Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Minute

Minute Quotes (125 quotes)

From thus meditating on the great similarity of the structure of the warm-blooded animals, and at the same time of the great changes they undergo both before and after their nativity; and by considering in how minute a portion of time many of the changes of animals above described have been produced; would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which THE GREAT FIRST CAUSE endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Association (46)  |  Attend (65)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Filament (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  New (1216)  |  Portion (84)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volition (3)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  World (1774)

Als Physiker, der sein ganzes Leben der nüchternen Wissenschaft, der Erforschung der Materie widmete, bin ich sicher von dem Verdacht frei, für einen Schwarmgeist gehalten zu werden. Und so sage ich nach meinen Erforschungen des Atoms dieses: Es gibt keine Materie an sich. Alle Materie entsteht und besteht nur durch eine Kraft, welche die Atomteilchen in Schwingung bringt und sie zum winzigsten Sonnensystem des Alls zusammenhält. Da es im ganzen Weltall aber weder eine intelligente Kraft noch eine ewige Kraft gibt - es ist der Menschheit nicht gelungen, das heißersehnte Perpetuum mobile zu erfinden - so müssen wir hinter dieser Kraft einen bewußten intelligenten Geist annehmen. Dieser Geist ist der Urgrund aller Materie.
As a man who has devoted his whole life to the most clear headed science, to the study of matter, I can tell you as a result of my research about atoms this much: There is no matter as such. All matter originates and exists only by virtue of a force which brings the particle of an atom to vibration and holds this most minute solar system of the atom together. We must assume behind this force the existence of a conscious and intelligent mind. This mind is the matrix of all matter.
Lecture, 'Das Wesen der Materie' [The Essence/Nature/Character of Matter], Florence, Italy (1944). Archiv zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Abt. Va, Rep. 11 Planck, Nr. 1797. Excerpt in Gregg Braden, The Spontaneous Healing of Belief: Shattering the Paradigm of False Limits (2009), 334-35. Note: a number of books showing this quote cite it as from Planck's Nobel Prize acceptance speech (1918), which the Webmaster has checked, and does not see this quote therein.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Behind (137)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Force (487)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Originate (36)  |  Origination (7)  |  Particle (194)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Sage (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Study (653)  |  System (537)  |  Tell (340)  |  Together (387)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Whole (738)

[About Francis Baily] The history of the astronomy of the nineteenth century will be incomplete without a catalogue of his labours. He was one of the founders of the Astronomical Society, and his attention to its affairs was as accurate and minute as if it had been a firm of which he was the chief clerk, with expectation of being taken into partnership.
In Supplement to the Penny Cyclopaedia. Quoted in Sophia Elizabeth De Morgan, Memoir of Augustus De Morgan (1882), 46
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Affair (29)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Catalogue (5)  |  Century (310)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Firm (47)  |  Founder (26)  |  History (673)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Labour (98)  |  Partnership (4)  |  Society (326)  |  Will (2355)

[When questioned on his longevity] First of all, I selected my ancestors very wisely. ... They were long-lived, healthy people. Then, as a chemist, I know how to eat, how to exercise, keep my blood circulating. ... I don't worry. I don't get angry at people. I don't worry about things I can't help. I do what I can to make the world a better place to live, but I don't complain if things aren't right. As a scientist I take the world as I find it.
[About celebrating his 77th birthday by swimming a half mile in 22 minutes] I used swim fins and webbed gloves because a man of intelligence should apply his power efficiently, not just churn the water.
As quoted in obituary by Wallace Turner, 'Joel Hildebrand, 101', New York Times (3 May 1983), D27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Anger (20)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Better (486)  |  Birthday (8)  |  Blood (134)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Churn (4)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fin (3)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Glove (4)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Lived (2)  |  Longevity (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Obituary (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Question (621)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

A committee is a group that keeps minutes and loses hours.
In Bernard S. Raskas, Living Thoughts: Inspiration, Insight, and Wisdom from Sources Throughout the Ages (1976), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Committee (15)  |  Group (78)  |  Hour (186)  |  Keep (101)  |  Lose (159)

A person is smart. People are dumb ... Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the Earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet. Imagine what you'll know tomorrow.
Anonymous
Character Agent K in movie Men in Black(1997), screen story and screenplay by Ed Solomon. Quoted in George Aichele, Culture, Entertainment and the Bible (2000), 26. In a footnote, from the post-movie novel by Steve Perry, Men in Black (1997), 66, is added, 'Yeah. A hundred years from now, whoever is here will probably pee themselves laughing at what we believe.'
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Flat (33)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Planet (356)  |  Smart (26)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

A professor is one who can speak on any subject—for precisely fifty minutes.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Fifty (15)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Professor (128)  |  Speak (232)  |  Subject (521)

A prominent official was asked to deliver an after-dinner speech at the banquet recently held in Cambridge, Mass., for the Mathematicians at the International Congress. “What do you wish me to speak about?" he asked. "About five minutes," was the answer.
Anonymous
Found as a space filler, Pi Mu Epsilon Journal (1949), 1, No. 1, 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Banquet (2)  |  Congress (19)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Do (1908)  |  International (37)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speech (61)  |  Wish (212)

A quarter-horse jockey learns to think of a twenty-second race as if it were occurring across twenty minutes—in distinct parts, spaced in his consciousness. Each nuance of the ride comes to him as he builds his race. If you can do the opposite with deep time, living in it and thinking in it until the large numbers settle into place, you can sense how swiftly the initial earth packed itself together, how swiftly continents have assembled and come apart, how far and rapidly continents travel, how quickly mountains rise and how quickly they disintegrate and disappear.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Assemble (13)  |  Build (204)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Continent (76)  |  Deep (233)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Far (154)  |  Horse (74)  |  Initial (17)  |  Jockey (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Pack (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Race (268)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Ride (21)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sense (770)  |  Settle (19)  |  Space (500)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Travel (114)

About two-thirds of the oxygen in our atmosphere is produced in the surface waters of the sea by phytoplankton, the minute forms of algae that give the sea its slightly green hue, and which initiate the entire food web of the ocean.
In 'Ocean Policy and Reasonable Utopias', The Forum (Summer 1981), 16, No. 5, 899-900.
Science quotes on:  |  Algae (6)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Entire (47)  |  Food (199)  |  Food Web (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Green (63)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Phytoplankton (2)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sea (308)  |  Surface (209)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)

Accurate and minute measurement seems to the non-scientific imagination, a less lofty and dignified work than looking for something new. But nearly all the grandest discoveries of science have been but the rewards of accurate measurement and patient long-continued labour in the minute sifting of numerical results.
Presidential inaugural address, to the General Meeting of the British Association, Edinburgh (2 Aug 1871). In Report of the Forty-First Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1872), xci.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Grandest (10)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Minuteness (8)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Non-Scientific (7)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)  |  Result (677)  |  Reward (68)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Something (719)  |  Work (1351)

All life is linked together in such a way that no part of the chain is unimportant. Frequently, upon the action of some of these minute beings depends the material success or failure of a great commonwealth.
Insect Life: An Introduction To Nature-Study And A Guide For Teachers (1897), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chain (50)  |  Commonwealth (4)  |  Depend (228)  |  Failure (161)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Minuteness (8)  |  Success (302)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)

All that Anatomie can doe is only to shew us the gross and sensible parts of the body, or the vapid and dead juices all which, after the most diligent search, will be noe more able to direct a physician how to cure a disease than how to make a man; for to remedy the defects of a part whose organicall constitution and that texture whereby it operates, he cannot possibly know, is alike hard, as to make a part which he knows not how is made. Now it is certaine and beyond controversy that nature performs all her operations on the body by parts so minute and insensible that I thinke noe body will ever hope or pretend, even by the assistance of glasses or any other intervention, to come to a sight of them, and to tell us what organicall texture or what kinde offerment (for whether it be done by one or both of these ways is yet a question and like to be soe always notwithstanding all the endeavours of the most accurate dissections) separate any part of the juices in any of the viscera, or tell us of what liquors the particles of these juices are, or if this could be donne (which it is never like to be) would it at all contribute to the cure of the diseases of those very parts which we so perfectly knew.
'Anatomie' (1668). Quoted in Kenneth Dewhurst (ed.), Dr. Thomas Sydenham (1624-1689): His Life and Original Writings (1966), 85-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Cure (122)  |  Defect (31)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hope (299)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Juice (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perform (121)  |  Physician (273)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (621)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sight (132)  |  Tell (340)  |  Viscera (2)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Always preoccupied with his profound researches, the great Newton showed in the ordinary-affairs of life an absence of mind which has become proverbial. It is related that one day, wishing to find the number of seconds necessary for the boiling of an egg, he perceived, after waiting a minute, that he held the egg in his hand, and had placed his seconds watch (an instrument of great value on account of its mathematical precision) to boil!
This absence of mind reminds one of the mathematician Ampere, who one day, as he was going to his course of lectures, noticed a little pebble on the road; he picked it up, and examined with admiration the mottled veins. All at once the lecture which he ought to be attending to returned to his mind; he drew out his watch; perceiving that the hour approached, he hastily doubled his pace, carefully placed the pebble in his pocket, and threw his watch over the parapet of the Pont des Arts.
Popular Astronomy: a General Description of the Heavens (1884), translated by J. Ellard Gore, (1907), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Approach (108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Boil (23)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Egg (69)  |  Find (998)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hastily (7)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pace (14)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Precision (68)  |  Profound (104)  |  Proverbial (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Return (124)  |  Show (346)  |  Value (365)  |  Vein (25)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Watch (109)

Among the studies to which the [Rockefeller] Foundation is giving support is a series in a relatively new field, which may be called molecular biology, in which delicate modern techniques are being used to investigate ever more minute details of certain life processes.
In 'Molecular Biology', Annual Report of the Rockefeller Foundation (1938), 203-4. Reprinted in a letter to Science (6 Nov 1970), 170, 582.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Detail (146)  |  Field (364)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Life (1795)  |  Modern (385)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Process (423)  |  Series (149)  |  Study (653)  |  Support (147)  |  Technique (80)

An engineer, a physicist and a mathematician find themselves in an anecdote, indeed an anecdote quite similar to many that you have no doubt already heard.
After some observations and rough calculations the engineer realizes the situation and starts laughing.
A few minutes later the physicist understands too and chuckles to himself happily, as he now has enough experimental evidence to publish a paper.
This leaves the mathematician somewhat perplexed, as he had observed right away that he was the subject of an anecdote, and deduced quite rapidly the presence of humor from similar anecdotes, but considers this anecdote to be too trivial a corollary to be significant, let alone funny.
Anonymous
In 'Zero Gravity: The Lighter Side of Science' APS News (Jun 2003), 12 No. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Already (222)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Consider (416)  |  Corollary (5)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Funny (11)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humor (8)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Joke (83)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Presence (63)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Right (452)  |  Significant (74)  |  Situation (113)  |  Start (221)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Understand (606)

