Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Implement

Implement Quotes (13 quotes)

...while science gives us implements to use, science alone does not determine for what ends they will be employed. Radio is an amazing invention. Yet now that it is here, one suspects that Hitler never could have consolidated his totalitarian control over Germany without its use. One never can tell what hands will reach out to lay hold on scientific gifts, or to what employment they will be put. Ever the old barbarian emerges, destructively using the new civilization.
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Barbarian (2)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Control (167)  |  Determine (144)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Germany (13)  |  Gift (104)  |  Hand (143)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Hold (95)  |  Invention (369)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Radio (50)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Suspect (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Totalitarian (6)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

As a scientist and geneticist I started to feel that science would probably soon reach the point where its interference into the life processes would be counterproductive if a properly designed governing policy was not implemented. A heavily overcrowded planet, ninety-five percent urbanized with nuclear energy as the main source of energy and with all aspects of life highly computerized, is not too pleasant a place for human life. The life of any individual soon will be predictable from birth to death. Medicine, able to cure almost everything, will make the load of accumulated defects too heavy in the next two or three centuries. The artificial prolongation of life, which looked like a very bright idea when I started research in aging about twenty-five years ago, has now lost its attractiveness for me. This is because I now know that the aging process is so multiform and complex that the real technology and chemistry of its prevention by artificial interference must be too complex and expensive. It would be the privilege of a few, not the method for the majority. I also was deeply concerned about the fact that most research is now either directly or indirectly related to military projects and objectives for power.
Quoted in 'Zhores A(leksandrovich) Medvedev', Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2002.
Science quotes on:  |  Aging (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bright (79)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concern (228)  |  Cure (122)  |  Death (388)  |  Defect (31)  |  Design (195)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Future (429)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Governing (20)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interference (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Majority (66)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Objective (91)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Project (73)  |  Reach (281)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Soon (186)  |  Start (221)  |  Technology (257)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Deprived, therefore, as regards this period, of any assistance from history, but relieved at the same time from the embarrassing interference of tradition, the archaeologist is free to follow the methods which have been so successfully pursued in geology—the rude bone and stone implements of bygone ages being to the one what the remains of extinct animals are to the other. The analogy may be pursued even further than this. Many mammalia which are extinct in Europe have representatives still living in other countries. Our fossil pachyderms, for instance, would be almost unintelligible but for the species which still inhabit some parts of Asia and Africa; the secondary marsupials are illustrated by their existing representatives in Australia and South America; and in the same manner, if we wish clearly to understand the antiquities of Europe, we must compare them with the rude implements and weapons still, or until lately, used by the savage races in other parts of the world. In fact, the Van Diemaner and South American are to the antiquary what the opossum and the sloth are to the geologist.
Pre-historic Times, as Illustrated by Ancient Remains, and the Manners and Customs of Modern Savages, (2nd ed. 1869, 1890), 429-430.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  Age (499)  |  America (127)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Animal (617)  |  Antiquary (4)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Australia (8)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Compare (69)  |  Europe (43)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Free (232)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Interference (21)  |  Living (491)  |  Marsupial (2)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opossum (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Savage (29)  |  Sloth (6)  |  South (38)  |  South America (6)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unintelligible (15)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Engineers apply the theories and principles of science and mathematics to research and develop economical solutions to practical technical problems. Their work is the link between scientific discoveries and commercial applications. Engineers design products, the machinery to build those products, the factories in which those products are made, and the systems that ensure the quality of the product and efficiency of the workforce and manufacturing process. They design, plan, and supervise the construction of buildings, highways, and transit systems. They develop and implement improved ways to extract, process, and use raw materials, such as petroleum and natural gas. They develop new materials that both improve the performance of products, and make implementing advances in technology possible. They harness the power of the sun, the earth, atoms, and electricity for use in supplying the Nation’s power needs, and create millions of products using power. Their knowledge is applied to improving many things, including the quality of health care, the safety of food products, and the efficient operation of financial systems.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook (2000) as quoted in Charles R. Lord. Guide to Information Sources in Engineering (2000), 5. This definition has been revised and expanded over time in different issues of the Handbook.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atom (355)  |  Both (493)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Care (186)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Construction (112)  |  Create (235)  |  Design (195)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Economical (9)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Extract (40)  |  Factory (20)  |  Finance (2)  |  Food (199)  |  Gas (83)  |  Harness (23)  |  Health (193)  |  Health Care (9)  |  Highway (13)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Million (114)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Gas (2)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Operation (213)  |  Performance (48)  |  Petroleum (7)  |  Plan (117)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Quality (135)  |  Raw (28)  |  Research (664)  |  Safety (54)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supervise (2)  |  System (537)  |  Technical (43)  |  Technology (257)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transit (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Using (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

