Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Fertile

Fertile Quotes (29 quotes)

Le paradoxe, c'est de la graine de vérité. Il suffit d'un terrain propice pour que cela germe, fleurisse et fructifie.
The paradox is the seed of truth. This germ just needs a fertile ground to flourish and bear fruit.
In Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 198. Google translation by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Bearing (9)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Germ (53)  |  Ground (217)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Seed (93)  |  Terrain (5)  |  Truth (1057)

Ut ager quamvis fertilis sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
A mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than can a field, however fertile, without cultivation.
In Hannis Taylor and Mary Lillie Taylor Hunt, Cicero: a Sketch of His Life and Works (2nd Ed., 1918), 597.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Education (378)  |  Field (364)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)

A large proportion of mankind, like pigeons and partridges, on reaching maturity, having passed through a period of playfulness or promiscuity, establish what they hope and expect will be a permanent and fertile mating relationship. This we call marriage.
Genetics And Man (1964), 298.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Expect (200)  |  Hope (299)  |  Large (394)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Maturity (14)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Pigeon (8)  |  Promiscuity (3)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

Bertrand, Darboux, and Glaisher have compared Cayley to Euler, alike for his range, his analytical power, and, not least, for his prolific production of new views and fertile theories. There is hardly a subject in the whole of pure mathematics at which he has not worked.
In Proceedings of London Royal Society (1895), 58, 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Joseph Bertrand (6)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Compare (69)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  James Whitbread Lee Glaisher (3)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Power (746)  |  Production (183)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Range (99)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

EMBALM, v.t. To cheat vegetation by locking up the gases upon which it feeds. By embalming their dead and thereby deranging the natural balance between animal and vegetable life, the Egyptians made their once fertile and populous country barren and incapable of supporting more than a meagre crew. The modern metallic burial casket is a step in the same direction, and many a dead man who ought now to be ornamenting his neighbor's lawn as a tree, or enriching his table as a bunch of radishes, is doomed to a long inutility. We shall get him after awhile if we are spared, but in the meantime the violet and rose are languishing for a nibble at his glutæus maximus.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 90. Also published later as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Country (251)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doom (32)  |  Embalming (2)  |  Humour (116)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Rose (34)  |  Step (231)  |  Table (104)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Violet (11)

Henry Thoreau quote Dews of fresh and living truth
photo credit: Inspired Images CC0 (source)
Even the facts of science may dust the mind by their dryness, unless they are … rendered fertile by the dews of fresh and living truth. Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven.
Essay, first published as 'Life Without Principle', Atlantic Monthly (Oct 1863). Collected in Yankee in Canada, Etc., (1866) 267. Also excerpted in H.G.O. Blake (ed.), Thoreau's Thoughts: Selections From the Writings of Henry David Thoreau (1890, 2005), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Detail (146)  |  Dew (9)  |  Dryness (5)  |  Dust (64)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Flash (49)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Render (93)  |  Science (3879)  |  Truth (1057)

Everyone admits that the male is the primary efficient cause in generation, as being that in whom the species or form resides, and they further assert that his genitures emitted in coitus causes the egg both to exist and to be fertile. But how the semen of the cock produces the chick from the egg, neither the philosophers nor the physicians of yesterday or today have satisfactorily explained, or solved the problem formulated by Aristotle.
Disputations Touching the Generation of Animals (1651), trans. Gweneth Whitteridge (1981), Chapter 47, 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cock (6)  |  Egg (69)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physician (273)  |  Primary (80)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Reside (25)  |  Semen (5)  |  Species (401)  |  Today (314)  |  Yesterday (36)

Fertile soil, level plains, easy passage across the mountains, coal, iron, and other metals imbedded in the rocks, and a stimulating climate, all shower their blessings upon man.
The Red Man's Continent: A Chronicle of Aboriginal America (1919), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Climate (97)  |  Coal (57)  |  Easy (204)  |  Iron (96)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Rock (161)  |  Soil (86)