And from this such small difference of eight minutes [of arc] it is clear why Ptolemy, since he was working with bisection [of the linear eccentricity], accepted a fixed equant point… . For Ptolemy set out that he actually did not get below ten minutes [of arc], that is a sixth of a degree, in making observations. To us, on whom Divine benevolence has bestowed the most diligent of observers, Tycho Brahe, from whose observations this eight-minute error of Ptolemy’s in regard to Mars is deduced, it is fitting that we accept with grateful minds this gift from God, and both acknowledge and build upon it. So let us work upon it so as to at last track down the real form of celestial motions (these arguments giving support to our belief that the assumptions are incorrect). This is the path I shall, in my own way, strike out in what follows. For if I thought the eight minutes in [ecliptic] longitude were unimportant, I could make a sufficient correction (by bisecting the [linear] eccentricity) to the hypothesis found in Chapter 16. Now, because they could not be disregarded, these eight minutes alone will lead us along a path to the reform of the whole of Astronomy, and they are the matter for a great part of this work.
Astronomia Nova, New Astronomy (1609), ch. 19, 113-4, Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937-), Vol. 3, 177-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arc (12)  |  Argument (138)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Both (493)  |  Tycho Brahe (23)  |  Build (204)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Correction (40)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difference (337)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Divine (112)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Linear (13)  |  Longitude (6)  |  Making (300)  |  Mars (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observation (555)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Reform (22)  |  Regard (305)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Strike (68)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Support (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

At this very minute, with almost absolute certainty, radio waves sent forth by other intelligent civilizations are falling on the earth. A telescope can be built that, pointed in the right place, and tuned to the right frequency, could discover these waves. Someday, from somewhere out among the stars, will come the answers to many of the oldest, most important, and most exciting questions mankind has asked.
In Intelligent Life in Space (1962), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fall (230)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Important (209)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Most (1731)  |  Oldest (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Radio (50)  |  Right (452)  |  Someday (14)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Tune (19)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)

Borel makes the amusing supposition of a million monkeys allowed to play upon the keys of a million typewriters. What is the chance that this wanton activity should reproduce exactly all of the volumes which are contained in the library of the British Museum? It certainly is not a large chance, but it may be roughly calculated, and proves in fact to be considerably larger than the chance that a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen will separate into the two pure constituents. After we have learned to estimate such minute chances, and after we have overcome our fear of numbers which are very much larger or very much smaller than those ordinarily employed, we might proceed to calculate the chance of still more extraordinary occurrences, and even have the boldness to regard the living cell as a result of random arrangement and rearrangement of its atoms. However, we cannot but feel that this would be carrying extrapolation too far. This feeling is due not merely to a recognition of the enormous complexity of living tissue but to the conviction that the whole trend of life, the whole process of building up more and more diverse and complex structures, which we call evolution, is the very opposite of that which we might expect from the laws of chance.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 158-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Émile Borel (2)  |  British (41)  |  Building (156)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Due (141)  |  Employ (113)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Library (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Number (699)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pure (291)  |  Random (41)  |  Rearrangement (5)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Trend (22)  |  Two (937)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

But when it has been shown by the researches of Pasteur that the septic property of the atmosphere depended not on the oxygen, or any gaseous constituent, but on minute organisms suspended in it, which owed their energy to their vitality, it occurred to me that decomposition in the injured part might be avoided without excluding the air, by applying as a dressing some material capable of destroying the life of the floating particles. Upon this principle I have based a practice.
'On the Antiseptic Principle in the Practice of Surgery', The British Medical Journal (1867), ii, 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Capable (168)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dressing (3)  |  Energy (344)  |  Infection (27)  |  Injury (36)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Particle (194)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitality (23)

Champions aren’t made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them—a desire, a dream, a vision. They have to have last-minute stamina, they have to be a little faster, they have to have the skill and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.
As co-author with Richard Durham, in The Greatest: My Own Story (1975), 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Champion (5)  |  Deep (233)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Gym (2)  |  Inside (26)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Make (25)  |  Must (1526)  |  Skill (109)  |  Something (719)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)

Chemistry is yet, indeed, a mere embryon. Its principles are contested; experiments seem contradictory; their subjects are so minute as to escape our senses; and their result too fallacious to satisfy the mind. It is probably an age too soon to propose the establishment of a system.
Letter to Rev. James Madison (Paris, 19 Jul 1788). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 135. From H.A. Washington, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1853-54). Vol 2, 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Escape (80)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Principle (507)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Soon (186)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Boston (7)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fail (185)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Institution (69)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

From the rocket we can see the huge sphere of the planet in one or another phase of the Moon. We can see how the sphere rotates, and how within a few hours it shows all its sides successively ... and we shall observe various points on the surface of the Earth for several minutes and from different sides very closely. This picture is so majestic, attractive and infinitely varied that I wish with all my soul that you and I could see it. (1911)
As translated in William E. Burrows, The Survival Imperative: Using Space to Protect Earth (2007), 147. From Tsiolkovsky's 'The Investigation of Universal Space by Means of Reactive Devices', translated in K.E. Tsiolkovsky, Works on Rocket Technology (NASA, NASATT F-243, n.d.), 76-77.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Moon (237)  |  Observe (168)  |  Phase (36)  |  Picture (143)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Rotate (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Varied (6)  |  Various (200)  |  Wish (212)

Geology, perhaps more than any other department of natural philosophy, is a science of contemplation. It requires no experience or complicated apparatus, no minute processes upon the unknown processes of matter. It demands only an enquiring mind and senses alive to the facts almost everywhere presented in nature. And as it may be acquired without much difficulty, so it may be improved without much painful exertion.
'Lectures on Geology, 1805 Lecture', in R. Siegfried and R. H. Dott (eds.), Humphry Davy on Geology (1980), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Alive (90)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Demand (123)  |  Department (92)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geology (220)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Unknown (182)

He who would do good to another must do it in Minute Particulars: General Good is the plea of the scoundrel, hypocrite, and flatterer, For Art and Science cannot exist but in minutely organized particulars.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Hypocrite (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Particular (76)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scoundrel (8)

He who would do good to another must do it in Minute Particulars: General Good is the plea of the scoundrel, hypocrite, and flatterer, For Art and Science cannot exist but in minutely organized particulars.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Hypocrite (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scoundrel (8)

Here are a few things to keep in mind the next time ants show up in the potato salad. The 8,800 known species of the family Formicidae make up from 10% to 15% of the world's animal biomass, the total weight of all fauna. They are the most dominant social insect in the world, found almost everywhere except in the polar regions. Ants turn more soil than earthworms; they prune, weed and police most of the earth's carrion. Among the most gregarious of creatures, they are equipped with a sophisticated chemical communications system. To appreciate the strength and speed of this pesky invertebrate, consider that a leaf cutter the size of a man could run repeated four-minute miles while carrying 750 lbs. of potato salad.
From book review, 'Nature: Splendor in The Grass', Time (3 Sep 1990).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ant (28)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Carrion (4)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthworm (6)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Family (94)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Gregarious (3)  |  Insect (77)  |  Invertebrate (4)  |  Known (454)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mile (39)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Polar (12)  |  Police (5)  |  Potato (10)  |  Prune (7)  |  Run (174)  |  Show (346)  |  Social (252)  |  Soil (86)  |  Sophistication (9)  |  Species (401)  |  Speed (65)  |  Strength (126)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Weed (18)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

Herewith I offer you the Omnipotent Finger of God in the anatomy of a louse: wherein you will find miracles heaped on miracles and will see the wisdom of God clearly manifested in a minute point.
Letter to Melchisedec Thevenot (Apr 1678). In G. A. Lindeboom (ed.), The Letters of Jan Swammerdam to Melchisedec Thivenot (1975), 104-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Louse (6)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Offer (141)  |  Omnipotence (4)  |  Omnipotent (12)  |  Point (580)  |  See (1081)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

How near one Species to the next is join'd,
The due Gradations please a thinking Mind;
and there are Creatures which no eye can see,
That for a Moment live and breathe like me:
Whom a small Fly in bulk as far exceeds,
As yon tall Cedar does the waving Reeds:
These we can reach—and may we not suppose
There still are Creatures more minute than those.
'The Enquiry'. In Poems Upon Several Occasions (1748), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Breathe (45)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Creature (233)  |  Due (141)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Live (628)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Please (65)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reed (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thinking (414)

I can see him now at the blackboard, chalk in one hand and rubber in the other, writing rapidly and erasing recklessly, pausing every few minutes to face the class and comment earnestly, perhaps on the results of an elaborate calculation, perhaps on the greatness of the Creator, perhaps on the beauty and grandeur of Mathematics, always with a capital M. To him mathematics was not the handmaid of philosophy. It was not a humanly devised instrument of investigation, it was Philosophy itself, the divine revealer of TRUTH.
Writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, a former student of Peirce, in 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Capital (15)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Comment (11)  |  Creator (91)  |  Devised (3)  |  Divine (112)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Face (212)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Handmaid (6)  |  Humanly (4)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Recklessly (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Rubber (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Writing (189)

I don’t know if I would call it a miracle. I would call it a spectacular example of what people can do. To me, it’s like putting the first man on the moon or splitting the atom. We’ve shown that if the right treatment is given to people who have a catastrophic injury that they could walk away from it.
Expressing optimism for further recovery for Kevin Everett, a Buffalo Bills football player who suffered a paralyzing spinal injury during a game (9 Sep 2007), but after two days of hospital treatment had begun voluntarily moving his arms and legs. Green credits as significant to the recovery was that within minutes of his injury, the patient was quickly treated with intravenous ice-cold saline solution to induce hypothermia.
Quoted in John Wawrow, 'Bills' Everett Improves, May Walk Again', Associated Press news report, Washington Post (12 Sep 2007).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Atom (355)  |  Buffalo (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Catastrophic (9)  |  Cold (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Football (10)  |  Game (101)  |  Green (63)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Ice (54)  |  Induce (22)  |  Injury (36)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leg (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Moon (237)  |  Neurosurgery (3)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Significant (74)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Splitting The Atom (4)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)

I had a dislike for [mathematics], and ... was hopelessly short in algebra. ... [One extraordinary teacher of mathematics] got the whole year's course into me in exactly six [after-school] lessons of half an hour each. And how? More accurately, why? Simply because he was an algebra fanatic—because he believed that algebra was not only a science of the utmost importance, but also one of the greatest fascination. ... [H]e convinced me in twenty minutes that ignorance of algebra was as calamitous, socially and intellectually, as ignorance of table manners—That acquiring its elements was as necessary as washing behind the ears. So I fell upon the book and gulped it voraciously. ... To this day I comprehend the binomial theorem.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 261-262.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken's Recollections of School Algebra.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Behind (137)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Book (392)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Course (409)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Ear (68)  |  Element (310)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fanatic (7)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Half (56)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Hour (186)  |  How (3)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Manners (3)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Society (326)  |  Table (104)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Washing (3)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

