Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Bank

Bank Quotes (31 quotes)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Despair (40)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

A fear of intellectual inadequacy, of powerlessness before the tireless electronic wizards, has given rise to dozens of science-fiction fantasies of computer takeovers. ... Other scientists too are apprehensive. D. Raj Reddy, a computer scientist at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie-Mellon University, fears that universally available microcomputers could turn into formidable weapons. Among other things, says Reddy, sophisticated computers in the wrong hands could begin subverting a society by tampering with people’s relationships with their own computers—instructing the other computers to cut off telephone, bank and other services, for example.
Magazine
An early prediction of DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service), viruses and worms like Stuxnet. As stated, without further citation, in 'The Age of Miracle Chips', Time (20 Feb 1978), 44. The article introduces a special section on 'The Computer Society.' Please contact Webmaster if you know a primary source.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Available (78)  |  Begin (260)  |  Computer (127)  |  Cut (114)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Fear (197)  |  Formidable (7)  |  Hand (143)  |  Inadequacy (4)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Service (110)  |  Society (326)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Subvert (2)  |  Tamper (6)  |  Tampering (3)  |  Telephone (27)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tireless (5)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universal (189)  |  University (121)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wizard (4)  |  Wrong (234)

Aging is an inevitable process. I surely wouldn't want to grow younger. The older you become, the more you know; your bank account of knowledge is much richer.
Found in several quote books, but without citation, for example, in Tom Crisp, The Book of Bill: Choice Words Memorable Men (2009), 220. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Aging (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Grow (238)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Older (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Surely (101)  |  Want (497)  |  Younger (21)

All rivers, small or large, agree in one character; they like to lean a little on one side; they cannot bear to have their channels deepest in the middle, but will always, if they can, have one bank to sun themselves upon, and another to get cool under.
In 'Water', The True and the Beautiful in Nature, Art, Morals, and Religion (1872), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Channel (21)  |  Character (243)  |  Cool (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Large (394)  |  Lean (6)  |  Little (707)  |  River (119)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2355)

All that concerns the Mediterranean is of the deepest interest to civilized man, for the history of its progress is the history of the development of the world; the memory of the great men who have lived and died around its banks; the recollection of the undying works that have come thence to delight us for ever; the story of patient research and brilliant discoveries connected with every physical phenomenon presented by its waves and currents, and with every order of creatures dwelling in and around its waters.
From Literary Papers (1855), 106. As quoted in On Early Explorations in the Mediterranean.In George Wilson and Archibald Geikie, Memoir of Edward Forbes F.R.S. (1861), 279. Geike introduces the Forbes quote as “the recollection of these, his earliest explorations in the Mediterranean,” as written down years later.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Creature (233)  |  Current (118)  |  Delight (108)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Interest (386)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Mediterranean Sea (6)  |  Memory (134)  |  Order (632)  |  Patient (199)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Research (664)  |  Story (118)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Chagrined a little that we have been hitherto able to produce nothing in this way of use to mankind; and the hot weather coming on, when electrical experiments are not so agreeable, it is proposed to put an end to them for this season, somewhat humorously, in a party of pleasure, on the banks of Skuylkil. Spirits, at the same time, are to be fired by a spark sent from side to side through the river, without any other conductor that the water; an experiment which we some time since performed, to the amazement of many. A turkey is to be killed for our dinner by the electrified bottle: when the healths of all the famous electricians in England, Holland, France, and Germany are to be drank in electrified bumpers, under the discharge of guns from the electrical battery.
Letter to Peter Collinson, 29 Apr 1749. In I. Bernard Cohen (ed.), Benjamin Franklin's Experiments (1941), 199-200.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Amazement (15)  |  Battery (12)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (159)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Health (193)  |  Hot (60)  |  Kill (100)  |  Little (707)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  River (119)  |  Season (47)  |  Side (233)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weather (44)

