Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Convenience

Convenience Quotes (25 quotes)
Convenient Quotes, Conveniently Quotes, Conveniences Quotes


Dilbert: You joined the “Flat Earth Society?”
Dogbert: I believe the earth must be flat. There is no good evidence to support the so-called “round earth theory.”
Dilbert: I think Christopher Columbus would disagree.
Dogbert: How convenient that your best witness is dead.
Dilbert comic strip (9 Oct 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Christopher Columbus (13)  |  Death (270)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Earth (487)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Flat (13)  |  Flat Earth (3)  |  Join (15)  |  Support (63)  |  Theory (582)  |  Witness (18)

Douter de tout ou tout croire, ce sont deux solutions également commodes, qui l’une et l’autre nous dispensent de défléchir.
To doubt everything and to believe everything are two equally convenient solutions; each saves us from thinking.
From 'Introduction', La Science et l’Hypothèse (1902), 2. Translation by George Bruce Halsted, 'Introduction', Science and Hypothesis (New York, 1905), 1. In 'Author’s Preface', Science and Hypothesis (London 1905), xxii, it is translated more closely as “To doubt everything and to believe everything are two equally convenient solutions; both dispense with the necessity of reflection.”
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Equal (53)  |  Everything (120)  |  Saving (19)  |  Solution (168)  |  Thinking (222)

A vast technology has been developed to prevent, reduce, or terminate exhausting labor and physical damage. It is now dedicated to the production of the most trivial conveniences and comfort.
Reflections on Behaviorism and Society (1978), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Comfort (42)  |  Damage (18)  |  Dedication (10)  |  Development (228)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Labour (36)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Production (105)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Technology (199)  |  Termination (3)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Vast (56)

Boundaries which mark off one field of science from another are purely artificial, are set up only for temporary convenience. Let chemists and physicists dig deep enough, and they reach common ground.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (26)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Common Ground (3)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dig (9)  |  Field (119)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Purely (15)  |  Reach (68)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Temporary (13)

Certain elements have the property of producing the same crystal form when in combination with an equal number of atoms of one or more common elements, and the elements, from his point of view, can be arranged in certain groups. For convenience I have called the elements belonging to the same group … isomorphous.
Originally published in 'Om Förhållandet emellan chemiska sammansättningen och krystallformen hos Arseniksyrade och Phosphorsyrade Salter', (On the Relation between the Chemical Composition and Crystal Form of Salts of Arsenic and Phosphoric Acids), Kungliga Svenska vetenskapsakademiens handlingar (1821), 4. In F. Szabadváry article on 'Eilhard Mitscherlich' in Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 424; perhaps from J.R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, Vol. 4 (1964), 210.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Atom (251)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Certain (84)  |  Combination (69)  |  Common (92)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Element (129)  |  Equal (53)  |  Form (210)  |  Group (52)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Number (179)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Producing (6)  |  Property (96)  |  Same (92)

Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and the convenience of people. In its modern form engineering involves people, money, materials, machines, and energy. It is differentiated from science because it is primarily concerned with how to direct to useful and economical ends the natural phenomena which scientists discover and formulate into acceptable theories. Engineering therefore requires above all the creative imagination to innovate useful applications of natural phenomena. It seeks newer, cheaper, better means of using natural sources of energy and materials.
In McGraw Hill, Science and Technology Encyclopedia
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (5)  |  Application (117)  |  Art (205)  |  Better (131)  |  Cheaper (5)  |  Concern (76)  |  Creative (41)  |  Differentiate (6)  |  Direct (44)  |  Directing (5)  |  Discover (115)  |  Economical (7)  |  End (141)  |  Energy (185)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Form (210)  |  Formulate (10)  |  Great (300)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Involve (27)  |  Machine (133)  |  Material (124)  |  Means (109)  |  Modern (104)  |  Money (125)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Person (114)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Power (273)  |  Primarily (9)  |  Require (33)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Seek (57)  |  Source (71)  |  Theory (582)  |  Useful (66)

For books [Charles Darwin] had no respect, but merely considered them as tools to be worked with. ... he would cut a heavy book in half, to make it more convenient to hold. He used to boast that he had made Lyell publish the second edition of one of his books in two volumes, instead of in one, by telling him how ho had been obliged to cut it in half. ... his library was not ornamental, but was striking from being so evidently a working collection of books.
In Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1908), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Boast (12)  |  Book (181)  |  Collection (38)  |  Cut (36)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Half (35)  |  Heavy (13)  |  Library (37)  |  Sir Charles Lyell (41)  |  Ornament (12)  |  Respect (57)  |  Tool (70)  |  Volume (13)

