Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Common

Common Quotes (436 quotes)

... all the great scientists have one thing in common: each snatched from the subtle motions of nature one irrevocable secret; each caught one feather of the plumage of the Great White Bird that symbolizes everlasting truth.
With co-author Justus J. Schifferes, in The Autobiography of Science (1945).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Great (1574)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Secret (194)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  White (127)

...Outer space, once a region of spirited international competition, is also a region of international cooperation. I realized this as early as 1959, when I attended an international conference on cosmic radiation in Moscow. At this conference, there were many differing views and differing methods of attack, but the problems were common ones to all of us and a unity of basic purpose was everywhere evident. Many of the papers presented there depended in an essential way upon others which had appeared originally in as many as three or four different languages. Surely science is one of the universal human activities.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attend (65)  |  Basic (138)  |  Competition (39)  |  Conference (17)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Depend (228)  |  Different (577)  |  Early (185)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evident (91)  |  Human (1468)  |  International (37)  |  Language (293)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Surely (101)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universal (189)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

Die Wissenschaft ist ein Land, welches die Eigenschaft hat, um so mehr Menschen beherbergen zu können, je mehr Bewohner sich darin sammeln; sie ist ein Schatz, der um so grösser wird, je mehr man ihn teilt. Darum kann jeder von uns in seiner Art seine Arbeit tun, und die Gemeinsamkeit bedeutet nicht Gleichförmigkeit.
Science is one land, having the ability to accommodate even more people, as more residents gather in it; it is a treasure that is the greater the more it is shared. Because of that, each of us can do his work in his own way, and the common ground does not mean conformity.
Speaking (in German) at the Banquet to Past Presidents, the Chemical Society, as published in William Crookes (ed.) The Chemical News (16 Dec 1898), 78, 298. Also used as epigraph, in Paul Walden, Wilhelm Ostwald (1904), 1. Translation by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Accommodate (15)  |  Art (657)  |  Common Ground (4)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Gather (72)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Land (115)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3879)  |  Share (75)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Dilbert: Wow! According to my computer simulation, it should be possible to create new life forms from common household chemicals
Dogbert: This raises some thorny issues.
Dilbert: You mean legal, ethical and religious issues?
Dogbert: I was thinking about parking spaces.
Dilbert comic strip (31 May 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Computer (127)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Form (959)  |  Household (8)  |  Issue (42)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life-Form (6)  |  Mean (809)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Simulation (7)  |  Space (500)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thorny (2)

Il senso comune è un giudizio senz'alcuna riflessione, comunemente sentito da tutto un ordine, da tutto un popolo, da tutta una Nazione, o da tutto il Gener Umano.
Common sense is judgment without reflection, shared by an entire class, an entire nation, or the entire human race.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 142, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Class (164)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Nation (193)  |  Race (268)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Sense (770)  |  Share (75)

Le bon sense n’est pas tel.
Common sense is not such.
From script for the character Le Marquis, in play, Homme du Jour (1732), Act 1, Scene 5, Line 255. Translated by Webmaster using Google Translate. English title would be The Man of the Day. This quote represents both early 18th century and foreign language use of the well-known saying that common sense is not (common).
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Sense (770)

Question: Explain how to determine the time of vibration of a given tuning-fork, and state what apparatus you would require for the purpose.
Answer: For this determination I should require an accurate watch beating seconds, and a sensitive ear. I mount the fork on a suitable stand, and then, as the second hand of my watch passes the figure 60 on the dial, I draw the bow neatly across one of its prongs. I wait. I listen intently. The throbbing air particles are receiving the pulsations; the beating prongs are giving up their original force; and slowly yet surely the sound dies away. Still I can hear it, but faintly and with close attention; and now only by pressing the bones of my head against its prongs. Finally the last trace disappears. I look at the time and leave the room, having determined the time of vibration of the common “pitch” fork. This process deteriorates the fork considerably, hence a different operation must be performed on a fork which is only lent.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 176-7, Question 4. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bow (14)  |  Close (69)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Dial (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Ear (68)  |  Examination (98)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Faint (9)  |  Figure (160)  |  Force (487)  |  Head (81)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Howler (15)  |  Last (426)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mounting (2)  |  Must (1526)  |  Operation (213)  |  Original (58)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Process (423)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Require (219)  |  Room (40)  |  Second (62)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Slow (101)  |  Sound (183)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Sure (14)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Watch (109)

Question: State what are the conditions favourable for the formation of dew. Describe an instrument for determining the dew point, and the method of using it.
Answer: This is easily proved from question 1. A body of gas as it ascends expands, cools, and deposits moisture; so if you walk up a hill the body of gas inside you expands, gives its heat to you, and deposits its moisture in the form of dew or common sweat. Hence these are the favourable conditions; and moreover it explains why you get warm by ascending a hill, in opposition to the well-known law of the Conservation of Energy.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179, Question 12. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Body (537)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Deposition (4)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Determination (78)  |  Dew (9)  |  Easy (204)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Favor (63)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gas (83)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hill (20)  |  Howler (15)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  State (491)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Use (766)  |  Walk (124)  |  Warm (69)  |  Well-Known (4)  |  Why (491)

Socrates: Shall we set down astronomy among the objects of study? Glaucon: I think so, to know something about the seasons, the months and the years is of use for military purposes, as well as for agriculture and for navigation. Socrates: It amuses me to see how afraid you are, lest the common herd of people should accuse you of recommending useless studies.
Socrates
As quoted by Plato. In Richard Garnett, Léon Vallée, Alois Brandl (eds.), The Universal Anthology: A Collection of the Best Literature (1899), Vol. 4, 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuse (4)  |  Afraid (21)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Amuse (2)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Down (456)  |  Know (1518)  |  Military (40)  |  Month (88)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Object (422)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Year (933)

That the general characters of the big group to which the embryo belongs appear in development earlier than the special characters. In agreement with this is the fact that the vesicular form is the most general form of all; for what is common in a greater degree to all animals than the opposition of an internal and an external surface?
The less general structural relations are formed after the more general, and so on until the most special appear.
The embryo of any given form, instead of passing through the state of other definite forms, on the contrary separates itself from them.

Fundamentally the embryo of a higher animal form never resembles the adult of another animal form, but only its embryo.
Über Entwicklungsgeschichte der Thiere: Beobachtung und Reflexion (1828), 224. Trans. E. S. Russell, Form and Function: A Contribution to the History of Animal Morphology (1916), 125-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Belong (162)  |  Character (243)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definite (110)  |  Degree (276)  |  Development (422)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Greater (288)  |  Internal (66)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passing (76)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Separate (143)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  Structural (29)  |  Surface (209)  |  Through (849)

QUEEN: Thou know'st 'tis common—all that lives must die,
Passing through nature to eternity.
HAMLET: Ay, madam, it is common.
Hamlet (1601), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Death (388)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Small (477)  |  Through (849)

A black hole has no hair.
[Summarizing the simplicity of a black hole, which shows only three characteristics to the outside world (mass, charge, spin) and comparing the situation to a room full of bald-pated people who had one characteristic in common, but no differences in hair length, style or color for individual variations.]
In Geons, Black Holes, and Quantum Foam (2000), 297. Quote introduced previously as the No-Hair Theorem in Charles W. Misner, Kip S. Thorne and John Wheeler, Gravitation (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Charge (59)  |  Color (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Identification (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Mass (157)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Show (346)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Situation (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Spin (26)  |  Variation (90)  |  World (1774)

A common fallacy in much of the adverse criticism to which science is subjected today is that it claims certainty, infallibility and complete emotional objectivity. It would be more nearly true to say that it is based upon wonder, adventure and hope.
Quoted in E. J. Bowen's obituary of Hinshelwood, Chemistry in Britain (1967), Vol. 3, 536.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Claim (146)  |  Complete (204)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Hope (299)  |  Infallibility (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Today (314)  |  Wonder (236)

A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.
In Mostly Harmless (1992), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Completely (135)  |  Design (195)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolproof (4)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Mistake (169)  |  People (1005)  |  Something (719)  |  Trying (144)  |  Underestimate (7)

A formative influence on my undergraduate self was the response of a respected elder statesmen of the Oxford Zoology Department when an American visitor had just publicly disproved his favourite theory. The old man strode to the front of the lecture hall, shook the American warmly by the hand and declared in ringing, emotional tones: ‘My dear fellow, I wish to thank you. I have been wrong these fifteen years.’ And we clapped our hands red. Can you imagine a Government Minister being cheered in the House of Commons for a similar admission? “Resign, Resign” is a much more likely response!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (17)  |  American (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Clap (3)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Department (92)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Elder (8)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Formative (2)  |  Front (16)  |  Government (110)  |  Hand (143)  |  House (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Influence (222)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Likely (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minister (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Red (35)  |  Resign (4)  |  Respect (207)  |  Response (53)  |  Ring (16)  |  Self (267)  |  Shake (41)  |  Similar (36)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Stride (15)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tone (22)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)  |  Zoology (36)

A good gulp of hot whisky at bedtime—it’s not very scientific, but it helps.
Response when questioned about the common cold.
News summaries of 22 Mar 1954.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cold (112)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Question (621)  |  Response (53)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Whisky (3)

A government, at bottom, is nothing more than a gang of men, and as a practical matter most of them are inferior men ... Government is actually the worst failure of civilized man. There has never been a really good one, and even those that are most tolerable are arbitrary, cruel, grasping and unintelligent. Indeed, it would not be far wrong to describe the best as the common enemy of all decent citizens.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Bad (180)  |  Best (459)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Decent (10)  |  Describe (128)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Failure (161)  |  Far (154)  |  Gang (4)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Practical (200)  |  Really (78)  |  Tolerable (2)  |  Unintelligent (2)  |  Worst (57)  |  Wrong (234)

A mathematical argument is, after all, only organized common sense, and it is well that men of science should not always expound their work to the few behind a veil of technical language, but should from time to time explain to a larger public the reasoning which lies behind their mathematical notation.
In The Tides and Kindred Phenomena in the Solar System: The Substance of Lectures Delivered in 1897 at the Lowell Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (1898), Preface, v. Preface
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Behind (137)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Explain (322)  |  Language (293)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Notation (27)  |  Organized (9)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Technical (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Veil (26)  |  Work (1351)

A metallurgist is an expert who can look at a platinum blonde and tell whether she is virgin metal or common ore.
Anonymous
In Evan Esar, 20,000 Quips and Quotes, 703.
Science quotes on:  |  Expert (65)  |  Joke (83)  |  Look (582)  |  Metal (84)  |  Metallurgist (2)  |  Ore (12)  |  Platinum (6)  |  Tell (340)  |  Virgin (9)

A Miracle is a Violation of the Laws of Nature; and as a firm and unalterable Experience has established these Laws, the Proof against a Miracle, from the very Nature of the Fact, is as entire as any Argument from Experience can possibly be imagined. Why is it more than probable, that all Men must die; that Lead cannot, of itself, remain suspended in the Air; that Fire consumes Wood, and is extinguished by Water; unless it be, that these Events are found agreeable to the Laws of Nature, and there is required a Violation of these Laws, or in other Words, a Miracle to prevent them? Nothing is esteem'd a Miracle, if it ever happen in the common Course of Nature... There must, therefore, be a uniform Experience against every miraculous Event, otherwise the Event would not merit that Appellation. And as a uniform Experience amounts to a Proof, there is here a direct and full Proof, from the Nature of the Fact, against the Existence of any Miracle; nor can such a Proof be destroy'd, or the Miracle render'd credible, but by an opposite Proof, which is superior.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Argument (138)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direct (225)  |  Event (216)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fire (189)  |  Firm (47)  |  Happen (274)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Merit (50)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Probable (20)  |  Proof (287)  |  Remain (349)  |  Render (93)  |  Required (108)  |  Superior (81)  |  Violation (7)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  Wood (92)  |  Word (619)

A plain, reasonable working man supposes, in the old way which is also the common-sense way, that if there are people who spend their lives in study, whom he feeds and keeps while they think for him—then no doubt these men are engaged in studying things men need to know; and he expects of science that it will solve for him the questions on which his welfare, and that of all men, depends. He expects science to tell him how he ought to live: how to treat his family, his neighbours and the men of other tribes, how to restrain his passions, what to believe in and what not to believe in, and much else. And what does our science say to him on these matters?
It triumphantly tells him: how many million miles it is from the earth to the sun; at what rate light travels through space; how many million vibrations of ether per second are caused by light, and how many vibrations of air by sound; it tells of the chemical components of the Milky Way, of a new element—helium—of micro-organisms and their excrements, of the points on the hand at which electricity collects, of X rays, and similar things.
“But I don't want any of those things,” says a plain and reasonable man—“I want to know how to live.”
In 'Modern Science', Essays and Letters (1903), 221-222.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Component (48)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  Ether (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Family (94)  |  Helium (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solve (130)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Travel (114)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  X-ray (37)

A small overweight of knowledge is often a sore impediment to the movements of common sense.
In The Collected Works of Dr. P.M. Latham (1878), Vol. 2, 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Movement (155)  |  Sense (770)  |  Small (477)  |  Sore (4)

A well-chosen anthology is a complete dispensary of medicine for the more common mental disorders, and may be used as much for prevention as cure.
'The Use of Poetry', On English Poetry (1922), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Chosen (48)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mental Disorder (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Well-Chosen (2)

Absolute, true, and mathematical time, in and of itself and of its own nature, without reference to anything external, flows uniformly and by another name is called duration. Relative, apparent, and common time is any sensible and external measure (precise or imprecise) of duration by means of motion; such as a measure—for example, an hour, a day, a month, a year—is commonly used instead of true time.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Definitions, Scholium, 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Call (769)  |  Day (42)  |  Duration (10)  |  External (57)  |  Flow (83)  |  Hour (186)  |  Imprecise (3)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Month (88)  |  Motion (310)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Relative (39)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Year (933)

According to the common law of nature, deficiency of power is supplied by duration of time.
'Geological Illustrations', Appendix to G. Cuvier, Essay on the Theory of the Earth, trans. R. Jameson (1827), 430.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Time (1877)

After a tremendous task has been begun in our time, first by Copernicus and then by many very learned mathematicians, and when the assertion that the earth moves can no longer be considered something new, would it not be much better to pull the wagon to its goal by our joint efforts, now that we have got it underway, and gradually, with powerful voices, to shout down the common herd, which really does not weigh arguments very carefully?
Letter to Galileo (13 Oct 1597). In James Bruce Ross (ed.) and Mary Martin (ed., trans.), 'Comrades in the Pursuit of Truth', The Portable Renaissance Reader (1953, 1981), 599. As quoted and cited in Merry E. Wiesner, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789 (2013), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Consider (416)  |  Copernicus_Nicolaud (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effort (227)  |  First (1283)  |  Goal (145)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Herd (15)  |  Joint (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pull (43)  |  Shout (25)  |  Something (719)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Voice (52)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Weigh (49)

Alexander is said to have asked Menæchmus to teach him geometry concisely, but Menæchmus replied: “O king, through the country there are royal roads and roads for common citizens, but in geometry there is one road for all.”
As quoted in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 152-153, citing Stobaeus, Edition Wachsmuth (1884), Ecl. II, 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Alexander the Great (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Country (251)  |  Geometry (255)  |  King (35)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Road (4)  |  Teach (277)  |  Through (849)

All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the “expanding universe” might also be called the theory of the “shrinking atom”. …
:Let us then take the whole universe as our standard of constancy, and adopt the view of a cosmic being whose body is composed of intergalactic spaces and swells as they swell. Or rather we must now say it keeps the same size, for he will not admit that it is he who has changed. Watching us for a few thousand million years, he sees us shrinking; atoms, animals, planets, even the galaxies, all shrink alike; only the intergalactic spaces remain the same. The earth spirals round the sun in an ever-decreasing orbit. It would be absurd to treat its changing revolution as a constant unit of time. The cosmic being will naturally relate his units of length and time so that the velocity of light remains constant. Our years will then decrease in geometrical progression in the cosmic scale of time. On that scale man’s life is becoming briefer; his threescore years and ten are an ever-decreasing allowance. Owing to the property of geometrical progressions an infinite number of our years will add up to a finite cosmic time; so that what we should call the end of eternity is an ordinary finite date in the cosmic calendar. But on that date the universe has expanded to infinity in our reckoning, and we have shrunk to nothing in the reckoning of the cosmic being.
We walk the stage of life, performers of a drama for the benefit of the cosmic spectator. As the scenes proceed he notices that the actors are growing smaller and the action quicker. When the last act opens the curtain rises on midget actors rushing through their parts at frantic speed. Smaller and smaller. Faster and faster. One last microscopic blurr of intense agitation. And then nothing.
In The Expanding Universe (1933) , 90-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atom (355)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Body (537)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Drama (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Expand (53)  |  Faster (50)  |  Finite (59)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Growing (98)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Owing (39)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Progression (23)  |  Property (168)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Stage (143)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Velocity (48)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

All important unit operations have much in common, and if the underlying principles upon which the rational design and operation of basic types of engineering equipment depend are understood, their successful adaptation to manufacturing processes becomes a matter of good management rather than of good fortune.
In William H. Walker, Warren K. Lewis and William H. MacAdams, The Principles of Chemical Engineering (1923), Preface to 1st. edition, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Become (815)  |  Depend (228)  |  Design (195)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Important (209)  |  Management (21)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Matter (798)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Rational (90)  |  Successful (123)  |  Type (167)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Understood (156)

And part of the soil is called to wash away
In storms and streams shave close and gnaw the rocks.
Besides, whatever the earth feeds and grows
Is restored to earth. And since she surely is
The womb of all things and their common grave,
Earth must dwindle, you see and take on growth again.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 255-60, 166.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Dwindle (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Must (1526)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Soil (86)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Stream (81)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wash (21)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Womb (24)

