Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Reduction

Reduction Quotes (35 quotes)

Les mathématiciens parviennent à la solution d’un problême par le simple arrangement des données, & en réduisant le raisonnement à des opérations si simples, à des jugemens si courts, qu’ils ne perdent jamais de vue l’évidence qui leur sert de guide.
Mathematicians come to the solution of a problem by the simple arrangement of the data, and reducing the reasoning to such simple operations, to judgments so brief, that they never lose sight of the evidence that serves as their guide.
From a paper read to the Académie Royales des Sciences (18 Apr 1787), printed in Méthode de Nomenclature Chimique (1787), 12. Translation from the French by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Brief (14)  |  Data (100)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Guide (46)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Operation (96)  |  Problem (362)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Simple (111)  |  Solution (168)

A vast technology has been developed to prevent, reduce, or terminate exhausting labor and physical damage. It is now dedicated to the production of the most trivial conveniences and comfort.
Reflections on Behaviorism and Society (1978), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Comfort (42)  |  Convenience (25)  |  Damage (18)  |  Dedication (10)  |  Development (228)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Labour (36)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Production (105)  |  Technology (199)  |  Termination (3)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Vast (56)

All that can be said upon the number and nature of elements is, in my opinion, confined to discussions entirely of a metaphysical nature. The subject only furnishes us with indefinite problems, which may be solved in a thousand different ways, not one of which, in all probability, is consistent with nature. I shall therefore only add upon this subject, that if, by the term elements, we mean to express those simple and indivisible atoms of which matter is composed, it is extremely probable we know nothing at all about them; but, if we apply the term elements, or principles of bodies, to express our idea of the last point which analysis is capable of reaching, we must admit, as elements, all the substances into which we are capable, by any means, to reduce bodies by decomposition.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, Preface, xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Atom (251)  |  Composition (52)  |  Decomposition (12)  |  Element (129)  |  Idea (440)  |  Indivisible (7)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Matter (270)  |  Metaphysics (30)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Solution (168)  |  Substance (73)

By science, then, I understand the consideration of all subjects, whether of a pure or mixed nature, capable of being reduced to measurement and calculation. All things comprehended under the categories of space, time and number properly belong to our investigations; and all phenomena capable of being brought under the semblance of a law are legitimate objects of our inquiries.
In Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1833), xxviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (67)  |  Capability (35)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Law (418)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Number (179)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Semblance (3)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Understanding (317)

Certainly, speaking for the United States of America, I pledge that, as we sign this treaty in an era of negotiation, we consider it only one step toward a greater goal: the control of nuclear weapons on earth and the reduction of the danger that hangs over all nations as long as those weapons are not controlled.
'Remarks at the Signing Ceremony of the Seabed Arms Control Treaty' (11 Feb 1971), Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Richard M. Nixon (1972), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (93)  |  Danger (62)  |  Earth (487)  |  Goal (81)  |  Nation (111)  |  Nuclear Weapon (5)  |  Pledge (3)  |  Sign (36)  |  Treaty (2)  |  United States (31)

Combustible bodies do not reduce the metals by giving them phlogiston, as the Phlogistians suppose; nor buy uniting with, and separating their oxygen, as the Anti-phlogistians maintain.
Rejecting older theories of combustion.
Preface to An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), iv. In Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie and Joy Dorothy Harvey, The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science (2000), 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Combustion (10)  |  Oxidation (6)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Redox Reaction (2)

Fortunately somewhere between chance and mystery lies imagination, the only thing that protects our freedom, despite the fact that people keep trying to reduce it or kill it off altogether.
My Last Breath? (1984), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (122)  |  Fortunately (7)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Kill (37)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Protection (23)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (54)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Corpse (5)  |  Crown (19)  |  Death (270)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Effort (94)  |  Hero (29)  |  History (302)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Love (164)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Pain (82)  |  Part (146)  |  Patriot (3)  |  Pedestal (2)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Render (17)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Sake (17)  |  Scholar (31)  |  Statue (9)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Substantial (7)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)

