Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Slope

Slope Quotes (9 quotes)

A fossil hunter needs sharp eyes and a keen search image, a mental template that subconsciously evaluates everything he sees in his search for telltale clues. A kind of mental radar works even if he isn’t concentrating hard. A fossil mollusk expert has a mollusk search image. A fossil antelope expert has an antelope search image. … Yet even when one has a good internal radar, the search is incredibly more difficult than it sounds. Not only are fossils often the same color as the rocks among which they are found, so they blend in with the background; they are also usually broken into odd-shaped fragments. … In our business, we don’t expect to find a whole skull lying on the surface staring up at us. The typical find is a small piece of petrified bone. The fossil hunter’s search therefore has to have an infinite number of dimensions, matching every conceivable angle of every shape of fragment of every bone on the human body.
Describing the skill of his co-worker, Kamoya Kimeu, who discovered the Turkana Boy, the most complete specimen of Homo erectus, on a slope covered with black lava pebbles.
Richard Leakey and Roger Lewin, Origins Reconsidered: In Search of What Makes Us Human (1992), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (43)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (96)  |  Boy (94)  |  Broken (56)  |  Business (149)  |  Color (139)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Difficult (247)  |  Dimension (62)  |  Discover (553)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expect (201)  |  Expert (65)  |  Eye (423)  |  Find (999)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1470)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Image (96)  |  Infinite (233)  |  Internal (66)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lava (9)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mollusk (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Number (701)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Pebble (26)  |  Radar (8)  |  Rock (164)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1082)  |  Skill (109)  |  Small (479)  |  Sound (184)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Surface (209)  |  Usually (176)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1352)

In this House on July 24, 1895 the Secret of Dreams was revealed to Dr. Sigmund Freud.
Plaque was placed on 6 May 1977 at Bellevue (a house on the slopes of the Wienerwald) where the Freud family spent their summers.
From a letter to Wilhelm Fliess, 20 Jun 1900. Quoted in Ernst L. Freud (ed.), Letters of Sigmund Freud 1873-1939 (1961), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (209)  |  Family (95)  |  House (140)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Secret (196)  |  Spent (85)  |  Summer (54)

It is grindingly, creakingly, crashingly obvious that, if Darwinism were really a theory of chance, it couldn’t work. You don't need to be a mathematician or physicist to calculate that an eye or a haemoglobin molecule would take from here to infinity to self-assemble by sheer higgledy-piggledy luck. Far from being a difficulty peculiar to Darwinism, the astronomic improbability of eyes and knees, enzymes and elbow joints and all the other living wonders is precisely the problem that any theory of life must solve, and that Darwinism uniquely does solve. It solves it by breaking the improbability up into small, manageable parts, smearing out the luck needed, going round the back of Mount Improbable and crawling up the gentle slopes, inch by million-year inch. Only God would essay the mad task of leaping up the precipice in a single bound.
In Climbing Mount Improbable (1996), 67-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Assemble (13)  |  Back (391)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bound (119)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Chance (239)  |  Difficulty (199)  |  Elbow (3)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Essay (27)  |  Evolution (594)  |  Eye (423)  |  God (758)  |  Haemoglobin (4)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Infinity (91)  |  Joint (31)  |  Life (1801)  |  Living (491)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mad (53)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (260)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Problem (680)  |  Self (267)  |  Single (354)  |  Small (479)  |  Solve (130)  |  Task (147)  |  Theory (972)  |  Wonder (237)  |  Work (1352)  |  Year (932)

One night we were hauling long lines on the Faroe slope, working with an electric lamp hanging over the side in order to see the line, when like lightning flashes one squid after another shot towards the light; … In October 1902 we were one night steaming outside the slopes of the coast banks of Norway, and for many miles we could see the squids moving in the surface waters like luminous bubbles, resembling large milky white electric lamps being constantly lit and extinguished.
From Sir John Murray and Johan Hyort, The Depths of the Ocean (1912), 649.
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (30)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bubble (23)  |  Electric (76)  |  Extinguish (8)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Large (394)  |  Light (609)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Long (789)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Order (632)  |  Outside (141)  |  Resemble (63)  |  See (1082)  |  Side (232)  |  Squid (3)  |  Surface (209)  |  Water (482)  |  White (127)

The earth was covered by a huge ice sheet which buried the Siberian mammoths, and reached just as far south as did the phenomenon of erratic boulders. This ice sheet filled all the irregularities of the surface of Europe before the uplift of the Alps, the Baltic Sea, all the lakes of Northern Germany and Switzerland. It extended beyond the shorelines of the Mediterranean and of the Atlantic Ocean, and even covered completely North America and Asiatic Russia. When the Alps were uplifted, the ice sheet was pushed upwards like the other rocks, and the debris, broken loose from all the cracks generated by the uplift, fell over its surface and, without becoming rounded (since they underwent no friction), moved down the slope of the ice sheet.
From Ιtudes sur Les Glaciers (1840), as translated by Albert V. Carozzi in Studies on Glaciers: Preceded by the Discourse of Neuchβtel (1967), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (9)  |  America (127)  |  Atlantic Ocean (7)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boulder (8)  |  Broken (56)  |  Completely (135)  |  Debris (7)  |  Down (455)  |  Earth (998)  |  Erratic (4)  |  Extend (128)  |  Friction (14)  |  Geology (223)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Ice (54)  |  Lake (32)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Ocean (203)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (319)  |  Push (63)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rock (164)  |  Sea (309)  |  South (38)  |  Surface (209)  |  Uplift (6)  |  Upward (43)