I strongly oppose cloning, as do most Americans. We recoil at the idea of growing human beings for spare body parts or creating life for our convenience. And while we must devote enormous energy to conquering disease, it is equally important that we pay attention to the moral concerns raised by the new frontier of human embryo stem cell research. Even the most noble ends do not justify any means.
'Address to the Nation on Stem Cell Research', (9 Aug 2001) in Public Papers Of The Presidents Of The United States, George W. Bush, 2001 (2004), Book 2, 955.
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Attention (76)  |  Body (193)  |  Cloning (3)  |  Concern (76)  |  Creating (7)  |  Devote (23)  |  Disease (257)  |  Embryo (22)  |  Energy (185)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Frontier (16)  |  Growing (15)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Idea (440)  |  Important (124)  |  Life (917)  |  Moral (100)  |  New (340)  |  Noble (41)  |  Oppose (16)  |  Part (146)  |  Recoil (5)  |  Research (517)  |  Spare (6)  |  Stem Cell (11)  |  Strongly (6)

In this physical world there is no real chaos; all is in fact orderly; all is ordered by the physical principles. Chaos is but unperceived order- it is a word indicating the limitations of the human mind and the paucity of observational facts. The words “chaos,” “accidental,” “chance,” “unpredictable," are conveniences behind which we hide our ignorance.
From Of Stars and Men: The Human Response to an Expanding Universe (1958 Rev. Ed. 1964), Foreword.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Behind (25)  |  Chance (122)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Fact (609)  |  Hide (36)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Indicate (10)  |  Limit (86)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Paucity (3)  |  Physical World (6)  |  Principle (228)  |  Real (95)  |  Unpredictable (10)  |  Word (221)

It is arguable whether the human race have been gainers by the march of science beyond the steam engine. Electricity opens a field of infinite conveniences to ever greater numbers, but they may well have to pay dearly for them. But anyhow in my thought I stop short of the internal combustion engine which has made the world so much smaller. Still more must we fear the consequences of entrusting a human race so little different from their predecessors of the so-called barbarous ages such awful agencies as the atomic bomb. Give me the horse.
Address to the Royal College of Surgeons (10 Jul 1951). Collected in Stemming the Tide: Speeches 1951 and 1952 (1953), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (101)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Engine (25)  |  Horse (40)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Invention (283)  |  Progress (317)  |  Steam Engine (41)  |  War (144)

It is not nature which imposes time and space upon us, it is we who impose them upon nature because we find them convenient.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Find (248)  |  Impose (17)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Time And Space (30)

It seems to me that God is a convenient invention of the human mind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  God (454)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Invention (283)  |  Seem (89)

On foundations we believe in the reality of mathematics, but of course, when philosophers attack us with their paradoxes, we rush to hide behind formalism and say 'mathematics is just a combination of meaningless symbols,'... Finally we are left in peace to go back to our mathematics and do it as we have always done, with the feeling each mathematician has that he is working with something real. The sensation is probably an illusion, but it is very convenient.
'The Work of Nicholas Bourbaki'American Mathematical Monthly (1970), 77, 134. In Carl C. Gaither, Alma E. Cavazos-Gaither, Mathematically Speaking: a Dictionary of Quotations (), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (69)  |  Formalism (5)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Reality (140)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Symbol (35)

One geometry cannot be more true than another; it can only be more convenient. Geometry is not true, it is advantageous.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advantageous (2)  |  Geometry (99)  |  True (120)

Psychologists pay lip service to the scientific method, and use it whenever it is convenient; but when it isn't they make wild leaps of their uncontrolled fancy....
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (93)  |  Fancy (16)  |  Leap (23)  |  Psychologist (11)  |  Scientific Method (155)

Scientific discovery consists in the interpretation for our own convenience of a system of existence which has been made with no eye to our convenience at all.
The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society (1988), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (591)  |  Existence (254)  |  Interpretation (61)

Scientists often invent words to fill the holes in their understanding.These words are meant as conveniences until real understanding can be found. … Words such as dimension and field and infinity … are not descriptions of reality, yet we accept them as such because everyone is sure someone else knows what the words mean.
In God’s Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Description (72)  |  Dimension (26)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Field (119)  |  Fill (35)  |  Hole (11)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Invention (283)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Reality (140)  |  Sure (13)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Word (221)

The analysis of variance is not a mathematical theorem, but rather a convenient method of arranging the arithmetic.
Remarking on the paper, ‘Statistics in Agricultural Research’ by J. Wishart, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Supplement (1934), 1, 52. As cited in Michael Cowle, Statistics in Psychology: An Historical Perspective (2005), 210.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Arithmetic (68)  |  Arranging (3)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Method (154)  |  Theorem (46)  |  Variance (4)