In general, a fact is worth more than theories in the long run. The theory stimulates, but the fact builds. The former in due time is replaced by one better but the fact remains and becomes fertile.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Due (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Former (137)  |  General (511)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Run (174)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Worth (169)

In nature hybrid species are usually sterile, but in science the reverse is often true. Hybrid subjects are often astonishingly fertile, whereas if a scientific discipline remains too pure it usually wilts.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pure (291)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Species (401)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Subject (521)  |  True (212)  |  Usually (176)

It is usually not recognized that for every injurious or parasitic microbe there are dozens of beneficial ones. Without the latter, there would be no bread to eat nor wine to drink, no fertile soils and no potable waters, no clothing and no sanitation. One can visualize no form of higher life without the existence of the microbes. They are the universal scavengers. They keep in constant circulation the chemical elements which are so essential to the continuation of plant and animal life.
In My Life With the Microbes (1954), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Bread (39)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Clothing (10)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Element (310)  |  Essential (199)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Injurious (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microbes (14)  |  Microbiology (11)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Plant (294)  |  Potable (3)  |  Sanitation (5)  |  Scavenger (4)  |  Soil (86)  |  Universal (189)  |  Usually (176)  |  Visualize (8)  |  Water (481)  |  Wine (38)

Modern war, even from the consideration of physical welfare, is not creative. Soldiers and civilians alike are supposed to put on mental khaki. … War means the death of that fertile war which consists of the free, restless conflict of ideas. The war which matters is that of the scientist with nature; of the farmer with the tawny desert; of … philosopher against … mob stupidity. Such war is creative. … Inventions that further life and joy; freedom; new knowledge, whether Luther Burbank’s about the breeding of fruits or Einstein's about relativity; great cathedrals and Beethoven's music: these modern mechanical war can destroy but never produce. At its most inventive height, war creates the Maxim gun, the submarine, disseminable germs of disease, life-blasting gases. Spiritually and intellectually, modern war is not creative.
From ‘The Stagnation of War’, in Allen D. Hole (ed.) The Messenger of Peace (Nov 1924), 49, No. 11, 162-163.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Alike (60)  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Biological Warfare (2)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Luther Burbank (14)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consist (223)  |  Create (235)  |  Creative (137)  |  Death (388)  |  Desert (56)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Disease (328)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Farmer (32)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Germ (53)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Invention (369)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mob (9)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physical (508)  |  Produce (104)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Spiritually (3)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Submarine (12)  |  Tawny (3)  |  War (225)  |  Welfare (25)

Nature becomes fertile only by virtue of laws that oblige matter to organize itself into one of a number of necessarily very simple primitive forms. Because of their very simplicity, these are capable of constituting the basis for increasingly complex bodies, by the addition of organs calculated according to identical laws of possibility.
'Matiere', Dictionnaire Classique d' Histoire Naturelle (1822-31), Vol. 10, 277, trans. J. Mandelbaum. Quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck (1988), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Addition (66)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Capable (168)  |  Complex (188)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Identical (53)  |  Law (894)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblige (6)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organize (29)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Virtue (109)

One naturally asks, what was the use of this great engine set at work ages ago to grind, furrow, and knead over, as it were, the surface of the earth? We have our answer in the fertile soil which spreads over the temperate regions of the globe. The glacier was God’s great plough.
In 'Ice-Period in America', Geological Sketches (1875), 99.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engine (98)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Glacier (17)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Plough (13)  |  Set (394)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spread (83)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Use (766)  |  Work (1351)

