Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Commercial

Commercial Quotes (25 quotes)

Any demanding high technology tends to develop influential and dedicated constituencies of those who link its commercial success with both the public welfare and their own. Such sincerely held beliefs, peer pressures, and the harsh demands that the work i
Foreign Affairs (Oct 1976).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Both (52)  |  Constituency (2)  |  Dedicate (9)  |  Demand (52)  |  Develop (55)  |  Harsh (7)  |  High (78)  |  Hold (56)  |  Influential (3)  |  Link (29)  |  Peer (4)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Public (82)  |  Sincerely (2)  |  Success (202)  |  Technology (199)  |  Tend (23)  |  Welfare (16)  |  Work (457)

As to Bell's talking telegraph, it only creates interest in scientific circles, and, as a toy it is beautiful; but ... its commercial value will be limited.
Letter to William D. Baldwin, his attorney (1 Nov 1876). Telephone Investigating Committee, House of Representatives, United States 49th Congress, 1st Session, Miscellaneous Documents (1886), No. 355, 1186.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Alexander Graham Bell (34)  |  Circle (28)  |  Creation (211)  |  Interest (170)  |  Limited (13)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Talk (61)  |  Telegraph (31)  |  Telephone (21)  |  Toy (14)  |  Value (180)

Electronic aids, particularly domestic computers, will help the inner migration, the opting out of reality. Reality is no longer going to be the stuff out there, but the stuff inside your head. It's going to be commercial and nasty at the same time, like 'Rite of Spring' in Disney's Fantasia ... our internal devils may destroy and renew us through the technological overload we've invoked.
Interview in Heavy Metal (Apr 1971). Reprinted in Re/Search, No. 8/9 (1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (23)  |  Computer (84)  |  Electronics (8)  |  Inner (27)  |  Migration (7)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nasty (6)  |  Reality (140)

Engineers apply the theories and principles of science and mathematics to research and develop economical solutions to practical technical problems. Their work is the link between scientific discoveries and commercial applications. Engineers design products, the machinery to build those products, the factories in which those products are made, and the systems that ensure the quality of the product and efficiency of the workforce and manufacturing process. They design, plan, and supervise the construction of buildings, highways, and transit systems. They develop and implement improved ways to extract, process, and use raw materials, such as petroleum and natural gas. They develop new materials that both improve the performance of products, and make implementing advances in technology possible. They harness the power of the sun, the earth, atoms, and electricity for use in supplying the Nation’s power needs, and create millions of products using power. Their knowledge is applied to improving many things, including the quality of health care, the safety of food products, and the efficient operation of financial systems.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook (2000) as quoted in Charles R. Lord. Guide to Information Sources in Engineering (2000), 5. This definition has been revised and expanded over time in different issues of the Handbook.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Application (117)  |  Applied (15)  |  Atom (251)  |  Build (80)  |  Building (51)  |  Construction (69)  |  Create (98)  |  Design (92)  |  Develop (55)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Economical (7)  |  Efficiency (25)  |  Efficient (20)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Ensure (8)  |  Extract (13)  |  Factory (13)  |  Finance (2)  |  Food (139)  |  Harness (15)  |  Health Care (7)  |  Highway (10)  |  Implement (5)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Material (124)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Million (89)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Gas (2)  |  Need (211)  |  Operation (96)  |  Performance (27)  |  Petroleum (7)  |  Plan (69)  |  Power (273)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Product (72)  |  Quality (65)  |  Raw (10)  |  Research (517)  |  Safety (39)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Solution (168)  |  Sun (211)  |  Supervise (2)  |  System (141)  |  Technical (26)  |  Technology (199)  |  Theory (582)  |  Using (6)

England was nothing, compared to continental nations until she had become commercial … until about the middle of the last century, when a number of ingenious and inventive men, without apparent relation to each other, arose in various parts of the kingdom, succeeded in giving an immense impulse to all the branches of the national industry; the result of which has been a harvest of wealth and prosperity, perhaps without a parallel in the history of the world.
In Lives of the Engineers (1862, 1874), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (61)  |  Continent (39)  |  England (31)  |  Harvest (14)  |  History (302)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Industry (91)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Inventive (5)  |  Nation (111)  |  National (20)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Prosperity (15)  |  Result (250)  |  Wealth (50)  |  World (667)

I am more of a sponge than an inventor. I absorb ideas from every source. I take half-matured schemes for mechanical development and make them practical. I am a sort of middleman between the long-haired and impractical inventor and the hard-headed businessman who measures all things in terms of dollars and cents. My principal business is giving commercial value to the brilliant but misdirected ideas of others.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (11)  |  Brilliant (14)  |  Business (71)  |  Businessman (3)  |  Cent (5)  |  Development (228)  |  Dollar (19)  |  Give (117)  |  Hard-Headed (2)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inventor (49)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Misdirect (2)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principal (15)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Sort (32)  |  Source (71)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Term (87)  |  Value (180)