I heard … xenon was a good anesthesia. … I thought, “How can xenon, which doesn’t form any chemical compounds, serve as a general anesthetic? … I lay awake at night for a few minutes before going to sleep, and during the next couple of weeks each night I would think, “…how do anesthetic agents work?" Then I forgot to do it after a while, but I’d trained my unconscious mind to keep this question alive and to call [it] to my consciousness whenever a new idea turned up…. So seven years went by. [One day I] put my feet up on the desk and started reading my mail, and here was a letter from George Jeffrey … an x-ray crystallographer, on his determination of the structure of a hydrate crystal. Immediately I sat up, took my feet off the desk, and said, “I understand anesthesia!” … I spent a year [and] determined the structure of chloroform hydrate, and then I wrote my paper published in June of 1961.
Interview with George B. Kauffman and Laurie M. Kauffman, in 'Linus Pauling: Reflections', American Scientist (Nov-Dec 1994), 82, No. 6, 522-523.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Alive (90)  |  Anesthesia (5)  |  Awake (19)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chloroform (4)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Determination (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Publish (36)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Spent (85)  |  Start (221)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subconscious (4)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Week (70)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Work (1351)  |  X-ray (37)  |  Xenon (5)  |  Year (933)

I never could do anything with figures, never had any talent for mathematics, never accomplished anything in my efforts at that rugged study, and to-day the only mathematics I know is multiplication, and the minute I get away up in that, as soon as I reach nine times seven— [He lapsed into deep thought, trying to figure nine times seven. Mr. McKelway whispered the answer to him.] I’ve got it now. It’s eighty-four. Well, I can get that far all right with a little hesitation. After that I am uncertain, and I can’t manage a statistic.
Speech at the New York Association for Promoting the Interests of the Blind (29 Mar 1906). In Mark Twain and William Dean Howells (ed.), Mark Twain’s Speeches? (1910), 323.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Deep (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Reach (281)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Whisper (11)

I took a course in speed reading course … and I was able to go through read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It’s about Russia.
As quoted in Reader's Digest (Oct 1967), 91, 120.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Course (409)  |  Peace (108)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Russia (13)  |  Speed (65)  |  Through (849)  |  War (225)

I took him [Lawrence Bragg] to a young zoologist working on pattern formation in insect cuticles. The zoologist explained how disturbances introduced into these regular patterns pointed to their formation being governed by some kind of gradient. Bragg listened attentively and then exclaimed: “Your disturbed gradient behaves like a stream of sand running downhill and encountering an obstacle.” “Good heavens,” replied the zoologist, “I had been working on this problem for years before this simple analogy occurred to me and you think of it after twenty minutes.”
As quoted in David Phillips, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1979), 25, 132, citing: Perutz, M.F. 1971 New Sci. & Sci. J. 8 July 1967.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Being (1278)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (13)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Downhill (3)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Formation (96)  |  Good (889)  |  Govern (64)  |  Gradient (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Listen (73)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regular (46)  |  Running (61)  |  Sand (62)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Zoologist (12)

I wouldn’t miss this opportunity for anything. For the chance to work on these conservation issues, to serve my country, to work for this president, I’d do it all over again, every single minute.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Chance (239)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Do (1908)  |  Issue (42)  |  Miss (51)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  President (31)  |  Serve (59)  |  Single (353)  |  Work (1351)

If it is a terrifying thought that life is at the mercy of the multiplication of these minute bodies [microbes], it is a consoling hope that Science will not always remain powerless before such enemies...
Paper read to the French Academy of Sciences (29 Apr 1878), published in Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences, 86, 1037-43, as translated by H.C.Ernst. Collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.) The Harvard Classics, Vol. 38; Scientific Papers: Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology (1910), 366.
Science quotes on:  |  Consolation (9)  |  Consoling (4)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Germ Theory (2)  |  Hope (299)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microbes (14)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Organism (220)  |  Powerless (6)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Terrify (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)

If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn’t brood. I’d type a little faster.
Life (1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Faster (50)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Physician (273)  |  Type (167)

If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son.
In 'If', Rewards and Fairies (1910), 182.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fill (61)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Run (174)  |  Second (62)  |  Son (24)  |  Worth (169)

In a few minutes a computer can make a mistake so great that it would have taken many men many months to equal.
Anonymous
In Civilization's Quotations: Life's Ideal (2002), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (127)  |  Equal (83)  |  Great (1574)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Month (88)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Domain (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geology (220)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Master (178)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialize (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stream (81)  |  Striking (48)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented knowledge. That was the haughtiest and most mendacious minute of ‘world history’—yet only a minute. After nature had drawn a few breaths the star grew cold, and the clever animals had to die. ... There have been eternities when [human intellect] did not exist; and when it is done for again, nothing will have happened.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Breath (59)  |  Clever (38)  |  Cold (112)  |  Corner (57)  |  Die (86)  |  Draw (137)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Exist (443)  |  Glitter (8)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Haughty (2)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Invent (51)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mendacious (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pour (10)  |  Remote (83)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solar Systems (3)  |  Star (427)  |  System (537)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

IODINE
It was Courtois discover'd Iodine
(In the commencement of this century),
Which, with its sisters, bromine and chlorine,
Enjoys a common parentage - the sea;
Although sometimes 'tis found, with other things,
In minerals and many saline springs.

But yet the quantity is so minute
In the great ocean, that a chemist might,
With sensibilities the most acute,
Have never brought this element to light,
Had he not thought it were as well to try
Where ocean's treasures concentrated lie.

And Courtois found that several plants marine,
Sponges, et cetera, exercise the art
Of drawing from the sea its iodine
In quantities sufficient to impart
Its properties; and he devised a plan
Of bringing it before us - clever man!
Anonymous
Discursive Chemical Notes in Rhyme (1876) by the Author of the Chemical Review, a B.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bromine (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clever (38)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Common (436)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Element (310)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impart (23)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poem (96)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Sea (308)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)

It is a matter of primary importance in the cultivation of those sciences in which truth is discoverable by the human intellect that the investigator should be free, independent, unshackled in his movement; that he should be allowed and enabled to fix his mind intently, nay, exclusively, on his special object, without the risk of being distracted every other minute in the process and progress of his inquiry by charges of temerariousness, or by warnings against extravagance or scandal.
In The Idea of a University Defined and Illustrated (1905), 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Being (1278)  |  Charge (59)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distraction (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Extravagance (3)  |  Free (232)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Importance (286)  |  Independent (67)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Movement (155)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Risk (61)  |  Scandal (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Special (184)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unshackled (2)  |  Warning (17)

It is almost irresistible for humans to believe that we have some special relation to the universe, that human life is not just a more-or-less farcical outcome of a chain of accidents reaching back to the first three minutes, but that we were somehow built in from the beginning.
The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Back (390)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belief (578)  |  Chain (50)  |  Farce (5)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Special (184)  |  Universe (857)

It is estimated that thirty-five to fifty acres of rain forest are chopped down every minute.
From interview collected in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  Chop (7)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Down (456)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Forest (150)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rain Forest (29)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Admit (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Application (242)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (33)  |  Attain (125)  |  Author (167)  |  Balance (77)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (80)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chair (24)  |  Civil (26)  |  Classic (11)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Current (118)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Division (65)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (56)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (364)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (228)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  General (511)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Group (78)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Histology (3)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Major (84)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Office (71)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peer (12)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (77)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Probability (130)  |  Projective Geometry (3)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recess (8)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Relate (21)  |  Render (93)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Service (110)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Single (353)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Survey (33)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  War (225)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It is the destiny of wine to be drunk, and it is the destiny of glucose to be oxidized. But it was not oxidized immediately: its drinker kept it in his liver for more than a week, well curled up and tranquil, as a reserve aliment for a sudden effort; an effort that he was forced to make the following Sunday, pursuing a bolting horse. Farewell to the hexagonal structure: in the space of a few instants the skein was unwound and became glucose again, and this was dragged by the bloodstream all the way to a minute muscle fiber in the thigh, and here brutally split into two molecules of lactic acid, the grim harbinger of fatigue: only later, some minutes after, the panting of the lungs was able to supply the oxygen necessary to quietly oxidize the latter. So a new molecule of carbon dioxide returned to the atmosphere, and a parcel of the energy that the sun had handed to the vine-shoot passed from the state of chemical energy to that of mechanical energy, and thereafter settled down in the slothful condition of heat, warming up imperceptibly the air moved by the running and the blood of the runner. 'Such is life,' although rarely is it described in this manner: an inserting itself, a drawing off to its advantage, a parasitizing of the downward course of energy, from its noble solar form to the degraded one of low-temperature heat. In this downward course, which leads to equilibrium and thus death, life draws a bend and nests in it.
The Periodic Table (1975), trans. Raymond Rosenthal (1984), 192-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Blood (134)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Energy (3)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effort (227)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Glucose (2)  |  Heat (174)  |  Horse (74)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Lactic Acid (2)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Liver (19)  |  Low (80)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nest (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Noble (90)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Running (61)  |  Settled (34)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supply (93)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Two (937)  |  Warming (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)  |  Wine (38)

It is well known that theoretical physicists cannot handle experimental equipment; it breaks whenever they touch it. Pauli was such a good theoretical physicist that something usually broke in the lab whenever he merely stepped across the threshold. A mysterious event that did not seem at first to be connected with Pauli's presence once occurred in Professor J. Franck's laboratory in Göttingen. Early one afternoon, without apparent cause, a complicated apparatus for the study of atomic phenomena collapsed. Franck wrote humorously about this to Pauli at his Zürich address and, after some delay, received an answer in an envelope with a Danish stamp. Pauli wrote that he had gone to visit Bohr and at the time of the mishap in Franck's laboratory his train was stopped for a few minutes at the Göttingen railroad station. You may believe this anecdote or not, but there are many other observations concerning the reality of the Pauli Effect!
From Thirty Years That Shook Physics: The Story of Quantum Theory (1966), 64. Note the so-called Pauli Effect is merely anecdotal to provide humor about supposed parapsychology phenomena in coincidences involving Pauli; it should not be confused with scientifically significant Pauli Exclusion Principle.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Break (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Delay (20)  |  Early (185)  |  Effect (393)  |  Envelope (6)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  First (1283)  |  James Franck (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Handle (28)  |  Humor (8)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mishap (2)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Wolfgang Pauli (16)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Presence (63)  |  Professor (128)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reality (261)  |  Something (719)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Station (29)  |  Step (231)  |  Stopped (3)  |  Study (653)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Train (114)  |  Usually (176)  |  Visit (26)  |  Whenever (81)

It [science] must be amoral by its very nature: the minute it begins separating facts into the two categories of good ones and bad ones it ceases to be science and becomes a mere nuisance, like theology.
From American Mercury (Sep 1927). Collected in A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Category (18)  |  Cease (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Good (889)  |  Mere (84)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Theology (52)  |  Two (937)

