspect of life. Without them, much of modern medicine would be impossible and the consumer electronics and computer industries would disappear. Plastic sewage and water pipes alone have made an immeasurable contribution to public health worldwide.
'Plastics—No Need To Apologize', Trends in Polymer Science (Jun 1996), 4, 172. In Paul C. Painter and Michael M. Coleman, Essentials of Polymer Science and Engineering (2008), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consumer (6)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Electronics (11)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Health (193)  |  Immeasurable (4)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Industry (137)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Modern (385)  |  Mold (33)  |  Pipe (7)  |  Public (96)  |  Public Health (10)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sewage (6)  |  Surface (209)  |  Through (849)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Water (481)  |  Worldwide (16)

I find sitting at a specially equipped desk in front of some pretty ugly plastics and staring at a little window is a very unnatural event.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Desk (13)  |  Equip (5)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Event (216)  |  Find (998)  |  Front (16)  |  Little (707)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Specially (3)  |  Stare (9)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Window (58)

I had this experience at the age of eight. My parents gave me a microscope. I don’t recall why, but no matter. I then found my own little world, completely wild and unconstrained, no plastic, no teacher, no books, no anything predictable. At first I did not know the names of the water-drop denizens or what they were doing. But neither did the pioneer microscopists. Like them, I graduated to looking at butterfly scales and other miscellaneous objects. I never thought of what I was doing in such a way, but it was pure science. As true as could be of any child so engaged, I was kin to Leeuwenhoek, who said that his work “was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more that most other men.”
In The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth (2010), 143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Book (392)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Child (307)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completely (135)  |  Craving (5)  |  Doing (280)  |  Drop (76)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Graduation (6)  |  Kin (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notice (77)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Praise (26)  |  Predictability (7)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reside (25)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unconstrained (2)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I just want to say one word to you—just one word ...“plastics!” ... There's a great future in plastics.
Advice by Mr. McGuire, a Los Angeles businessman to Ben Braddock (acted by Dustin Hoffman) in movie The Graduate (1967), based on the book by Charles Webb. In Graydon Carter, Vanity Fair's Tales of Hollywood: Rebels, Reds, and Graduates and the Wild Stories of 13 Iconic Films the scene is attributed solely to Buck Henry (it did not appear in the original book) who added it when he took over the script writing from Calder Willingham.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Say (984)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)

I propose to provide proof... that just as always an alcoholic ferment, the yeast of beer, is found where sugar is converted into alcohol and carbonic acid, so always a special ferment, a lactic yeast, is found where sugar is transformed into lactic acid. And, furthermore, when any plastic nitrogenated substance is able to transform sugar into that acid, the reason is that it is a suitable nutrient for the growth of the [lactic] ferment.
Comptes Rendus (1857), 45, 913.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Beer (10)  |  Carbonic Acid (4)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Ferment (5)  |  Growth (187)  |  Lactic Acid (2)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nutrient (4)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Providing (5)  |  Reason (744)  |  Special (184)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Transform (73)  |  Yeast (7)

I sometimes think there is a malign force loose in the universe that is the social equivalent of cancer, and it’s plastic. It infiltrates everything. It’s metastasis. It gets into every single pore of productive life. I mean there won’t be anything that isn’t made of plastic before long. They’ll be paving the roads with plastic before they’re done. Out bodies, our skeletons, will be replaced with plastic.
Quoted in Conversations with Norman Mailer 90, 321
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Everything (476)  |  Force (487)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Paving (2)  |  Pore (7)  |  Productive (32)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Road (64)  |  Single (353)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

In the hierarchy of the major poetic substances, it [plastic] figures as a disgraced material, lost between the effusiveness of rubber and the flat hardness of metal.
'Plastic', in Mythologies (1957), trans. Annette Lavers (1972), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Figure (160)  |  Flat (33)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Major (84)  |  Material (353)  |  Metal (84)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Substance (248)