Perhaps the majority of paleontologists of the present time, who believe in orthogenesis, the irreversibility of evolution and the polyphyletic origin families, will assume that a short molar must keep on getting shorter, that it can never get longer and then again grow relatively shorter and therefore that Propliopithecus with its extremely short third molar and Dryopithecus its long m3 are alike excluded from ancestry of the Gorilla, in which the is a slight retrogression in length of m3. After many years reflection and constant study of the evolution of the vertebrates however, I conclude that 'orthogenesis' should mean solely that structures and races evolve in a certain direction, or toward a certain goal, only until the direction of evolution shifts toward some other goal. I believe that the 'irreversibility of evolution' means only that past changes irreversibly limit and condition future possibilities, and that, as a matter of experience, if an organ is once lost the same (homogenous) organ can be regained, although nature is fertile in substituting imitations. But this not mean, in my judgement, that if one tooth is smaller than its fellows it will in all cases continue to grow smaller.
'Studies on the Evolution of the Primates’, Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 1916, 35, 307.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continue (165)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Future (429)  |  Goal (145)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Grow (238)  |  Irreversibility (4)  |  Limit (280)  |  Long (790)  |  Majority (66)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organ (115)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Shift (44)  |  Short (197)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Remind me that the most fertile lands were built by the fires of volcanoes.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Fire (189)  |  Land (115)  |  Most (1731)  |  Remind (13)

Science is continually correcting what it has said. Fertile corrections... science is a ladder... poetry is a winged flight... An artistic masterpiece exists for all time... Dante does not efface Homer.
Quoted in Pierre Biquard, Frederic Joliot-Curie: The Man and his Theories (1961), trans. Geoffrey Strachan (1965), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Correction (40)  |  Efface (6)  |  Exist (443)  |  Flight (98)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Masterpiece (9)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wing (75)

The consideration of mathematics is at the base of knowledge of the mind as it is at the base of the natural sciences, and for the same reason: the free and fertile work of thought dates from that epoch when mathematics brought to man the true norm of truth.
As translated in James Byrnie Shaw, Lectures on the Philosophy of Mathematics (1918), 193. From Léon Brunschvicg, Les Étapes de La Philosophie Mathématique (1912), 577, “La considération de la mathématique est à la base de la connaissance de l’esprit comme elle est à la base des sciences de la nature, et pour une même raison: l’œuvre libre et féconde de la pensée date de l’époque où la mathématique vint apporter à l’homme la norme véritable de la vérité.”
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Free (232)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Norm (5)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)

The Earth obey’d and straight
Op’ning her fertile womb, teem’d at a birth Innumerous living creatures, perfect forms,
Limb’d and full grown.
From 'Paradise Lost', Book 7, collected in Edward Hawkins (ed.), The Poetical Works of John Milton (1824), Vol. 2, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Full (66)  |  Grow (238)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obey (40)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Straight (73)  |  Womb (24)

The hypothetical character of continual creation has been pointed out, but why is it more of a hypothesis to say that creation is taking place now than that it took place in the past? On the contrary, the hypothesis of continual creation is more fertile in that it answers more questions and yields more results, and results that are, at least in principle, observable. To push the entire question of creation into the past is to restrict science to a discussion of what happened after creation while forbidding it to examine creation itself. This is a counsel of despair to be taken only if everything else fails.
From Cosmology (), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Character (243)  |  Continual (43)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Creation (327)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Everything (476)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  More (2559)  |  Observable (21)  |  Past (337)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Why (491)  |  Yield (81)

The origin of species is therefore simply the evolution of some difference—any difference at all—that prevents the production of fertile hybrids between populations under natural conditions.
In 'Biodiversity Rising', The Diversity of Life (1992), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Difference (337)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Population (110)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Production (183)  |  Simple (406)  |  Species (401)