I do not believe that a moral philosophy can ever be founded on a scientific basis. … The valuation of life and all its nobler expressions can only come out of the soul’s yearning toward its own destiny. Every attempt to reduce ethics to scientific formulas must fail. Of that I am perfectly convinced.
In 'Science and God: A Dialogue', Forum and Century (June 1930), 83, 374. Einstein’s dialogue was with James Murphy and J.W.N. Sullivan. Excerpted in David E. Rowe and Robert J. Schulmann, Einstein on Politics: His Private Thoughts and Public Stands on Nationalism, Zionism, War, Peace, and the Bomb (2007), 230. The book introduces this quote as Einstein’s reply when Murphy asked, in the authors’ words, “how far he thought modern science might be able to go toward establishing practical ideals of life on the ruins of religious ideals.”
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Belief (400)  |  Destiny (26)  |  Ethic (12)  |  Expression (82)  |  Failure (118)  |  Formula (51)  |  Life (917)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nobler (3)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Soul (139)  |  Valuation (3)  |  Yearning (5)

I don't really care how time is reckoned so long as there is some agreement about it, but I object to being told that I am saving daylight when my reason tells me that I am doing nothing of the kind. I even object to the implication that I am wasting something valuable if I stay in bed after the sun has risen. As an admirer of moonlight I resent the bossy insistence of those who want to reduce my time for enjoying it. At the back of the Daylight Saving scheme I detect the bony, blue-fingered hand of Puritanism, eager to push people into bed earlier, and get them up earlier, to make them healthy, wealthy and wise in spite of themselves.
In The Diary of Samuel Marchbanks (1947), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirer (4)  |  Agreement (29)  |  Bed (20)  |  Blue (30)  |  Care (73)  |  Daylight Saving Time (9)  |  Detection (12)  |  Eager (7)  |  Earlier (8)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Finger (38)  |  Hand (103)  |  Healthy (17)  |  Insistence (9)  |  Moonlight (2)  |  Object (110)  |  Reason (330)  |  Reckoning (4)  |  Resent (4)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Sunrise (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Waste (57)  |  Wealthy (4)  |  Wise (43)

I may finally call attention to the probability that the association of paternal and maternal chromosomes in pairs and their subsequent separation during the reducing division as indicated above may constitute the physical basis of the Mendelian law of heredity.
'On the Morphology of the Chromosome Group in Brachystola Magna', Biological Bulletin (1902), 4, 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (15)  |  Attention (76)  |  Basis (60)  |  Chromosome (17)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Division (27)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Indication (21)  |  Law (418)  |  Maternal (2)  |  Gregor Mendel (20)  |  Pair (10)  |  Paternal (2)  |  Probability (83)  |  Separation (32)  |  Subsequent (11)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Apron (2)  |  Busy (21)  |  Calcination (3)  |  Charcoal (7)  |  Chatter (3)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Coal (41)  |  Cure (88)  |  Dagger (3)  |  Day And Night (2)  |  Dirt (8)  |  Distillation (9)  |  Extraction (5)  |  Finger (38)  |  Fire (117)  |  Fixation (2)  |  Glove (3)  |  Gold (55)  |  Gossip (5)  |  Hand (103)  |  Help (68)  |  Hide (36)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Leather (3)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (55)  |  Patience (31)  |  Patient (116)  |  Physician (232)  |  Praise (17)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Recreation (11)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ring (14)  |  Rubbish (8)  |  Satin (2)  |  Separation (32)  |  Show (55)  |  Sick (23)  |  Silk (5)  |  Silver (26)  |  Smith (2)  |  Solution (168)  |  Soot (7)  |  Step (67)  |  Velvet (3)  |  White (38)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Word (221)  |  Work (457)