Kirchhoff’s whole tendency, and its true counterpart, the form of his presentation, was different [from Maxwell’s “dramatic bulk”]. … He is characterized by the extreme precision of his hypotheses, minute execution, a quiet rather than epic development with utmost rigor, never concealing a difficulty, always dispelling the faintest obscurity. … he resembled Beethoven, the thinker in tones. — He who doubts that mathematical compositions can be beautiful, let him read his memoir on Absorption and Emission … or the chapter of his mechanics devoted to Hydrodynamics.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 30, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 187. From the original German, “Kirchhoff … seine ganze Richtung war eine andere, und ebenso auch deren treues Abbild, die Form seiner Darstellung. … Ihn charakterisirt die schärfste Präcisirung der Hypothesen, feine Durchfeilung, ruhige mehr epische Fortentwicklung mit eiserner Consequenz ohne Verschweigung irgend einer Schwierigkeit, unter Aufhellung des leisesten Schattens. … er glich dem Denker in Tönen: Beethoven. – Wer in Zweifel zieht, dass mathematische Werke künstlerisch schön sein können, der lese seine Abhandlung über Absorption und Emission oder den der Hydrodynamik gewidmeten Abschnitt seiner Mechanik.” The memoir reference is Gesammelte Abhandlungen (1882), 571-598.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Composition (84)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Development (422)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dispel (5)  |  Dispelling (4)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Emission (17)  |  Epic (12)  |  Execution (25)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Faint (9)  |  Form (959)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Read (287)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Tone (22)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Whole (738)

Lift off! We have a lift off 32 minutes past the hour!
NASA
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Hour (186)  |  Lift (55)  |  Lift Off (3)  |  Past (337)

Lift off! We have a lift off
Thirty five minutes past the hour!
O.M.D.
Song lyrics, Apollo XI by Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark (O.M.D.)
Science quotes on:  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lift (55)  |  Lift Off (3)  |  Past (337)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Space Flight (25)

Like all things of the mind, science is a brittle thing: it becomes absurd when you look at it too closely. It is designed for few at a time, not as a mass profession. But now we have megascience: an immense apparatus discharging in a minute more bursts of knowledge than humanity is able to assimilate in a lifetime. Each of us has two eyes, two ears, and, I hope, one brain. We cannot even listen to two symphonies at the same time. How do we get out of the horrible cacophony that assails our minds day and night? We have to learn, as others did, that if science is a machine to make more science, a machine to grind out so-called facts of nature, not all facts are equally worth knowing. Students, in other words, will have to learn to forget most of what they have learned. This process of forgetting must begin after each exam, but never before. The Ph.D. is essentially a license to start unlearning.
Voices In the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science (1979), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Brain (270)  |  Burst (39)  |  Call (769)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ear (68)  |  Education (378)  |  Equally (130)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Forget (115)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immense (86)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  PhD (8)  |  Process (423)  |  Profession (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Start (221)  |  Student (300)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Worth (169)

Look Nature thro’, ’tis neat Gradation all.
By what minute Degrees her Scale ascends!
Each middle Nature join’d at each Extreme,
To that above it join’d, to that beneath.
The Complaint: or, Night-Thoughts on Life, Death, and Immortality (1742, 1750), Night 6, 140.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Degree (276)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Join (26)  |  Look (582)  |  Middle (16)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Scale (121)

Look round the world, contemplate the whole and every part of it: you will find it to be nothing but one great machine, subdivided into an infinite number of lesser machines, which again admit of subdivisions to a degree beyond what human senses and faculties can trace and explain. All these various machines, and even their most minute parts, are adjusted to each other with an accuracy which ravishes into admiration all men who have ever contemplated them. The curious adapting of means to ends, throughout all nature, resembles exactly, though it much exceeds, the productions of human contrivance-of human design, thought, wisdom, and intelligence.
Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779), 47-48.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Curious (91)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  End (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Production (183)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Trace (103)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)

Looking at the thunder machine which had been set up, I saw not the slightest indication of the presence of electricity. However, while they were putting the food on the table, I obtained extraordinary electric sparks from the wire. My wife and others approached from it, for the reason that I wished to have witnesses see the various colors of fire about which the departed Professor Richmann used to argue with me. Suddenly it thundered most violently at the exact time that I was holding my hand to the metal, and sparks crackled. All fled away from me, and my wife implored that I go away. Curiosity kept me there two or three minutes more, until they told me that the soup was getting cold. By that time the force of electricity greatly subsided. I had sat at table only a few minutes when the man servant of the departed Richmann suddenly opened the door, all in tears and out of breath from fear. I thought that some one had beaten him as he was on his way to me, but he said, with difficulty, that the professor had been injured by thunder… . Nonetheless, Mr. Richmann died a splendid death, fulfilling a duty of his profession.
As quoted in Boris Menshutkin, 'Lomonosov: Excerpts', collected in Thomas Riha (ed.), Readings for Introduction to Russian Civilization (1963), Vol. 2, 30.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Argue (23)  |  Breath (59)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Death (388)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Door (93)  |  Duty (68)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flee (8)  |  Food (199)  |  Force (487)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Hand (143)  |  Indication (33)  |  Injure (3)  |  Looking (189)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Presence (63)  |  Profession (99)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reason (744)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Servant (39)  |  Set (394)  |  Soup (9)  |  Spark (31)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Table (104)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wire (35)  |  Wish (212)

Mr. Darwin in the Zoological Gardens. Frank Darwin told me his father was once standing near the hippopotamus cage when a little boy and girl, aged four and five, came up. The hippopotamus shut his eyes for a minute. “That bird’s dead,” said the little girl; “come along.”
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 243. Francis Darwin was a son of Charles Darwin.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bird (149)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cage (12)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Francis Darwin (6)  |  Dead (59)  |  Eye (419)  |  Father (110)  |  Garden (60)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hippopotamus (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Shut (41)  |  Zoo (8)

Natural science is founded on minute critical views of the general order of events taking place upon our globe, corrected, enlarged, or exalted by experiments, in which the agents concerned are placed under new circumstances, and their diversified properties separately examined. The body of natural science, then, consists of facts; is analogy,—the relation of resemblance of facts by which its different parts are connected, arranged, and employed, either for popular use, or for new speculative improvements.
'Introductory Lecture to the Chemistry of Nature' (1807), in J. Davy (ed.), The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy (1839-40), Vol 8, 167-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Body (537)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consist (223)  |  Critical (66)  |  Different (577)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)

Nature, … in order to carry out the marvelous operations [that occur] in animals and plants has been pleased to construct their organized bodies with a very large number of machines, which are of necessity made up of extremely minute parts so shaped and situated as to form a marvelous organ, the structure and composition of which are usually invisible to the naked eye without the aid of a microscope. … Just as Nature deserves praise and admiration for making machines so small, so too the physician who observes them to the best of his ability is worthy of praise, not blame, for he must also correct and repair these machines as well as he can every time they get out of order.
'Reply to Doctor Sbaraglia' in Opera Posthuma (1697), in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 568.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Aid (97)  |  Animal (617)  |  Best (459)  |  Blame (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Carry (127)  |  Composition (84)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Correction (40)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Large (394)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Minuteness (8)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked Eye (12)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organization (114)  |  Out Of Order (2)  |  Part (222)  |  Physician (273)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Praise (26)  |  Repair (11)  |  Shape (72)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)

Newton lectured now and then to the few students who chose to hear him; and it is recorded that very frequently he came to the lecture-room and found it empty. On such occasions he would remain fifteen minutes, and then, if no one came, return to his apartments.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Apartment (4)  |  Choose (112)  |  Empty (80)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Hear (139)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Record (154)  |  Remain (349)  |  Return (124)  |  Student (300)

No creature is too bulky or formidable for man's destructive energies—none too minute and insignificant for his keen detection and skill of capture. It was ordained from the beginning that we should be the masters and subduers of all inferior animals. Let us remember, however, that we ourselves, like the creatures we slay, subjugate, and modify, are the results of the same Almighty creative will—temporary sojourners here, and co-tenants with the worm and the whale of one small planet. In the exercise, therefore, of those superior powers that have been intrusted to us, let us ever bear in mind that our responsibilities are heightened in proportion.
Lecture to the London Society of Arts, 'The Raw Materials of the Animal Kingdom', collected in Lectures on the Results of the Great Exhibition of 1851' (1852), 131.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Capture (10)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creature (233)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Detection (16)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Formidable (7)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Keen (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modify (15)  |  Ordained (2)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Remember (179)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Skill (109)  |  Slaying (2)  |  Small (477)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Superior (81)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Tenant (2)  |  Whale (32)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worm (42)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (69)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Door (93)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (47)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Help (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Involve (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Listen (73)  |  Mile (39)  |  Muse (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (15)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rich (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Roll (40)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strand (9)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (300)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Not from the stars do I my judgement pluck,
And yet methinks I have astronomy.
But not to tell of good or evil luck,
Of plagues, of dearths, or season's quality;
Nor can I fortune to brief minutes tell,
Pointing to each his thunder, rain, and wind,
Or say with princes if it shall go well …
Opening lines of 'Sonnet 14' (1609) in Complete Dramatic Works and Miscellaneous Poems (1823), 776. (1906), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Brief (36)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Luck (42)  |  Plague (41)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rain (62)  |  Say (984)  |  Season (47)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Wind (128)

ORGANIC LIFE beneath the shoreless waves
Was born and nurs'd in Ocean's pearly caves;
First, forms minute, unseen by spheric glass,
Move on the mud, or pierce the watery mass;
These, as successive generations bloom,
New powers acquire, and larger limbs assume;
Whence countless groups of vegetation spring,
And breathing realms of fin, and feet, and wing.
Thus the tall Oak, the giant of the wood,
Which bears Britannia's thunders on the flood;
The Whale, unmeasured monster of the main,
The lordly Lion, monarch of the plain,
The Eagle soaring in the realms of air,
Whose eye undazzled drinks the solar glare,
Imperious man, who rules the bestial crowd,
Of language, reason, and reflection proud,
With brow erect, who scorns this earthy sod,
And styles himself the image of his God;
Arose from rudiments of form and sense,
An embryon point, or microscopic ens!
The Temple of Nature (1803), canto 1, lines 295-314, pages 26-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Countless (36)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Flood (50)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Giant (67)  |  Glass (92)  |  God (757)  |  Himself (461)  |  Image (96)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lion (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Monster (31)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Oak (14)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Organic (158)  |  Poem (96)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Sense (770)  |  Soaring (9)  |  Spring (133)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Wave (107)  |  Whale (32)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wood (92)

Round about the accredited and orderly facts of every science there ever floats a sort of dust-cloud of exceptional observations, of occurrences minute and irregular and seldom met with, which it always proves more easy to ignore than to attend to … Anyone will renovate his science who will steadily look after the irregular phenomena, and when science is renewed, its new formulas often have more of the voice of the exceptions in them than of what were supposed to be the rules.
In 'The Hidden Self', Scribner’s Magazine (1890), Vol. 7, 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Dust (64)  |  Easy (204)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Float (30)  |  Formula (98)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Irregular (6)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Prove (250)  |  Renew (19)  |  Renovate (3)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Will (2355)

Round about the accredited and orderly facts of every science there ever floats a sort of dustcloud of exceptional observations, of occurrences minute and irregular and seldom met with, which it always proves more easy to ignore than to attend to.
The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Easy (204)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Float (30)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)

Running overtime is the one unforgivable error a lecturer can make. After fifty minutes (one microcentury as von Neumann used to say) everybody's attention will turn elsewhere.
In 'Ten Lessons I Wish I Had Been Taught', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 197.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attention (190)  |  Error (321)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Running (61)  |  Say (984)  |  Turn (447)  |  John von Neumann (28)  |  Will (2355)