The Frog—that arch-martyr to science—affords the most convenient subject.
Carl Wedl
In Rudiments of Pathological Histology (1855), trans. and ed. by George Busk, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Frog (30)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Subject (129)

The observer is not he who merely sees the thing which is before his eyes, but he who sees what parts the thing is composed of. To do this well is a rare talent. One person, from inattention, or attending only in the wrong place, overlooks half of what he sees; another sets down much more than he sees, confounding it with what he imagines, or with what he infers; another takes note of the kind of all the circumstances, but being inexpert in estimating their degree, leaves the quantity of each vague and uncertain; another sees indeed the whole, but makes such an awkward division of it into parts, throwing into one mass things which require to be separated, and separating others which might more conveniently be considered as one, that the result is much the same, sometimes even worse than if no analysis had been attempted at all.
In A System of Logic Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Attend (9)  |  Awkward (6)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Composed (3)  |  Confound (9)  |  Consider (45)  |  Degree (48)  |  Division (27)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Eye (159)  |  Half (35)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Inattention (3)  |  Infer (10)  |  Kind (99)  |  Mass (61)  |  Merely (35)  |  Note (22)  |  Observation (418)  |  Observer (33)  |  Overlook (8)  |  Part (146)  |  Person (114)  |  Place (111)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Rare (31)  |  Require (33)  |  Result (250)  |  See (197)  |  Separate (46)  |  Talent (49)  |  Uncertain (11)  |  Vague (10)  |  Whole (122)  |  Worse (17)  |  Wrong (116)

The wise man, however, will avoid partial views of things. He will not, with the miser, look to gold and silver as the only blessings of life; nor will he, with the cynic, snarl at mankind for preferring them to copper and iron. … That which is convenient is that which is useful, and that which is useful is that which is valuable.
From 13th Lecture in 1818, in Bence Jones, The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 255.
Science quotes on:  |  Blessing (7)  |  Copper (18)  |  Cynic (4)  |  Gold (55)  |  Iron (53)  |  Miser (3)  |  Silver (26)  |  Useful (66)  |  Value (180)  |  Viewpoint (6)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Wise Man (10)

The world is a construct of our sensations, perceptions, memories. It is convenient to regard it as existing objectively on its own. But it certainly does not become manifest by its mere existence.
Opening remark in first Tarner Lecture, at Trinity College, Cambridge (Oct 1956), 'The Physical Basis of Consciousness', printed in Mind and Matter (1958), 1. Also collected in What is Life?: With Mind and Matter and Autobiographical Sketches (1992, 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (18)  |  Construct (25)  |  Existence (254)  |  Manifest (11)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mere (41)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Perception (53)  |  Regard (58)  |  Sensation (22)  |  World (667)

There is no reason that the universe should be designed for our convenience.
In The Origin Of The Universe: Science Masters Series (1997), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (92)  |  Reason (330)  |  Universe (563)

We must remember that all our [models of flying machine] inventions are but developments of crude ideas; that a commercially successful result in a practically unexplored field cannot possibly be got without an enormous amount of unremunerative work. It is the piled-up and recorded experience of many busy brains that has produced the luxurious travelling conveniences of to-day, which in no way astonish us, and there is no good reason for supposing that we shall always be content to keep on the agitated surface of the sea and air, when it is possible to travel in a superior plane, unimpeded by frictional disturbances.
Paper to the Royal Society of New South Wales (4 Jun 1890), as quoted in Octave Chanute, Progress in Flying Machines (1894), 2226.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Amount (20)  |  Astonish (3)  |  Brain (181)  |  Busy (21)  |  Commercially (3)  |  Content (39)  |  Crude (14)  |  Development (228)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Experience (268)  |  Field (119)  |  Flying Machine (6)  |  Good (228)  |  Idea (440)  |  Invention (283)  |  Model (64)  |  Plane (15)  |  Possible (100)  |  Practically (9)  |  Produce (63)  |  Reason (330)  |  Recorded (2)  |  Remember (53)  |  Result (250)  |  Sea (143)  |  Successful (20)  |  Superior (30)  |  Supposing (3)  |  Surface (74)  |  Today (86)  |  Travel (40)  |  Travelling (3)  |  Unexplored (11)  |  Work (457)

Why there is one Body in or System qualified to give Light and Heat to all ye rest, I know no reason, but because ye author of the Systeme thought it convenient.
Letter to Bentley (10 Dec 1692). In The Works of Richard Bentley (1838), Vol. 3, 204.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (39)  |  Body (193)  |  Heat (90)  |  Light (246)  |  Qualified (3)  |  Reason (330)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Solar System (48)  |  Sun (211)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.