Anthropology has reached that point of development where the careful investigation of facts shakes our firm belief in the far-reaching theories that have been built up. The complexity of each phenomenon dawns on our minds, and makes us desirous of proceeding more cautiously. Heretofore we have seen the features common to all human thought. Now we begin to see their differences. We recognize that these are no less important than their similarities, and the value of detailed studies becomes apparent. Our aim has not changed, but our method must change. We are still searching for the laws that govern the growth of human culture, of human thought; but we recognize the fact that before we seek for what is common to all culture, we must analyze each culture by careful and exact methods, as the geologist analyzes the succession and order of deposits, as the biologist examines the forms of living matter. We see that the growth of human culture manifests itself in the growth of each special culture. Thus we have come to understand that before we can build up the theory of the growth of all human culture, we must know the growth of cultures that we find here and there among the most primitive tribes of the Arctic, of the deserts of Australia, and of the impenetrable forests of South America; and the progress of the civilization of antiquity and of our own times. We must, so far as we can, reconstruct the actual history of mankind, before we can hope to discover the laws underlying that history.
The Jesup North Pacific Expedition: Memoir of the American Museum of Natural History (1898), Vol. 1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Australia (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Build (204)  |  Change (593)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Culture (143)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desert (56)  |  Desirous (2)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Firm (47)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Govern (64)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recognize (125)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shake (41)  |  South (38)  |  South America (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Succession (77)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Understand (606)  |  Value (365)

Any child born into the hugely consumptionist way of life so common in the industrial world will have an impact that is, on average, many times more destructive than that of a child born in the developing world.
Al Gore
Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit (2006), 308.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Child (307)  |  Impact (42)  |  Industrialisation (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Population (110)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Anyone of common mental and physical health can practice scientific research. … Anyone can try by patient experiment what happens if this or that substance be mixed in this or that proportion with some other under this or that condition. Anyone can vary the experiment in any number of ways. He that hits in this fashion on something novel and of use will have fame. … The fame will be the product of luck and industry. It will not be the product of special talent.
In Essays of a Catholic Layman in England (1931).
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (356)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fame (50)  |  Happen (274)  |  Health (193)  |  Industry (137)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mental (177)  |  Novel (32)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physical (508)  |  Practice (204)  |  Product (160)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Something (719)  |  Special (184)  |  Substance (248)  |  Talent (94)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Anyone who has examined into the history of the theories of earth evolution must have been astounded to observe the manner in which the unique and the difficultly explainable has been made to take the place of the common and the natural in deriving the framework of these theories.
Earth Evolution and Facial Expression (1921), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Astound (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Framework (31)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observe (168)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unique (67)

Architecture has its political Use; publick Buildings being the Ornament of a Country; it establishes a Nation, draws People and Commerce; makes the People love their native Country, which Passion is the Original of all great Actions in a Common-wealth…. Architecture aims at Eternity.
In Charles Henry Bellenden Ker, Sir Christopher Wren (1828), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Country (251)  |  Draw (137)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Great (1574)  |  Love (309)  |  Nation (193)  |  Native (38)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Political (121)  |  Use (766)  |  Wealth (94)

Are the humanistic and scientific approaches different? Scientists can calculate the torsion of a skyscraper at the wing-beat of a bird, or 155 motions of the Moon and 500 smaller ones in addition. They move in academic garb and sing logarithms. They say, “The sky is ours”, like priests in charge of heaven. We poor humanists cannot even think clearly, or write a sentence without a blunder, commoners of “common sense”. We never take a step without stumbling; they move solemnly, ever unerringly, never a step back, and carry bell, book, and candle.
Quoting himself in Stargazers and Gravediggers: Memoirs to Worlds in Collision (2012), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Addition (66)  |  Approach (108)  |  Back (390)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bell (35)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Book (392)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Candle (30)  |  Carry (127)  |  Charge (59)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Different (577)  |  Garb (6)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Humanist (7)  |  Humanistic (3)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Moon (237)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poor (136)  |  Priest (28)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Sing (26)  |  Sky (161)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Step (231)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Wing (75)  |  Write (230)

As a different, but perhaps more common, strategy for the suppression of novelty, we may admit the threatening object to our midst, but provide an enveloping mantle of ordinary garb… . This kind of cover-up, so often amusing in our daily lives, can be quite dangerous in science, for nothing can stifle originality more effectively than an ordinary mantle placed fully and securely over an extraordinary thing.
In 'A Short Way to Big Ends', Natural History (Jan 1986), 95, No. 1, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Daily (87)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Different (577)  |  Envelop (5)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Garb (6)  |  Kind (557)  |  Live (628)  |  Mantle (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Object (422)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Originality (19)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stifle (5)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Suppression (9)  |  Thing (1915)

As every circumstance relating to so capital a discovery as this (the greatest, perhaps, that has been made in the whole compass of philosophy, since the time of Sir Isaac Newton) cannot but give pleasure to all my readers, I shall endeavour to gratify them with the communication of a few particulars which I have from the best authority. The Doctor [Benjamin Franklin], after having published his method of verifying his hypothesis concerning the sameness of electricity with the matter lightning, was waiting for the erection of a spire in Philadelphia to carry his views into execution; not imagining that a pointed rod, of a moderate height, could answer the purpose; when it occurred to him, that, by means of a common kite, he could have a readier and better access to the regions of thunder than by any spire whatever. Preparing, therefore, a large silk handkerchief, and two cross sticks, of a proper length, on which to extend it, he took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field, in which there was a shed convenient for his purpose. But dreading the ridicule which too commonly attends unsuccessful attempts in science, he communicated his intended experiment to no body but his son, who assisted him in raising the kite.
The kite being raised, a considerable time elapsed before there was any appearance of its being electrified. One very promising cloud passed over it without any effect; when, at length, just as he was beginning to despair of his contrivance, he observed some loose threads of the hempen string to stand erect, and to avoid one another, just as if they had been suspended on a common conductor. Struck with this promising appearance, he inmmediately presented his knuckle to the key, and (let the reader judge of the exquisite pleasure he must have felt at that moment) the discovery was complete. He perceived a very evident electric spark. Others succeeded, even before the string was wet, so as to put the matter past all dispute, and when the rain had wetted the string, he collected electric fire very copiously. This happened in June 1752, a month after the electricians in France had verified the same theory, but before he had heard of any thing that they had done.
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767, 3rd ed. 1775), Vol. 1, 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attend (65)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Carry (127)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Communication (94)  |  Compass (34)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evident (91)  |  Execution (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  France (27)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Judge (108)  |  Key (50)  |  Kite (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Past (337)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Present (619)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silk (13)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stand (274)  |  Storm (51)  |  String (21)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Depend (228)  |  Describe (128)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Goethe (3)  |  Higher (37)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Magic (86)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (746)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Real (149)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solution (267)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

Astronomy concerns itself with the whole of the visible universe, of which our earth forms but a relatively insignificant part; while Geology deals with that earth regarded as an individual. Astronomy is the oldest of the sciences, while Geology is one of the newest. But the two sciences have this in common, that to both are granted a magnificence of outlook, and an immensity of grasp denied to all the rest.
Proceedings of the Geological Society of London (1903), 59, lxviii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Both (493)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deal (188)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grant (73)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Whole (738)

Astronomy, as the science of cyclical motions, has nothing in common with Geology. But look at Astronomy where she has an analogy with Geology; consider our knowledge of the heavens as a palaetiological science;—as the study of a past condition, from which the present is derived by causes acting in time. Is there no evidence of a beginning, or of a progress?
In History of the Inductive Sciences (1857), Vol. 3, 516.
Science quotes on:  |  Acting (5)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cause (541)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Derived (5)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Geology (220)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)

At first he who invented any art that went beyond the common perceptions of man was naturally admired by men, not only because there was something useful in the inventions, but because he was thought wise and superior to the rest. But as more arts were invented, and some were directed to the necessities of life, others to its recreation, the inventors of the latter were always regarded as wiser than the inventors of the former, because their branches of knowledge did not aim at utility.
Aristotle
Metaphysics, 981b, 13-20. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 2, 1553.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Art (657)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Direct (225)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Something (719)  |  Superior (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Wise (131)

At length being at Clapham where there is, on the common, a large pond which, I observed to be one day very rough with the wind, I fetched out a cruet of oil and dropt a little of it on the water. I saw it spread itself with surprising swiftness upon the surface; but the effect of smoothing the waves was not produced; for I had applied it first on the leeward side of the pond, where the waves were largest, and the wind drove my oil back upon the shore. I then went to the windward side, where they began to form; and there the oil, though not more than a tea-spoonful, produced an instant calm over a space several yards square, which spread amazingly, and extended itself gradually till it reached the leeside, making all that quarter of the pond, perhaps half an acre, as smooth as a looking-glass.
[Experiment to test an observation made at sea in 1757, when he had seen the wake of a ship smoothed, explained by the captain as presumably due to cooks emptying greasy water in to the sea through the scuppers.]
Letter, extract in 'Of the still of Waves by Means of Oil The Gentleman's Magazine (1775), Vol. 45, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calm (31)  |  Captain (14)  |  Due (141)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Instant (45)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oil (59)  |  Pond (15)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reach (281)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Side (233)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Space (500)  |  Spread (83)  |  Square (70)  |  Still (613)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tea (12)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wind (128)

Because intelligence is our own most distinctive feature, we may incline to ascribe superior intelligence to the basic primate plan, or to the basic plan of the mammals in general, but this point requires some careful consideration. There is no question at all that most mammals of today are more intelligent than most reptiles of today. I am not going to try to define intelligence or to argue with those who deny thought or consciousness to any animal except man. It seems both common and scientific sense to admit that ability to learn, modification of action according to the situation, and other observable elements of behavior in animals reflect their degrees of intelligence and permit us, if only roughly, to compare these degrees. In spite of all difficulties and all the qualifications with which the expert (quite properly) hedges his conclusions, it also seems sensible to conclude that by and large an animal is likely to be more intelligent if it has a larger brain at a given body size and especially if its brain shows greater development of those areas and structures best developed in our own brains. After all, we know we are intelligent, even though we wish we were more so.
In The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Area (31)  |  Argument (138)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Basic (138)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Care (186)  |  Compare (69)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Degree (276)  |  Deny (66)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Element (310)  |  Expert (65)  |  Feature (44)  |  General (511)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Larger (14)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observable (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permit (58)  |  Plan (117)  |  Point (580)  |  Primate (11)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Question (621)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Show (346)  |  Situation (113)  |  Size (60)  |  Spite (55)  |  Structure (344)  |  Superior (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Try (283)  |  Wish (212)

Beneath multiple specific and individual distinctions, beneath innumerable and incessant transformations, at the bottom of the circular evolution without beginning or end, there hides a law, a unique nature participated in by all beings, in which this common participation produces a ground of common harmony.
A.W. Grabau, Stratigraphy of China (1928), title page.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Circular (19)  |  Distinction (72)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Ground (217)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Hide (69)  |  Individual (404)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Law (894)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Participation (15)  |  Specific (95)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Unique (67)

Boundaries which mark off one field of science from another are purely artificial, are set up only for temporary convenience. Let chemists and physicists dig deep enough, and they reach common ground.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (33)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Common Ground (4)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Enough (340)  |  Field (364)  |  Ground (217)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Temporary (23)

But to proceed; as in order and place, so also in matter of her Creation, Woman far excells Man. things receive their value from the matter they are made of, and the excellent skill of their maker: Pots of common clay must not contend with China-dishes, nor pewter utensils vye dignity with those of silver…. Woman was not composed of any inanimate or vile dirt, but of a more refined and purified substance, enlivened and actuated by a Rational Soul, whose operations speak it a beam, or bright ray of Divinity.
In Female Pre-eminence: Or, The Dignity and Excellency of that Sex above the Male, translation (1670).
Science quotes on:  |  Beam (24)  |  Bright (79)  |  China (23)  |  Clay (9)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Excel (4)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Rational (90)  |  Ray (114)  |  Receive (114)  |  Silver (46)  |  Skill (109)  |  Soul (226)  |  Speak (232)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Utensil (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Woman (151)

By considering the embryological structure of man - the homologies which he presents with the lower animals - the rudiments which he retains - and the reversions to which he is liable, we can partly recall in imagination the former condition of our early progenitors; and we can approximately place them in their proper position in the zoological series. We thus learnt that man is descended from a hairy quadruped, furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in its habit, and an inhabitant of the Old World. This creature, if its whole structure had been examined by a naturalist, would have been classed among the Quadrumana, as surely as would be the common and still more ancient progenitor of the Old and New World monkeys.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 389.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Ear (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Former (137)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Habit (168)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Old World (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Proper (144)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Series (149)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surely (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

By the mid-1950s manatees were already scarce, and monk seals, once common as far north as Galveston, were gone. By the end of the 20th century, up to 90 percent of the sharks, tuna, swordfish, marlins, groupers, turtles, whales, and many other large creatures that prospered in the Gulf for millions of years had been depleted by overfishing.
From 'My Blue Wilderness', National Geographic Magazine (Oct 2010), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Already (222)  |  Century (310)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deplete (2)  |  End (590)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Large (394)  |  Marlin (2)  |  Million (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Seal (18)  |  Shark (10)  |  Swordfish (2)  |  Tuna (4)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Whale (32)  |  Year (933)

Certain elements have the property of producing the same crystal form when in combination with an equal number of atoms of one or more common elements, and the elements, from his point of view, can be arranged in certain groups. For convenience I have called the elements belonging to the same group … isomorphous.
Originally published in 'Om Förhållandet emellan chemiska sammansättningen och krystallformen hos Arseniksyrade och Phosphorsyrade Salter', (On the Relation between the Chemical Composition and Crystal Form of Salts of Arsenic and Phosphoric Acids), Kungliga Svenska vetenskapsakademiens handlingar (1821), 4. In F. Szabadváry article on 'Eilhard Mitscherlich' in Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 424; perhaps from J.R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, Vol. 4 (1964), 210.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combination (144)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Element (310)  |  Equal (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Group (78)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Producing (6)  |  Property (168)  |  Same (157)  |  View (488)

Chemical signs ought to be letters, for the greater facility of writing, and not to disfigure a printed book ... I shall take therefore for the chemical sign, the initial letter of the Latin name of each elementary substance: but as several have the same initial letter, I shall distinguish them in the following manner:— 1. In the class which I shall call metalloids, I shall employ the initial letter only, even when this letter is common to the metalloid and to some metal. 2. In the class of metals, I shall distinguish those that have the same initials with another metal, or a metalloid, by writing the first two letters of the word. 3. If the first two letters be common to two metals, I shall, in that case, add to the initial letter the first consonant which they have not in common: for example, S = sulphur, Si = silicium, St = stibium (antimony), Sn = stannum (tin), C = carbonicum, Co = colbaltum (colbalt), Cu = cuprum (copper), O = oxygen, Os = osmium, &c.
'Essay on the Cause of Chemical Proportions, and on some circumstances relating to them: together with a short and easy method of expressing them', Annals of Philosophy, 1814, 3,51-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antimony (7)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Class (164)  |  Cobalt (4)  |  Consonant (3)  |  Copper (25)  |  Disfigure (2)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Employ (113)  |  Facility (11)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  Initial (17)  |  Latin (38)  |  Letter (109)  |  Metal (84)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Osmium (3)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Print (17)  |  Sign (58)  |  Silicon (4)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tin (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)

Common integration is only the memory of differentiation...
Science quotes on:  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Integration (19)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)

Common sense always speaks too late. Common sense is the guy who tells you you ought to have had your brakes relined last week before you smashed a front end this week. Common sense is the Monday morning quarterback who could have won the ball game if he had been on the team. But he never is. He’s high up in the stands with a flask on his hip. Common sense is the little man in a grey suit who never makes a mistake in addition. But it’s always somebody else’s money he’s adding up.
In novel, Playback (1958), Chap. 14, 95.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Ball (62)  |  Brake (2)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  End (590)  |  Front (16)  |  Game (101)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Hip (3)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Money (170)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  Repair (11)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smash (4)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Suit (11)  |  Team (15)  |  Tell (340)  |  Week (70)  |  Win (52)

Common Sense and Education: The more you think you have of one, the less you think you need of the other.
In The Well-Spoken Thesaurus (2011), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Education (378)  |  Less (103)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sense (770)  |  Think (1086)

Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom.
In 'Hacket’s Life of Lord Keeper Williams', notes published in Henry Nelson Coleridge (ed.), The Literary Remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1838), Vol. 3, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Degree (276)  |  Sense (770)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)

Common sense is a fool when it expects fools to act with common sense.
In Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford, to Sir Horace Mann (31 Jul 1767), Vol. 1, 356.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fool (116)  |  Sense (770)

Common sense is as rare as genius—is the basis of genius and experience is the hands and feet to every enterprise.
In essay, 'Experience', Essays: Second Series (1844), collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Essays First and Second Series (1883), 97. A half-century later, Arthur Handly Marks incorporated the quote (without attribution) as “a first-rate article of common sense is as rare as genius”, in his Address (6 Jun 1892), 'Common Sense' at the Commencement of Prior Institute, Jasper, Tennessee, collected in Igerne and Other Writings of Arthur Handly Marks (1897), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Experience (467)  |  Foot (60)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hand (143)  |  Rare (89)  |  Sense (770)

Common sense is in spite of, not as the result of, education.
Anonymous
“Anonymous” because although commonly seen attributed to Victor Hugo, the quote cannot be found in his works.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Education (378)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spite (55)

Common sense is not wrong in the view that is meaningful, appropriate and necessary to talk about the large objects of our daily experience …. Common sense is wrong only if it insists that what is familiar must reappear in what is unfamiliar.
In 'Uncommon Sense', collected in J. Robert Oppenheimer, Nicholas Metropolis (ed.) and ‎Gian-Carlo Rota (ed.), Uncommon Sense (1984), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Daily (87)  |  Experience (467)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Insist (20)  |  Large (394)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Reappear (4)  |  Sense (770)  |  Talk (100)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  View (488)  |  Wrong (234)