Egypt has been called the Gift of the Nile. Once every year the river overflows its banks, depositing a layer of rich alluvial soil on the parched ground. Then it recedes and soon the whole countryside, as far as the eye can reach, is covered with Egyptologists.
In 'Cheops, or Khufu', The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody (1950), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Alluvial (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Countryside (5)  |  Covered (5)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gift (104)  |  Ground (217)  |  Layer (40)  |  Nile (4)  |  Overflow (9)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recede (11)  |  Rich (62)  |  River (119)  |  Soil (86)  |  Soon (186)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

Far be it from me to suggest that geologists should be reckless in their drafts upon the bank of Time; but nothing whatever is gained, and very much is lost, by persistent niggardliness in this direction.
Proceedings of the Geological Society of London (1903), 59, lxxii.
Science quotes on:  |  Direction (175)  |  Draft (6)  |  Gain (145)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Loss (110)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Reckless (4)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whatever (234)

For a dying man it is not a difficult decision [to agree to become the world's first heart transplant] … because he knows he is at the end. If a lion chases you to the bank of a river filled with crocodiles, you will leap into the water convinced you have a chance to swim to the other side. But you would not accept such odds if there were no lion.
In Janie B. Butts and Karen Rich, Nursing Ethics (2005), 59.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chase (14)  |  Crocodile (14)  |  Decision (91)  |  Difficult (246)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heart Transplant (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leap (53)  |  Lion (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Risk (61)  |  River (119)  |  Side (233)  |  Swim (30)  |  Transplant (12)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I denounce to you the Coryphaeus—the leader of the chorus—of charlatans, Sieur Lavoisier, son of a land-grabber, apprentice-chemist, pupil of the Genevan stock-jobber [Necker], a Farmer-General, Commisioner for Gunpowder and Saltpetre, Governor of the Discount Bank, Secretary to the King, Member of the Academy of Sciences.
Marat's denunciation of 1791
L' Ami du Peuple, 27 January 1791. Trans. D. McKie, Antoine Lavoisier, Scientist, Economist, Social Reformer (1952), 242.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Academy Of Sciences (4)  |  Apprentice (4)  |  Charlatan (8)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Farmer (32)  |  General (511)  |  Governor (13)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Leader (43)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Science (3879)

I have been especially fortunate for about 50 years in having two memory banks available—whenever I can't remember something I ask my wife, and thus I am able to draw on this auxiliary memory bank. Moreover, there is a second way In which I get ideas ... I listen carefully to what my wife says, and in this way I often get a good idea. I recommend to ... young people ... that you make a permanent acquisition of an auxiliary memory bank that you can become familiar with and draw upon throughout your lives.
T. Goertzel and B. Goertzel, Linus Pauling (1995), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Ask (411)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Draw (137)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Live (628)  |  Memory (134)  |  People (1005)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wife (41)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

I often get letters … from people who say … I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature. … I reply … “Well, it’s funny that the people, when they say that this is evidence of the Almighty, always quote beautiful things … orchids and hummingbirds and butterflies and roses.” But I always have to think too of a little boy sitting on the banks of a river in west Africa who has a worm boring through his eyeball, turning him blind before he’s five years old. And I … say, “Well, presumably the God you speak about created the worm as well,” and now, I find that baffling to credit a merciful God with that action. And therefore it seems to me safer to show things that I know to be truth, truthful and factual, and allow people to make up their own minds about the moralities of this thing, or indeed the theology of this thing.
From BBC TV, Life on Air (2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Africa (35)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boring (7)  |  Boy (94)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchid (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reply (56)  |  River (119)  |  Rose (34)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Show (346)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Worm (42)  |  Year (933)