In the summer after kindergarten, a friend introduced me to the joys of building plastic model airplanes and warships. By the fourth grade, I graduated to an erector set and spent many happy hours constructing devices of unknown purpose where the main design criterion was to maximize the number of moving parts and overall size. The living room rug was frequently littered with hundreds of metal “girders” and tiny nuts and bolts surrounding half-finished structures. An understanding mother allowed me to keep the projects going for days on end.
Autobiography in Gösta Ekspong (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1996-2000 (2002), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (41)  |  Bolt (9)  |  Building (156)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Design (195)  |  Device (70)  |  End (590)  |  Finish (59)  |  Friend (168)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Joy (107)  |  Kindergarten (5)  |  Litter (5)  |  Living (491)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Metal (84)  |  Model (102)  |  Mother (114)  |  Number (699)  |  Overall (9)  |  Project (73)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Set (394)  |  Spent (85)  |  Structure (344)  |  Summer (54)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unknown (182)

Man’s usurpation over nature is an egotism that will destroy human as well as whale kingdoms. … Academies should return to wisdom study in tree groves rather than robot study in plastic cells…
Resolution at World Poetry Conference in Stony Brook, Long Island, New York by Beat Bard, Allen Ginsberg and 35 others. Quoted in Time (12 Jul 1968).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Human (1468)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Return (124)  |  Robot (13)  |  Study (653)  |  Tree (246)  |  Whale (32)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

Mathematics is, as it were, a sensuous logic, and relates to philosophy as do the arts, music, and plastic art to poetry.
Aphorism 365 from Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797-1800). In Friedrich Schlegel, translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms (trans. 1968), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Do (1908)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Music (129)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sensuous (5)

My interest in the biology of tissue and organ transplantation arose from my [WW II] military experience at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania … a major plastic surgical center. While there, I spent all my available spare time on the plastic surgical wards which were jammed with hundreds of battle casualties. I enjoyed talking to the patients, helping with dressings, and observing the results of the imaginative reconstructive surgical operations.
As a First Lieutenant with only a nine-month surgical internship, randomly assigned to VFGH to await overseas duty. In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Available (78)  |  Battle (34)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biology (216)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forge (9)  |  General (511)  |  Help (105)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Major (84)  |  Military (40)  |  Observe (168)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organ (115)  |  Patient (199)  |  Result (677)  |  Spent (85)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Transplantation (4)  |  Valley (32)  |  Ward (7)

Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed; if we permit the last virgin forests to be turned into comic books and plastic cigarette cases; if we drive the few remaining members of the wild species into zoos or to extinction; if we pollute the last clean air and dirty the last clean streams and push our paved roads through the last of the silence, so that never again will Americans be free in their own country from the noise, the exhausts, the stinks of human and automotive waste.
Letter (3 Dec 1960) written to David E. Pesonen of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission. Collected in 'Coda: Wilderness Letter', The Sound of Mountain Water: The Changing American West (1969), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  American (46)  |  Book (392)  |  Case (99)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Clean (50)  |  Comic (4)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Drive (55)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Forest (150)  |  Free (232)  |  Human (1468)  |  Last (426)  |  Let (61)  |  Member (41)  |  Never (1087)  |  Noise (37)  |  Pave (8)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Push (62)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Road (64)  |  Silence (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (401)  |  Stink (7)  |  Stream (81)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Virgin (9)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zoo (8)

Surely the claim of mathematics to take a place among the liberal arts must now be admitted as fully made good. Whether we look at the advances made in modern geometry, in modern integral calculus, or in modern algebra, in each of these three a free handling of the material employed is now possible, and an almost unlimited scope is left to the regulated play of fancy. It seems to me that the whole of aesthetic (so far as at present revealed) may be regarded as a scheme having four centres, which may be treated as the four apices of a tetrahedron, namely Epic, Music, Plastic, and Mathematic. There will be found a common plane to every three of these, outside of which lies the fourth; and through every two may be drawn a common axis opposite to the axis passing through the other two. So far is certain and demonstrable. I think it also possible that there is a centre of gravity to each set of three, and that the line joining each such centre with the outside apex will intersect in a common point the centre of gravity of the whole body of aesthetic; but what that centre is or must be I have not had time to think out.
In 'Proof of the Hitherto Undemonstrated Fundamental Theorem of Invariants', Collected Mathematical Papers (1909), Vol. 3, 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Apex (6)  |  Art (657)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Centre Of Gravity (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Claim (146)  |  Common (436)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Employ (113)  |  Epic (12)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Free (232)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Good (889)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Integral (26)  |  Integral Calculus (6)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Joining (11)  |  Liberal Arts (5)  |  Lie (364)  |  Look (582)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Modern (385)  |  Music (129)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Passing (76)  |  Place (177)  |  Plane (20)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Regard (305)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scope (45)  |  Set (394)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tetrahedron (4)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