The ravages committed by man subvert the relations and destroy the balance which nature had established between her organized and her inorganic creations; and she avenges herself upon the intruder, by letting loose upon her defaced provinces destructive energies hitherto kept in check by organic forces destined to be his best auxiliaries, but which he has unwisely dispersed and driven from the field of action. When the forest is gone, the great reservoir of moisture stored up in its vegetable mould is evaporated, and returns only in deluges of rain to wash away the parched dust into which that mould has been converted. The well-wooded and humid hills are turned to ridges of dry rock, which encumbers the low grounds and chokes the watercourses with its debris, and–except in countries favored with an equable distribution of rain through the seasons, and a moderate and regular inclination of surface–the whole earth, unless rescued by human art from the physical degradation to which it tends, becomes an assemblage of bald mountains, of barren, turfless hills, and of swampy and malarious plains. There are parts of Asia Minor, of Northern Africa, of Greece, and even of Alpine Europe, where the operation of causes set in action by man has brought the face of the earth to a desolation almost as complete as that of the moon; and though, within that brief space of time which we call “the historical period,” they are known to have been covered with luxuriant woods, verdant pastures, and fertile meadows, they are now too far deteriorated to be reclaimable by man, nor can they become again fitted for human use, except through great geological changes, or other mysterious influences or agencies of which we have no present knowledge, and over which we have no prospective control. The earth is fast becoming an unfit home for its noblest inhabitant, and another era of equal human crime and human improvidence, and of like duration with that through which traces of that crime and that improvidence extend, would reduce it to such a condition of impoverished productiveness, of shattered surface, of climatic excess, as to threaten the depravation, barbarism, and perhaps even extinction of the species.
Man and Nature, (1864), 42-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Africa (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Balance (77)  |  Balance Of Nature (4)  |  Barbarism (7)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Best (459)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Control (167)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crime (38)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dust (64)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Excess (22)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Face (212)  |  Favor (63)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Historical (70)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impoverished (3)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Mold (33)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Prospective (7)  |  Province (35)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Regular (46)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Return (124)  |  Rock (161)  |  Season (47)  |  Set (394)  |  Shattered (8)  |  Space (500)  |  Species (401)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tend (124)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Verdant (2)  |  Wash (21)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wood (92)

The ruthless destruction of their forests by the Chinese is one of the reasons why famine and plague today hold this nation in their sinister grasp. Denudation, wherever practiced, leaves naked soil; floods and erosion follow, and when the soil is gone men must also go—and the process does not take long. The great plains of Eastern China were centuries ago transformed from forest into agricultural land. The mountain plateau of Central China have also within a few hundred years been utterly devastated of tree growth, and no attempt made at either natural or artificial reforestation. As a result, the water rushes off the naked slopes in veritable floods, gullying away the mountain sides, causing rivers to run muddy with yellow soil, and carrying enormous masses of fertile earth to the sea. Water courses have also changed; rivers become uncontrollable, and the water level of the country is lowered perceptibly. In consequence, the unfortunate people see their crops wither and die for lack of water when it is most needed.
Statement (11 May 1921) by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) concerning the famine in China in seven out of every ten years. Reported in 'Blames Deforestation: Department of Agriculture Ascribes Chinese Famine to it', New York Times (12 May 1921), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Central (80)  |  Century (310)  |  Changed (2)  |  China (23)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Country (251)  |  Course (409)  |  Crop (25)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Die (86)  |  Earth (996)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Famine (15)  |  Flood (50)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Lack (119)  |  Land (115)  |  Level (67)  |  Long (790)  |  Lowered (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Muddy (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked (10)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Need (290)  |  People (1005)  |  Perceptibly (2)  |  Plague (41)  |  Plain (33)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Result (677)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Side (233)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Slope (9)  |  Soil (86)  |  Today (314)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tree (246)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Utterly (15)  |  Water (481)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Why (491)  |  Wither (8)  |  Year (933)  |  Yellow (30)

The shrewd guess, the fertile hypothesis, the courageous leap to a tentative conclusion—these are the most valuable coin of the thinker at work.
In The Process of Education (1960).
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Leap (53)  |  Most (1731)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Work (1351)