If coal plants release mercury—and mercury is a neurotoxin that damages children's brains—then reducing the amount of mercury in emissions doesn’t stop that. It just says, “We’ll tell you at what rate you can dispense death.”
In interview article, 'Designing For The Future', Newsweek (15 May 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Brain (181)  |  Child (189)  |  Coal (41)  |  Death (270)  |  Dispense (7)  |  Emission (16)  |  Industry (91)  |  Mercury (39)  |  Rate (22)  |  Release (15)  |  Stop (56)

In my youth I often asked what could be the use and necessity of smelting by putting powdered charcoal at the bottom of the furnace. Nobody could give me any other reason except that the metal and especially lead, could bury itself in the charcoal and so be protected against the action of the bellows which would calcine or dissipate it. Nevertheless it is evident that this does not answer the question. I accordingly examined the operation of a metallurgical furnace and how it was used. In assaying some litharge [lead oxide], I noticed each time a little charcoal fell into the crucible, I always obtained a bit of lead … I do not think up to the present time foundry-men ever surmised that in the operation of founding with charcoal there was something [phlogiston] which became corporeally united with the metal.
Traité de Soufre (1766), 64. French translation published 1766, first published in German in 1718.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Asking (23)  |  Bellows (3)  |  Calcination (3)  |  Charcoal (7)  |  Crucible (5)  |  Dissipation (2)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Examination (60)  |  Furnace (10)  |  Lead (101)  |  Metal (38)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Question (315)  |  Reason (330)  |  Youth (57)

Indeed, the most important part of engineering work—and also of other scientific work—is the determination of the method of attacking the problem, whatever it may be, whether an experimental investigation, or a theoretical calculation. … It is by the choice of a suitable method of attack, that intricate problems are reduced to simple phenomena, and then easily solved.
In Engineering Mathematics: A Series of Lectures Delivered at Union College (1911, 1917), Vol. 2, 275.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (29)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Choice (64)  |  Determination (53)  |  Ease (29)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Intricacy (6)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Method (154)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Problem (362)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Theory (582)  |  Work (457)

Iron and coal dominated everywhere, from grey to black: the black boots, the black stove-pipe hat, the black coach or carriage, the black iron frame of the hearth, the black cooking pots and pans and stoves. Was it a mourning? Was it protective coloration? Was it mere depression of the senses? No matter what the original color of the paleotechnic milieu might be it was soon reduced by reason of the soot and cinders that accompanied its activities, to its characteristic tones, grey, dirty-brown, black.
Technics and Civilisation (1934), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Black (27)  |  Brown (4)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Cinder (5)  |  Coal (41)  |  Color (78)  |  Depression (15)  |  Dirty (7)  |  Domination (12)  |  Grey (6)  |  Hat (8)  |  Iron (53)  |  Milieu (2)  |  Paleotechnic (2)  |  Protection (23)  |  Reason (330)  |  Sense (240)  |  Soot (7)  |  Tone (7)

Mainstream biology may be suffering from what I call 'Physics envy' in aiming to reduce life to nothing but well known, typically Newtonian principles of physics and chemistry.
'From the Editor's Desk', Frontier Perspectives (1991), 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Biology (150)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Envy (10)  |  Mainstream (3)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Physics (301)  |  Principle (228)  |  Suffering (26)

Mathematicians deal with possible worlds, with an infinite number of logically consistent systems. Observers explore the one particular world we inhabit. Between the two stands the theorist. He studies possible worlds but only those which are compatible with the information furnished by observers. In other words, theory attempts to segregate the minimum number of possible worlds which must include the actual world we inhabit. Then the observer, with new factual information, attempts to reduce the list further. And so it goes, observation and theory advancing together toward the common goal of science, knowledge of the structure and observation of the universe.
Lecture to Sigma Xi, 'The Problem of the Expanding Universe' (1941), printed in Sigma Xi Quarterly (1942), 30, 104-105. Reprinted in Smithsonian Institution Report of the Board of Regents (1943), 97, 123. As cited by Norriss S. Hetherington in 'Philosophical Values and Observation in Edwin Hubble's Choice of a Model of the Universe', Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences (1982), 13, No. 1, 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Advance (123)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Common (92)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Fact (609)  |  Goal (81)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Information (102)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Minimum (10)  |  Number (179)  |  Observation (418)  |  Observer (33)  |  Science (1699)  |  Segregation (2)  |  Structure (191)  |  Study (331)  |  System (141)  |  Theorist (24)  |  Theory (582)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