I distinguish two kinds of "applied" research: problem-solving research — government or commercially initiated, centrally managed and institutionally coupled to a plan for application of the results, useful science—investigator-initiated, competitively evaluated and widely communicated. Then we have basic science—useful also, also investigator-initiated, competitively evaluated and widely communicated.
In Confessions of a Technophile (1994), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (52)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Government (85)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Problem (362)  |  Research (517)  |  Solution (168)

Thomas Edison quote “Afraid of things that worked”, record track background+colorized photo of Edison & tinfoil phonograph
derivative art and colorization © todayinsci.com (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

I was always afraid of things that worked the first time. Long experience proved that there were great drawbacks found generally before they could be got commercial; but here was something there was no doubt of.
[Recalling astonishment when his tin-foil cylinder phonograph first played back his voice recording of “Mary had a little lamb.”]
Quoted in Frank Lewis Dyer, Thomas Commerford Martin, Edison: His Life and Inventions (1910), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (15)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Drawback (3)  |  Experience (268)  |  Invention (283)  |  Phonograph (8)  |  Success (202)

If texts are unified by a central logic of argument, then their pictorial illustrations are integral to the ensemble, not pretty little trifles included only for aesthetic or commercial value. Primates are visual animals, and (particularly in science) illustration has a language and set of conventions all its own.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Animal (309)  |  Argument (59)  |  Central (23)  |  Convention (13)  |  Illustration (24)  |  Include (27)  |  Integral (6)  |  Language (155)  |  Little (126)  |  Logic (187)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Pretty (10)  |  Primate (8)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Text (8)  |  Trifle (10)  |  Unified (9)  |  Value (180)  |  Visual (9)

In 1891, during the Presidency of William Henry Harrison [Benjamin Harrison], electric lights were first installed in the White House, the residence of the leaders of our country. At that time, commercial electricity was not economically feasible, but President Harrison wanted to affirm his confidence in the technological capability of our country.
Speech, at dedication of solar panels on the White House roof, 'Solar Energy Remarks Announcing Administration Proposals' (20 Jun 1979).
Science quotes on:  |  Affirmation (5)  |  Capability (35)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Country (121)  |  Economy (46)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Feasible (2)  |  Leader (19)  |  President (11)  |  Residence (2)  |  Technology (199)  |  Want (120)  |  White House (3)

It has been just so in all my inventions. The first step is an intuition—and comes with a burst, then difficulties arise. This thing that gives out and then that—“Bugs”as such little faults and difficulties are called show themselves and months of anxious watching, study and labor are requisite before commercial success—or failure—is certainly reached.
[Describing his invention of a storage battery that involved 10,296 experiments. Note Edison's use of the term “Bug” in the engineering research field for a mechanical defect greatly predates the use of the term as applied by Admiral Grace Murray Hopper to a computing defect upon finding a moth in the electronic mainframe.]
Letter to Theodore Puskas (18 Nov 1878). In The Yale Book of Quotations (2006), 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Anxiety (15)  |  Bug (10)  |  Burst (17)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fault (27)  |  Invention (283)  |  Labour (36)  |  Reach (68)  |  Study (331)  |  Success (202)  |  Watch (39)

It is true that the trees are for human use. But these are aesthetic uses as well as commercial uses—uses for the spiritual wealth of all, as well as the material wealth of some.
In an early issue of the Sierra Club Bulletin. Quoted in Stephen Fox, John Muir and His Legacy (1981), 115. As cited in Bryan G. Norton, Toward Unity Among Environmentalists (), 32. 317
Science quotes on:  |  Aestheticism (2)  |  Human (445)  |  Material (124)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Tree (143)  |  Truth (750)  |  Use (70)  |  Wealth (50)

My second fixed idea is the uselessness of men above sixty years of age, and the incalculable benefit it would be in commercial, political, and in professional life, if as a matter of course, men stopped work at this age.
In farewell address, Johns Hopkins University, 'The Fixed Period', as quoted in Harvey Cushing, The Life of Sir William Osier (1925), vol. 1, 666. He was reflecting on his own intention to retire (now age 55) because he felt a teacher should have a fixed period of service. The title of his address was from an Anthony Trollope novel The Fixed Period which discussed the retiring of college teachers at age 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Idea (440)  |  Political (31)  |  Professional (27)  |  Retirement (6)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Uselessness (21)