The so-called ‘crank’ may be quite original in his ideas. … Invention, however, in the engineering sense involves originality; but not that alone, if the results are to be of value. There is imagination more or less fertile, but with it a knowledge of what has been done before, carried perhaps by the memory, together with a sense of the present or prospective needs in art or industry. Necessity is not always the mother of invention. It may be prevision.
Address as M.I.T. acting president, to the graduating class (11 Jun 1920). Published in Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Technology Review (Jul 1920), 22, 419-420.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Art (657)  |  Call (769)  |  Carried (2)  |  Crank (18)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Industry (137)  |  Invention (369)  |  Involve (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Of Invention (6)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Need (290)  |  Original (58)  |  Originality (19)  |  Present (619)  |  Prospective (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Together (387)  |  Value (365)

There can be no greater issue than that of conservation in this country. Just as we must conserve our men, women and children, so we must conserve the resources of the land on which they live. We must conserve the soil so that our children shall have a land that is more and not less fertile than our fathers dwelt in. We must conserve the forests, not by disuse, but by use, making them more valuable at the same time that we use them. We must conserve the mines. Moreover, we must insure so far as possible the use of certain types of great natural resources for the benefit of the people as a whole.
Confession of Faith Speech, Progressive National Convention, Chicago, Illinois, 6 Aug 1912. In Marion Mills Miller (Ed.) Great Debates in American History (1913), Vol. 10, 111-112.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Certain (550)  |  Children (200)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Father (110)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Live (628)  |  Making (300)  |  Mine (76)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  People (1005)  |  Possible (552)  |  Soil (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

These microscopic organisms form an entire world composed of species, families and varieties whose history, which has barely begun to be written, is already fertile in prospects and findings of the highest importance. The names of these organisms are very numerous and will have to be defined and in part discarded. The word microbe which has the advantage of being shorter and carrying a more general meaning, and of having been approved by my illustrious friend, M. Littré, the most competent linguist in France, is one we will adopt.
In paper read to the Académie de Medecine (Mar 1878). In Charles-Emile Sedillot, 'Influence de M. Pasteur sur les progres de la chirurgie' [Influence of Pasteur on the progress of surgery].
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (7)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Already (222)  |  Approval (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Composition (84)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discard (29)  |  Family (94)  |  Finding (30)  |  Form (959)  |  France (27)  |  Friend (168)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Importance (286)  |  Linguist (2)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Organism (220)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Shortness (2)  |  Species (401)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

We have before us the restoration of that ancient land whose name was a synonym for abundance, prosperity, and grandeur for many generations. Records as old as those of Egypt and as well attested tell of fertile lands and teeming populations, mighty kings and warriors, sages and wise men, over periods of thousands of years. ... A land such as this is worth resuscitating. Once we have apprehended the true cause of its present desolate and abandoned condition, we are on our way to restoring it to its ancient fertility. A land which so readily responded to ancient science, and gave a return which sufficed for the maintenance of a Persian Court in all its splendor, will surely respond to the efforts of modern science and return manifold the money and talent spent on its regeneration.
From The Restoration of the Ancient Irrigation Works on the Tigris: or, The Re-creation of Chaldea (1903), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apprehend (5)  |  Attest (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Condition (356)  |  Court (33)  |  Desolation (3)  |  Effort (227)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  King (35)  |  Land (115)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Money (170)  |  Name (333)  |  Old (481)  |  Period (198)  |  Persian (4)  |  Population (110)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosperity (21)  |  Record (154)  |  Regeneration (5)  |  Restoration (4)  |  Return (124)  |  Sage (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spent (85)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Surely (101)  |  Synonym (2)  |  Talent (94)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

“Divide et impera” is as true in algebra as in statecraft; but no less true and even more fertile is the maxim “auge et impera”.The more to do or to prove, the easier the doing or the proof.
In 'Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Invariants', Philosophic Magazine (1878), 186. In Collected Mathematical Papers, 3, 126. [The Latin phrases, “Divide/auge et impera” translate as “Divide/increase and rule”.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Increase (210)  |  Less (103)  |  Maxim (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rule (294)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  True (212)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.