In Cairo, I secured a few grains of wheat that had slumbered for more than thirty centuries in an Egyptian tomb. As I looked at them this thought came into my mind: If one of those grains had been planted on the banks of the Nile the year after it grew, and all its lineal descendants had been planted and replanted from that time until now, its progeny would to-day be sufficiently numerous to feed the teeming millions of the world. An unbroken chain of life connects the earliest grains of wheat with the grains that we sow and reap. There is in the grain of wheat an invisible something which has power to discard the body that we see, and from earth and air fashion a new body so much like the old one that we cannot tell the one from the other.…This invisible germ of life can thus pass through three thousand resurrections.
In In His Image (1922), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Chain (50)  |  Connect (125)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Discard (29)  |  DNA (77)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Germ (53)  |  Grain (50)  |  Growth (187)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Nile (4)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (294)  |  Planting (4)  |  Power (746)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Reap (17)  |  Resurrection (4)  |  Secured (18)  |  See (1081)  |  Slumber (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Sow (11)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Wheat (10)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It is curious to observe with what different degrees of architectonic skill Providence has endowed birds of the same genus, and so nearly correspondent in their general mode of life! for while the swallow and the house-martin discover the greatest address in raising and securely fixing crusts or shells of loam as cunabula for their young, the bank-martin terebrates a round and regular hole in the sand or earth, which is serpentine, horizontal, and about two feet deep. At the inner end of this burrow does this bird deposit, in a good degree of safety, her rude nest, consisting of fine grasses and feathers, usually goose-feathers, very inartificially laid together.
In Letter to Daines Barrington, (26 Feb 1774), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Crust (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Feather (12)  |  General (511)  |  Genus (25)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  Grass (46)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  House (140)  |  Inner (71)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nest (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Providence (18)  |  Regular (46)  |  Safety (54)  |  Sand (62)  |  Shell (63)  |  Skill (109)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Young (227)

It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
Concluding remarks in final chapter, The Origin of Species (1859), 490. In the second edition, Darwin changed “breathed” to “breathed by the Creator”.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breath (59)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Construct (124)  |  Death (388)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Famine (15)  |  Follow (378)  |  Food Web (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Singing (19)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Worm (42)

It is raining DNA outside. On the bank of the Oxford canal at the bottom of my garden is a large willow tree, and it is pumping downy seeds into the air. ... [spreading] DNA whose coded characters spell out specific instructions for building willow trees that will shed a new generation of downy seeds. … It is raining instructions out there; it’s raining programs; it’s raining tree-growing, fluff-spreading, algorithms. That is not a metaphor, it is the plain truth. It couldn’t be any plainer if it were raining floppy discs.
The Blind Watchmaker (1986), 111.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Algorithm (5)  |  Building (156)  |  Canal (17)  |  Character (243)  |  DNA (77)  |  Garden (60)  |  Generation (242)  |  Growing (98)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Large (394)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  New (1216)  |  Outside (141)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Seed (93)  |  Specific (95)  |  Tree (246)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Knowledge of Nature is an account at bank, where each dividend is added to the principal and the interest is ever compounded; and hence it is that human progress, founded on natural knowledge, advances with ever increasing speed.
Concluding sentence of Address (11 Dec 1895) as President of the Geological Society, 'The Origin of Hypotheses, illustrated by the Discussion of a Topographical Problem', printed as Presidential Address of Grove Karl Gilbert (1896), 24. Also collected in Science (1896), 3, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Advance (280)  |  Compound (113)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Principal (63)  |  Progress (465)  |  Speed (65)

Mr Humphry Davy is a lively and talented man, and a thorough chemist; but if I might venture to give an opinion... he is rather too lively to fill the Chair of the Royal Society with that degree of gravity it is most becoming to assume.
Sir Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society. Quoted in John Barrow, Sketches of the Royal Society (1849), 52.
Royal Society;Davy_Humphry
Science quotes on:  |  Becoming (96)  |  Chair (24)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Lively (17)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Opinion (281)  |  President (31)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Society (326)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thorough (40)

One night we were hauling long lines on the Faroe slope, working with an electric lamp hanging over the side in order to see the line, when like lightning flashes one squid after another shot towards the light; … In October 1902 we were one night steaming outside the slopes of the coast banks of Norway, and for many miles we could see the squids moving in the surface waters like luminous bubbles, resembling large milky white electric lamps being constantly lit and extinguished.
From Sir John Murray and Johan Hyort, The Depths of the Ocean (1912), 649.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Electric (76)  |  Extinguish (8)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Large (394)  |  Light (607)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Long (790)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Order (632)  |  Outside (141)  |  Resemble (63)  |  See (1081)  |  Side (233)  |  Slope (9)  |  Squid (3)  |  Surface (209)  |  Water (481)  |  White (127)