Common sense is only the application of theories which have grown and been formulated unconsciously as result of experience.
From 'For Mans Use of God's Gifts', collected in Robert C. Goodpasture (ed.), Engineers and Ivory Towers (1952), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Experience (467)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Grow (238)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unconscious (22)

Common sense is science exactly in so far as it fulfills the ideal of common sense; that is, sees facts as they are, or at any rate, without the distortion of prejudice, and reasons from them in accordance with the dictates of sound judgment. And science is simply common sense at its best, that is, rigidly accurate in observation, and merciless to fallacy in logic.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (10)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Best (459)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Logic (287)  |  Observation (555)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sound (183)

Common Sense is that which judges the things given to it by other senses.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Give (202)  |  Judge (108)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Common sense is that which tells us the world is flat.
As quoted in Samuel Ichiyé Hayakawa, Language in Thought and Action (1939, 1949), 31. Hayakawa clearly specified the quote was “recently defined by Stuart Chase”. Some later sources incorrectly attribute to Hayakawa alone. Others even attribute to Einstein.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Flat (33)  |  Sense (770)  |  Tell (340)  |  World (1774)

Common sense is the favorite daughter of Reason, and altho thare are menny other wimmin more attraktive for a time, thare is nothing but death kan rob common sense ov her buty.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (23)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Death (388)  |  Favorite (37)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rob (6)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)  |  Women (9)

Common sense is the knack of seeing things as they are, and doing things as they ought to be done.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Doing (280)  |  Knack (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Common sense is the knack of seeing things as they are, and doing things as they ought to be done.
Anonymous
Appears in Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations (1891), 77, attributed, without citation, to Calvin Ellis Stowe. However, Webmaster, as yet, has not been able to find any primary source in a work by Stowe. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Doing (280)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Common sense is the measure of the possible; it is composed of experience and prevision; it is calculation applied to life.
Entry for 26 Dec 1852 in Amiel’s Journal: The Journal Intime of Henri-Frédéric Amiel, trans. Humphry Ward (1893), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Experience (467)  |  Life (1795)  |  Measure (232)  |  Possible (552)  |  Sense (770)

Common sense is the most widely shared commodity in the world, for every man is convinced that he is well supplied with it.
Epigraph in Ian Glynn, An Anatomy of Thought: The Origin and Machinery of the Mind (), Chap. 2, 7. A more freely translated version of the Descartes (longer) quote beginning, “Good sense is, of all things among men…” also on the René Descartes Quotes page on this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Commodity (5)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sense (770)  |  Share (75)  |  Supply (93)  |  Widely (9)  |  World (1774)

Common sense is the very antipodes of science.
In Systematic Psychology: Prolegomena (1972), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Antipodes (2)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)

Common sense is, of all kinds, the most uncommon.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Kind (557)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sense (770)  |  Uncommon (14)

Common sense iz instinkt, and instinkt don’t make enny blunders mutch, no more than a rat duz, in coming out, or going intew a hole, he hits the hole the fust time, and just fills it.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Blunder (21)  |  Coming (114)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Fill (61)  |  First (1283)  |  Hit (20)  |  Hole (16)  |  Instinct (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)

Common sense iz like biled vittles, it is good right from the pot, and it is good nex day warmed up.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Boil (23)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Food (199)  |  Good (889)  |  Pot (3)  |  Right (452)  |  Sense (770)  |  Warm (69)

Common sense kan be improved upon by edukashun—genius kan be too, sum, but not much.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Education (378)  |  Genius (284)  |  Improve (58)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sum (102)

Common sense needs to be renamed
Cause nowadays it’s rare.
From lyrics, 'Jme', on album Blam! (Released 4 Oct 2010).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cause (541)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Need (290)  |  Nowadays (6)  |  Rare (89)  |  Sense (770)

Common sense … has the very curious property of being more correct retrospectively than prospectively. It seems to me that one of the principal criteria to be applied to successful science is that its results are almost always obvious retrospectively; unfortunately, they seldom are prospectively. Common sense provides a kind of ultimate validation after science has completed its work; it seldom anticipates what science is going to discover.
Quoted in A. De Reuck, M. Goldsmith and J. Knight (eds.), Decision Making in National Science Policy (1968), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Applied (177)  |  Being (1278)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Completed (30)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Kind (557)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Principal (63)  |  Property (168)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Sense (770)  |  Successful (123)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Validation (2)  |  Work (1351)

Common sense … is to the judgment what genius is to the understanding.
In Igerne and Other Writings of Arthur Handly Marks (1897), 349.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Genius (284)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Sense (770)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Common sense … may be thought of as a series of concepts and conceptual schemes which have proved highly satisfactory for the practical uses of mankind. Some of those concepts and conceptual schemes were carried over into science with only a little pruning and whittling and for a long time proved useful. As the recent revolutions in physics indicate, however, many errors can be made by failure to examine carefully just how common sense ideas should be defined in terms of what the experimenter plans to do.
In Science and Common Sense (1951), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (24)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Concept (221)  |  Define (49)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Examine (78)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Failure (161)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plan (117)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prune (7)  |  Pruning (7)  |  Recent (77)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)

Common sense, (which, in truth, is very uncommon) is the best sense I know of: abide by it; it will counsel you best.
From Letter (27 Sep 1748, O.S.) to his son, collected in Letters Written by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, to his son, Philip Stanhope (1777), Vol. 2, 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Best (459)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Sense (770)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Will (2355)

Common sense, the half-truths of a deceitful society, is honored as the honest truths of a frank world.
In Social Amnesia (1975), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Deceit (7)  |  Frank (4)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honor (54)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Common to all these types is the anthropomorphic character of their conception of God. In general, only individuals of exceptional endowments, and exceptionally high-minded communities, rise to any considerable extent above this level. But there is a third stage of religious experience which belongs to all of them, even though it is rarely found in a pure form: I shall call it cosmic religious feeling. It is very difficult to elucidate this feeling to anyone who is entirely without it, especially as there is no anthropomorphic conception of God corresponding to it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropomorphic (3)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Belong (162)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Community (104)  |  Conception (154)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Exceptionally (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Individual (404)  |  Level (67)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rise (166)  |  Stage (143)  |  Third (15)  |  Type (167)

Common-sense contents itself with the unreconciled contradiction, laughs when it can, and weeps when it must, and makes, in short, a practical compromise, without trying a theoretical solution.
From Essay, 'German Pessimism', a book review (of Der Modern Pessimismus by Edmund Pfleiderer) in Nation (7 Oct 1875), 21, No. 536, 233. Reprinted in Ralph Barton Perry (ed.), Collected Essays and Reviews by William James (1920), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Compromise (9)  |  Content (69)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Must (1526)  |  Practical (200)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Solution (267)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Weep (5)

Communication of science as subject-matter has so far outrun in education the construction of a scientific habit of mind that to some extent the natural common sense of mankind has been interfered with to its detriment.
Address to Section L, Education, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Boston (1909), 'Science as Subject-Matter and as Method'. Published in Science (28 Jan 1910), N.S. Vol. 31, No. 787, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Communication (94)  |  Construction (112)  |  Detriment (3)  |  Education (378)  |  Extent (139)  |  Habit (168)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Outrun (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)

Consider the very roots of our ability to discern truth. Above all (or perhaps I should say “underneath all”), common sense is what we depend on—that crazily elusive, ubiquitous faculty we all have to some degree or other. … If we apply common sense to itself over and over again, we wind up building a skyscraper. The ground floor of the structure is the ordinary common sense we all have, and the rules for building news floors are implicit in the ground floor itself. However, working it all out is a gigantic task, and the result is a structure that transcends mere common sense.
In Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern (1985), 93–94.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discern (33)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Floor (20)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ground Floor (2)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Mere (84)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Result (677)  |  Root (120)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Structure (344)  |  Task (147)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ubiquitous (5)  |  Underneath (4)  |  Wind (128)  |  Work (1351)

Despite the dazzling successes of modern technology and the unprecedented power of modern military systems, they suffer from a common and catastrophic fault. While providing us with a bountiful supply of food, with great industrial plants, with high-speed transportation, and with military weapons of unprecedented power, they threaten our very survival.
In Science and Survival (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Catastrophic (9)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Despite (7)  |  Fault (54)  |  Food (199)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Military (40)  |  Modern (385)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Provide (69)  |  Speed (65)  |  Success (302)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Supply (93)  |  Survival (94)  |  System (537)  |  Technology (257)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Unprecedented (11)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)

Devised with a maximum of erudition and a minimum of common sense.
Aphorism 56 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Devised (3)  |  Erudition (6)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Sense (770)

Do not all charms fly
At the mere touch of cold philosophy?
There was an awful rainbow once in heaven:
We know her woof, her texture; she is given
In the dull catalogue of common things.
Philosophy will clip an Angel’s wings,
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line,
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine
Unweave a rainbow.
Lamia 1820, II, lines 229-37. In John Barnard (ed.), John Keats. The Complete Poems (1973), 431.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Angel (44)  |  Charm (51)  |  Cold (112)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dull (54)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fly (146)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mine (76)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poem (96)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)

Do not imagine that mathematics is harsh and crabbed, and repulsive to common sense. It is merely the etherealisation of common sense.
'The Six Gateways of Knowledge', Presidential Address to the Birmingham and Midland Institute, Birmingham (3 Oct 1883). In Popular Lectures and Addresses (1891), Vol. 1, 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Do (1908)  |  Harsh (8)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Repulsive (7)  |  Sense (770)

During my stay in London I resided for a considerable time in Clapham Road in the neighbourhood of Clapham Common... One fine summer evening I was returning by the last bus 'outside' as usual, through the deserted streets of the city, which are at other times so full of life. I fell into a reverie (Träumerei), and 10, the atoms were gambolling before my eyes! Whenever, hitherto, these diminutive beings had appeared to me, they had always been in motion: but up to that time I had never been able to discern the nature of their motion. Now, however, I saw how, frequently, two smaller atoms united to form a pair: how the larger one embraced the two smaller ones: how still larger ones kept hold of three or even four of the smaller: whilst the whole kept whirling in a giddy dance. I saw how the larger ones formed a chain, dragging the smaller ones after them but only at the ends of the chain. I saw what our past master, Kopp, my highly honoured teacher and friend has depicted with such charm in his Molekular-Welt: but I saw it long before him. The cry of the conductor 'Clapham Road', awakened me from my dreaming: but I spent part of the night in putting on paper at least sketches of these dream forms. This was the origin of the 'Structural Theory'.
Kekule at Benzolfest in Berichte (1890), 23, 1302.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chain (50)  |  Charm (51)  |  City (78)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dance (32)  |  Desert (56)  |  Discern (33)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Dream (208)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hermann Franz Moritz Kopp (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (182)  |  Past (337)  |  Saw (160)  |  Spent (85)  |  Still (613)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Summer (54)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Whole (738)

During the half-century that has elapsed since the enunciation of the cell-theory by Schleiden and Schwann, in 1838-39, it has became ever more clearly apparent that the key to all ultimate biological problems must, in the last analysis, be sought in the cell. It was the cell-theory that first brought the structure of plants and animals under one point of view by revealing their common plan of organization. It was through the cell-theory that Kolliker and Remak opened the way to an understanding of the nature of embryological development, and the law of genetic continuity lying at the basis of inheritance. It was the cell-­theory again which, in the hands of Virchaw and Max Schultze, inaugurated a new era in the history of physiology and pathology, by showing that all the various functions of the body, in health and in disease, are but the outward expression of cell­-activities. And at a still later day it was through the cell-theory that Hertwig, Fol, Van Beneden, and Strasburger solved the long-standing riddle of the fertilization of the egg, and the mechanism of hereditary transmission. No other biological generalization, save only the theory of organic evolution, has brought so many apparently diverse phenomena under a common point of view or has accomplished more far the unification of knowledge. The cell-theory must therefore be placed beside the evolution-theory as one of the foundation stones of modern biology.
In The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1896), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Basis (173)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Cell Theory (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Development (422)  |  Disease (328)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Enunciation (7)  |  Era (51)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Function (228)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Health (193)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Oskar Hertwig (2)  |  History (673)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Key (50)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Problem (676)  |  Robert Remak (2)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Save (118)  |  Theodor Schwann (12)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unification (11)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Rudolf Virchow (50)  |  Way (1217)

During the time of the Deluge, whilst the Water was out upon, and covered the Terrestrial Globe, … all Fossils whatever that had before obtained any Solidity, were totally dissolved, and their constituent Corpuscles all disjoyned, their Cohesion perfectly ceasing … [A]nd, to be short, all Bodies whatsoever that were either upon the Earth, or that constituted the Mass of it, if not quite down to the Abyss, yet at least to the greatest depth we ever dig: I say all these were assumed up promiscuously into the Water, and sustained in it, in such a manner that the Water, and Bodies in it, together made up one common confused Mass. That at length all the Mass that was thus borne up in the Water, was again precipitated and subsided towards the bottom. That this subsidence happened generally, and as near as possibly could be expected in so great a Confusion, according to the laws of Gravity.
In An Essay Toward A Natural History of the Earth (1695), 74-75.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Cohesion (7)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dig (21)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Law (894)  |  Mass (157)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Say (984)  |  Short (197)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Water (481)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whatsoever (41)

Electricity is often called wonderful, beautiful; but it is so only in common with the other forces of nature. The beauty of electricity or of any other force is not that the power is mysterious, and unexpected, touching every sense at unawares in turn, but that it is under law, and that the taught intellect can even govern it largely. The human mind is placed above, and not beneath it, and it is in such a point of view that the mental education afforded by science is rendered super-eminent in dignity, in practical application and utility; for by enabling the mind to apply the natural power through law, it conveys the gifts of God to man.
Notes for a Friday Discourse at the Royal Institution (1858).
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Call (769)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Education (378)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Force (487)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Govern (64)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Render (93)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Through (849)  |  Touching (16)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Utility (49)  |  View (488)  |  Wonderful (149)

Every common mechanic has something to say in his craft about good and evil, useful and useless, but these practical considerations never enter into the purview of the mathematician.
Quoted in Robert Drew Hicks, Stoic and Epicurean (1910), 210.
Science quotes on:  |  Consideration (139)  |  Craft (10)  |  Enter (141)  |  Evil (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Never (1087)  |  Practical (200)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Something To Say (4)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Uselessness (22)

Every discipline must be honored for reason other than its utility, otherwise it yields no enthusiasm for industry.
For both reasons, I consider mathematics the chief subject for the common school. No more highly honored exercise for the mind can be found; the buoyancy [Spannkraft] which it produces is even greater than that produced by the ancient languages, while its utility is unquestioned.
In 'Mathematischer Lehrplan für Realschulen' Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 167. (Mathematics Curriculum for Secondary Schools). As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Both (493)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Chief (97)  |  Consider (416)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Greater (288)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honored (3)  |  Industry (137)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reason (744)  |  School (219)  |  Subject (521)  |  Unquestioned (7)  |  Utility (49)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Yield (81)

Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual motion and alteration; some words go off, and become obsolete; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use; or the same word is inverted to a new sense and notion, which in tract of time makes as observable a change in the air and features of a language as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Air (347)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Face (212)  |  Grow (238)  |  Language (293)  |  Living (491)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observable (21)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Perspire (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

Every utterance from government - from justifying 90-day detention to invading other countries [and] to curtailing civil liberties - is about the dangers of religious division and fundamentalism. Yet New Labour is approving new faith schools hand over fist. We have had the grotesque spectacle of a British prime minister, on the floor of the House of Commons, defending - like some medieval crusader - the teaching of creationism in the science curriculum at a sponsor-run school whose running costs are wholly met from the public purse.
In The Guardian (10 Apr 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (10)  |  Britain (24)  |  British (41)  |  Civil (26)  |  Cost (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Danger (115)  |  Defense (23)  |  Detention (2)  |  Division (65)  |  Faith (203)  |  Floor (20)  |  Fundamentalism (4)  |  Government (110)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  House (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Justification (48)  |  Labour (98)  |  Medieval (10)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Public (96)  |  Purse (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Sponsor (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Wholly (88)

Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.
In 'Reflection on the Atomic Bomb', Yale Poetry Review (Dec 1947). Reprinted in Robert Bartlett Haas (Ed.), Reflection on the Atomic Bomb: Volume One of the Previously Uncollected Writings of Gertrude Stein (1973), Vol. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Information (166)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Sense (770)

Everyone is aware of the difficult and menacing situation in which human society–shrunk into one community with a common fate–now finds itself, but only a few act accordingly. Most people go on living their every-day life: half frightened, half indifferent, they behold the ghostly tragicomedy which is being performed on the international stage before the eyes and ears of the world. But on that stage, on which the actors under the floodlights play their ordained parts, our fate of tomorrow, life or death of the nations, is being decided.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Act (272)  |  Actor (6)  |  Aware (31)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Community (104)  |  Death (388)  |  Decide (41)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Ear (68)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Floodlight (2)  |  Half (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  International (37)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Menace (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Ordain (4)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Play (112)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Situation (113)  |  Society (326)  |  Stage (143)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  World (1774)

Experimental geology has this in common with all other branches of our science, petrology and palaeontology included, that in the long run it withers indoors.
'Experiments in Geology', Transactions of the Geological Society of Glasgow (1958), 23, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Geology (220)  |  Indoors (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)

Experimental science can be thought of as an … extension of common sense.
In Science and Common Sense (1951), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extension (59)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thought (953)

Fifty years from now if an understanding of man's origins, his evolution, his history, his progress is not in the common place of the school books we shall not exist.
The Long Childhood episode, The Ascent of Man, TV series
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Book (392)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  History (673)  |  Man (2251)  |  Origin (239)  |  Progress (465)  |  School (219)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Year (933)