Science has gone down into the mines and coal-pits, and before the safety-lamp the Gnomes and Genii of those dark regions have disappeared… Sirens, mermaids, shining cities glittering at the bottom of quiet seas and in deep lakes, exist no longer; but in their place, Science, their destroyer, shows us whole coasts of coral reef constructed by the labours of minute creatures; points to our own chalk cliffs and limestone rocks as made of the dust of myriads of generations of infinitesimal beings that have passed away; reduces the very element of water into its constituent airs, and re-creates it at her pleasure.
Book review of Robert Hunt, Poetry of Science (1848), in the London Examiner (1848). Although uncredited in print, biographers identified his authorship from his original handwritten work. Collected in Charles Dickens and Frederic George Kitton (ed.) Old Lamps for New Ones: And Other Sketches and Essays (1897), 86-87.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Chalk (8)  |  City (78)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Coal (57)  |  Coast (13)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Construct (124)  |  Constructing (3)  |  Coral (10)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Create (235)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deep (233)  |  Destroyer (4)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Down (456)  |  Dust (64)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glitter (8)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lake (32)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  Mine (76)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pit (19)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reef (7)  |  Region (36)  |  Rock (161)  |  Safety (54)  |  Safety Lamp (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shining (35)  |  Show (346)  |  Siren (4)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

Science, regarded as the pursuit of truth, which can only be attained by patient and unprejudiced investigation, wherein nothing is to be attempted, nothing so minute as to be justly disregarded, must ever afford occupation of consummate interest, and subject of elevated meditation.
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1858), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Consummate (4)  |  Disregard (8)  |  Elevated (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mediation (4)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unprejudiced (2)

Scientific inquiry would thus he conceived of as analogous to terrestrial exploration, whose product—geography—yields results of continually smaller significance which fill in ever more minute gaps in our information. In such a view, later investigations yield findings of ever smaller importance, with each successive accretion making a relatively smaller contribution to what has already come to hand. The advance of science leads, step by diminished step, toward a fixed and final view of things.
In The Limits Of Science (1984, Rev. 1999), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Accretion (5)  |  Advance (280)  |  Already (222)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fill (61)  |  Final (118)  |  Findings (5)  |  Gap (33)  |  Geography (36)  |  Importance (286)  |  Information (166)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lead (384)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Product (160)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Step (231)  |  Successive (73)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thing (1915)  |  View (488)  |  Yield (81)

Sir Mortimer Wheeler is perhaps the most distinguished archaeologist in Europe. But he owes the greatest of his achievements to the rare combination of two qualities: namely a scientific expertise in the technique of excavation which has always been marked by a meticulous attention to minute detail, and a gift of imaginative vision.
Book review of two books by Mortimer Wheeler, 'Achaeology From the Earth' and 'Rome Beyond the Imperial Frontiers', in Blackfriars (Jan 1955), 36, No. 418, 597-598.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Attention (190)  |  Combination (144)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Expertise (8)  |  Gift (104)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Marked (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Owe (71)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rare (89)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Technique (80)  |  Two (937)  |  Vision (123)  |  Sir Mortimer Wheeler (4)

So many of the properties of matter, especially when in the gaseous form, can be deduced from the hypothesis that their minute parts are in rapid motion, the velocity increasing with the temperature, that the precise nature of this motion becomes a subject of rational curiosity. Daniel Bernoulli, Herapath, Joule, Kronig, Clausius, &c., have shewn that the relations between pressure, temperature and density in a perfect gas can be explained by supposing the particles move with uniform velocity in straight lines, striking against the sides of the containing vessel and thus producing pressure. (1860)
In W.D. Niven (ed.) 'Illustrations of the Dynamical Theory of Gases,' The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell, Vol 1, 377. Quoted in John David Anderson, Jr., Hypersonic and High Temperature Gas Dynamics (2000), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Become (815)  |  Daniel Bernoulli (5)  |  Rudolf Clausius (9)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Density (25)  |  Explain (322)  |  Form (959)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Kinetic Theory (7)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Precise (68)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Properties Of Matter (7)  |  Rational (90)  |  Side (233)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subject (521)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Vessel (63)

Sooner or later in every talk, [David] Brower describes the creation of the world. He invites his listeners to consider the six days of Genesis as a figure of speech for what has in fact been 4 billion years. On this scale, one day equals something like six hundred and sixty-six million years, and thus, all day Monday and until Tuesday noon, creation was busy getting the world going. Life began Tuesday noon, and the beautiful organic wholeness of it developed over the next four days. At 4 p.m. Saturday, the big reptiles came on. At three minutes before midnight on the last day, man appeared. At one-fourth of a second before midnight Christ arrived. At one-fortieth of a second before midnight, the Industrial Revolution began. We are surrounded with people who think that what we have been doing for that one-fortieth of a second can go on indefinitely. They are considered normal, but they are stark. raving mad.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 79-80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Begin (260)  |  Big (48)  |  Billion (95)  |  Brower (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Christ (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  David (6)  |  Describe (128)  |  Develop (268)  |  Doing (280)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Figure (160)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Invite (9)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listener (7)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Million (114)  |  Monday (3)  |  Next (236)  |  Noon (14)  |  Normal (28)  |  Organic (158)  |  P (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Scale (121)  |  Second (62)  |  Something (719)  |  Sooner (6)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stark (3)  |  Surround (30)  |  Talk (100)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tuesday (3)  |  Wholeness (9)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Space is so close: It took only eight minutes to get there and twenty to get back.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Close (69)  |  Space (500)

Suppose [an] imaginary physicist, the student of Niels Bohr, is shown an experiment in which a virus particle enters a bacterial cell and 20 minutes later the bacterial cell is lysed and 100 virus particles are liberated. He will say: “How come, one particle has become 100 particles of the same kind in 20 minutes? That is very interesting. Let us find out how it happens! How does the particle get in to the bacterium? How does it multiply? Does it multiply like a bacterium, growing and dividing, or does it multiply by an entirely different mechanism ? Does it have to be inside the bacterium to do this multiplying, or can we squash the bacterium and have the multiplication go on as before? Is this multiplying a trick of organic chemistry which the organic chemists have not yet discovered ? Let us find out. This is so simple a phenomenon that the answers cannot be hard to find. In a few months we will know. All we have to do is to study how conditions will influence the multiplication. We will do a few experiments at different temperatures, in different media, with different viruses, and we will know. Perhaps we may have to break into the bacteria at intermediate stages between infection and lysis. Anyhow, the experiments only take a few hours each, so the whole problem can not take long to solve.”
[Eight years later] he has not got anywhere in solving the problem he set out to solve. But [he may say to you] “Well, I made a slight mistake. I could not do it in a few months. Perhaps it will take a few decades, and perhaps it will take the help of a few dozen other people. But listen to what I have found, perhaps you will be interested to join me.”
From 'Experiments with Bacterial Viruses (Bacteriophages)', Harvey Lecture (1946), 41, 161-162. As cited in Robert Olby, The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (1974, 1994), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Become (815)  |  Break (99)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Condition (356)  |  Decade (59)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infection (27)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Media (13)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Month (88)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Problem (676)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solve (130)  |  Squash (4)  |  Stage (143)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Trick (35)  |  Virus (27)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Taking a very gloomy view of the future of the human race, let us suppose that it can only expect to survive for two thousand millions years longer, a period about equal to the past age of the earth. Then, regarded as a being destined to live for three-score years and ten, humanity although it has been born in a house seventy years old, is itself only three days old. But only in the last few minutes has it become conscious that the whole world does not centre round its cradle and its trappings, and only in the last few ticks of the clock has any adequate conception of the size of the external world dawned upon it. For our clock does not tick seconds, but years; its minutes are the lives of men.
EOS: Or the Wider Aspects of Cosmology (1928), 12-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of The Earth (12)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clock (47)  |  Conception (154)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Destined (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Expect (200)  |  Future (429)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Last (426)  |  Live (628)  |  Old (481)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tick (9)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Rufus Porter quote Animalculae…hideous forms…with malignant and voracious propensities
From paragraph in Scientific American (1846) urging the use of water filters. (source)
The fact is generally known that nearly all liquids contain a variety of minute living animals, though in some they are too small for observation, even with a microscope. In others, especially in water that has been long stagnant, these animals appear not only in hideous forms, but with malignant and voracious propensities. … we cheerfully and heartily recommend the adoption of filters by all who use this water, from either the public or private hydrants.
In 'Animalculae in Water', Scientific American (10 Oct 1846), 2, No. 3, 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Filter (9)  |  Form (959)  |  Hideous (5)  |  Known (454)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Malignant (2)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Private (23)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Public (96)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Small (477)  |  Stagnant (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Water (481)

The first step in all physical investigations, even in those which admit of the application of mathematical reasoning and the deductive method afterwards, is the observation of natural phenomena; and the smallest error in such observation in the beginning is sufficient to vitiate the whole investigation afterwards. The necessity of strict and minute observation, then, is the first thing which the student of the physical sciences has to learn; and it is easy to see with what great advantage the habit thus acquired may be carried into everything else afterwards.
Presidential Address to Anniversary meeting of the Royal Society (30 Nov 1859), Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (1860), 10, 164-165.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Easy (204)  |  Error (321)  |  Everything (476)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habit (168)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Learn (629)  |  Method (505)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whole (738)

The future … [is] something which everyone reaches at the rate of sixty minutes an hour, whatever he does, whoever he is.
In The Screwtape Letters & Screwtape Proposes a Toast (1961), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Everyone (34)  |  Future (429)  |  Hour (186)  |  Rate (29)  |  Reach (281)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whoever (42)

The heat produced in maximal muscular effort, continued for twenty minutes, would be so great that, if it were not promptly dissipated, it would cause some of the albuminous substances of the body to become stiff, like a hard-boiled egg.
Science quotes on:  |  Albumin (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cause (541)  |  Effort (227)  |  Egg (69)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Heat (174)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Produced (187)  |  Stiff (3)  |  Substance (248)

The infinite variations in the ways creatures fulfill the same requirement—to fuel energy needs—constantly astound me. Booby birds and pelicans … actually performed underwater dives, descending some twenty feet below the surface and then flapping their wings to fly through water. Totally encrusted with tiny diamond bubbles—like the jeweled nightingales of Asian emperors—they soared around below for nearly half a minute.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Asian (3)  |  Astound (7)  |  Below (24)  |  Bird (149)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Creature (233)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Dive (11)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Need (290)  |  Nightingale (2)  |  Perform (121)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Soar (23)  |  Surface (209)  |  Through (849)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Underwater (5)  |  Variation (90)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)

The line separating investment and speculation, which is never bright and clear, becomes blurred still further when most market participants have recently enjoyed triumphs. Nothing sedates rationality like large doses of effortless money. After a heady experience of that kind, normally sensible people drift into behavior akin to that of Cinderella at the ball. They know that overstaying the festivities—that is, continuing to speculate in companies that have gigantic valuations relative to the cash they are likely to generate in the future—will eventually bring on pumpkins and mice. But they nevertheless hate to miss a single minute of what is one helluva party. Therefore, the giddy participants all plan to leave just seconds before midnight. There’s a problem, though: They are dancing in a room in which the clocks have no hands.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Akin (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Become (815)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Blur (8)  |  Bright (79)  |  Bring (90)  |  Cash (2)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clock (47)  |  Company (59)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dance (32)  |  Dose (16)  |  Drift (13)  |  Effortless (3)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Future (429)  |  Generate (16)  |  Giddy (3)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hate (64)  |  Heady (2)  |  Investment (13)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Market (20)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Miss (51)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Normally (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Overstay (2)  |  Participant (6)  |  Party (18)  |  People (1005)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Recently (3)  |  Relative (39)  |  Room (40)  |  Second (62)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Still (613)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Valuation (4)  |  Will (2355)