Papyra, throned upon the banks of Nile,
Spread her smooth leaf, and waved her silver style.
The storied pyramid, the laurel’d bust,
The trophy’d arch had crumbled into dust;
The sacred symbol, and the epic song (Unknown the character, forgot the tongue,)
With each unconquer’d chief, or sainted maid,
Sunk undistinguish’d in Oblivion’s shade.
Sad o’er the scatter’d ruins Genius sigh’d,
And infant Arts but learn’d to lisp, and died.
Till to astonish’d realms Papyra taught To paint in mystic colours Sound and Thought,
With Wisdom’s voice to print the page sublime,
And mark in adamant the steps of Time.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adamant (3)  |  Arch (11)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Art (657)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Character (243)  |  Chief (97)  |  Dust (64)  |  Epic (12)  |  Genius (284)  |  Infant (26)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Realm (85)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Saint (17)  |  Shade (31)  |  Silver (46)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Song (37)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spread (83)  |  Step (231)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Wisdom (221)

Saying that each of two atoms can attain closed electron shells by sharing a pair of electrons is equivalent to saying that husband and wife, by having a total of two dollars in a joint account and each having six dollars in individual bank accounts, have eight dollars apiece!
Quoted in Reynold E. Holmen, 'Kasimir Fajans (1887-1975): The Man and His Work', Bulletin for the History of Chemistry, 1990, 6, 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Atom (355)  |  Attain (125)  |  Bond (45)  |  Closed (38)  |  Electron (93)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Individual (404)  |  Joint (31)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Shell (63)  |  Total (94)  |  Two (937)  |  Wife (41)

The age of the earth was thus increased from a mere score of millions [of years] to a thousand millions and more, and the geologist who had before been bankrupt in time now found himself suddenly transformed into a capitalist with more millions in the bank than he knew how to dispose of … More cautious people, like myself, too cautious, perhaps, are anxious first of all to make sure that the new [radioactive] clock is not as much too fast as Lord Kelvin’s was too slow.
1921 British Association for the Advancement of Science symposium on 'The Age of the Earth'. In Nature (1921), 108, 282.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of The Earth (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Bankrupt (3)  |  Capitalist (6)  |  Caution (24)  |  Clock (47)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fast (45)  |  First (1283)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Himself (461)  |  Increase (210)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Lord (93)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Slow (101)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Year (933)

The blood, the fountain whence the spirits flow,
The generous stream that waters every part,
And motion, vigour, and warm life conveys
To every Particle that moves or lives;
This vital fluid, thro' unnumber'd tubes
Pour'd by the heart, and to the heart again
Refunded; scourg'd forever round and round;
Enrag'd with heat and toil, at last forgets
Its balmy nature; virulent and thin
It grows; and now, but that a thousand gates
Are open to its flight, it would destroy
The parts it cherish' d and repair'd before.
Besides, the flexible and tender tubes
Melt in the mildest, most nectareous tide
That ripening Nature rolls; as in the stream
Its crumbling banks; but what the vital force
Of plastic fluids hourly batters down,
That very force, those plastic particles
Rebuild: so mutable the state of man.
For this the watchful appetite was given,
Daily with fresh materials to repair
This unavoidable expense of life,
This necessary waste of flesh and blood.
Hence the concoctive powers, with various art,
Subdue the cruder aliments to chyle;
The chyle to blood; the foamy purple tide
To liquors, which through finer arteries
To different parts their winding course pursue;
To try new changes, and new forms put on,
Or for the public, or some private use.
The Art of Preserving Health (1744), book 2, I. 12-23, p.15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Appetite (17)  |  Art (657)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Gate (32)  |  Generous (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Particle (194)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Roll (40)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Stream (81)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Toil (25)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)  |  Warm (69)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Winding (8)