Finally, in regard to those who possess the largest shares in the stock of worldly goods, could there, in your opinion, be any police so vigilant and effetive, for the protections of all the rights of person, property and character, as such a sound and comprehensive education and training, as our system of Common Schools could be made to impart; and would not the payment of a sufficient tax to make such education and training universal, be the cheapest means of self-protection and insurance?
Annual Reports of the Secretary of the Board of Education of Massachusetts for the years 1839-1844, Life and Works of Horace Mann (1891), Vol. 3, 100.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Character (243)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Education (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Impart (23)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Largest (39)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Person (363)  |  Police (5)  |  Possess (156)  |  Property (168)  |  Protection (36)  |  Regard (305)  |  Right (452)  |  School (219)  |  Self (267)  |  Share (75)  |  Sound (183)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  System (537)  |  Tax (26)  |  Training (80)  |  Universal (189)

Fine sense and exalted sense are not half as useful as common sense.
'Thoughts On Various Subjects', The Works of Alexander Pope (1806), Vol. 6, 406.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Fine (33)  |  Sense (770)  |  Useful (250)

Following the original proposal of Belinfante, “the writer has in a recent note on the meson theory of nuclear forces” used the word “nuclon” as a common notation for the heavy nuclear constituents, neutrons and protons. In the meantime, however, it has been pointed out to me that, since the root of the word nucleus is “nucle”, the notation “nucleon” would from a philological point of view be more appropriate for this purpose….
In Physical Review (1 Feb 1941), 59, 323. For book using the word “nuclon”, see Frederik Jozef Belinfante, Theory of Heavy Quanta: Proefschrift (1939), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Frederik Belinfante (2)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Definition (221)  |  Force (487)  |  Meson (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Notation (27)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleon (5)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Nude (3)  |  Philological (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Proton (21)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recent (77)  |  Root (120)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Word (619)  |  Writer (86)

For even they who compose treatises of medicine or natural philosophy in verse are denominated Poets: yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common except their metre; the former, therefore, justly merits the name of the Poet; while the other should rather be called a Physiologist than a Poet.
Aristotle
Aristotle’s Treatise on Poetry, I:2, trans. Thomas Twining (1957), 103
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Empedocles (10)  |  Former (137)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Merit (50)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Verse (11)

For it is too bad that there are so few who seek the truth and so few who do not follow a mistaken method in philosophy. This is not, however, the place to lament the misery of our century, but to rejoice with you over such beautiful ideas for proving the truth. So I add only, and I promise, that I shall read your book at leisure; for I am certain that I shall find the noblest things in it. And this I shall do the more gladly, because I accepted the view of Copernicus many years ago, and from this standpoint I have discovered from their origins many natural phenomena, which doubtless cannot be explained on the basis of the more commonly accepted hypothesis.
Letter (4 Aug 1597) to Kepler, expressing thanks and interest in the book Kepler sent him. As quoted in translation in Jackson J. Spielvogel, Western Civilization: Alternate Volume: Since 1300 (2010), Vol. 2, 494.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Bad (180)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Book (392)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lament (11)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Method (505)  |  Misery (30)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Origin (239)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Promise (67)  |  Prove (250)  |  Read (287)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Seek (213)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

From common salt are obtained chemically as primary derivatives chlorine—both a war gas and a means of purifying water; and 'caustic soda.' … [O]n the chlorine side there is obtained chloride of lime, (a bleaching powder and a disinfectant), chloroform (an anesthetic), phosgene (a frightful ware gas), chloroacetophenone (another war gas), and an indigo and a yellow dye. [O]n the soda side we get metallic sodium, from which are derived sodium cyanide (a disinfectant), two medicines with [long] names, another war gas, and a beautiful violet dye. Thus, from a healthful, preservative condiment come things useful and hurtful—according to the intent or purpose.
Anonymous
The Homiletic Review, Vol. 83-84 (1922), Vol. 83, 209.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Both (493)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Chloroform (4)  |  Dye (10)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hurtful (8)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Name (333)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Phosgene (2)  |  Powder (9)  |  Primary (80)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Salt (46)  |  Side (233)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  Violet (11)  |  War (225)  |  Water (481)  |  Yellow (30)

Generality of points of view and of methods, precision and elegance in presentation, have become, since Lagrange, the common property of all who would lay claim to the rank of scientific mathematicians. And, even if this generality leads at times to abstruseness at the expense of intuition and applicability, so that general theorems are formulated which fail to apply to a single special case, if furthermore precision at times degenerates into a studied brevity which makes it more difficult to read an article than it was to write it; if, finally, elegance of form has well-nigh become in our day the criterion of the worth or worthlessness of a proposition,—yet are these conditions of the highest importance to a wholesome development, in that they keep the scientific material within the limits which are necessary both intrinsically and extrinsically if mathematics is not to spend itself in trivialities or smother in profusion.
In Die Entwickdung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1884), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Apply (160)  |  Article (22)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Claim (146)  |  Condition (356)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Expense (16)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  Formulate (15)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Lead (384)  |  Limit (280)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Profusion (3)  |  Property (168)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rank (67)  |  Read (287)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Smother (3)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triviality (2)  |  View (488)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Worth (169)  |  Worthless (21)  |  Write (230)

Generation by male and female is a law common to animals and plants.
In Louis Ferdinand Compte de Marsilli, 'Preface', Histoire Physique de la Mer (1725), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Female (50)  |  Generation (242)  |  Law (894)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reproduction (72)

Genius is the whistle of the locomotive, which with steaming shrieks indicates its progress, but common sense is the driving-wheel which moves the train.
In Igerne and Other Writings of Arthur Handly Marks (1897), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  Genius (284)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Move (216)  |  Progress (465)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shriek (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Train (114)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whistle (2)

Gods are fragile things they may be killed by a whiff of science or a dose of common sense.
In Garry Poole, Judson Poling, MS Debra Poling, Do Science and the Bible Conflict? (), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Dose (16)  |  Fragile (21)  |  God (757)  |  Kill (100)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whiff (2)

Good, old-fashioned common sense iz one ov the hardest things in the world to out-wit, out-argy, or beat in enny way, it iz az honest az a loaf ov good domestik bread, alwus in tune, either hot from the oven or 8 days old.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (23)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bread (39)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Good (889)  |  Honest (50)  |  Hot (60)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Old (481)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Outwit (6)  |  Oven (5)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wit (59)  |  World (1774)

He who appropriates land to himself by his labor, does not lessen but increases the common stock of mankind. For the provisions serving to the support of human life, produced by one acre of inclosed and cultivated land, are … ten times more than those which are yielded by an acre of land, of an equal richness lying waste in common. And therefore he that incloses land and has a greater plenty of the conveniences of life from ten acres than he could have from a hundred left to nature, may truly be said to give ninety acres to mankind.
In John Locke and Thomas Preston Peardon (ed.), The Second Treatise of Civil Government: An Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent and End of Civil Government (Dec 1689, 1952), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Greater (288)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Increase (210)  |  Labor (107)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Produced (187)  |  Provision (16)  |  Serving (15)  |  Support (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)  |  Waste (101)  |  Yield (81)

He who criticises, be he ever so honest, must suggest a practical remedy or he soon descends from the height of a critic to the level of a common scold.
Aphorism in The Philistine (Jan 1905), 20, No. 2, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Critic (20)  |  Criticise (2)  |  Descend (47)  |  Honest (50)  |  Must (1526)  |  Practical (200)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Scold (6)  |  Soon (186)  |  Suggest (34)

How can altruism, which by definition reduces personal fitness, possibly evolve by natural selection? The answer is kinship: if the genes causing the altruism are shared by two organisms because of common descent, and if the altruistic act by one organism increases the joint contribution of these genes to the next generation, the propensity to altruism will spread through the gene pool. This occurs even though the altruist makes less of a solitary contribution to the gene pool as the price of its altruistic act.
In Sociobiology (1975), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Altruism (7)  |  Answer (366)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Definition (221)  |  Descent (27)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Gene (98)  |  Gene Pool (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Increase (210)  |  Joint (31)  |  Kin (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Next (236)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organism (220)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Price (51)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Selection (128)  |  Spread (83)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

How quaint the way of paradox—
At common sense she gaily mocks.
In libretto of The Pirates of Penzance, collected in Original Plays (1907), 328.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Mock (7)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Quaint (7)  |  Sense (770)  |  Way (1217)

However far the calculating reason of the mathematician may seem separated from the bold flight of the artist’s phantasy, it must be remembered that these expressions are but momentary images snatched arbitrarily from among the activities of both. In the projection of new theories the mathematician needs as bold and creative a phantasy as the productive artist, and in the execution of the details of a composition the artist too must calculate dispassionately the means which are necessary for the successful consummation of the parts. Common to both is the creation, the generation, of forms out of mind.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 185. From the original German, “Wie weit auch der rechnende Verstand des Mathematikers von dem kühnen Fluge der Phantasie des Künstlers getrennt zu sein scheint, so bezeichnen diese Ausdrücke doch blosse Augenblicksbilder, die willkürlich aus der Thätigkeit Beider herausgerissen sind. Bei dem Entwurfe neuer Theorieen bedarf der Mathematiker einer ebenso kühnen und schöpferischen Phantasie wie der schaffende Künstler, und bei der Ausführung der Einzelheiten eines Werkes muss auch der Künstler kühl alle Mittel berechnen, welche zum Gelingen der Theile erforderlich sind. Gemeinsam ist Beiden die Hervorbringung, die Erzeugung der Gebilde aus dem Geiste.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Artist (90)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dispassionate (8)  |  Execution (25)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Image (96)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Momentary (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Productive (32)  |  Projection (5)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remember (179)  |  Separate (143)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theory (970)

However far the mathematician’s calculating senses seem to be separated from the audacious flight of the artist’s imagination, these manifestations refer to mere instantaneous images, which have been arbitrarily torn from the operation of both. In designing new theories, the mathematician needs an equally bold and inspired imagination as creative as the artist, and in carrying out the details of a work the artist must unemotionally reckon all the resources necessary for the success of the parts. Common to both is the fabrication, the creation of the structure from the intellect.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. Translated by Webmaster using online resources. From the original German, “Wie weit auch der rechnende Verstand des Mathematikers von dem kühnen Fluge der Phantasie des Künstlers getrennt zu sein scheint, so bezeichnen diese Ausdrücke doch blosse Augenblicksbilder, die willkürlich aus der Thätigkeit Beider herausgerissen sind. Bei dem Entwurfe neuer Theorieen bedarf der Mathematiker einer ebenso kühnen und schöpferischen Phantasie wie der schaffende Künstler, und bei der Ausführung der Einzelheiten eines Werkes muss auch der Künstler kühl alle Mittel berechnen, welche zum Gelingen der Theile erforderlich sind. Gemeinsam ist Beiden die Hervorbringung, die Erzeugung der Gebilde aus dem Geiste.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Artist (90)  |  Audacious (4)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Design (195)  |  Detail (146)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fabrication (2)  |  Flight (98)  |  Image (96)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Instantaneous (3)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mere (84)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Operation (213)  |  Part (222)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Refer (14)  |  Resource (63)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Success (302)  |  Tear (42)  |  Theory (970)  |  Torn (17)  |  Work (1351)

However, all scientific statements and laws have one characteristic in common: they are “true or false” (adequate or inadequate). Roughly speaking, our reaction to them is “yes” or “no.” The scientific way of thinking has a further characteristic. The concepts which it uses to build up its coherent systems are not expressing emotions. For the scientist, there is only “being,” but no wishing, no valuing, no good, no evil; no goal. As long as we remain within the realm of science proper, we can never meet with a sentence of the type: “Thou shalt not lie.” There is something like a Puritan's restraint in the scientist who seeks truth: he keeps away from everything voluntaristic or emotional.
Essays in Physics (1950), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Build (204)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Concept (221)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evil (116)  |  False (100)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Long (790)  |  Never (1087)  |  Proper (144)  |  Puritan (3)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Realm (85)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restraint (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Something (719)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Statement (142)  |  System (537)  |  Thinking (414)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

Human behaviour reveals uniformities which constitute natural laws. If these uniformities did not exist, then there would be neither social science nor political economy, and even the study of history would largely be useless. In effect, if the future actions of men having nothing in common with their past actions, our knowledge of them, although possibly satisfying our curiosity by way of an interesting story, would be entirely useless to us as a guide in life.
In Cours d’Economie Politique (1896-7), Vol. 2, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Economy (55)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Future (429)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Story (118)  |  Study (653)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Way (1217)

HURRICANE, n. An atmospheric demonstration once very common but now generally abandoned for the tornado and cyclone. The hurricane is still in popular use in the West Indies and is preferred by certain old- fashioned sea-captains.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Captain (14)  |  Certain (550)  |  Cyclone (2)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Humour (116)  |  Hurricane (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Sea (308)  |  Still (613)  |  Tornado (3)  |  Use (766)

Huts they made then, and fire, and skins for clothing,
And a woman yielded to one man in wedlock...
... Common, to see the offspring they had made; The human race began to mellow then. Because of fire their shivering forms no longer
Could bear the cold beneath the covering sky.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Authony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 1008-13, 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Clothing (10)  |  Cold (112)  |  Covering (14)  |  Fire (189)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Man (2251)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Race (268)  |  See (1081)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Skin (47)  |  Sky (161)  |  Woman (151)  |  Yield (81)

I am not unmindful of the journalist’s quip that yesterday’s paper wraps today’s garbage. I am also not unmindful of the outrages visited upon our forests to publish redundant and incoherent collections of essays; for, like Dr. Seuss’ Lorax, I like to think that I speak for the trees. Beyond vanity, my only excuses for a collection of these essays lie in the observation that many people like (and as many people despise) them, and that they seem to cohere about a common theme–Darwin’s evolutionary perspective as an antidote to our cosmic arrogance.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antidote (9)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Collection (64)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Despise (13)  |  Essay (27)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Forest (150)  |  Garbage (8)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Lie (364)  |  Observation (555)  |  Outrage (3)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Publish (36)  |  Quip (80)  |  Seem (145)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theme (17)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Visit (26)  |  Wrap (7)  |  Yesterday (36)

I am one of those philosophers who have held that that “the Common Sense view of the world” is in certain fundamental features, wholly true.
In 'A Defence of Common Sense', J.H. Muirhead (ed.), Contemporary British Philosophy (1925). Reprinted in Philosophical Papers of George Edward Moore (1959), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Feature (44)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hold (95)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Sense (770)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)

I appeal to the contemptible speech made lately by Sir Robert Peel to an applauding House of Commons. 'Orders of merit,' said he, 'were the proper rewards of the military' (the desolators of the world in all ages). 'Men of science are better left to the applause of their own hearts.' Most learned Legislator! Most liberal cotton-spinner! Was your title the proper reward of military prowess? Pity you hold not the dungeon-keys of an English Inquisition! Perhaps Science, like creeds, would flourish best under a little persecution.
Chemical Recreations (1834), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Creed (27)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Heart (229)  |  House (140)  |  Inquisition (8)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Merit (50)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Order (632)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reward (68)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speech (61)  |  World (1774)

I believe that natural history has lost much by the vague general treatment that is so common.
From 'Note to the Reader', introducing Wild Animals I Have Known (1898), 9. The author explains this is his motivation for writing true stories about individual animals as real characters.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  History (673)  |  Loss (110)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vagueness (15)

I believe that the Dayton trial marked the beginning of the decline of fundamentalism. … I feel that restrictive legislation on academic freedom is forever a thing of the past, that religion and science may now address one another in an atmosphere of mutual respect and of a common quest for truth. I like to think that the Dayton trial had some part in bringing to birth this new era.
From 'Reflections—Forty Years After', in Jerry R. Tompkins (ed.), D-Days at Dayton: Reflections on the Scopes Trial(1965), 31. As quoted in Stephen Jay Gould, Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1983), 274.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Birth (147)  |  Decline (26)  |  Era (51)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forever (103)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fundamentalism (4)  |  Legislation (10)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mutual (52)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Quest (39)  |  Religion (361)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)

I can remember … starting to gather all sorts of things like rocks and beetles when I was about nine years old. There was no parental encouragement—nor discouragement either—nor any outside influence that I can remember in these early stages. By about the age of twelve, I had settled pretty definitely on butterflies, largely I think because the rocks around my home were limited to limestone, while the butterflies were varied, exciting, and fairly easy to preserve with household moth-balls. … I was fourteen, I remember, when … I decided to be scientific, caught in some net of emulation, and resolutely threw away all of my “childish” specimens, mounted haphazard on “common pins” and without “proper labels.” The purge cost me a great inward struggle, still one of my most vivid memories, and must have been forced by a conflict between a love of my specimens and a love for orderliness, for having everything just exactly right according to what happened to be my current standards.
In The Nature of Natural History (1950, 1990), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Cost (86)  |  Current (118)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easy (204)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fourteen (2)  |  Gather (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Haphazard (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Home (170)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inward (6)  |  Label (11)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Love (309)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Outside (141)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pin (18)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purge (9)  |  Remember (179)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Settled (34)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standard (57)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Year (933)

I cannot let the year run out without sending you a sign of my continued existence and to extend my sincere wishes for the well-being of you and your dear ones in the New Year. We will not be able to send New Year greetings much longer; but even when we have passed away and have long since decomposed, the bonds that united us in life will remain and we shall be remembered as a not too common example of two men, who truly without envy and jealousy, contended and struggled in the same field, yet nevertheless remained always closely bound in friendship.
Letter from Liebig to Wohler (31 Dec 1871). Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Bond (45)  |  Bound (119)  |  Envy (15)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  Friend (168)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  New (1216)  |  Pass (238)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Run (174)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

I claim that relativity and the rest of modern physics is not complicated. It can be explained very simply. It is only unusual or, put another way, it is contrary to common sense.
In Edward Teller, Wendy Teller and Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2013), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (146)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Way (1217)