My expectations were reduced to zero when I was 21. Everything since then has been a bonus.
Interview with Deborah Solomon, 'The Science of Second-Guessing', in New York Times Magazine (12 Dec 2004), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Bonus (2)  |  Everything (120)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Zero (15)

No problem can be solved until it is reduced to some simple form. The changing of a vague difficulty into a specific, concrete form is a very essential element in thinking.
Seen, for example, in The Grain and Feed Review (1931), 21, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Changing (6)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Element (129)  |  Essential (87)  |  Form (210)  |  Problem (362)  |  Simple (111)  |  Solution (168)  |  Specific (30)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Vague (10)

Of all the frictional resistances, the one that most retards human movement is ignorance, what Buddha called 'the greatest evil in the world.' The friction which results from ignorance ... can be reduced only by the spread of knowledge and the unification of the heterogeneous elements of humanity. No effort could be better spent.
'The Problem of Increasing Human Energy', The Century (Jun 1900), 211. Collected in The Century (1900), Vol. 60, 211
Science quotes on:  |  Buddha_Gautama (2)  |  Effort (94)  |  Evil (67)  |  Human (445)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Movement (65)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Retardation (4)  |  Spread (19)  |  Unification (9)

Ordinarily logic is divided into the examination of ideas, judgments, arguments, and methods. The two latter are generally reduced to judgments, that is, arguments are reduced to apodictic judgments that such and such conclusions follow from such and such premises, and method is reduced to judgments that prescribe the procedure that should be followed in the search for truth.
Ampére expresses how arguments have a logical structure which he expected should be applied to relate scientific theories to experimental evidence. In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 158. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, École Normale lecture 15 notes, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (59)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Division (27)  |  Examination (60)  |  Following (16)  |  Generality (22)  |  Idea (440)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Latter (13)  |  Logic (187)  |  Method (154)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Premise (14)  |  Prescription (14)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Search (85)  |  Truth (750)

Our confused wish finds expression in the confused question as to the nature of force and electricity. But the answer which we want is not really an answer to this question. It is not by finding out more and fresh relations and connections that it can be answered; but by removing the contradictions existing between those already known, and thus perhaps by reducing their number. When these painful contradictions are removed, the question as to the nature of force will not have been answered; but our minds, no longer vexed, will cease to ask illegitimate questions.
Principles of Mechanics (1899), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Connection (86)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Expression (82)  |  Force (194)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Removal (10)  |  Vexation (2)

Something is as little explained by means of a distinctive vital force as the attraction between iron and magnet is explained by means of the name magnetism. We must therefore firmly insist that in the organic natural sciences, and thus also in botany, absolutely nothing has yet been explained and the entire field is still open to investigation as long as we have not succeeded in reducing the phenomena to physical and chemical laws.
Grundzüge der Wissenschaftlichen Botanik nebst einer Methodologischen Einleitung als Anleitung zum Studium der Planze [Principles of Scientific Botany] (1842-3), Vol. 1, 49. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mayer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Attraction (32)  |  Botany (47)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Distinctive (8)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Force (194)  |  Insistence (9)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Iron (53)  |  Law (418)  |  Magnet (8)  |  Magnetism (26)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physics (301)  |  Sucess (2)  |  Vital (32)

The inclusion of lemon or lime juice in grog, made compulsory in 1795, therefore reduced the incidence of scurvy dramatically. And since beer contains no vitamin C, switching from beer to grog made British crews far healthier overall.
In A History of the World in 6 Glasses (2005, 2009), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Beer (6)  |  British (5)  |  Compulsory (6)  |  Containing (4)  |  Crew (8)  |  Health (136)  |  Incidence (2)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Juice (7)  |  Lemon (2)  |  Lime (3)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Vitamin C (3)