The clouds roll on.
Silent as sleepwalkers the clouds
keep coming from infinity
bank behind bank
and line after line,
and change colors on the earth.
As translated in Rolf Jacobsen and ‎Roger Greenwald (ed., trans.), 'The Clouds', North in the World: Selected Poems of Rolf Jacobsen, A Bilingual Edition (1985, 2002), 9, from 'Earth and Iron' (1933). Collected in the original Norwegian edition (1999).
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Change (593)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Coming (114)  |  Earth (996)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Roll (40)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sleepwalker (2)

The human brain is a machine which alone accounts for all our actions, our most private thoughts, our beliefs. ... To choose a spouse, a job, a religious creed—or even choose to rob a bank—is the peak of a causal chain that runs back to the origin of life and down to the nature of atoms and molecules.
The Mind Machine (1998), 145. In Vinoth Ramachandra, Subverting Global Myths: Theology and the Public Issues Shaping our World (2008), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Atom (355)  |  Back (390)  |  Belief (578)  |  Brain (270)  |  Causal (7)  |  Chain (50)  |  Choose (112)  |  Creed (27)  |  Down (456)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Brain (4)  |  Job (82)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machine (257)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Peak (20)  |  Private (23)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rob (6)  |  Run (174)  |  Thought (953)

The past is a bank where an unlimited number of ideas have been deposited to our credit.
Life and History (1922), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (843)  |  Number (699)  |  Past (337)  |  Unlimited (22)

The works which this man [Joseph Banks] leaves behind him occupy a few pages only; their importance is not greatly superior to their extent; and yet his name will shine out with lustre in the history of the sciences.
Funeral oration at the Academy of Sciences, Paris (2 Apr 1821). Quoted in Hector Charles Cameron, Sir Joseph Banks, K.B., P.R.S.: the Autocrat of the Philosophers (1952) 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Joseph Banks (3)  |  Behind (137)  |  Extent (139)  |  History (673)  |  Importance (286)  |  Lustre (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Name (333)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Publication (101)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shine (45)  |  Superior (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Sea. It is the Gulf Stream.
Opening paragraph of The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cold (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Drought (13)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Flood (50)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Overflow (9)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Stream (81)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Seas. It is the Gulf Stream. There is in the world no other such majestic flow of waters. Its current is more rapid than the Mississippi or the Amazon.
In The Physical Geography of the Sea and Its Meteorology (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (9)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cold (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Drought (13)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flood (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Mississippi (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overflow (9)  |  Rapid (33)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Severe (16)  |  Stream (81)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Twenty centuries of “progress” have brought the average citizen a vote, a national anthem, a Ford, a bank account, and a high opinion of himself, but not the capacity to live in high density without befouling and denuding his environment, nor a conviction that such capacity, rather than such density, is the true test of whether he is civilized.
In Game Management (1933), 423.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Average (82)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Density (25)  |  Environment (216)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Live (628)  |  Money (170)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Progress (465)  |  Test (211)  |  Vote (16)

Yesterday, a small white keel feather escaped from my goose and lodged in the bank boughs near the kitchen porch, where I spied it as I came home in the cold twilight. The minute I saw the feather, I was projected into May, knowing a barn swallow would be along to claim the prize and use it to decorate the front edge of its nest. Immediately, the December air seemed full of wings of swallows and the warmth of barns.
In 'Home-Coming' (10 Dec 1955), collected in Essays of E.B. White (1977), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Barn (5)  |  Bough (9)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cold (112)  |  December (3)  |  Decorate (2)  |  Edge (47)  |  Feather (12)  |  Front (16)  |  Full (66)  |  Goose (12)  |  Home (170)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Minute (125)  |  Nest (23)  |  Prize (13)  |  Project (73)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seem (145)  |  Small (477)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Use (766)  |  Warmth (21)  |  White (127)  |  Wing (75)  |  Yesterday (36)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.