I don’t profess to be profound, but I do lay claim to common sense.
Fictional character, Miss Murstone, in 'My Holidays, Especially One Happy Afternoon', David Copperfield (1849-1850, 1878), Chap. 8, 70
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (146)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Do (1908)  |  Profess (20)  |  Profound (104)  |  Sense (770)

I don’t think America can just drill itself out of its current energy situation. We don’t need to destroy the environment to meet our energy needs. We need smart, comprehensive, common-sense approaches that balance the need to increase domestic energy supplies with the need to maximize energy efficiency.
Statement on New Long-Term Energy Solutions (22 Mar 2001). In Bill Adler (ed.), The Wit and Wisdom of Ted Kennedy (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Balance (77)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Current (118)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Drill (11)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Energy (344)  |  Energy Efficiency (5)  |  Environment (216)  |  Increase (210)  |  Sense (770)  |  Situation (113)  |  Smart (26)  |  Supply (93)  |  Think (1086)

I have just received copies of “To-day” containing criticisms of my letter. I am in no way surprised to find that these criticisms are not only unfair and misleading in the extreme. They are misleading in so far that anyone reading them would be led to believe the exact opposite of the truth. It is quite possible that I, an old and trained engineer and chronic experimenter, should put an undue value upon truth; but it is common to all scientific men. As nothing but the truth is of any value to them, they naturally dislike things that are not true. ... While my training has, perhaps, warped my mind so that I put an undue value upon truth, their training has been such as to cause them to abhor exact truth and logic.
[Replying to criticism by Colonel Acklom and other religious parties attacking Maxim's earlier contribution to the controversy about the modern position of Christianity.]
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 86.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Content (69)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Copy (33)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Find (998)  |  Leading (17)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Modern (385)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reading (133)  |  Receive (114)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undue (4)  |  Unfair (8)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

I have long held an opinion, almost amounting to conviction, in common I believe with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, one into another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.
Paper read to the Royal Institution (20 Nov 1845). 'On the Magnetization of Light and the Illumination of Magnetic Lines of Force', Series 19. In Experimental Researches in Electricity (1855), Vol. 3, 1. Reprinted from Philosophical Transactions (1846), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Belief (578)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Electromagnetism (18)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possession (65)  |  Power (746)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Various (200)  |  Word (619)

I have long since come to see that no one deserves either praise or blame for the ideas that come to him, but only for the actions resulting therefrom. Ideas and beliefs are certainly not voluntary acts. They come to us—we hardly know how or whence, and once they have got possession of us we can not reject or change them at will. It is for the common good that the promulgation of ideas should be free—uninfluenced by either praise or blame, reward or punishment. But the actions which result from our ideas may properly be so treated, because it is only by patient thought and work, that new ideas, if good and true, become adopted and utilized; while, if untrue or if not adequately presented to the world, they are rejected or forgotten.
In 'The Origin of the Theory of Natural Selection', Popular Science Monthly (1909), 74, 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blame (30)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Possession (65)  |  Praise (26)  |  Present (619)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Result (677)  |  Reward (68)  |  See (1081)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treated (2)  |  True (212)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Voluntary (4)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I have procured air [oxygen] ... between five and six times as good as the best common air that I have ever met with.
Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air (1775), Vol. 2, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Best (459)  |  Good (889)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Time (1877)

I have very often reflected on what it is that really distinguishes the great genius from the common crowd. Here are a few observations I have made. The common individual always conforms to the prevailing opinion and the prevailing fashion; he regards the State in which everything now exists as the only possible one and passively accepts it ail. It does not occur to him that everything, from the shape of the furniture up to the subtlest hypothesis, is decided by the great council of mankind of which he is a member. He wears thin-soled shoes even though the sharp stones of the Street hurt his feet, he allows fashion to dictate to him that the buckles of his shoes must extend as far as the toes even though that means the shoe is often hard to get on. He does not reflect that the form of the shoe depends as much upon him as it does upon the fool who first wore thin shoes on a cracked pavement. To the great genius it always occurs to ask: Could this too not be false! He never gives his vote without first reflecting.
Aphorism 24 in Notebook C (1772-1773), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Ask (411)  |  Council (8)  |  Depend (228)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fashion (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Fool (116)  |  Form (959)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Individual (404)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Possible (552)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shoe (11)  |  State (491)  |  Stone (162)  |  Vote (16)

I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
In Walden: or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1893), 496.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dream (208)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Hour (186)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Success (302)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Will (2355)

I see with much pleasure that you are working on a large work on the integral Calculus [ ... ] The reconciliation of the methods which you are planning to make, serves to clarify them mutually, and what they have in common contains very often their true metaphysics; this is why that metaphysics is almost the last thing that one discovers. The spirit arrives at the results as if by instinct; it is only on reflecting upon the route that it and others have followed that it succeeds in generalising the methods and in discovering its metaphysics.
Letter to S. F. Lacroix, 1792. Quoted in S. F. Lacroix, Traité du calcul differentiel et du calcul integral (1797), Vol. 1, xxiv, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculus (65)  |  Clarification (7)  |  Discover (553)  |  Follow (378)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Integral (26)  |  Integral Calculus (6)  |  Integration (19)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planning (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Result (677)  |  Route (15)  |  See (1081)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

I shall always feel respect for every one who has written a book, let it be what it may, for I had no idea of the trouble which trying to write common English could cost one—And alas there yet remains the worst part of all correcting the press.
Letter to W. D. Fox, 7 July 1837, referring to his Journal of Researches. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1837-1843 (1986), Vol. 2, 29.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Book (392)  |  Cost (86)  |  Feel (367)  |  Idea (843)  |  Press (21)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Trying (144)  |  Worst (57)  |  Write (230)

I shall explain a System of the World differing in many particulars from any yet known, answering in all things to the common Rules of Mechanical Motions: This depends upon three Suppositions. First, That all Cœlestial Bodies whatsoever, have an attraction or gravitating power towards their own Centers, whereby they attract not only their own parts, and keep them from flying from them, as we may observe the Earth to do, but that they do also attract all the other Cœlestial bodies that are within the sphere of their activity; and consequently that not only the Sun and Moon have an influence upon the body and motion the Earth, and the Earth upon them, but that Mercury also Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter by their attractive powers, have a considerable influence upon its motion in the same manner the corresponding attractive power of the Earth hath a considerable influence upon every one of their motions also. The second supposition is this, That all bodies whatsoever that are put into a direct and simple motion, will continue to move forward in a streight line, till they are by some other effectual powers deflected and bent into a Motion, describing a Circle, Ellipse, or some other more compounded Curve Line. The third supposition is, That these attractive powers are so much the more powerful in operating, by how much the nearer the body wrought upon is to their own Centers. Now what these several degrees are I have not yet experimentally verified; but it is a notion, which if fully prosecuted as it ought to be, will mightily assist the Astronomer to reduce all the Cœlestial Motions to a certain rule, which I doubt will never be done true without it. He that understands the nature of the Circular Pendulum and Circular Motion, will easily understand the whole ground of this Principle, and will know where to find direction in Nature for the true stating thereof. This I only hint at present to such as have ability and opportunity of prosecuting this Inquiry, and are not wanting of Industry for observing and calculating, wishing heartily such may be found, having myself many other things in hand which I would first compleat and therefore cannot so well attend it. But this I durst promise the Undertaker, that he will find all the Great Motions of the World to be influenced by this Principle, and that the true understanding thereof will be the true perfection of Astronomy.
An Attempt to Prove the Motion of the Earth from Observations (1674), 27-8. Based on a Cutlerian Lecture delivered by Hooke at the Royal Society four years earlier.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Compound (113)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Continue (165)  |  Curve (49)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direct (225)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hint (21)  |  Industry (137)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mars (44)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observe (168)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supposition (50)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Venus (20)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits, unless I spend four hours a day at least—and it is commonly more than that—sauntering through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all worldly engagements.
In 'Walking', The Atlantic (Jun 1862), 9, No. 56, 657-674. Collected in Walking (1841, 1914), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  All (4108)  |  Engagement (8)  |  Field (364)  |  Free (232)  |  Health (193)  |  Hill (20)  |  Hour (186)  |  Least (75)  |  More (2559)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Saunter (2)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Wood (92)  |  Worldly (2)

I think, too, that we've got to recognize that where the preservation of a natural resource like the redwoods is concerned, that there is a common sense limit. I mean, if you've looked at a hundred thousand acres or so of trees—you know, a tree is a tree, how many more do you need to look at?
Speech, pandering for support, while candidate for governor of California, to the Western Wood Products Association, San Francisco (12 Mar 1966), opposing expansion of Redwood National Park. Commonly seen paraphrased as “If you’ve seen one redwood tree, you’ve seen them all,” but Reagan did not himself express this wording.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Do (1908)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Mean (809)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Sense (770)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tree (246)

I took a glass retort, capable of containing eight ounces of water, and distilled fuming spirit of nitre according to the usual method. In the beginning the acid passed over red, then it became colourless, and lastly again all red: no sooner did this happen, than I took away the receiver; and tied to the mouth of the retort a bladder emptied of air, which I had moistened in its inside with milk of lime lac calcis, (i.e. lime-water, containing more quicklime than water can dissolve) to prevent its being corroded by the acid. Then I continued the distillation, and the bladder gradually expanded. Here-upon I left every thing to cool, tied up the bladder, and took it off from the mouth of the retort.— I filled a ten-ounce glass with this air and put a small burning candle into it; when immediately the candle burnt with a large flame, of so vivid a light that it dazzled the eyes. I mixed one part of this air with three parts of air, wherein fire would not burn; and this mixture afforded air, in every respect familiar to the common sort. Since this air is absolutely necessary for the generation of fire, and makes about one-third of our common air, I shall henceforth, for shortness sake call it empyreal air, [literally fire-air] the air which is unserviceable for the fiery phenomenon, and which makes abut two-thirds of common air, I shall for the future call foul air [literally corrupted air].
Chemische Abhandlung von der Luft und dem Feuer (1777), Chemical Observations and Experiments on Air and Fire (1780), trans. J. R. Forster, 34-5.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Acid (83)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bladder (3)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Call (769)  |  Candle (30)  |  Capable (168)  |  Corrosion (4)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Expand (53)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Foul (15)  |  Fume (7)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Happen (274)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Large (394)  |  Light (607)  |  Lime (3)  |  Literally (30)  |  Method (505)  |  Milk (22)  |  Mixture (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pass (238)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Receiver (5)  |  Respect (207)  |  Retort (3)  |  Sake (58)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Water (481)

I would have you to observe that the difficulty & mystery which often appear in matters of science & learning are only owing to the terms of art used in them, & if many gentlemen had not been rebuted by the uncouth dress in which science was offered to them, we must believe that many of these who now shew an acute & sound judgement in the affairs of life would also in science have excelled many of those who are devoted to it & who were engaged in it only by necessity & a phlegmatic temper. This is particularly the case with respect to chemistry, which is as easy to be comprehended as any of the common affairs of life, but gentlemen have been kept from applying to it by the jargon in which it has been industriously involved.
Cullen MSS, No. 23, Glasgow University library. In A. L. Donovan, Philosophical Chemistry In the Scottish Enlightenment: The Doctrines and Discoveries of Wllliam Cullen and Joseph Black (1975), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Easy (204)  |  Involved (90)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observe (168)  |  Offer (141)  |  Owing (39)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sound (183)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

Ideas, like ghosts (according to the common notion of a ghost), must be spoken to a little before they will explain themselves.
From Dealings With the Firm of Dombey and Son (1846), Vol. 1, 184.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Explain (322)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  Notion (113)  |  Speak (232)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2355)

If a man can have only one kind of sense, let him have common sense. If he has that an uncommon sense too, he is not far from genius.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Far (154)  |  Genius (284)  |  Kind (557)  |  Let (61)  |  Man (2251)  |  Sense (770)

If common sense has not the brilliancy of the sun, it has the fixity of the stars.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Brilliancy (3)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Sense (770)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)

If E is considered to be a continuously divisible quantity, this distribution is possible in infinitely many ways. We consider, however—this is the most essential point of the whole calculation—E to be composed of a well-defined number of equal parts and use thereto the constant of nature h = 6.55 ×10-27 erg sec. This constant multiplied by the common frequency ν of the resonators gives us the energy element ε in erg, and dividing E by ε we get the number P of energy elements which must be divided over the N resonators.
[Planck’s constant, as introduced in 1900; subsequently written e = hν.]
In 'On the theory of the energy distribution law of the normal spectrum', in D. ter Haar and Stephen G. Brush, trans., Planck’s Original Papers in Quantum Physics (1972), 40.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Definition (221)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Divided (50)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equation (132)  |  Essential (199)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Well-Defined (8)  |  Whole (738)

If it is good to teach students about the chemical industry then why is it not good to assign ethical qualities to substances along with their physical and chemical ones? We might for instance say that CS [gas] is a bad chemical because it can only ever be used by a few people with something to protect against many people with nothing to lose. Terylene or indigotin are neutral chemicals. Under capitalism their production is an exploitive process, under socialism they are used for the common good. Penicillin is a good chemical.
Quoted in T. Pateman (ed.), Countercourse (1972), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Bad (180)  |  Capitalism (10)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Gas (83)  |  Good (889)  |  Industry (137)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loss (110)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Physical (508)  |  Process (423)  |  Production (183)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Quality (135)  |  Say (984)  |  Socialism (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Student (300)  |  Substance (248)  |  Teach (277)  |  Use (766)  |  Why (491)

If migraine patients have a common and legitimate second complaint besides their migraines, it is that they have not been listened to by physicians. Looked at, investigated, drugged, charged, but not listened to.
Quoted by Walter Clemons, 'Listening to the Lost', Newsweek (20 Aug 1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)

If the question were, “What ought to be the next objective in science?” my answer would be the teaching of science to the young, so that when the whole population grew up there would be a far more general background of common sense, based on a knowledge of the real meaning of the scientific method of discovering truth.
Marion Savin Selections from the Scientific Correspondence of Elihu Thomson (1971), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Background (43)  |  Base (117)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Discovery (780)  |  General (511)  |  Growth (187)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Objective (91)  |  Population (110)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sense (770)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)  |  Young (227)

If two or more instances of the phenomenon under investigation have only one circumstance in common, the circumstance in which alone all the instances agree is the cause (or effect) of the given phenomenon.
A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Effect (393)  |  Investigation (230)  |  More (2559)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Two (937)

If we ever establish contact with intelligent aliens living on a planet around a distant star … They would be made of similar atoms to us. They could trace their origins back to the big bang 13.7 billion years ago, and they would share with us the universe's future. However, the surest common culture would be mathematics.
In 'Take Me to Your Mathematician', New Scientist (14 Feb 2009), 201, No. 2695.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alien (34)  |  Atom (355)  |  Back (390)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Billion (95)  |  Contact (65)  |  Culture (143)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Future (429)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Living (491)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Origin (239)  |  Planet (356)  |  Share (75)  |  Star (427)  |  Trace (103)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

If we view mathematical speculations with reference to their use, it appears that they should be divided into two classes. To the first belong those which furnish some marked advantage either to common life or to some art, and the value of such is usually determined by the magnitude of this advantage. The other class embraces those speculations which, though offering no direct advantage, are nevertheless valuable in that they extend the boundaries of analysis and increase our resources and skill. Now since many investigations, from which great advantage may be expected, must be abandoned solely because of the imperfection of analysis, no small value should be assigned to those speculations which promise to enlarge the field of anaylsis.
In Novi Comm. Petr., Vol. 4, Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Art (657)  |  Assign (13)  |  Belong (162)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Class (164)  |  Determine (144)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Increase (210)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reference (33)  |  Resource (63)  |  Skill (109)  |  Small (477)  |  Solely (9)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)

If we wish to give an account of the atomic constitution of the aromatic compounds, we are bound to explain the following facts:
1) All aromatic compounds, even the most simple, are relatively richer in carbon than the corresponding compounds in the class of fatty bodies.
2) Among the aromatic compounds, as well as among the fatty bodies, a large number of homologous substances exist.
3) The most simple aromatic compounds contain at least six atoms of carbon.
4) All the derivatives of aromatic substances exhibit a certain family likeness; they all belong to the group of 'Aromatic compounds'. In cases where more vigorous reactions take place, a portion of the carbon is often eliminated, but the chief product contains at least six atoms of carbon These facts justify the supposition that all aromatic compounds contain a common group, or, we may say, a common nucleus consisting of six atoms of carbon. Within this nucleus a more intimate combination of the carbon atoms takes place; they are more compactly placed together, and this is the cause of the aromatic bodies being relatively rich in carbon. Other carbon atoms can be joined to this nucleus in the same way, and according to the same law, as in the case of the group of fatty bodies, and in this way the existence of homologous compounds is explained.
Bulletin de la Societé Chimique de France (1865), 1, 98. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Aromatic (3)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bound (119)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chief (97)  |  Class (164)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Homologous (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Likeness (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portion (84)  |  Product (160)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Simple (406)  |  Substance (248)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

If we work, it is less to obtain those positive results the common people think are our only interest, than to feel that aesthetic emotion and communicate it to those able to experience it.
From the original French, “Si nous travaillons, c’est moins pour obtenir ces résultats auxquels le vulgaire nous croit uniquement attachés, que pour ressentir cette émotion esthétique et la communiquer à ceux qui sont capables de l’éprouver,” quoted in Henri Poincaré,'Notice sur Halphen', Journal de l’École Polytechnique (1890), 60, 143, cited in Oeuvres de G.H. Halphen (1916), Vol. 1, xxiv. As translated in Armand Borel, 'On the Place of Mathematics in Culture', in Armand Borel: Œvres: Collected Papers (1983), Vol. 4, 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Common People (2)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Interest (386)  |  Obtain (163)  |  People (1005)  |  Positive (94)  |  Result (677)  |  Think (1086)  |  Work (1351)