The blood, the fountain whence the spirits flow,
The generous stream that waters every part,
And motion, vigour, and warm life conveys
To every Particle that moves or lives;
This vital fluid, thro' unnumber'd tubes
Pour'd by the heart, and to the heart again
Refunded; scourg'd forever round and round;
Enrag'd with heat and toil, at last forgets
Its balmy nature; virulent and thin
It grows; and now, but that a thousand gates
Are open to its flight, it would destroy
The parts it cherish' d and repair'd before.
Besides, the flexible and tender tubes
Melt in the mildest, most nectareous tide
That ripening Nature rolls; as in the stream
Its crumbling banks; but what the vital force
Of plastic fluids hourly batters down,
That very force, those plastic particles
Rebuild: so mutable the state of man.
For this the watchful appetite was given,
Daily with fresh materials to repair
This unavoidable expense of life,
This necessary waste of flesh and blood.
Hence the concoctive powers, with various art,
Subdue the cruder aliments to chyle;
The chyle to blood; the foamy purple tide
To liquors, which through finer arteries
To different parts their winding course pursue;
To try new changes, and new forms put on,
Or for the public, or some private use.
The Art of Preserving Health (1744), book 2, I. 12-23, p.15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Appetite (17)  |  Art (657)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Gate (32)  |  Generous (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Particle (194)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Roll (40)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Stream (81)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Toil (25)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)  |  Warm (69)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Winding (8)

The cloning of humans is on most of the lists of things to worry about from Science, along with behaviour control, genetic engineering, transplanted heads, computer poetry and the unrestrained growth of plastic flowers.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1979), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Clon (3)  |  Cloning (8)  |  Computer (127)  |  Control (167)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Flower (106)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetic Engineering (15)  |  Growth (187)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1468)  |  List (10)  |  Most (1731)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transplant (12)  |  Unrestrained (4)  |  Worry (33)

The distinguishing of the strata, or layers, in the embryonic membrane was a turning-point in the study of the history of evolution, and placed later researches in their proper light. A division of the (disc-shaped) embryo into an animal and a plastic part first takes place. In the lower part (the plastic or vegetative layer) are a serous and a vascular layer, each of peculiar organization. In the upper part also (the animal or serous germ-layer) two layers are clearly distinguishable, a flesh-layer and a skin-layer. (1828)
Quoted in Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel, The Evolution of Man (1897), Vol 1, 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Division (65)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Germ (53)  |  History (673)  |  Layer (40)  |  Light (607)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Organization (114)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Point (580)  |  Proper (144)  |  Skin (47)  |  Strata (35)  |  Study (653)  |  Two (937)

The new painters do not propose, any more than did their predecessors, to be geometers. But it may be said that geometry is to the plastic arts what grammar is to the art of the writer. Today, scholars no longer limit themselves to the three dimensions of Euclid. The painters have been lead quite naturally, one might say by intuition, to preoccupy themselves with the new possibilities of spatial measurement which, in the language of the modern studios, are designated by the term fourth dimension.
The Cubist Painters: Aesthetic Meditations (1913) translated by Lionel Abel (1970), 13. Quoted in Michele Emmer, The Visual Mind II (2005), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fourth Dimension (3)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Lead (384)  |  Limit (280)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Painter (29)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Preoccupy (4)  |  Say (984)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Today (314)  |  Writer (86)