The manner of Demoivre’s death has a certain interest for psychologists. Shortly before it, he declared that it was necessary for him to sleep some ten minutes or a quarter of an hour longer each day than the preceding one: the day after he had thus reached a total of something over twenty-three hours he slept up to the limit of twenty-four hours, and then died in his sleep.
In History of Mathematics (3rd Ed., 1901), 394.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Certain (550)  |  Day (42)  |  Death (388)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interest (386)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Psychologist (15)  |  Reach (281)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Something (719)  |  Total (94)

The moment after, I began to respire 20 quarts of unmingled nitrous oxide. A thrilling, extending from the chest to the extremities, was almost immediately produced. I felt a sense of tangible extension highly pleasurable in every limb; my visible impressions were dazzling, and apparently magnified, I heard distinctly every sound in the room and was perfectly aware of my situation. By degrees, as the pleasurable sensations increased, I last all connection with external things; trains of vivid visible images rapidly passed through my mind, and were connected with words in such a manner, as to produce perceptions perfectly novel. I existed in a world of newly connected and newly modified ideas. I theorised—I imagined that I made discoveries. When I was awakened from this semi-delirious trance by Dr. Kinglake, who took the bag from my mouth, indignation and pride were the first feelings produced by the sight of the persons about me. My emotions were enthusiastic and sublime; and for a minute I walked round the room, perfectly regardless of what was said to me. As I recovered my former state of mind, I felt an inclination to communicate the discoveries I had made during the experiment. I endeavoured to recall the ideas, they were feeble and indistinct; one collection of terms, however, presented itself: and with the most intense belief and prophetic manner, I exclaimed to Dr Kinglake, 'Nothing exists but thoughts!—the universe is composed of impressions, ideas, pleasures and pains!'
Researches, Chemical and Philosophical (1800), in J. Davy (ed.), The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy (1839-40), Vol 3, 289-90.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anaesthetic (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biography (240)  |  Collection (64)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Degree (276)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extension (59)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Idea (843)  |  Image (96)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nitrous Oxide (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Novel (32)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perception (97)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Pride (78)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sound (183)  |  State (491)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Walk (124)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The monogram of our national initials, which is the symbol for our monetary unit, the dollar, is almost as frequently conjoined to the figures of an engineer’s calculations as are the symbols indicating feet, minutes, pounds, or gallons. … This statement, while true in regard to the work of all engineers, applies particularly to that of the mechanical engineer…
'The Engineer as an Economist', Proceedings of the Chicago Meeting (25-28 May 1886)Transactions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1886), 7, 428.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Economics (37)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Figure (160)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanical Engineer (2)  |  Money (170)  |  Regard (305)  |  Statement (142)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Unit (33)  |  Work (1351)

The moon is a very nice place. When we landed, we were 20 minutes behind. Because time on the Moon was so precious, what I remember most is trying to catch up.
As quoted in 'NASA Mourns the Passing of Astronaut John Young' (6 Jan 2018) on nasa.gov website.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Catch Up (2)  |  Land (115)  |  Late (118)  |  Moon (237)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nice (13)  |  Place (177)  |  Precious (41)  |  Remember (179)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)

The more important fundamental laws and facts of physical science have all been discovered, and these are now so firmly established that the possibility of their ever being supplanted in consequence of new discoveries is exceedingly remote. Nevertheless, it has been found that there are apparent exceptions to most of these laws, and this is particularly true when the observations are pushed to a limit, i.e., whenever the circumstances of experiment are such that extreme cases can be examined. Such examination almost surely leads, not to the overthrow of the law, but to the discovery of other facts and laws whose action produces the apparent exceptions. As instances of such discoveries, which are in most cases due to the increasing order of accuracy made possible by improvements in measuring instruments, may be mentioned: first, the departure of actual gases from the simple laws of the so-called perfect gas, one of the practical results being the liquefaction of air and all known gases; second, the discovery of the velocity of light by astronomical means, depending on the accuracy of telescopes and of astronomical clocks; third, the determination of distances of stars and the orbits of double stars, which depend on measurements of the order of accuracy of one-tenth of a second-an angle which may be represented as that which a pin's head subtends at a distance of a mile. But perhaps the most striking of such instances are the discovery of a new planet or observations of the small irregularities noticed by Leverrier in the motions of the planet Uranus, and the more recent brilliant discovery by Lord Rayleigh of a new element in the atmosphere through the minute but unexplained anomalies found in weighing a given volume of nitrogen. Many other instances might be cited, but these will suffice to justify the statement that “our future discoveries must be looked for in the sixth place of decimals.”
In Light Waves and Their Uses (1903), 23-4. Michelson had some years earlier referenced “an eminent physicist” that he did not name who had “remarked that the future truths of physical science are to be looked for in the sixth place of decimals,” near the end of his Convocation Address at the Dedication of the Ryerson Physical Laboratory at the University of Chicago, 'Some of the Objects and Methods of Physical Science' (4 Jul 1894), published in University of Chicago Quarterly Calendar (Aug 1894), 3, No.2, 15. Also
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Anomaly (11)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Call (769)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Clock (47)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Due (141)  |  Element (310)  |  Examination (98)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Exception (73)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Gas (83)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  LeVerrier_Urbain (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Liquefaction (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  New (1216)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Observation (555)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pin (18)  |  Planet (356)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practical (200)  |  Push (62)  |  Sir John William Strutt, Lord Rayleigh (9)  |  Recent (77)  |  Remote (83)  |  Represent (155)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Statement (142)  |  Striking (48)  |  Surely (101)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Unexplained (8)  |  Uranus (4)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Urbain-Jean-Joseph Le Verrier (4)  |  Volume (19)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)

The night before Easter Sunday of that year (1920) I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory, and performed a simple experiment on a frog heart according to the nocturnal design. I have to describe this experiment briefly since its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse. The hearts of two frogs were isolated, the first with its nerves, the second without. Both hearts were attached to Straub cannulas filled with a little Ringer solution. The vagus nerve of the first heart was stimulated for a few minutes. Then the Ringer solution that had been in the first heart during the stimulation of the vagus was transferred to the second heart. It slowed and its beats diminished just as if its vagus had been stimulated. Similarly, when the accelerator nerve was stimulated and the Ringer from this period transferred, the second heart speeded up and its beats increased. These results unequivocally proved that the nerves do not influence the heart directly but liberate from their terminals specific chemical substances which, in their turn, cause the well-known modifications of the function of the heart characteristic of the stimulation of its nerves.
'An Autobiographic Sketch', Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (1960), 4, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerator (10)  |  According (237)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Beat (41)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Clock (47)  |  Describe (128)  |  Design (195)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Easter (4)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Frog (38)  |  Function (228)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Influence (222)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Modification (55)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Next (236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perform (121)  |  Period (198)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Scrawl (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speed (65)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)

The night spread out of the east in a great flood, quenching the red sunlight in a single minute. We wriggled by breathless degrees deep into our sleeping bags. Our sole thought was of comfort; we were not alive to the beauty or the grandeur of our position; we did not reflect on the splendor of our elevation. A regret I shall always have is that I did not muster up the energy to spend a minute or two stargazing. One peep I did make between the tent flaps into the night, and I remember dimly an appalling wealth of stars, not pale and remote as they appear when viewed through the moisture-laden air of lower levels, but brilliant points of electric blue fire standing out almost stereoscopically. It was a sight an astronomer would have given much to see, and here were we lying dully in our sleeping bags concerned only with the importance of keeping warm and comfortable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Alive (90)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Appear (118)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Bag (3)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blue (56)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dimly (6)  |  East (18)  |  Electric (76)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flap (2)  |  Flood (50)  |  Give (202)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Keep (101)  |  Level (67)  |  Lie (364)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Muster (2)  |  Night (120)  |  Pale (9)  |  Peep (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Red (35)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Regret (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remote (83)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Single (353)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Sole (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Spread (83)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Tent (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Wriggle (2)

The only important thing to realise about history is that it all took place in the last five minutes.
In The Decline and Fall of Science (1976), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  History (673)  |  Important (209)  |  Last (426)  |  Realize (147)  |  Thing (1915)

The Pacific. You don’t comprehend it by looking at a globe, but when you’re traveling at four miles a second and it still takes you twenty-five minutes to cross it, you know it’s big.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Big (48)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Cross (16)  |  Globe (47)  |  Know (1518)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mile (39)  |  Pacific (2)  |  Second (62)  |  Still (613)  |  Travel (114)

The pilots I worked with in the aerospace industry were willing to put on almost anything to keep them safe in case of a crash, but regular people in cars don't want to be uncomfortable even for a minute.
as quoted by Karl Ritter, Associated Press writer in news article Inventor of Three-Point Seat Belt Dies, 26 Sep 2002
Science quotes on:  |  Car (71)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Industry (137)  |  People (1005)  |  Regular (46)  |  Safe (54)  |  Safety (54)  |  Want (497)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)

The so-called science of poll-taking is not a science at all but mere necromancy. People are unpredictable by nature, and although you can take a nation's pulse, you can't be sure that the nation hasn't just run up a flight of stairs, and although you can take a nation's blood pressure, you can’t be sure that if you came back in twenty minutes you’d get the same reading. This is a damn fine thing. .
In 'Polling' (13 Nov 1948), collected in Writings from The New Yorker, 1925-1976 (1976, 2006), 60.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Blood (134)  |  Call (769)  |  Error (321)  |  Flight (98)  |  Mere (84)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necromancy (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Reading (133)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Stairs (2)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unpredictable (17)

The sun atom shakes; my eye electron shakes eight minutes later, because of a direct interaction across.
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Direct (225)  |  Electron (93)  |  Eye (419)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Shake (41)  |  Sun (385)