Imagine the chaos that would arise if time machines were as common as automobiles, with tens of millions of them commercially available. Havoc would soon break loose, tearing at the fabric of our universe. Millions of people would go back in time to meddle with their own past and the past of others, rewriting history in the process. … It would thus be impossible to take a simple census to see how many people there were at any given time.
In Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and The Tenth Dimension (1994, 1995), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Available (78)  |  Back (390)  |  Break (99)  |  Census (4)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Havoc (7)  |  History (673)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Machine (257)  |  Meddle (3)  |  Millions (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Process (423)  |  Rewriting (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Soon (186)  |  Tear (42)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Machine (4)  |  Universe (857)

In all likelihood, it is the local conditions of society, which determine the form of the disease, and we can so far think of it as a fairly general result, that the simplest form is the more common, the more paltry and unbalanced the food, and the worse the dwellings are.
From the original German, “Aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach sind es die lokalen Verhältnisse der Gesellschaft, welche die Form der Krankheit bestimmen, und wir können bis jetzt als ein ziemlich allgemeines Resultathinstellen, daß die einfache Form umso häufiger ist, je armseliger und einseitiger die Nahrungsmittel und je schlechter die Wohnungen sind,” in 'Mittheilungen über die in Oberschlesien herrschende Typhus-Epidemie', R. Virchow and B. Reinhardt, Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für klinische Medicin (1848), 2, No. 2, 248. English version by Webmaster with Google translate.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Determine (144)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Local (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Paltry (4)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Society (326)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unbalanced (2)  |  Worse (24)

In an age of egoism, it is so difficult to persuade man that of all studies, the most important is that of himself. This is because egoism, like all passions, is blind. The attention of the egoist is directed to the immediate needs of which his senses give notice, and cannot be raised to those reflective needs that reason discloses to us; his aim is satisfaction, not perfection. He considers only his individual self; his species is nothing to him. Perhaps he fears that in penetrating the mysteries of his being he will ensure his own abasement, blush at his discoveries, and meet his conscience. True philosophy, always at one with moral science, tells a different tale. The source of useful illumination, we are told, is that of lasting content, is in ourselves. Our insight depends above all on the state of our faculties; but how can we bring our faculties to perfection if we do not know their nature and their laws! The elements of happiness are the moral sentiments; but how can we develop these sentiments without considering the principle of our affections, and the means of directing them? We become better by studying ourselves; the man who thoroughly knows himself is the wise man. Such reflection on the nature of his being brings a man to a better awareness of all the bonds that unite us to our fellows, to the re-discovery at the inner root of his existence of that identity of common life actuating us all, to feeling the full force of that fine maxim of the ancients: 'I am a man, and nothing human is alien to me.'
Considerations sur les diverses méthodes à suivre dans l'observation des peuples sauvages (1800) The Observation of Savage Peoples, trans. F. C. T. Moore (1969), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attention (190)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Blind (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Consider (416)  |  Depend (228)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Identity (19)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passion (114)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Root (120)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Studying (70)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Unite (42)  |  Useful (250)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wise Man (15)

In describing a protein it is now common to distinguish the primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The primary structure is simply the order, or sequence, of the amino-acid residues along the polypeptide chains. This was first determined by Sanger using chemical techniques for the protein insulin, and has since been elucidated for a number of peptides and, in part, for one or two other small proteins. The secondary structure is the type of folding, coiling or puckering adopted by the polypeptide chain: the a-helix structure and the pleated sheet are examples. Secondary structure has been assigned in broad outline to a number of librous proteins such as silk, keratin and collagen; but we are ignorant of the nature of the secondary structure of any globular protein. True, there is suggestive evidence, though as yet no proof, that a-helices occur in globular proteins, to an extent which is difficult to gauge quantitatively in any particular case. The tertiary structure is the way in which the folded or coiled polypeptide chains are disposed to form the protein molecule as a three-dimensional object, in space. The chemical and physical properties of a protein cannot be fully interpreted until all three levels of structure are understood, for these properties depend on the spatial relationships between the amino-acids, and these in turn depend on the tertiary and secondary structures as much as on the primary. Only X-ray diffraction methods seem capable, even in principle, of unravelling the tertiary and secondary structures.
Co-author with G. Bodo, H. M. Dintzis, R. G. Parrish, H. Wyckoff, and D. C. Phillips
'A Three-Dimensional Model of the Myoglobin Molecule Obtained by X-ray Analysis', Nature (1958) 181, 662.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Diffraction (5)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Helix (10)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Polypeptide (2)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Protein (54)  |  Ray (114)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Residue (9)  |  Frederick Sanger (6)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Silk (13)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Structure (344)  |  Technique (80)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Understood (156)  |  Way (1217)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Diffraction (3)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Account (192)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Against (332)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deal (188)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Finding (30)  |  Force (487)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pain (136)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Successful (123)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Train (114)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

In its famous paradox, the equation of money and excrement, psychoanalysis becomes the first science to state what common sense and the poets have long known—that the essence of money is in its absolute worthlessness.
Life Against Death: the Psychoanalytical Meaning of History (1985), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Become (815)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Equation (132)  |  Essence (82)  |  Excrement (2)  |  First (1283)  |  Known (454)  |  Long (790)  |  Money (170)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Poet (83)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  State (491)  |  Worthlessness (3)

In mathematical analysis we call x the undetermined part of line a: the rest we don’t call y, as we do in common life, but a-x. Hence mathematical language has great advantages over the common language.
Lichtenberg: A Doctrine of Scattered Occasions: Reconstructed From: Reconstructed From His Aphorisms and Reflections (1959), 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Call (769)  |  Do (1908)  |  Great (1574)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Rest (280)  |  Undetermined (3)  |  Y (2)

In practical talk, a man’s common sense means his good judgement, his freedom from eccentricity, his gumption.
In Lecture (1907/1908), 'Pragmatism and Common Sense', collected in 'Lecture 5: Pragmatism and Common Sense', Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking (1907, 1910), 171.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Eccentricity (3)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Good (889)  |  Gumption (2)  |  Judgement (7)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Practical (200)  |  Sense (770)  |  Talk (100)

In science, each of us knows that what he has accomplished will be antiquated in ten, twenty, fifty years. That is the fate to which science is subjected; it is the very meaning of scientific work, to which it is devoted in a quite specific sense, as compared with other spheres of culture for which in general the same holds. Every scientific “fulfilment” raises new “questions”; it asks to be “surpassed” and outdated. Whoever wishes to serve science has to resign himself to this fact. Scientific works certainly can last as “gratifications” because of their artistic quality, or they may remain important as a means of training. Yet they will be surpassed scientifically—let that be repeated—for it is our common fate and, more our common goal. We cannot work without hoping that others will advance further than we have. In principle, this progress goes on ad infinitum.
Max Weber
From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufsätze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. As given in H.H. Gerth and C. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 138. A different translation of a shorter excerpt from this quote, beginning “[In] the realm of science, …” is also on the Max Weber Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Ad Infinitum (5)  |  Advance (280)  |  Antiquated (3)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Ask (411)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Culture (143)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  General (511)  |  Goal (145)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Specific (95)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Training (80)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

In scientific matters there was a common language and one standard of values; in moral and political problems there were many. … Furthermore, in science there is a court of last resort, experiment, which is unavailable in human affairs.
In Enrico Fermi: Physicist (1970), 149. Segrè refers to the issues regarding the consequences of mastering the release of atomic energy.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Court (33)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Affairs (5)  |  Language (293)  |  Last (426)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moral (195)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resort (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Standard (57)  |  Value (365)

In the discovery of hidden things and the investigation of hidden causes, stronger reasons are obtained from sure experiments and demonstrated arguments than from probable conjectures and the opinions of philosophical speculators of the common sort...
De Magnete (1600). In William Gilbert and P. Fleury Mottelay (trans.), William Gilbert of Colchester, physician of London: On the load stone and magnetic bodies (1893), xlvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Probable (20)  |  Reason (744)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Thing (1915)

In the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children's future. And we are all mortal.
Commencement Address at American University, Washington, D.C. (Jun 1963). In Steven Cohen, Understanding Environmental Policy (2006), Preface, xi. Also on web site of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Basic (138)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Children (200)  |  Final (118)  |  Future (429)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Link (43)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Planet (356)  |  Small (477)

In the following pages I offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense; and have no other preliminaries to settle with the reader, than that he will divest himself of prejudice and repossession, and suffer his reason and feelings to determine for themselves; and that he will put on, or rather that he will not put off, the true character of man, and generously enlarge his view beyond the present day.
In Common Sense: Addressed to the Inhabitants of America (1792), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Character (243)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Determine (144)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Generous (17)  |  Himself (461)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plain (33)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Present (619)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Themselves (433)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

In the modern interpretation of Mendelism, facts are being transformed into factors at a rapid rate. If one factor will not explain the facts, then two are involved; if two prove insufficient, three will sometimes work out. The superior jugglery sometimes necessary to account for the results may blind us, if taken too naively, to the common-place that the results are often so excellently 'explained' because the explanation was invented to explain them. We work backwards from the facts to the factors, and then, presto! explain the facts by the very factors that we invented to account for them. I am not unappreciative of the distinct advantages that this method has in handling the facts. I realize how valuable it has been to us to be able to marshal our results under a few simple assumptions, yet I cannot but fear that we are rapidly developing a sort of Mendelian ritual by which to explain the extraordinary facts of alternative inheritance. So long as we do not lose sight of the purely arbitrary and formal nature of our formulae, little harm will be done; and it is only fair to state that those who are doing the actual work of progress along Mendelian lines are aware of the hypothetical nature of the factor-assumption.
'What are 'Factors' in Mendelian Explanations?', American Breeders Association (1909), 5, 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Involved (90)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Superior (81)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In the whole history of the world there was never a race with less liking for abstract reasoning than the Anglo-Saxon. … Common-sense and compromise are believed in, logical deductions from philosophical principles are looked upon with suspicion, not only by legislators, but by all our most learned professional men.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Anglo-Saxon (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Deduction (82)  |  History (673)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Legislator (4)  |  Less (103)  |  Logical (55)  |  Look (582)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professional (70)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

In the year 1666 he retired again from Cambridge... to his mother in Lincolnshire & whilst he was musing in a garden it came into his thought that the power of gravity (wch brought an apple from the tree to the ground) was not limited to a certain distance from the earth but that this power must extend much farther than was usually thought. Why not as high as the moon said he to himself & if so that must influence her motion & perhaps retain her in her orbit, whereupon he fell a calculating what would be the effect of that supposition but being absent from books & taking the common estimate in use among Geographers & our seamen before Norwood had measured the earth, that 60 English miles were contained in one degree of latitude on the surface of the Earth his computation did not agree with his theory & inclined him then to entertain a notion that together with the force of gravity there might be a mixture of that force wch the moon would have if it was carried along in a vortex.
[The earliest account of Newton, gravity and an apple.]
Memorandum of a conversation with Newton in August 1726. Quoted in Richard Westfall, Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton (1980), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent (3)  |  Account (192)  |  Apple (40)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Computation (24)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Extend (128)  |  Farther (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Garden (60)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Influence (222)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mother (114)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notion (113)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Power (746)  |  Retain (56)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Tree (246)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vortex (9)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

In this great celestial creation, the catastrophy of a world, such as ours, or even the total dissolution of a system of worlds, may possibly be no more to the great Author of Nature, than the most common accident in life with us, and in all probability such final and general Doomsdays may be as frequent there, as even Birthdays or mortality with us upon the earth. This idea has something so cheerful in it, that I know I can never look upon the stars without wondering why the whole world does not become astronomers; and that men endowed with sense and reason should neglect a science they are naturally so much interested in, and so capable of enlarging their understanding, as next to a demonstration must convince them of their immortality, and reconcile them to all those little difficulties incident to human nature, without the least anxiety. All this the vast apparent provision in the starry mansions seem to promise: What ought we then not to do, to preserve our natural birthright to it and to merit such inheritance, which alas we think created all to gratify alone a race of vain-glorious gigantic beings, while they are confined to this world, chained like so many atoms to a grain of sand.
In The Universe and the Stars: Being an Original Theory on the Visible Creation, Founded on the Laws of Nature (1750, 1837), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Atom (355)  |  Author (167)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birthday (8)  |  Birthright (4)  |  Capable (168)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Convince (41)  |  Creation (327)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doomsday (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Final (118)  |  General (511)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Grain (50)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Merit (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Probability (130)  |  Promise (67)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Sand (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)  |  Total (94)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vain (83)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

In this lecture I would like to conclude with … some characteristics [of] gravity … The most impressive fact is that gravity is simple. It is simple to state the principles completely and not have left any vagueness for anybody to change the ideas of the law. It is simple, and therefore it is beautiful. It is simple in its pattern. I do not mean it is simple in its action—the motions of the various planets and the perturbations of one on the other can be quite complicated to work out, and to follow how all those stars in a globular cluster move is quite beyond our ability. It is complicated in its actions, but the basic pattern or the system beneath the whole thing is simple. This is common to all our laws; they all turn out to be simple things, although complex in their actual actions.
In 'The Law of Gravitation, as Example of Physical Law', the first of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 33-34.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Basic (138)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Completely (135)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Law (894)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Simple (406)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Inasmuch as science represents one way of dealing with the world, it does tend to separate its practitioners from the rest. Being a scientist resembles membership of a religious order and a scientist usually finds that he has more in common with a colleague on the other side of the world than with his next-door neighbor.
In A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Door (93)  |  Find (998)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Religious (126)  |  Represent (155)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Separate (143)  |  Side (233)  |  Tend (124)  |  Usually (176)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Indeed, the ideal for a well-functioning democratic state is like the ideal for a gentleman’s well-cut suit—it is not noticed. For the common people of Britain, Gestapo and concentration camps have approximately the same degree of reality as the monster of Loch Ness. Atrocity propaganda is helpless against this healthy lack of imagination.
In 'A Challenge to “Knights in Rusty Armor”', The New York Times (14 Feb 1943), Sunday Magazine, 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Britain (24)  |  Camp (10)  |  Common People (2)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Cut (114)  |  Degree (276)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Helpless (11)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Lack (119)  |  Loch Ness Monster (2)  |  Monster (31)  |  People (1005)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Reality (261)  |  State (491)  |  Suit (11)

IODINE
It was Courtois discover'd Iodine
(In the commencement of this century),
Which, with its sisters, bromine and chlorine,
Enjoys a common parentage - the sea;
Although sometimes 'tis found, with other things,
In minerals and many saline springs.

But yet the quantity is so minute
In the great ocean, that a chemist might,
With sensibilities the most acute,
Have never brought this element to light,
Had he not thought it were as well to try
Where ocean's treasures concentrated lie.

And Courtois found that several plants marine,
Sponges, et cetera, exercise the art
Of drawing from the sea its iodine
In quantities sufficient to impart
Its properties; and he devised a plan
Of bringing it before us - clever man!
Anonymous
Discursive Chemical Notes in Rhyme (1876) by the Author of the Chemical Review, a B.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bromine (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clever (38)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Element (310)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impart (23)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poem (96)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Sea (308)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)

It appears, nevertheless, that all such simple solutions of the problem of vertebrate ancestry are without warrant. They arise from a very common tendency of the mind, against which the naturalist has to guard himself,—a tendency which finds expression in the very widespread notion that the existing anthropoid apes, and more especially the gorilla, must be looked upon as the ancestors of mankind, if once the doctrine of the descent of man from ape-like forefathers is admitted. A little reflexion suffices to show that any given living form, such as the gorilla, cannot possibly be the ancestral form from which man was derived, since ex-hypothesi that ancestral form underwent modification and development, and in so doing, ceased to exist.
'Vertebrata', entry in Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th edition (1899), Vol. 24, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arise (158)  |  Descent (27)  |  Descent Of Man (6)  |  Development (422)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Notion (113)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Problem (676)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Warrant (8)  |  Widespread (22)

It has become a cheap intellectual pastime to contrast the infinitesimal pettiness of man with the vastnesses of the stellar universes. Yet all such comparisons are illicit. We cannot compare existence and meaning; they are disparate. The characteristic life of a man is itself the meaning of vast stretches of existences, and without it the latter have no value or significance. There is no common measure of physical existence and conscious experience because the latter is the only measure there is of the former. The significance of being, though not its existence, is the emotion it stirs, the thought it sustains.
Philosophy and Civilization (1931), reprinted in David Sidorsky (ed.), John Dewey: The Essential Writings (1977), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Former (137)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Pastime (4)  |  Pettiness (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Significance (113)  |  Stir (21)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Vast (177)