They think that differential equations are not reality. Hearing some colleagues speak, it’s as though theoretical physics was just playing house with plastic building blocks. This absurd idea has gained currency, and now people seem to feel that theoretical physicists are little more than dreamers locked away ivory towers. They think our games, our little houses, bear no relation to their everyday worries, their interests, their problems, or their welfare. But I’m going to tell you something, and I want you to take it as a ground rule for this course. From now on I will be filling this board with equations. … And when I'm done, I want you to do the following: look at those numbers, all those little numbers and Greek letters on the board, and repeat to yourselves, “This is reality,” repeat it over and over.
Zig Zag, trans. Lisa Dillman (2008), 63.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Board (12)  |  Building (156)  |  Building Block (8)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Course (409)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dreamer (13)  |  Equation (132)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Feel (367)  |  Gain (145)  |  Game (101)  |  Greek (107)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hearing (49)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Ivory Tower (5)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Playing (42)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reality (261)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Rule (294)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tower (42)  |  Want (497)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worry (33)

Today every city, town, or village is affected by it. We have entered the Neon Civilization and become a plastic world.. It goes deeper than its visual manifestations, it affects moral matters; we are engaged, as astrophysicists would say, on a decaying orbit.
On the official Raymond Loewry website.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Astrophysicist (7)  |  Become (815)  |  City (78)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Enter (141)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moral (195)  |  Neon (4)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Say (984)  |  Today (314)  |  Town (27)  |  Village (7)  |  Visual (15)  |  World (1774)

Under the... new hypothesis [of Continental Drift] certain geological concepts come to acquire a new significance amounting in a few cases to a complete inversion of principles, and the inquirer will find it necessary to re-orient his ideas. For the first time he will get glimpses... of a pulsating restless earth, all parts of which are in greater or less degree of movement in respect to the axis of rotation, having been so, moreover, throughout geological time. He will have to leave behind him—perhaps reluctantly—the dumbfounding spectacle of the present continental masses, firmly anchored to a plastic foundation yet remaining fixed in space; set thousands of kilometres apart, it may be, yet behaving in almost identical fashion from epoch to epoch and stage to stage like soldiers, at drill; widely stretched in some quarters at various times and astoundingly compressed in others, yet retaining their general shapes, positions and orientations; remote from one another through history, yet showing in their fossil remains common or allied forms of terrestrial life; possessed during certain epochs of climates that may have ranged from glacial to torrid or pluvial to arid, though contrary to meteorological principles when their existing geographical positions are considered -to mention but a few such paradoxes!
Our Wandering Continents: An Hypothesis of Continental Drifting (1937), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arid (6)  |  Behind (137)  |  Certain (550)  |  Climate (97)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continental Drift (10)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Degree (276)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Foundation (171)  |  General (511)  |  Greater (288)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Inquirer (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mention (82)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Remote (83)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Set (394)  |  Significance (113)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Space (500)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

We divorced ourselves from the materials of the earth, the rock, the wood, the iron ore; we looked to new materials which were cooked in vats, long complex derivatives of urine which we called plastic. They had no odor of the living, ... their touch was alien to nature. ... [They proliferated] like the matastases of cancer cells.
The Idol and the Octopus: political writings (1968), 83 and 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Call (769)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Cook (17)  |  Derivative (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Iron (96)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Odor (10)  |  Ore (12)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Rock (161)  |  Touch (141)  |  Urine (16)  |  Wood (92)

We have dominated and overruled nature, and from now on the earth is ours, a kitchen garden until we learn to make our own chlorophyll and float it out in the sun inside plastic mebranes. We will build Scarsdale on Mount Everest.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Chlorophyll (4)  |  Domination (12)  |  Earth (996)  |  Float (30)  |  Garden (60)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Making (300)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sun (385)  |  Will (2355)

We've all seen Apollo 13. NASA guys always have the old 'plastic bag, cardboard tubing, and duct tape' option to fall back on when the shit hits the fan. Neurosurgeons have no such leeway. What it comes down to is this: if a brain surgeon screws up, it means a multi-million-dollar malpractice suit, but if a rocket scientist screws up, it means a multi-million-dollar hit movie starring Tom Hanks.
Lucky Man (2002), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brain Surgery (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Error (321)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Old (481)  |  Plastic Bag (2)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Rocket Science (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Screw (17)  |  Surgeon (63)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.