The present state of electrical science seems peculiarly unfavorable to speculation … to appreciate the requirements of the science, the student must make himself familiar with a considerable body of most intricate mathematics, the mere retention of which in the memory materially interferes with further progress. The first process therefore in the effectual study of the science, must be one of simplification and reduction of the results of previous investigation to a form in which the mind can grasp them.
First sentence of Maxwell’s first paper (read 10 Dec 1855), 'On Faraday’s Lines of Force', Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society (1857), Vol. X, part I. Collected in William Davidson Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 1, 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (17)  |  Body (193)  |  Considerable (11)  |  Effective (20)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Form (210)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Interfere (8)  |  Intricate (14)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Process (201)  |  Progress (317)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Result (250)  |  Retention (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Simplification (12)  |  Speculation (77)  |  State (96)  |  Student (131)  |  Study (331)  |  Unfavorable (3)

The Superfund legislation set up a system of insurance premiums collected from the chemical industry to clean up toxic wastes. This new program may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent but bitterly fought issue—another example for the conflict between the public welfare and the profits of a few private despoilers of our nation's environment.
Keeping Faith: Memoirs of a President (1980), 591.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Administration (8)  |  America (74)  |  Bitter (12)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Clean (20)  |  Collect (10)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Continuation (17)  |  Environment (138)  |  Health (136)  |  Importance (183)  |  Industry (91)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Issue (37)  |  Legislation (8)  |  Nation (111)  |  Premium (2)  |  Private (17)  |  Profit (28)  |  Public (82)  |  Safety (39)  |  Site (11)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Threat (24)  |  Toxic Waste (3)  |  Urgent (7)  |  Welfare (16)

The universality of parasitism as an offshoot of the predatory habit negatives the position taken by man that it is a pathological phenomenon or a deviation from the normal processes of nature. The pathological manifestations are only incidents in a developing parasitism. As human beings intent on maintaining man's domination over nature we may regard parasitism as pathological insofar as it becomes a drain upon human resources. In our efforts to protect ourselves we may make every kind of sacrifice to limit, reduce, and even eliminate parasitism as a factor in human life. Science attempts to define the terms on which this policy of elimination may or may not succeed. We must first of all thoroughly understand the problem, put ourselves in possession of all the facts in order to estimate the cost. Too often it has been assumed that parasitism was abnormal and that it needed only a slight force to reestablish what was believed to be a normal equilibrium without parasitism. On the contrary, biology teaches us that parasitism is a normal phenomenon and if we accept this view we shall be more ready to pay the price of freedom as a permanent and ever recurring levy of nature for immunity from a condition to which all life is subject. The greatest victory of man over nature in the physical realm would undoubtedly be his own delivery from the heavy encumbrance of parasitism with which all life is burdened.
Parasitism and Disease (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Burden (23)  |  Cost (31)  |  Development (228)  |  Deviation (11)  |  Domination (12)  |  Drain (6)  |  Effort (94)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Encumbrance (3)  |  Equilibrium (16)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Fact (609)  |  Habit (78)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Incident (3)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Policy (23)  |  Predator (5)  |  Process (201)  |  Protection (23)  |  Resource (47)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Universality (11)  |  Victory (24)

There is, it appears, a conspiracy of scientists afoot. Their purpose is to break down religion, propagate immorality, and so reduce mankind to the level of brutes. They are the sworn and sinister agents of Beelzebub, who yearns to conquer the world, and has his eye especially upon Tennessee.
[Report on the Scopes Monkey Trial.]
Baltimore Evening Sun (11 Jul 1925). In H.L. Mencken, S. T. Joshi (Ed.), H.L. Mencken on Religion (2002), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Beelzebub (2)  |  Break (33)  |  Brute (12)  |  Conquer (12)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Eye (159)  |  Immorality (4)  |  Level (51)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Propagation (9)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Religion (210)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (6)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Swear (3)  |  Tennessee (3)  |  World (667)  |  Yearn (8)