It has been asserted … that the power of observation is not developed by mathematical studies; while the truth is, that; from the most elementary mathematical notion that arises in the mind of a child to the farthest verge to which mathematical investigation has been pushed and applied, this power is in constant exercise. By observation, as here used, can only be meant the fixing of the attention upon objects (physical or mental) so as to note distinctive peculiarities—to recognize resemblances, differences, and other relations. Now the first mental act of the child recognizing the distinction between one and more than one, between one and two, two and three, etc., is exactly this. So, again, the first geometrical notions are as pure an exercise of this power as can be given. To know a straight line, to distinguish it from a curve; to recognize a triangle and distinguish the several forms—what are these, and all perception of form, but a series of observations? Nor is it alone in securing these fundamental conceptions of number and form that observation plays so important a part. The very genius of the common geometry as a method of reasoning—a system of investigation—is, that it is but a series of observations. The figure being before the eye in actual representation, or before the mind in conception, is so closely scrutinized, that all its distinctive features are perceived; auxiliary lines are drawn (the imagination leading in this), and a new series of inspections is made; and thus, by means of direct, simple observations, the investigation proceeds. So characteristic of common geometry is this method of investigation, that Comte, perhaps the ablest of all writers upon the philosophy of mathematics, is disposed to class geometry, as to its method, with the natural sciences, being based upon observation. Moreover, when we consider applied mathematics, we need only to notice that the exercise of this faculty is so essential, that the basis of all such reasoning, the very material with which we build, have received the name observations. Thus we might proceed to consider the whole range of the human faculties, and find for the most of them ample scope for exercise in mathematical studies. Certainly, the memory will not be found to be neglected. The very first steps in number—counting, the multiplication table, etc., make heavy demands on this power; while the higher branches require the memorizing of formulas which are simply appalling to the uninitiated. So the imagination, the creative faculty of the mind, has constant exercise in all original mathematical investigations, from the solution of the simplest problems to the discovery of the most recondite principle; for it is not by sure, consecutive steps, as many suppose, that we advance from the known to the unknown. The imagination, not the logical faculty, leads in this advance. In fact, practical observation is often in advance of logical exposition. Thus, in the discovery of truth, the imagination habitually presents hypotheses, and observation supplies facts, which it may require ages for the tardy reason to connect logically with the known. Of this truth, mathematics, as well as all other sciences, affords abundant illustrations. So remarkably true is this, that today it is seriously questioned by the majority of thinkers, whether the sublimest branch of mathematics,—the infinitesimal calculus—has anything more than an empirical foundation, mathematicians themselves not being agreed as to its logical basis. That the imagination, and not the logical faculty, leads in all original investigation, no one who has ever succeeded in producing an original demonstration of one of the simpler propositions of geometry, can have any doubt. Nor are induction, analogy, the scrutinization of premises or the search for them, or the balancing of probabilities, spheres of mental operations foreign to mathematics. No one, indeed, can claim preeminence for mathematical studies in all these departments of intellectual culture, but it may, perhaps, be claimed that scarcely any department of science affords discipline to so great a number of faculties, and that none presents so complete a gradation in the exercise of these faculties, from the first principles of the science to the farthest extent of its applications, as mathematics.
In 'Mathematics', in Henry Kiddle and Alexander J. Schem, The Cyclopedia of Education, (1877.) As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 27-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Act (272)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attention (190)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Build (204)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Child (307)  |  Claim (146)  |  Class (164)  |  Complete (204)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Conception (154)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Creative (137)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curve (49)  |  Demand (123)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Infinitesimal Calculus (2)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Majority (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memorize (4)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Notice (77)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preeminence (3)  |  Premise (37)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Representation (53)  |  Require (219)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Search (162)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Step (231)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Table (104)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Today (314)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Verge (10)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writer (86)

It is a common failing–and one that I have myself suffered from–to fall in love with a hypothesis and to be unwilling to take no for an answer. A love affair with a pet hypothesis can waste years of precious time. There is very often no finally decisive yes, though quite often there can be a decisive no.
Advice to a Young Scientist (1979), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Failing (5)  |  Fall (230)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Love (309)  |  Myself (212)  |  Precious (41)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unwilling (9)  |  Waste (101)  |  Year (933)

It is a common observation that a science first begins to be exact when it is quantitatively treated. What are called the exact sciences are no others than the mathematical ones.
On The Doctrine of Chances, with Later Reflections (1878), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Call (769)  |  Exactness (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Treatment (130)

It is a common rule in theoretical physics, one accepted by many physicists, that anything not forbidden by the basic laws of nature must take place.
In 'The Ultimate Speed Limit', Saturday Review of Sciences (8 Jul 1972), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Basic (138)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Happen (274)  |  Law (894)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Rule (294)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)

It is a common rule with primitive people not to waken a sleeper, because his soul is away and might not have time to get back.
In The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion: Part II: Taboo and the Perils of the Soul (1890, 1911), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Rule (294)  |  Soul (226)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wake (13)

It is a strange feeling which comes over one as he stands in the centre of the tunnel, and knows that a mighty river is rolling on over his head, and that great ships with their thousands of tons burthen, sail over him. ... There is no single work of Art in London (with the exception of St. Paul's Cathedral) which excites so much curiosity and admiration among foreigners as the Tunnel. Great buildings are common to all parts of Europe, but the world has not such another Tunnel as this. There is something grand in the idea of walking under a broad river—making a pathway dry and secure beneath ships and navies!
[About visiting Brunel's Thames Tunnel, the first in the world under a navigable waterway.]
What I Saw in London: or, Men and Things in the Great Metropolis (1853), 168-169.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Building (156)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Centre (28)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dry (57)  |  Exception (73)  |  Feeling (250)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Making (300)  |  Pathway (15)  |  River (119)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sailing (14)  |  Ship (62)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strange (157)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  Thames (6)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Ton (21)  |  Tunnel (13)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It is a strange irony that the principles of science should seem to deny the necessary conviction of common sense.
In The Order of Nature (1917), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Deny (66)  |  Irony (8)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strange (157)

It is admitted by all that a finished or even a competent reasoner is not the work of nature alone; the experience of every day makes it evident that education develops faculties which would otherwise never have manifested their existence. It is, therefore, as necessary to learn to reason before we can expect to be able to reason, as it is to learn to swim or fence, in order to attain either of those arts. Now, something must be reasoned upon, it matters not much what it is, provided it can be reasoned upon with certainty. The properties of mind or matter, or the study of languages, mathematics, or natural history, may be chosen for this purpose. Now of all these, it is desirable to choose the one which admits of the reasoning being verified, that is, in which we can find out by other means, such as measurement and ocular demonstration of all sorts, whether the results are true or not. When the guiding property of the loadstone was first ascertained, and it was necessary to learn how to use this new discovery, and to find out how far it might be relied on, it would have been thought advisable to make many passages between ports that were well known before attempting a voyage of discovery. So it is with our reasoning faculties: it is desirable that their powers should be exerted upon objects of such a nature, that we can tell by other means whether the results which we obtain are true or false, and this before it is safe to trust entirely to reason. Now the mathematics are peculiarly well adapted for this purpose, on the following grounds:
1. Every term is distinctly explained, and has but one meaning, and it is rarely that two words are employed to mean the same thing.
2. The first principles are self-evident, and, though derived from observation, do not require more of it than has been made by children in general.
3. The demonstration is strictly logical, taking nothing for granted except self-evident first principles, resting nothing upon probability, and entirely independent of authority and opinion.
4. When the conclusion is obtained by reasoning, its truth or falsehood can be ascertained, in geometry by actual measurement, in algebra by common arithmetical calculation. This gives confidence, and is absolutely necessary, if, as was said before, reason is not to be the instructor, but the pupil.
5. There are no words whose meanings are so much alike that the ideas which they stand for may be confounded. Between the meaning of terms there is no distinction, except a total distinction, and all adjectives and adverbs expressing difference of degrees are avoided.
In On the Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1898), chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (117)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adjective (2)  |  Admit (45)  |  Adverb (2)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Choose (112)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Competent (20)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Confound (21)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Derive (65)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Employ (113)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exert (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Faculty (72)  |  False (100)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Far (154)  |  Fence (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Grant (73)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ocular (3)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Property (168)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rely (11)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Safe (54)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Something (719)  |  Sort (49)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Study (653)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Total (94)  |  True (212)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Verify (23)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is common wonder of all men, how among so many millions of faces, there should be none alike.
Religio Medici (1642), Part 2, Section 2. In L. C. Martin (ed.), Thomas Browne: Religio Medki and Other Works (1964), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Face (212)  |  Man (2251)  |  Wonder (236)

It is impossible for us, who live in the latter ages of the world, to make observations in criticism, morality, or in any art or science, which have not been touched upon by others. We have little else left us but to represent the common sense of mankind in more strong, more beautiful, or more uncommon lights.
Spectator, No. 253. In Samuel Austin Allibone, Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay (1880), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Morality (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Represent (155)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strong (174)  |  Touch (141)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  World (1774)

It is inaccurate to say I hate everything. I am strongly in favor of common sense, common honesty, and common decency. This makes me forever ineligible for any public office.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Decency (4)  |  Everything (476)  |  Favor (63)  |  Forever (103)  |  Hate (64)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Office (71)  |  Public (96)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strongly (9)

It is said, sometimes, that common sense is very rare.
From the original French, “On dit quelquefois, Le sens commun est fort rare.” in Dictionnaire Philosophique Portatif (1765), New Edition, Vol. 2, 276. As, translated in A Philosophical Dictionary: From the French of M. de Voltaire (1824), Vol. 2, 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Rare (89)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sense (770)

It seems to be considered as a common right to all poets and artists, to live only in the world of their own thoughts, and to be quite unfitted for the world which other men inhabit.
In Lectures on the History of Literature, Ancient and Modern (1841), 5-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Consider (416)  |  Live (628)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poet (83)  |  Right (452)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  World (1774)

It was his [Leibnitz’s] love of method and order, and the conviction that such order and harmony existed in the real world, and that our success in understanding it depended upon the degree and order which we could attain in our own thoughts, that originally was probably nothing more than a habit which by degrees grew into a formal rule. This habit was acquired by early occupation with legal and mathematical questions. We have seen how the theory of combinations and arrangements of elements had a special interest for him. We also saw how mathematical calculations served him as a type and model of clear and orderly reasoning, and how he tried to introduce method and system into logical discussions, by reducing to a small number of terms the multitude of compound notions he had to deal with. This tendency increased in strength, and even in those early years he elaborated the idea of a general arithmetic, with a universal language of symbols, or a characteristic which would be applicable to all reasoning processes, and reduce philosophical investigations to that simplicity and certainty which the use of algebraic symbols had introduced into mathematics.
A mental attitude such as this is always highly favorable for mathematical as well as for philosophical investigations. Wherever progress depends upon precision and clearness of thought, and wherever such can be gained by reducing a variety of investigations to a general method, by bringing a multitude of notions under a common term or symbol, it proves inestimable. It necessarily imports the special qualities of number—viz., their continuity, infinity and infinite divisibility—like mathematical quantities—and destroys the notion that irreconcilable contrasts exist in nature, or gaps which cannot be bridged over. Thus, in his letter to Arnaud, Leibnitz expresses it as his opinion that geometry, or the philosophy of space, forms a step to the philosophy of motion—i.e., of corporeal things—and the philosophy of motion a step to the philosophy of mind.
In Leibnitz (1884), 44-45. [The first sentence is reworded to better introduce the quotation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Algebraic (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bring (90)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corporeal (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grow (238)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Highly (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Import (5)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Legal (8)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Original (58)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precision (68)  |  Probable (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Real World (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Step (231)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Type (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It was through living among these groups and much more I think, through moving regularly from one to the other and back again that I got occupied with the problem of what, long before I put it on paper, I christened to myself as the ‘two cultures’. For constantly I felt I was moving among two groups [scientists and literary intellectuals] comparable in intelligence, identical in race, not grossly different in social origin, earning about the same incomes, who had almost ceased to communicate at all, who in intellectual, moral and psychological climate had so little in common that instead of going from Burlington House or South Kensington to Chelsea, one might have crossed an ocean.
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 2. The places mentioned are all in London. Burlington House is the home of the Royal Society and South Kensington is the site of the Natural History Museum, whereas Chelsea represents an affluent centre of artistic life.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Climate (97)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Cross (16)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  House (140)  |  Identical (53)  |  Income (17)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Race (268)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  South (38)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)

It was to Hofmeister, working as a young man, an amateur and enthusiast, in the early morning hours of summer months, before business, at Leipzig in the years before 1851, that the vision first appeared of a common type of Life-Cycle, running through Mosses and Ferns to Gymnosperms and Flowering Plants, linking the whole series in one scheme of reproduction and life-history.
(1919). As quoted in E.J.H. Corner, The Life of Plants (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (19)  |  Business (149)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Early (185)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Fern (9)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  History (673)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Hour (186)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  Life History (2)  |  Linking (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Month (88)  |  Morning (94)  |  Moss (10)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Running (61)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Summer (54)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

It will be a general expression of the facts that have been detailed, relating to the changes and transitions by electricity, in common philosophical language, to say, that hydrogen, the alkaline substances, the metals, and certain metallic oxides, are all attracted by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and contrariwise, that oxygen and acid substances are attracted by positively electrified metallic surfaces and rejected by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and these attractive and repulsive forces are sufficiently energetic to destroy or suspend the usual operation of elective affinity.
Bakerian Lecture, 'On Some Chemical Agencies of Electricity', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1807, 97, 28-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Affinity (27)  |  Alkali (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Charge (59)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Detail (146)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Metal (84)  |  Operation (213)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Say (984)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Transition (26)  |  Will (2355)

It would be foolish to give credit to Euclid for pangeometrical conceptions; the idea of geometry deifferent from the common-sense one never occurred to his mind. Yet, when he stated the fifth postulate, he stood at the parting of the ways. His subconscious prescience is astounding. There is nothing comperable to it in the whole history of science.
Ancient Science And Modern Civilization (1954, 1959), 28. In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Astounding (9)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Conception (154)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Geometry (255)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Prescience (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

It... [can] be easily shown:
1. That all present mountains did not exist from the beginning of things.
2. That there is no growing of mountains.
3. That the rocks or mountains have nothing in common with the bones of animals except a certain resemblance in hardness, since they agree in neither matter nor manner of production, nor in composition, nor in function, if one may be permitted to affirm aught about a subject otherwise so little known as are the functions of things.
4. That the extension of crests of mountains, or chains, as some prefer to call them, along the lines of certain definite zones of the earth, accords with neither reason nor experience.
5. That mountains can be overthrown, and fields carried over from one side of a high road across to the other; that peaks of mountains can be raised and lowered, that the earth can be opened and closed again, and that other things of this kind occur which those who in their reading of history wish to escape the name of credulous, consider myths.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 232-4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aught (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bone (95)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closed (38)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consider (416)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Definite (110)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Function (228)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Myth (56)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Rock (161)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wish (212)

It’s a common occurrence in a forefront area of science, where the questions are tough and the measurements extremely difficult. You have different groups using different methods and they get different answers. You see it all the time, and the public rarely notices. But when it happens to be in cosmology, it makes headlines.
As quoted in John Moble Wilford, 'Astronomers Debate Conflicting Answers for the Age of the Universe', New York Times (27 Dec 1994), C9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Area (31)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Forefront (2)  |  Group (78)  |  Happen (274)  |  Headline (6)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Notice (77)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Public (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tough (19)

John Locke invented common sense, and only Englishmen have had it ever since!
As quoted by Gilbert Ryle from a conversation he had with Russell during travel on a train on Locke with Gilbert Ryle. Ryle recounted this to D.C. Dennett, who used it as a chapter epigraph in his Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meaning of Life (1995), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  John Locke (59)  |  Sense (770)

Keep in mind that new ideas are commonplace, and almost always wrong. Most flashes of insight lead nowhere; statistically, they have a half-life of hours or maybe days. Most experiments to follow up the surviving insights are tedious and consume large amounts of time, only to yield negative or (worse!) ambiguous results.
In Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge (1998, 1999), 60
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Amount (151)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Flash (49)  |  Follow (378)  |  Half-Life (2)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insight (102)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Negative (63)  |  New (1216)  |  Result (677)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Yield (81)

Knowledge is like a knife. In the hands of a well-balanced adult it is an instrument for good of inestimable value; but in the hands of a child, an idiot, a criminal, a drunkard or an insane man, it may cause havoc, misery, suffering and crime. Science and religion have this in common, that their noble aims, their power for good, have often, with wrong men, deteriorated into a boomerang to the human race.
In 'Applied Chemistry', Science (22 Oct 1915), New Series, 42, No. 1086, 548.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Aim (165)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Crime (38)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Drunkard (5)  |  Good (889)  |  Havoc (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Idiot (22)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Insanity (8)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Knife (23)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Misery (30)  |  Noble (90)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sanity (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Value (365)  |  Wrong (234)

Knowledge is never the exclusive possession of any favoured race; the whole world is inter-dependent and a constant stream of thought had through ages enriched the common heritage of mankind.
From 'Sir J.C. Bose’s Address', Benares Hindu University 1905-1935 (1936), 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Constant (144)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Favor (63)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Inter (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Never (1087)  |  Possession (65)  |  Race (268)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Learning how to access a continuity of common sense can be one of your most efficient accomplishments in this decade. Can you imagine common sense surpassing science and technology in the quest to unravel the human stress mess? In time, society will have a new measure for confirming truth. It’s inside the people-not at the mercy of current scientific methodology. Let scientists facilitate discovery, but not invent your inner truth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Access (20)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Current (118)  |  Decade (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inner (71)  |  Inside (26)  |  Invent (51)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Let (61)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Mess (13)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Quest (39)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Stress (22)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Will (2355)

Let any man reflect on the revolution produced in society by two simple and common things, glass and gunpowder.
Reflection 328, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Glass (92)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Man (2251)  |  Produced (187)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Simple (406)  |  Society (326)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

Let us investigate more closely this property common to animal and plant, this power of producing its likeness, this chain of successive existences of individuals, which constitutes the real existence of the species.
'De la Reproduction en Générale et particulière', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. 2, 18. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Existence (456)  |  Individual (404)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Likeness (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Property (168)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Species (401)  |  Successive (73)

Man is not only part of a field, but a part and member of his group. When people are together, as when they are at work, then the most unnatural behavior, which only appears in late stages or abnormal cases, would be to behave as separate Egos. Under normal circumstances they work in common, each a meaningfully functioning part of the whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (84)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concern (228)  |  Ego (17)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Field (364)  |  Function (228)  |  Group (78)  |  Independent (67)  |  Late (118)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Separate (143)  |  Stage (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Man … begins life as an ambiguous speck of matter which can in no way be distinguished from the original form of the lowest animal or plant. He next becomes a cell; his life is precisely that of the animalcule. Cells cluster round this primordial cell, and the man is so far advanced that he might be mistaken for an undeveloped oyster; he grows still more, and it is clear that he might even be a fish; he then passes into a stage which is common to all quadrupeds, and next assumes a form which can only belong to quadrupeds of the higher type. At last the hour of birth approaches; coiled within the dark womb he sits, the image of an ape; a caricature of the man that is to be. He is born, and for some time he walks only on all fours; he utters only inarticulate sounds; and even in his boyhood his fondness for climbing trees would seem to be a relic of the old arboreal life.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belong (162)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Cell (138)  |  Climbing (4)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Dark (140)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hour (186)  |  Image (96)  |  Inarticulate (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Plant (294)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Relic (6)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speck (23)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Type (167)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Womb (24)