The Sun is no lonelier than its neighbors; indeed, it is a very common-place star,—dwarfish, though not minute,—like hundreds, nay thousands, of others. By accident the brighter component of Alpha Centauri (which is double) is almost the Sun's twin in brightness, mass, and size. Could this Earth be transported to its vicinity by some supernatural power, and set revolving about it, at a little less than a hundred million miles' distance, the star would heat and light the world just as the Sun does, and life and civilization might go on with no radical change. The Milky Way would girdle the heavens as before; some of our familiar constellations, such as Orion, would be little changed, though others would be greatly altered by the shifting of the nearer stars. An unfamiliar brilliant star, between Cassiopeia and Perseus would be—the Sun. Looking back at it with our telescopes, we could photograph its spectrum, observe its motion among the stars, and convince ourselves that it was the same old Sun; but what had happened to the rest of our planetary system we would not know.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Alpha Centauri (2)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Back (390)  |  Brightness (12)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cassiopeia (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Component (48)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Convince (41)  |  Distance (161)  |  Double (15)  |  Dwarf (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Loneliness (5)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mile (39)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Million (114)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Nearness (3)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Perseus (2)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Radical (25)  |  Rest (280)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Set (394)  |  Shift (44)  |  Size (60)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  System (537)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transport (30)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Twin (15)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The universe flows, carrying with it milky ways and worlds, Gondwanas and Eurasias, inconsistent visions and clumsy systems. But the good conceptual models, these serena templa of intelligence on which several masters have worked, never disappear entirely. They are the great legacy of the past. They linger under more and more harmonious forms and actually never cease to grow. They bring solace by the great art that is inseparable from them. Their permanence relies on the immortal poetry of truth, of the truth that is given to us in minute amounts, foretelling an order whose majesty dominates time.
Tectonics of Asia (1924),164, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Art (657)  |  Cease (79)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Linger (14)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Master (178)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Past (337)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Poetry (143)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

There are many points in the history of an invention which the inventor himself is apt to overlook as trifling, but in which posterity never fail to take a deep interest. The progress of the human mind is never traced with such a lively interest as through the steps by which it perfects a great invention; and there is certainly no invention respecting which this minute information will be more eagerly sought after, than in the case of the steam-engine.
Quoted in The Origin and Progress of the Mechanical Inventions of James Watt (1854), Vol.1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Deep (233)  |  Engine (98)  |  Fail (185)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Information (166)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Lively (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Progress (465)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

There is no logical impossibility in the hypothesis that the world sprang into being five minutes ago, exactly as it then was, with a population that "remembered" a wholly unreal past. There is no logically necessary connection between events at different times; therefore nothing that is happening now or will happen in the future can disprove the hypothesis that the world began five minutes ago.
In The Analysis of Mind (1921) 159–160.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Connection (162)  |  Different (577)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Event (216)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Logic (287)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Population (110)  |  Remember (179)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unreal (4)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

There was a loudspeaker that reported on the time left before the blast: “T-minus ten minutes”—something like that. The last few seconds were counted off one by one. We had all turned away. At zero there was the flash. I counted and then turned around. The first thing I saw was a yellow-orange fireball that kept getting larger. As it grew, it turned more orange and then red. A mushroom-shaped cloud of glowing magenta began to rise over the desert where the explosion had been. My first thought was, “My God, that is beautiful!”
(1982).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blast (13)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Count (105)  |  Desert (56)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fireball (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Flash (49)  |  Glow (14)  |  God (757)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  Mushroom (4)  |  Orange (14)  |  Rise (166)  |  Saw (160)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Yellow (30)  |  Zero (37)

There was a seminar for advanced students in Zürich that I was teaching and von Neumann was in the class. I came to a certain theorem, and I said it is not proved and it may be difficult. Von Neumann didn’t say anything but after five minutes he raised his hand. When I called on him he went to the blackboard and proceeded to write down the proof. After that I was afraid of von Neumann.
In George Pólya and Gerald L. Alexanderson (ed.) The Pólya Picture Album: Encounters of a Mathematician (1987), 154. Also footnoted in Matti Tedre, The Development of Computer Science: a Sociocultural Perspective (2006), 198, cited as from How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (1957), xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (21)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Down (456)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proof (287)  |  Say (984)  |  Seminar (4)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Theorem (112)  |  John von Neumann (28)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

These duplicates in those parts of the body, without which a man might have very well subsisted, though not so well as with them, are a plain demonstration of an all-wise Contriver, as those more numerous copyings which are found among the vessels of the same body are evident demonstrations that they could not be the work of chance. This argument receives additional strength if we apply it to every animal and insect within our knowledge, as well as to those numberless living creatures that are objects too minute for a human eye: and if we consider how the several species in this whole world of life resemble one another in very many particulars, so far as is convenient for their respective states of existence, it is much more probable that a hundred millions of dice should be casually thrown a hundred millions of times in the same number than that the body of any single animal should be produced by the fortuitous concourse of matter.
In The Spectator (22 Nov 1712), No. 543, as collected in Vol. 4 (1721, 10th ed.), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Additional (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Body (537)  |  Casually (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Concourse (5)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contriver (2)  |  Creature (233)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dice (21)  |  Duplicate (8)  |  Evident (91)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Eye (2)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Insect (77)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Object (422)  |  Particular (76)  |  Probability (130)  |  Probable (20)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Receive (114)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Single (353)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Strength (126)  |  Subsist (5)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Thinking is the activity I love best, and writing to me is simply thinking through my fingers. I can write up to 18 hours a day. Typing 90 words a minute, I’ve done better than 50 pages a day. Nothing interferes with my concentration. You could put an orgy in my office and I wouldn't look up—well, maybe once.
When accepting the James T. Grady award from the American Chemical Society. As quoted in Something About the Author (1981), Vol. 26, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Finger (44)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Look (582)  |  Love (309)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Office (71)  |  Orgy (3)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

This part of optics [perspectiva], when well understood, shows us how we may make things a very long way off appear to be placed very close, and large near things appear very small, and how we may make small things placed at a distance appear as large as we want, so that it is possible for us to read the smallest letters at an incredible distance, or to count sand, or grain, or seeds, or any sort of minute objects.
Describing the use of a lens for magnification.
De iride, in Baur, Die philosophischen Werke, 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Count (105)  |  Distance (161)  |  Grain (50)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Large (394)  |  Lens (14)  |  Letter (109)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Object (422)  |  Optics (23)  |  Possible (552)  |  Read (287)  |  Sand (62)  |  Seed (93)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

To day we made the grand experiment of burning the diamond and certainly the phenomena presented were extremely beautiful and interesting… The Duke’s burning glass was the instrument used to apply heat to the diamond. It consists of two double convex lenses … The instrument was placed in an upper room of the museum and having arranged it at the window the diamond was placed in the focus and anxiously watched. The heat was thus continued for 3/4 of an hour (it being necessary to cool the globe at times) and during that time it was thought that the diamond was slowly diminishing and becoming opaque … On a sudden Sir H Davy observed the diamond to burn visibly, and when removed from the focus it was found to be in a state of active and rapid combustion. The diamond glowed brilliantly with a scarlet light, inclining to purple and, when placed in the dark, continued to burn for about four minutes. After cooling the glass heat was again applied to the diamond and it burned again though not for nearly so long as before. This was repeated twice more and soon after the diamond became all consumed. This phenomenon of actual and vivid combustion, which has never been observed before, was attributed by Sir H Davy to be the free access of air; it became more dull as carbonic acid gas formed and did not last so long.
Entry (Florence, 27 Mar 1814) in his foreign journal kept whilst on a continental tour with Sir Humphry Davy. In Michael Faraday, Bence Jones (ed.), The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 119. Silvanus Phillips Thompson identifies the Duke as the Grand Duke of Tuscany, in Michael Faraday, His Life and Work (1901), 21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Access (20)  |  Acid (83)  |  Active (76)  |  Actual (117)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convex (6)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Dark (140)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Dull (54)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Focus (35)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Gas (83)  |  Glass (92)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Window (58)

To sum up:
1. The cosmos is a gigantic fly-wheel making 10,000 revolutions a minute.
2. Man is a sick fly taking a dizzy ride on it.
3. Religion is the theory that the wheel was designed and set spinning to give him the ride.
From The Smart Set (Dec 1920), 45. Collected in 'Coda', A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Design (195)  |  Dizzy (4)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flywheel (2)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Religion (361)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Ride (21)  |  Set (394)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Sum (102)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wheel (50)

To the east was our giant neighbor Makalu, unexplored and unclimbed, and even on top of Everest the mountaineering instinct was sufficient strong to cause me to spend some moments conjecturing as to whether a route up that mountain might not exist. Far away across the clouds the great bulk of Kangchenjunga loomed on the horizon. To the west, Cho Oyu, our old adversary from 1952, dominated the scene and we could see the great unexplored ranges of Nepal stretching off into the distance. The most important photograph, I felt, was a shot down the north ridge, showing the North Col and the old route that had been made famous by the struggles of those great climbers of the 1920s and 1930s. I had little hope of the results being particularly successful, as I had a lot of difficulty in holding the camera steady in my clumsy gloves, but I felt that they would at least serve as a record. After some ten minutes of this, I realized that I was becoming rather clumsy-fingered and slow-moving, so I quickly replaced my oxygen set and experience once more the stimulating effect of even a few liters of oxygen. Meanwhile, Tenzing had made a little hole in the snow and in it he placed small articles of food – a bar of chocolate, a packet of biscuits and a handful of lollies. Small offerings, indeed, but at least a token gifts to the gods that all devoted Buddhists believe have their home on this lofty summit. While we were together on the South Col two days before, Hunt had given me a small crucifix that he had asked me to take to the top. I, too, made a hole in the snow and placed the crucifix beside Tenzing’s gifts.
As quoted in Whit Burnett, The Spirit of Adventure: The Challenge (1955), 349.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  Adversary (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Article (22)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bar (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Camera (6)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Climb (35)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Down (456)  |  East (18)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Famous (10)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Food (199)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gift (104)  |  Give (202)  |  Glove (4)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handful (13)  |  Hold (95)  |  Hole (16)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Important (209)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Least (75)  |  Little (707)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Loom (20)  |  Lot (151)  |  Meanwhile (2)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mountaineering (2)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Nepal (2)  |  North (11)  |  Offering (2)  |  Old (481)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Packet (3)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Range (99)  |  Realize (147)  |  Record (154)  |  Replace (31)  |  Result (677)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Route (15)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Serve (59)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Show (346)  |  Slow (101)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  South (38)  |  Spend (95)  |  Steady (44)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strong (174)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Summit (25)  |  Together (387)  |  Token (9)  |  Top (96)  |  Two (937)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  West (17)

To trace in Nature's most minute design
The signature and stamp of power divine.
...
The Invisible in things scarce seen revealed,
To whom an atom is an ample field.
'Retirement' in William Cowper, Robert Southey, William Harvey, The Poetical Works of William Cowper (1854), 220.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atom (355)  |  Design (195)  |  Divine (112)  |  Field (364)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)

We bombarded aluminum with alpha rays … then after a certain period of irradiation, we removed the source of alpha rays. We now observed that the sheet of aluminum continued to emit positive electrons over a period of several minutes.
Describing the crucial experiment made in 1934 that discovered artificial radioactivity. As quoted in John Daintith and Derek Gjertsen, A Dictionary of Scientists (1999), 287.
Science quotes on:  |  Alpha Ray (3)  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Certain (550)  |  Continued (2)  |  Electron (93)  |  Emit (15)  |  Observed (149)  |  Period (198)  |  Positive (94)  |  Positron (4)  |  Ray (114)  |  Sheet (7)  |  Source (93)