Understanding the world for a man is reducing it to the human, stamping it with his seal.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Human (445)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Seal (10)  |  Stamp (14)  |  Understand (189)  |  World (667)

We should stop the non-scientific, pseudo-scientific, and anti-scientific nonsense emanating from the right wing, and start demanding immediate action to reduce global warming and prevent catastrophic climate change that may be on our horizon now. We must not let the [Bush] Administration distort science and rewrite and manipulate scientific reports in other areas. We must not let it turn the Environmental Protection Agency into the Environmental Pollution Agency.
Address to National Press Club, Washington, DC (12 Jan 2005). In Bill Adler (ed.), The Wit and Wisdom of Ted Kennedy (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Administration (8)  |  Agency (13)  |  George W. Bush (16)  |  Catastrophe (17)  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Demand (52)  |  Distortion (10)  |  Environment (138)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Horizon (13)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Let (30)  |  Manipulation (9)  |  Non-Scientific (4)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Protection (23)  |  Report (31)  |  Rewrite (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Start (68)  |  Stop (56)  |  Turn (72)

Would not [an] uncluttered mind also see the attempts to reconcile science and religion by disparaging the reduction of the complex to the simple as attempts guided by muddle-headed sentiment and intellectually dishonest emotion?
Essay collected in John Cornwell (ed.), 'The Limitless Power of Science', Nature's Imagination: The Frontiers of Scientific Vision (1995), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Clutter (4)  |  Complex (78)  |  Dishonest (2)  |  Disparage (4)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Mind (544)  |  Reconcile (10)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Sentiment (9)  |  Simple (111)

[A contemporary study] predicted the loss of two-thirds of all tropical forests by the turn of the century. Hundreds of thousands of species will perish, and this reduction of 10 to 20 percent of the earth’s biota will occur in about half a human life span. … This reduction of the biological diversity of the planet is the most basic issue of our time.
Foreword, written for Michael Soulé and Bruce Wilcox (eds.), papers from the 1978 International Conference on Conservation Biology, collected as Conservation Biology (1980), ix. As quoted and cited in Timothy J. Farnham, Saving Nature's Legacy: Origins of the Idea of Biological Diversity (2007), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (52)  |  Biological Diversity (2)  |  Century (94)  |  Earth (487)  |  Human (445)  |  Issue (37)  |  Lifespan (6)  |  Occur (26)  |  Perish (23)  |  Planet (199)  |  Rain Forest (21)  |  Species (181)  |  Thousand (106)

[The] erroneous assumption is to the effect that the aim of public education is to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence, and so make them fit to discharge the duties of citizenship in an enlightened and independent manner. Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim of public education is not to spread enlightenment at all; it is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardised citizenry, to put down dissent and originality.
The American Mercury (24 Apr 1924).
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Assumption (49)  |  Citizenship (5)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Education (280)  |  Effect (133)  |  Enlightenment (11)  |  Error (230)  |  Independence (32)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Originality (14)  |  Public (82)  |  Safety (39)  |  Standardization (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  Young (72)

[When combustion occurs,] one body, at least, is oxygenated, and another restored, at the same time, to its combustible state... This view of combustion may serve to show how nature is always the same, and maintains her equilibrium by preserving the same quantities of air and water on the surface of our globe: for as fast as these are consumed in the various processes of combustion, equal quantities are formed, and rise regenerated like the Phoenix from her ashes.
Fulhame believed 'that water was the only source of oxygen, which oxygenates combustible bodies' and that 'the hydrogen of water is the only substance that restores bodies to their combustible state.'
An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), 179-180. In Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie and Joy Dorothy Harvey, The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science (2000), 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Combustion (10)  |  Conservation Of Matter (7)  |  Equilibrium (16)  |  Hydrogen (37)  |  Oxidation (6)  |  Oxygen (49)  |  Redox Reaction (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.