On CBS Radio the news of [Ed Murrow’s] death, reportedly from lung cancer, was followed by a cigarette commercial.
Prime Time: the Life of Edward R. Murrow (1969), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Cigarette (22)  |  Death (270)  |  Follow (66)  |  Lung Cancer (7)  |  New (340)  |  Radio (27)

Our commercial and mercantile law was no sudden invention. It was not the work of a day, or of one set of minds… In the incipient, the early existence of this system, a single maxim obtained force, others succeeded; one rule of right formed a nucleus around which other kindred rules might cling; the necessities of trade originated customs, customs ripened into law; a few feeble decisions of courts laid the foundation for others; the wisdom and experience of each succeeding generation improved upon the wisdom and experience of generations that were past; and thus the edifice arose, perfect in its parts, beautiful in its proportions.
From biographical preface by T. Bigelow to Austin Abbott (ed.), Official Report of the Trial of Henry Ward Beecher (1875), Vol. 1, xi-xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Court (16)  |  Custom (24)  |  Decision (58)  |  Experience (268)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Generation (111)  |  Improve (39)  |  Law (418)  |  Maxim (13)  |  Right (144)  |  Ripen (3)  |  Rule (135)  |  Trade (24)  |  Wisdom (151)

Perhaps it is better in this present world of ours that a revolutionary idea or invention instead of being helped and patted be hampered and ill-treated in its adolescence—by want of means, by selfish interest, pedantry, stupidity and ignorance; that it be attacked and stifled; that it pass through bitter trials and tribulations, through the heartless strife of commercial existence. ... So all that was great in the past was ridiculed, condemned, combatted, suppressed—only to emerge all the more powerfully, all the more triumphantly from the struggle.
'The Transmission of Electrical Energy Without Wires As a Means for Furthering Peace', Electrical World and Engineer (7 Jan 1905), 24. Reproduced in John T. Ratzlaff, editor, Tesla Said (1984), 86. Also reprinted in Nikola Tesla, Miscellaneous Writings (2007), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (29)  |  Bitter (12)  |  Condemnation (13)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Existence (254)  |  Hamper (2)  |  Help (68)  |  Idea (440)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Invention (283)  |  Pedantry (5)  |  Revolutionary (14)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Selfishness (8)  |  Stifle (4)  |  Strife (9)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Stupidity (27)  |  Trial (23)  |  Tribulation (2)  |  Triumph (33)

The chief problem of the commercial farmers is overproduction. The chief problem of the low-income farmers is poverty.
In Public Papers of Nelson A. Rockefeller: Fifty-Third Governor of the State of New York (1959), Vol. 1, 1206.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Farmer (23)  |  Income (8)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Problem (362)  |  Production (105)

The hybridoma technology was a by-product of basic research. Its success in practical applications is to a large extent the result of unexpected and unpredictable properties of the method. It thus represents another clear-cut example of the enormous practical impact of an investment in research which might not have been considered commercially worthwhile, or of immediate medical relevance. It resulted from esoteric speculations, for curiosity’s sake, only motivated by a desire to understand nature.
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and ‎Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 267-268.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Basic (52)  |  Basic Research (9)  |  Byproduct (3)  |  Clear-Cut (7)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Desire (101)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Esoteric (2)  |  Example (57)  |  Hybridoma (2)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Impact (21)  |  Investment (8)  |  Medical (18)  |  Method (154)  |  Motivation (21)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Practical (93)  |  Property (96)  |  Relevance (12)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Sake (17)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Success (202)  |  Technology (199)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Unexpected (26)  |  Unpredictable (10)  |  Worthwhile (9)

The marriage of reason and nightmare which has dominated the 20th century has given birth to an ever more ambiguous world. Across the communications landscape move the specters of sinister technologies and the dreams that money can buy. Thermonuclear weapons systems and soft drink commercials coexist in an overlit realm ruled by advertising and pseudoevents, science and pornography. Over our lives preside the great twin leitmotifs of the 20th century—sex and paranoia.
Crash (1973, 1995), catalogue notes. In J. G. Ballard, The Kindness of Women (2007), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertisement (11)  |  Ambiguous (4)  |  Coexist (3)  |  Communication (58)  |  Dream (92)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Money (125)  |  Nightmare (3)  |  Paranoia (2)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rule (135)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Technology (199)  |  Thermonuclear (2)  |  Weapon (57)  |  World (667)

The thoughts of Plato and Machiavelli... don't seem quite enough armor for a world beset with splitting the atoms, urban guerrillas, nineteen varieties of psychotherapists, amplified guitars, napalm, computers, astronauts, and an atmosphere polluted simultaneously with auto exhaust and TV commercials.
Science quotes on:  |  Armor (3)  |  Astronaut (22)  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Atom (251)  |  Automobile (19)  |  Computer (84)  |  Exhaust (12)  |  Nuclear Energy (10)  |  Plato (47)  |  Pollution (37)  |  TV (2)

