Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Modern Science

Modern Science Quotes (10 quotes)

As scientific men we have all, no doubt, felt that our fellow men have become more and more satisfying as fish have taken up their work which has been put often to base uses, which must lead to disaster. But what sin is to the moralist and crime to the jurist so to the scientific man is ignorance. On our plane, knowledge and ignorance are the immemorial adversaries. Scientific men can hardly escape the charge of ignorance with regard to the precise effect of the impact of modern science upon the mode of living of the people and upon their civilisation. For them, such a charge is worse than that of crime.
From Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1922), Nobel Prize in Chemistry, collected in Carl Gustaf Santesson (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1921-1922 (1923).
Science quotes on:  |  Adversary (4)  |  Base (43)  |  Civilisation (18)  |  Crime (20)  |  Disaster (36)  |  Effect (133)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Fish (85)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Immemorial (3)  |  Impact (21)  |  Jurist (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lead (101)  |  Living (44)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Mode (29)  |  Moralist (2)  |  People (269)  |  Satisfying (5)  |  Sin (27)  |  Work (457)

Giordano Bruno was the martyr; though the cause for which he suffered was not that of science, but that of free imaginative speculation. His death in the year 1600 ushered in the first century of modern science in the strict sense of the term.
In 'The Origins of Modern Science', Science and the Modern World (1926, 2011), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Giordano Bruno (8)  |  Cause (231)  |  Century (94)  |  Death (270)  |  First (174)  |  Free (59)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Suffer (25)

His spiritual insights were in three major areas: First, he has inspired mankind to see the world anew as the ultimate reality. Second, he perceived and described the physical universe itself as immanently divine. And finally, he challenged us to accept the ultimate demands of modern science which assign humanity no real or ultimate importance in the universe while also aspiring us to lives of spiritual celebration attuned to the awe, beauty and wonder about us.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Anew (5)  |  Area (18)  |  Aspire (4)  |  Assign (5)  |  Awe (24)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Celebration (6)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Demand (52)  |  Describe (38)  |  Divine (42)  |  Finally (10)  |  First (174)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Immanently (2)  |  Importance (183)  |  Insight (57)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Live (186)  |  Major (24)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Perceive (18)  |  Physical (94)  |  Real (95)  |  Reality (140)  |  Second (33)  |  See (197)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)

How strange it would be if the final theory were to be discovered in our lifetimes! The discovery of the final laws of nature will mark a discontinuity in human intellectual history, the sharpest that has occurred since the beginning of modern science in the seventeenth century. Can we now imagine what that would be like?
In Dreams of a Final Theory (1992), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (10)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Discontinuity (3)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Final (33)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Lifetime (19)  |  Like (18)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Sharp (12)  |  Strange (61)  |  Theory (582)

If I have put the case of science at all correctly, the reader will have recognised that modern science does much more than demand that it shall be left in undisturbed possession of what the theologian and metaphysician please to term its “legitimate field.” It claims that the whole range of phenomena, mental as well as physical—the entire universe—is its field. It asserts that the scientific method is the sole gateway to the whole region of knowledge.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (23)  |  Case (64)  |  Claim (52)  |  Correction (28)  |  Demand (52)  |  Field (119)  |  Gateway (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Left (13)  |  Legitimate (8)  |  Metaphysician (4)  |  Mind (544)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possession (37)  |  Range (38)  |  Reader (22)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Region (26)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Sole (9)  |  Term (87)  |  Theologian (14)  |  Universe (563)  |  Whole (122)

One of the principal results of civilization is to reduce more and more the limits within which the different elements of society fluctuate. The more intelligence increases the more these limits are reduced, and the nearer we approach the beautiful and the good. The perfectibility of the human species results as a necessary consequence of all our researches. Physical defects and monstrosities are gradually disappearing; the frequency and severity of diseases are resisted more successfully by the progress of modern science; the moral qualities of man are proving themselves not less capable of improvement; and the more we advance, the less we shall have need to fear those great political convulsions and wars and their attendant results, which are the scourges of mankind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Approach (33)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Capable (26)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Defect (14)  |  Different (110)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Disease (257)  |  Element (129)  |  Fear (113)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Good (228)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Great (300)  |  Human Species (6)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Increase (107)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Less (54)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Monstrosity (3)  |  Moral (100)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Need (211)  |  Perfectibility (2)  |  Physical (94)  |  Political (31)  |  Principal (15)  |  Progress (317)  |  Prove (60)  |  Quality (65)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Research (517)  |  Resist (10)  |  Result (250)  |  Scourge (3)  |  Severity (5)  |  Society (188)  |  Successfully (2)  |  Themselves (45)  |  War (144)

The belief in the immortality of the human soul is a dogma which is in hopeless contradiction with the most solid empirical truths of modern science.
In Wonders of Life (1904), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Hopeless (9)  |  Human (445)  |  Immortality (9)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Solid (34)  |  Soul (139)  |  Truth (750)

The seventeenth century witnessed the birth of modern science as we know it today. This science was something new, based on a direct confrontation of nature by experiment and observation. But there was another feature of the new science—a dependence on numbers, on real numbers of actual experience.
From The Triumph of Numbers: How Counting Shaped Modern Life (2005), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (10)  |  Actual (34)  |  Birth (81)  |  Confrontation (6)  |  Dependence (32)  |  Direct (44)  |  Experience (268)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Feature (34)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Nature (1029)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Observation (418)  |  Real (95)  |  Today (86)  |  Witness (18)

When I hear to-day protests against the Bolshevism of modern science and regrets for the old-established order, I am inclined to think that Rutherford, not Einstein, is the real villain of the piece. When we compare the universe as it is now supposed to be with the universe as we had ordinarily preconceived it, the most arresting change is not the rearrangement of space and time by Einstein but the dissolution of all that we regard as most solid into tiny specks floating in void. That gives an abrupt jar to those who think that things are more or less what they seem. The revelation by modern physics of the void within the atom is more disturbing than the revelation by astronomy of the immense void of interstellar space.
In The Nature of the Physical World (1928, 2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (3)  |  Arrest (5)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Change (291)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Dissolution (4)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Albert Einstein (535)  |  Established (6)  |  Floating (3)  |  Interstellar (4)  |  Order (167)  |  Preconception (10)  |  Protest (4)  |  Regard (58)  |  Regret (16)  |  Revelation (29)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (52)  |  Solid (34)  |  Space (154)  |  Speck (8)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Universe (563)  |  Villain (2)  |  Void (17)

“Half genius and half buffoon,” Freeman Dyson ... wrote. ... [Richard] Feynman struck him as uproariously American—unbuttoned and burning with physical energy. It took him a while to realize how obsessively his new friend was tunneling into the very bedrock of modern science.
In Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (1992), Prologue, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Bedrock (2)  |  Buffoon (2)  |  Freeman Dyson (43)  |  Richard P. Feynman (107)  |  Genius (186)  |  Obsession (8)  |  Tunnel (7)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.