I conceived and developed a new geometry of nature and implemented its use in a number of diverse fields. It describes many of the irregular and fragmented patterns around us, and leads to full-fledged theories, by identifying a family of shapes I call fractals.
The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), Introduction, xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Describe (128)  |  Develop (268)  |  Family (94)  |  Field (364)  |  Fractal (9)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Lead (384)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Shape (72)  |  Theory (970)  |  Use (766)

The institutional goal of science is the extension of certified knowledge. The technical methods employed toward this end provide the relevant definition of knowledge: empirically confirmed and logically consistent predictions. The institutional imperatives (mores) derive from the goal and the methods. The entire structure of technical and moral norms implements the final objective. The technical norm of empirical evidence, adequate, valid and reliable, is a prerequisite for sustained true prediction; the technical norm of logical consistency, a prerequisite for systematic and valid prediction. The mores of science possess a methodologic rationale but they are binding, not only because they are procedurally efficient, but because they are believed right and good. They are moral as well as technical prescriptions. Four sets of institutional imperatives–universalism, communism, disinterestedness, organized scepticism–comprise the ethos of modern science.
Social Theory and Social Structure (1957), 552-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Belief (578)  |  Binding (9)  |  Certification (2)  |  Communism (11)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Definition (221)  |  Derive (65)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extension (59)  |  Final (118)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Institution (69)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Method (505)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Objective (91)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Possess (156)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Prerequisite (9)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Right (452)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Technical (43)  |  Validity (47)

The ponderous instrument of synthesis, so effective in his [Newton’s] hands, has never since been grasped by one who could use it for such purposes; and we gaze at it with admiring curiosity, as on some gigantic implement of war, which stands idle among the memorials of ancient days, and makes us wonder what manner of man he was who could wield as a weapon what we can hardly lift as a burden.
In History of the Inductive Sciences (1857), Vol. 2, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Effective (59)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Idle (33)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memorial (3)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Ponderous (2)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Stand (274)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Use (766)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Wonder (236)

The science of genetics is in a transition period, becoming an exact science just as the chemistry in the times of Lavoisier, who made the balance an indispensable implement in chemical research.
The Genotype Conception of Heredity', The American Naturalist (1911), 45, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (77)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Period (198)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transition (26)

We have increased conservation spending, enacted legislation that enables us to clean up and redevelop abandoned brownfields sites across the country, and implemented new clean water standards that will protect us from arsenic.
Sue Kelly
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Across (32)  |  Arsenic (10)  |  Clean (50)  |  Clean Up (4)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Enable (119)  |  Increase (210)  |  Legislation (10)  |  New (1216)  |  Protect (58)  |  Site (14)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spending (24)  |  Standard (57)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

Wherever man has left the stamp of mind on brute-matter; whether we designate his work as structure, texture, or mixture, mechanical or chymical; whether the result be a house, a ship, a garment, a piece of glass, or a metallic implement, these memorials of economy and invention will always be worthy of the attention of the Archaeologist.
In Lecture to the Oxford meeting of the Archaeological Institute (18 Jun 1850), printed in 'On the Study of Achaeology', Archaeological Journal (1851), 8, No. 29, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Attention (190)  |  Brute (28)  |  Definition (221)  |  Garment (13)  |  Glass (92)  |  House (140)  |  Invention (369)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Result (677)  |  Ship (62)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Structure (344)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Whether or not it draws on new scientific research, technology is a branch of moral philosophy, not of Science. It aims at prudent goods for the comnonweal and to provide efficient means for these goods … philosopher, a technician should be able to criticize the programs given him (or her) to implement.
In 'Can Technology Be Humane?', New York Review of Books (20 Nov 1969),
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Branch (150)  |  Criticize (7)  |  Draw (137)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Give (202)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1216)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Program (52)  |  Provide (69)  |  Prudent (5)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Technician (9)  |  Technology (257)

While Occam’s razor is a useful tool in the physical sciences, it can be a very dangerous implement in biology. It is thus very rash to use simplicity and elegance as a guide in biological research.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 138.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Guide (97)  |  Occam’s Razor (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Rash (14)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Tool (117)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)

[Scientific research reveals] the majestic spectacle of the order of nature gradually unfolding itself to man’s consciousness and placing in his hands the implements of ever augmenting power to control his destinies and attain that ultimate comprehension of the universe which has in all ages constituted the supreme aspiration of man.
As quoted in book review by Ian Clunies Ross, "The Spirit of Research', The Australian Quarterly (Dec 1931), 3, No. 12, 126.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Control (167)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Research (664)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfold (12)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Universe (857)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.