There is an insistent tendency among serious social scientists to think of any institution which features rhymed and singing commercials, intense and lachrymose voices urging highly improbable enjoyment, caricatures of the human esophagus in normal and impaired operation, and which hints implausibly at opportunities for antiseptic seduction as inherently trivial. This is a great mistake. The industrial system is profoundly dependent on commercial television and could not exist in its present form without it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Antiseptic (5)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Dependent (14)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Exist (89)  |  Feature (34)  |  Form (210)  |  Great (300)  |  Highly (8)  |  Hint (6)  |  Human (445)  |  Impair (2)  |  Improbable (9)  |  Industrial (11)  |  Inherently (5)  |  Insistent (2)  |  Institution (32)  |  Intense (11)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Normal (21)  |  Operation (96)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Present (103)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Seduction (2)  |  Serious (37)  |  Sing (9)  |  System (141)  |  Television (27)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Think (205)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Urge (10)  |  Voice (41)

There is no plea which will justify the use of high-tension and alternating currents, either in a scientific or a commercial sense. They are employed solely to reduce investment in copper wire and real estate.
In 'The Dangers of Electric Lighting', North American Review (Nov 1889), 149, No. 396, 633.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternating Current (4)  |  Copper (18)  |  Electricity (121)  |  High-Tension (2)  |  Investment (8)  |  Justify (19)  |  Plea (2)  |  Real Estate (2)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Wire (18)

We urgently need [the landmark National Ocean Policy] initiative, as we use our oceans heavily: Cargo ships crisscross the sea, carrying goods between continents. Commercial and recreational fishing boats chase fish just offshore. Cruise ships cruise. Oil and gas drilling continues, but hopefully we will add renewable energy projects as well. Without planning, however, these various industrial activities amount to what we call “ocean sprawl,” steamrolling the resources we rely upon for our livelihoods, food, fun, and even the air we breathe. While humankind relies on many of these industries, we also need to keep the natural riches that support them healthy and thriving. As an explorer, I know firsthand there are many places in the ocean so full of life that they should be protected.
In 'A Blueprint for Our Blue Home', Huffington Post (18 Jul 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Boat (13)  |  Breathe (22)  |  Cargo (3)  |  Carry (35)  |  Chase (11)  |  Continent (39)  |  Continue (38)  |  Drill (6)  |  Explorer (15)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Fish (85)  |  Fishing (12)  |  Food (139)  |  Full (38)  |  Fun (28)  |  Gas (46)  |  Healthy (17)  |  Heavy (13)  |  Humankind (7)  |  Industry (91)  |  Initiative (12)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Landmark (6)  |  Life (917)  |  Livelihood (8)  |  National (20)  |  Natural (128)  |  Need (211)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Offshore (3)  |  Oil (37)  |  Place (111)  |  Plan (69)  |  Policy (23)  |  Project (22)  |  Protect (26)  |  Recreation (11)  |  Rely (6)  |  Renewable Energy (11)  |  Resource (47)  |  Rich (48)  |  Sea (143)  |  Ship (33)  |  Sprawl (2)  |  Support (63)  |  Thrive (6)  |  Urgent (7)  |  Various (25)

Will we ever again be able to view a public object with civic dignity, unencumbered by commercial messages? Must city buses be fully painted as movable ads, lampposts smothered, taxis festooned, even seats in concert halls sold one by one to donors and embellished in perpetuity with their names on silver plaques?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  City (37)  |  Civic (2)  |  Concert (3)  |  Dignity (18)  |  Embellish (2)  |  Festoon (3)  |  Fully (11)  |  Hall (4)  |  Message (30)  |  Movable (2)  |  Name (118)  |  Object (110)  |  Paint (17)  |  Perpetuity (7)  |  Plaque (2)  |  Public (82)  |  Seat (5)  |  Sell (10)  |  Silver (26)  |  Smother (2)  |  Taxi (3)  |  View (115)

Words change their meanings, just as organism s evolve. We would impose an enormous burden on our economy if we insisted on payment in cattle every time we identified a bonus as a pecuniary advantage (from the Latin pecus, or cattle, a verbal fossil from a former commercial reality).
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Bonus (2)  |  Burden (23)  |  Cattle (13)  |  Change (291)  |  Economy (46)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Former (18)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Identify (6)  |  Impose (17)  |  Insist (13)  |  Latin (20)  |  Meanings (2)  |  Organism (126)  |  Payment (6)  |  Pecuniary (2)  |  Reality (140)  |  Time (439)  |  Verbal (5)  |  Word (221)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.