The evening was calm, the calmest we had known above the North Col. The smooth, outward dipping slabs glowed in the fast setting sun and, at an immense distance beneath, clouds concealed the valleys and lesser peaks. There was nothing to obstruct the tremendous prospect. Seen from Everest, great peaks that dominate the climber as he toils along the East Rongbuk Glacier, and up the slopes of the North Col, show like insignificant ripples at the base of a great ocean roller. Even the North Peak was but a stepping-stone to quick-footed vision.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Calm (31)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Dip (3)  |  Distance (163)  |  Dominate (20)  |  East (18)  |  Everest (10)  |  Fast (45)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Glow (14)  |  Great (1575)  |  Immense (86)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Know (1519)  |  Known (454)  |  Lesser (5)  |  North (11)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Obstruct (3)  |  Ocean (203)  |  Outward (7)  |  Peak (20)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Ripple (10)  |  Roller (3)  |  See (1082)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Show (346)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sun (388)  |  Toil (26)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Valley (32)  |  Vision (122)

The handling of our forests as a continuous, renewable resource means permanent employment and stability to our country life. The forests are also needed for mitigating extreme climatic fluctuations, holding the soil on the slopes, retaining the moisture in the ground, and controlling the equable flow of water in our streams.
From 'A Presidential Statement on Receipt of the Award of the Schlich Forestry Medal' (29 Jan 1935) in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: F.D. Roosevelt, 1935, Volume 4 (1938), 65. Roosevelt was awarded the medal by the Society of American Foresters. This quote continues with the line “The forests are the ‘lungs’ of our land….”
Science quotes on:  |  Continuous (83)  |  Country (251)  |  Employment (32)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Flow (84)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Forest (150)  |  Ground (218)  |  Handling (7)  |  Holding (3)  |  Life (1801)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Need (290)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Renewable (6)  |  Resource (63)  |  Soil (87)  |  Stability (25)  |  Stream (81)  |  Water (482)

The ruthless destruction of their forests by the Chinese is one of the reasons why famine and plague today hold this nation in their sinister grasp. Denudation, wherever practiced, leaves naked soil; floods and erosion follow, and when the soil is gone men must also go—and the process does not take long. The great plains of Eastern China were centuries ago transformed from forest into agricultural land. The mountain plateau of Central China have also within a few hundred years been utterly devastated of tree growth, and no attempt made at either natural or artificial reforestation. As a result, the water rushes off the naked slopes in veritable floods, gullying away the mountain sides, causing rivers to run muddy with yellow soil, and carrying enormous masses of fertile earth to the sea. Water courses have also changed; rivers become uncontrollable, and the water level of the country is lowered perceptibly. In consequence, the unfortunate people see their crops wither and die for lack of water when it is most needed.
Statement (11 May 1921) by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) concerning the famine in China in seven out of every ten years. Reported in 'Blames Deforestation: Department of Agriculture Ascribes Chinese Famine to it', New York Times (12 May 1921), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Artificial (34)  |  Attempt (252)  |  Become (815)  |  Central (80)  |  Century (310)  |  Changed (2)  |  China (23)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Consequence (207)  |  Country (251)  |  Course (408)  |  Crop (25)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Die (86)  |  Earth (998)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Famine (16)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Flood (51)  |  Follow (379)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grasp (63)  |  Great (1575)  |  Growth (189)  |  Hundred (228)  |  Lack (119)  |  Land (115)  |  Level (67)  |  Long (789)  |  Lowered (2)  |  Most (1729)  |  Mountain (189)  |  Muddy (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked (10)  |  Nation (194)  |  Natural (796)  |  Need (290)  |  People (1005)  |  Perceptibly (2)  |  Plague (41)  |  Plain (33)  |  Plateau (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Result (678)  |  River (121)  |  Run (174)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  Sea (309)  |  See (1082)  |  Side (232)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Soil (87)  |  Today (314)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tree (246)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Utterly (15)  |  Water (482)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Why (491)  |  Wither (8)  |  Year (932)  |  Yellow (30)

We have a right to expect that the best trained, the best educated men on the Pacific slope, the Rocky Mountains, and great plains States will take the lead in the preservation and right use of forests, in securing the right use of waters, and in seeing that our land policy is not twisted from its original purpose, but is perpetuated by amendment, by change when such change is necessary in the life of that purpose, the purpose being to turn the public domain into farms each to be the property of the man who actually tills it and makes his home in it.
Address at Leland Stanford, Jr., University, Palo Alto, California, 12 May 1903. Addresses and Presidential Messages of Theodore Roosevelt, 1902-1904 (1904), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Change (595)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Domain (69)  |  Expect (201)  |  Farm (26)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1575)  |  Home (170)  |  Lead (385)  |  Life (1801)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mountain (189)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Property (169)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Right (452)  |  Seeing (142)  |  State (491)  |  Train (114)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twist (8)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (482)  |  Will (2354)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.