We entered into shadow. Contact with Moscow was gone. Japan floated by beneath us and I could clearly see its cities ablaze with lights. We left Japan behind to face the dark emptiness of the Pacific Ocean. No moon. Only stars, bright and far away. I gripped the handle like a man hanging onto a streetcar. Very slowly, agonizingly, half an hour passed, and with that, dawn on Earth. First, a slim greenish-blue line on the farthest horizon turning within a couple of minutes into a rainbow that hugged the Earth and in turn exploded into a golden sun. You’re out of your mind, I told myself, hanging onto a ship in space, and to your life, and getting ready to admire a sunrise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Behind (137)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Bright (79)  |  City (78)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Contact (65)  |  Couple (9)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  Enter (141)  |  Explode (11)  |  Exploded (11)  |  Face (212)  |  Far (154)  |  First (1283)  |  Float (30)  |  Golden (45)  |  Grip (9)  |  Half (56)  |  Handle (28)  |  Hang (45)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hug (2)  |  Japan (8)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Line (91)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moon (237)  |  Moscow (4)  |  Myself (212)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pacific Ocean (5)  |  Pass (238)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Ready (39)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Ship (62)  |  Slim (2)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Streetcar (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Tell (340)  |  Turn (447)

Well do I remember that dark hot little office in the hospital at Begumpett, with the necessary gleam of light coming in from under the eaves of the veranda. I did not allow the punka to be used because it blew about my dissected mosquitoes, which were partly examined without a cover-glass; and the result was that swarms of flies and of 'eye-flies' - minute little insects which try to get into one's ears and eyelids - tormented me at their pleasure
In Memoirs, With a Full Account of the Great Malaria Problem and its Solution (1923), 221.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Coming (114)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ear (68)  |  Examination (98)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fly (146)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gleam (12)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Hot (60)  |  Insect (77)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Mosquito (14)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Office (71)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Remember (179)  |  Result (677)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Torment (18)  |  Try (283)  |  Under (7)

Were I disposed to consider the comparative merit of each of them [facts or theories in medical practice], I should derive most of the evils of medicine from supposed facts, and ascribe all the remedies which have been uniformly and extensively useful, to such theories as are true. Facts are combined and rendered useful only by means of theories, and the more disposed men are to reason, the more minute and extensive they become in their observations.
Quoted in John Edmonds Stock, Memoirs of the life of Thomas Beddoes (1810), 401.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Become (815)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Consider (416)  |  Derive (65)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Evil (116)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Merit (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Practice (204)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Render (93)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

What is the use of this history, what the use of all this minute research? I well know that it will not produce a fall in the price of pepper, a rise in that of crates of rotten cabbages, or other serious events of this kind, which cause fleets to be manned and set people face to face intent upon one another's extermination. The insect does not aim at so much glory. It confines itself to showing us life in the inexhaustible variety of its manifestations; it helps us to decipher in some small measure the obscurest book of all, the book of ourselves.
Introducing the natural history and his study of the insect Minotaurus typhoeus. In Jean-Henri Fabre and Alexander Teixeira de Mattos (trans.), The Life and Love of the Insect (1918), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Cabbage (5)  |  Cause (541)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Event (216)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  History (673)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Measure (232)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  People (1005)  |  Pepper (2)  |  Price (51)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rotten (3)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

Whatever is Natural doth by that appear, adorned with all imaginable Elegance and Beauty. There are such inimitable gildings and embroideries in the smallest seeds of Plants, but especially in the parts of Animals, in the head or eye of a small Fly: such accurate order and symmetry in the frame of the most minute creatures, a Lowse or a Mite, as no man were able to conceive without seeing of them. Whereas the most curious works of Art, the sharpest finest Needle, doth appear as a blunt rough bar of iron, coming from the furnace or the forge. The most accurate engravings or embossments, seem such rude bungling deformed works, as if they had been done with a Mattock or a Trowel.
In Of the Principles and Duties of Natural Religion (1675), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Adornment (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Creature (233)  |  Curious (91)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Embroidery (2)  |  Engraving (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fly (146)  |  Forge (9)  |  Inimitable (6)  |  Iron (96)  |  Louse (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mattock (2)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mite (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Order (632)  |  Plant (294)  |  Seed (93)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Small (477)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)

When a man sits with a pretty girl for an hour, it seems like a minute. But let him sit on a hot stove for a minute—and it’s longer than any hour. That’s relativity.
Explanation given to his secretary, Helen Dukas, to relay to reporters and laypersons.
James B. Simpson, Best Quotes of '54, '55, '56 (1957), as cited in Fred R. Shapiro and Joseph Epstein, The Yale Book of Quotations (2006), 230. Also reprinted in Simpson's Contemporary Quotations (1988), 208, annotated merely as “recalled on his death 18 Apr 1955.” Compare with the News Chronicle (14 Mar 1949) as “When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That’s relativity.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hour (186)  |  Man (2251)  |  Quip (80)  |  Relativity (88)

When I was a boy, I could cycle out of town and be in fields in ten minutes. I knew where the birds’ nests and badger setts were. Now children’s mothers would tell them they need someone to go with them, to make sure they weren’t molested by a sexual deviant.
Commenting on today’s increased anxiety with health and safety culture. As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Badger (2)  |  Bicycle (10)  |  Bird (149)  |  Boy (94)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Field (364)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nest (23)  |  Safety (54)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Tell (340)  |  Town (27)

When [Humphry Davy] saw the minute globules of potassium burst through the crust of potash, and take fire as they entered the atmosphere, he could not contain his joy—he actually bounded about the room in ecstatic delight; some little time was required for him to compose himself to continue the experiment.
Quoted in Memoirs of the Life of Sir Humphry Davy, in J. Davy (ed.), The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy(1839-40), Vol 1, 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bound (119)  |  Burst (39)  |  Continue (165)  |  Crust (38)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Delight (108)  |  Ecstatic (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fire (189)  |  Globule (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Joy (107)  |  Little (707)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Required (108)  |  Saw (160)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)

Why the dinosaurs died out is not known, but it is supposed to be because they had minute brains and devoted themselves to the growth of weapons of offense in the shape of numerous horns. However that may be, it was not through their line that life developed.
In 'Men versus. Insects' (1933), collected in In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays (1935), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Develop (268)  |  Developed (11)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Growth (187)  |  Horn (18)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Offense (4)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Shape (72)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Why (491)

Yesterday, a small white keel feather escaped from my goose and lodged in the bank boughs near the kitchen porch, where I spied it as I came home in the cold twilight. The minute I saw the feather, I was projected into May, knowing a barn swallow would be along to claim the prize and use it to decorate the front edge of its nest. Immediately, the December air seemed full of wings of swallows and the warmth of barns.
In 'Home-Coming' (10 Dec 1955), collected in Essays of E.B. White (1977), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Bank (31)  |  Barn (5)  |  Bough (9)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cold (112)  |  December (3)  |  Decorate (2)  |  Edge (47)  |  Feather (12)  |  Front (16)  |  Full (66)  |  Goose (12)  |  Home (170)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Nest (23)  |  Prize (13)  |  Project (73)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seem (145)  |  Small (477)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Use (766)  |  Warmth (21)  |  White (127)  |  Wing (75)  |  Yesterday (36)

[Blackett] came one morning, deep in thought, into the G (technical) Office at Stanmore. It was a bitterly cold day, and the staff were shivering in a garret warmed over only with an oil-stove. Without a word of greeting, Blackett stepped silently up on to the table and stood there pondering with his feet among the plans. After ten minutes somebody coughed uneasily and said, diffidently: “Wouldn’t you like a chair, sir … or something?” “No, thank you,” said Professor Blackett, “it is necessary to apply scientific methods. Hot air rises. The warmest spot in this room, therefore, will be near the ceiling.” At this, Colonel Krohn, my technical G.S.O., stepped up on the table beside the Professor, and for the next half-hour, the two stayed there in silence. At the end of this period Professor Blackett stepped down from the table saying: “Well! That’s that problem solved.” And so it was.
Anecdote as told by General Sir Frederick Pile, in Frederick Pile, Ack-Ack: Britain’s Defence Against Air Attack During Second World War (1949), 161. As cited by Maurice W. Kirby and Jonathan Rosenhead, 'Patrick Blackett (1897)' in Arjang A. Assad (ed.) and Saul I. Gass (ed.),Profiles in Operations Research: Pioneers and Innovators (2011), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Apply (160)  |  Ceiling (5)  |  Chair (24)  |  Cold (112)  |  Deep (233)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hour (186)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Morning (94)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Next (236)  |  Office (71)  |  Oil (59)  |  Period (198)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Silence (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stove (2)  |  Table (104)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

[E.H.] Moore was presenting a paper on a highly technical topic to a large gathering of faculty and graduate students from all parts of the country. When half way through he discovered what seemed to be an error (though probably no one else in the room observed it). He stopped and re-examined the doubtful step for several minutes and then, convinced of the error, he abruptly dismissed the meeting—to the astonishment of most of the audience. It was an evidence of intellectual courage as well as honesty and doubtless won for him the supreme admiration of every person in the group—an admiration which was in no wise diminished, but rather increased, when at a later meeting he announced that after all he had been able to prove the step to be correct.
In Obituary, 'Eliakim Hastings Moore', The American Mathematical Monthly (Apr 1933), 40, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Announce (13)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Audience (26)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Correct (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Courage (69)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Increase (210)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Large (394)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Eliakim Hastings Moore (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observed (149)  |  Paper (182)  |  Person (363)  |  Present (619)  |  Prove (250)  |  Step (231)  |  Stop (80)  |  Student (300)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Technical (43)  |  Through (849)  |  Topic (21)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wise (131)

[N]o scientist likes to be criticized. … But you don’t reply to critics: “Wait a minute, wait a minute; this is a really good idea. I’m very fond of it. It’s done you no harm. Please don’t attack it.” That's not the way it goes. The hard but just rule is that if the ideas don't work, you must throw them away. Don't waste any neurons on what doesn’t work. Devote those neurons to new ideas that better explain the data. Valid criticism is doing you a favor.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attack (84)  |  Better (486)  |  Critic (20)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Data (156)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Favor (63)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Harm (39)  |  Idea (843)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neuron (9)  |  New (1216)  |  Please (65)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Validity (47)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

… just as the astronomer, the physicist, the geologist, or other student of objective science looks about in the world of sense, so, not metaphorically speaking but literally, the mind of the mathematician goes forth in the universe of logic in quest of the things that are there; exploring the heights and depths for facts—ideas, classes, relationships, implications, and the rest; observing the minute and elusive with the powerful microscope of his Infinitesimal Analysis; observing the elusive and vast with the limitless telescope of his Calculus of the Infinite; making guesses regarding the order and internal harmony of the data observed and collocated; testing the hypotheses, not merely by the complete induction peculiar to mathematics, but, like his colleagues of the outer world, resorting also to experimental tests and incomplete induction; frequently finding it necessary, in view of unforeseen disclosures, to abandon one hopeful hypothesis or to transform it by retrenchment or by enlargement:—thus, in his own domain, matching, point for point, the processes, methods and experience familiar to the devotee of natural science.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 26
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Class (164)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complete (204)  |  Data (156)  |  Depth (94)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Disclosure (6)  |  Domain (69)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Find (998)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Guess (61)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Height (32)  |  Hopeful (6)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Implication (23)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Internal (66)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Literally (30)  |  Located (2)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Process (423)  |  Quest (39)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Resort (8)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (300)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transform (73)  |  Unforeseen (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.