Many quite nefarious ideologies pass for common sense. For decades of American history, it was common sense in some quarters for white people to own slaves and for women not to vote. … If common sense sometimes preserves the social status quo, and that status quo sometimes treats unjust social hierarchies as natural, it makes good sense on such occasions to find ways of challenging common sense.
In 'A “Bad Writer” Bites Back', The New York Times (20 Mar 1999), A15.
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Decade (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Good Sense (2)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  History (673)  |  Ideology (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nefarious (2)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Pass (238)  |  People (1005)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Sense (770)  |  Slave (37)  |  Social (252)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Status (35)  |  Status Quo (5)  |  Treat (35)  |  Unjust (6)  |  Vote (16)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)  |  Woman (151)

Mathematicians deal with possible worlds, with an infinite number of logically consistent systems. Observers explore the one particular world we inhabit. Between the two stands the theorist. He studies possible worlds but only those which are compatible with the information furnished by observers. In other words, theory attempts to segregate the minimum number of possible worlds which must include the actual world we inhabit. Then the observer, with new factual information, attempts to reduce the list further. And so it goes, observation and theory advancing together toward the common goal of science, knowledge of the structure and observation of the universe.
Lecture to Sigma Xi, 'The Problem of the Expanding Universe' (1941), printed in Sigma Xi Quarterly (1942), 30, 104-105. Reprinted in Smithsonian Institution Report of the Board of Regents (1943), 97, 123. As cited by Norriss S. Hetherington in 'Philosophical Values and Observation in Edwin Hubble's Choice of a Model of the Universe', Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences (1982), 13, No. 1, 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Deal (188)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Goal (145)  |  Include (90)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observer (43)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Science (3879)  |  Segregation (2)  |  Stand (274)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  System (537)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Mathematics is often erroneously referred to as the science of common sense. Actually, it may transcend common sense and go beyond either imagination or intuition. It has become a very strange and perhaps frightening subject from the ordinary point of view, but anyone who penetrates into it will find a veritable fairyland, a fairyland which is strange, but makes sense, if not common sense.
With co-author James R. Newman, in Mathematics and the Imagination (1940), 359.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Find (998)  |  Frightening (3)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Refer (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strange (157)  |  Subject (521)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Veritable (4)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

May the conscience and the common sense of the peoples be awakened, so that we may reach a new stage in the life of nations, where people will look back on war as an incomprehensible aberration of their forefathers!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aberration (8)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Back (390)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Look Back (5)  |  Nation (193)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Reach (281)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stage (143)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)

Medicinal discovery,
It moves in mighty leaps,
It leapt straight past the common cold
And gave it us for keeps.
Pam Ayres
'Oh no! I got a cold', Some of Me Poetry (1976).
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (112)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Leap (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Past (337)  |  Straight (73)

Men of science, osteologists
And surgeons, beat some poets, in respect
For nature,—count nought common or unclean,
Spend raptures upon perfect specimens
Of indurated veins, distorted joints,
Or beautiful new cases of curved spine;
While we, we are shocked at nature’s falling off,
We dare to shrink back from her warts and blains.
From poem, 'Aurora Leigh' (1856), Book 6. In Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Harriet Waters Preston (ed.), The Complete Poetical Works of Mrs. Browning (1900), 344.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Beat (41)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Count (105)  |  Dare (50)  |  Distort (22)  |  Health (193)  |  Joint (31)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shock (37)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spine (9)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Vein (25)

Mere knowledge is comparatively worthless unless digested into practical wisdom and common sense as applied to the affairs of life.
As quoted, without citation, in John Walker, A Fork in the Road: Answers to Daily Dilemmas from the Teachings of Jesus Christ (2005), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Digest (9)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mere (84)  |  Practical (200)  |  Sense (770)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Worthless (21)

Nature is genius without common sense.
In On Love & Psychological Exercises: With Some Aphorisms & Other Essays (1998), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Genius (284)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sense (770)

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.
In 'The Epistle Dedicatory', Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), second unnumbered page.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Habit (168)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Usually (176)

New sources of power … will surely be discovered. Nuclear energy is incomparably greater than the molecular energy we use today. The coal a man can get in a day can easily do five hundred times as much work as himself. Nuclear energy is at least one million times more powerful still. If the hydrogen atoms in a pound of water could be prevailed upon to combine and form helium, they would suffice to drive a thousand-horsepower engine for a whole year. If the electrons, those tiny planets of the atomic systems, were induced to combine with the nuclei in hydrogen, the horsepower would be 120 times greater still. There is no question among scientists that this gigantic source of energy exists. What is lacking is the match to set the bonfire alight, or it may be the detonator to cause the dynamite to explode. The scientists are looking for this.
[In his last major speech to the House of Commons on 1 Mar 1955, Churchill quoted from his original printed article, nearly 25 years earlier.]
'Fifty Years Hence'. Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57:3, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Cause (541)  |  Coal (57)  |  Combine (57)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dynamite (6)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engine (98)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explode (11)  |  Form (959)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Greater (288)  |  Helium (11)  |  Himself (461)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Last (426)  |  Looking (189)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Bomb (6)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Speech (61)  |  Still (613)  |  Surely (101)  |  System (537)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

No more harmful nonsense exists than the common supposition that deepest insight into great questions about the meaning of life or the structure of reality emerges most readily when a free, undisciplined, and uncluttered (read, rather, ignorant and uneducated) mind soars above mere earthly knowledge and concern.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Deep (233)  |  Earthly (8)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Exist (443)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Insight (102)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Question (621)  |  Read (287)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reality (261)  |  Soar (23)  |  Structure (344)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Undisciplined (2)  |  Uneducated (9)

No one has yet been found so firm of mind and purpose as resolutely to compel himself to sweep away all theories and common notions, and to apply the understanding, thus made fair and even, to a fresh examination of particulars. Thus it happens that human knowledge, as we have it, is a mere medley and ill-digested mass, made up of much credulity and much accident, and also of the childish notions which we at first imbibed.
In Novum Organum (1620), Book 2, Aphorism 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Childish (20)  |  Compel (30)  |  Credulity (14)  |  Examination (98)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Happen (274)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Notion (113)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understanding (513)

No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes than a publick library; for who can see the wall crouded on every side by mighty volumes, the works of laborious meditation, and accurate inquiry, now scarcely known but by the catalogue, and preserved only to encrease the pomp of learning, without considering how many hours have been wasted in vain endeavours, how often imagination has anticipated the praises of futurity, how many statues have risen to the eye of vanity, how many ideal converts have elevated zeal, how often wit has exulted in the eternal infamy of his antagonists, and dogmatism has delighted in the gradual advances of his authority, the immutability of his decrees, and the perpetuity of his power.
Non unquam dedit
Documenta fors majora, quam fragili loco
Starent superbi.

Seneca, Troades, II, 4-6
Insulting chance ne'er call'd with louder voice,
On swelling mortals to be proud no more.
Of the innumerable authors whose performances are thus treasured up in magnificent obscurity, most are forgotten, because they never deserved to be remembered, and owed the honours which they have once obtained, not to judgment or to genius, to labour or to art, but to the prejudice of faction, the stratagem of intrigue, or the servility of adulation.
Nothing is more common than to find men whose works are now totally neglected, mentioned with praises by their contemporaries, as the oracles of their age, and the legislators of science. Curiosity is naturally excited, their volumes after long enquiry are found, but seldom reward the labour of the search. Every period of time has produced these bubbles of artificial fame, which are kept up a while by the breath of fashion and then break at once and are annihilated. The learned often bewail the loss of ancient writers whose characters have survived their works; but perhaps if we could now retrieve them we should find them only the Granvilles, Montagus, Stepneys, and Sheffields of their time, and wonder by what infatuation or caprice they could be raised to notice.
It cannot, however, be denied, that many have sunk into oblivion, whom it were unjust to number with this despicable class. Various kinds of literary fame seem destined to various measures of duration. Some spread into exuberance with a very speedy growth, but soon wither and decay; some rise more slowly, but last long. Parnassus has its flowers of transient fragrance as well as its oaks of towering height, and its laurels of eternal verdure.
The Rambler, Number 106, 23 Mar 1751. In W. J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (eds.), The Rambler (1969), Vol. 2, 200-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Authority (95)  |  Break (99)  |  Breath (59)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Call (769)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Class (164)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decree (8)  |  Delight (108)  |  Destined (42)  |  Dogmatism (14)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faction (3)  |  Fame (50)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Genius (284)  |  Growth (187)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Labour (98)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Library (48)  |  Long (790)  |  Loss (110)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Measure (232)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Oak (14)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Performance (48)  |  Period (198)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Produced (187)  |  Remember (179)  |  Reward (68)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Side (233)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spread (83)  |  Statue (16)  |  Striking (48)  |  Time (1877)  |  Towering (11)  |  Transient (12)  |  Vain (83)  |  Various (200)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wit (59)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

No scientist or student of science, need ever read an original work of the past. As a general rule, he does not think of doing so. Rutherford was one of the greatest experimental physicists, but no nuclear scientist today would study his researches of fifty years ago. Their substance has all been infused into the common agreement, the textbooks, the contemporary papers, the living present.
Attempting to distinguish between science and the humanities in which original works like Shakespeare's must be studied verbatim. 'The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case', (1970), reprinted in Public Affairs (1971), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Doing (280)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  General (511)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Living (491)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Original (58)  |  Paper (182)  |  Past (337)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Nobody knows more than a tiny fragment of science well enough to judge its validity and value at first hand. For the rest he has to rely on views accepted at second hand on the authority of a community of people accredited as scientists. But this accrediting depends in its turn on a complex organization. For each member of the community can judge at first hand only a small number of his fellow members, and yet eventually each is accredited by all. What happens is that each recognizes as scientists a number of others by whom he is recognized as such in return, and these relations form chains which transmit these mutual recognitions at second hand through the whole community. This is how each member becomes directly or indirectly accredited by all. The system extends into the past. Its members recognize the same set of persons as their masters and derive from this allegiance a common tradition, of which each carries on a particular strand.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Allegiance (4)  |  Authority (95)  |  Become (815)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Chain (50)  |  Community (104)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependance (4)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Derive (65)  |  Directly (22)  |  Enough (340)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Indirectly (7)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Master (178)  |  Member (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Number (699)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Strand (9)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Turn (447)  |  Validity (47)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

Non-standard analysis frequently simplifies substantially the proofs, not only of elementary theorems, but also of deep results. This is true, e.g., also for the proof of the existence of invariant subspaces for compact operators, disregarding the improvement of the result; and it is true in an even higher degree in other cases. This state of affairs should prevent a rather common misinterpretation of non-standard analysis, namely the idea that it is some kind of extravagance or fad of mathematical logicians. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Rather, there are good reasons to believe that non-standard analysis, in some version or other, will be the analysis of the future.
In 'Remark on Non-standard Analysis' (1974), in S. Feferman (ed.), Kurt Gödel Collected Works: Publications 1938-1974 (1990), Vol. 2, 311.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Compact (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fad (10)  |  Farther (51)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Kind (557)  |  Logician (17)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  State (491)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.
In Art (1841), collected in Nature and Art (1896), 40. https://books.google.com/books?id= Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1896
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Deal (188)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plain (33)  |  Sense (770)

Nothing could be more obvious than that the earth is stable and unmoving, and that we are in the center of the universe. Modern Western science takes its beginning from the denial of this common sense axiom.
In The Discoverers (2011), 294.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Center (33)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Denial (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stable (30)  |  Universe (857)  |  Western (45)

Nothing, however, is more common than energy in money-making, quite independent of any higher object than its accumulation. A man who devotes himself to this pursuit, body and soul, can scarcely fail to become rich. Very little brains will do; spend less than you earn; add guinea to guinea; scrape and save; and the pile of gold will gradually rise.
In Self-help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1859, 1861), 301-302.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Devote (35)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earn (7)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fail (185)  |  Gold (97)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Guinea (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Pile (12)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rich (62)  |  Rise (166)  |  Save (118)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spend (95)  |  Will (2355)

Now of the difficulties bound up with the public in which we doctors work, I hesitate to speak in a mixed audience. Common sense in matters medical is rare, and is usually in inverse ratio to the degree of education.
'Teaching and Thinking' (1894). In Aequanimitas with Other Addresses to Medical Students, Nurses and Practitioners of Medicine (1904), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Audience (26)  |  Binding (9)  |  Bound (119)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Education (378)  |  Hesitate (22)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Inverse (7)  |  Matter (798)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mixed (6)  |  Public (96)  |  Rare (89)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)

Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes, and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that they are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species. The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Class (164)  |  Close (69)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Descend (47)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Habit (168)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Observe (168)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Race (268)  |  Same (157)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Taste (90)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one’s mistakes.
In The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), Ch. 3, 61.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Creep (15)  |  Die (86)  |  Discover (553)  |  Late (118)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nowadays (6)  |  People (1005)  |  Regret (30)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sort (49)  |  Thing (1915)

Nowhere is water so beautiful as in the desert for nowhere else is it so scarce. By definition. Water, like a human being or a tree or a bird or a song gains value by rarity, singularity, isolation. In a humid climate water is common. In the desert each drop is precious.
Essay in Desert Images, collected in Beyond the Wall: Essays from the Outside (1984), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Climate (97)  |  Definition (221)  |  Desert (56)  |  Drop (76)  |  Gain (145)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Precious (41)  |  Rarity (11)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Singularity (4)  |  Song (37)  |  Tree (246)  |  Value (365)  |  Water (481)

Obviously, what our age has in common with the age of the Reformation is the fallout of disintegrating values. What needs explaining is the presence of a receptive audience. More significant than the fact that poets write abstrusely, painters paint abstractly, and composers compose unintelligible music is that people should admire what they cannot understand; indeed, admire that which has no meaning or principle.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Age (499)  |  Audience (26)  |  Compose (17)  |  Composer (7)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fallout (2)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Need (290)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Paint (22)  |  Painter (29)  |  People (1005)  |  Poet (83)  |  Presence (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Receptive (5)  |  Reformation (6)  |  Significant (74)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unintelligible (15)  |  Value (365)  |  Write (230)

On the 20th of May 1747, I took twelve patients in the scurvy, on board the Salisbury at sea. Their cases were as similar as I could have them. They all in general had putrid gums, the spots and lassitude, with weakness of their knees. They lay together in one place, being a proper apartment for the sick in the fore-hold; and had one diet common to all, viz, water-gruel sweetened with sugar in the morning; fresh mutton-broth often times for dinner; at other times puddings, boiled biscuit with sugar, &c.; and for supper, barley and raisins, rice and currents, sago and wine, or the like.
Two of these were ordered each a quart of cider a-day. Two others took twenty-five gutta of elixir vitriol three times a-day, upon an empty stomach; using a gargle strongly acidulated with it for their mouths. Two others took two spoonfuls of vinegar three times a-day, upon an empty stomach; having their gruels and their other food well acidulated with it, as also the gargle for their mouth. Two of the worst patients, with the tendons in the ham rigid, (a symptom none of the rest had), were put under a course of sea-water. Of this they drank half a pint every day, and sometimes more or less as it operated, by way of gentle physics. The others had each two oranges and one lemon given them every day. These they eat with greediness, at different times, upon an empty stomach. They continued but six days under this course, having consumed the quantity that could be spared. The two remaining patients, took the bigness of a nutmeg three times a-day, of an electuary recommended by an hospital-surgeon, made of garlic, mustard-seed, rad. raphan. balsam of Peru, and gum myrrh; using for common drink, barley-water well acidulated with tamarinds; by a decoction of which, with the addition of cremor tartar, they were gently purged three or four times during the course.
The consequence was, that the most sudden and visible good effects were perceived from the use of the oranges and lemons; one of those who had taken them, being at the end of six days fit for duty. …
Next to the oranges, I thought the cider had the best effects.
A Treatise of the Scurvy (1753), 191-193. Quoted in Carleton Ellis and Annie Louise Macleod, Vital Factors of Foods: Vitamins and Nutrition (1922), 229-230.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cider (3)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Current (118)  |  Diet (54)  |  Different (577)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elixir (5)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Fit (134)  |  Food (199)  |  Fresh (67)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Lemon (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Mutton (4)  |  Next (236)  |  Nutmeg (2)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Orange (14)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rice (4)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seaman (3)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sick (81)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supper (10)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vitamin C (3)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wine (38)  |  Worst (57)

One dictionary that I consulted remarks that “natural history” now commonly means the study of animals and plants “in a popular and superficial way,” meaning popular and superficial to be equally damning adjectives. This is related to the current tendency in the biological sciences to label every subdivision of science with a name derived from the Greek. “Ecology” is erudite and profound; while “natural history” is popular and superficial. Though, as far as I can see, both labels apply to just about the same package of goods.
In The Nature of Natural History (1961, 2014), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjective (2)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Both (493)  |  Current (118)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Dictionary (15)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Erudite (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Greek (107)  |  History (673)  |  Label (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Package (6)  |  Plant (294)  |  Popular (29)  |  Profound (104)  |  Related (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Study (653)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Way (1217)

One may summarize by saying that by a combination of behavior and physiology mammals can successfully occupy all but the most extreme environments on earth without anything more than quantitative shifts in the basic physiological pattern common to all.
From 'The role of physiology in the distribution of terrestrial vertebrates', collected in C.L. Hubbs (ed.), Zoogeography: Publ. 51 (1958), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Combination (144)  |  Earth (996)  |  Environment (216)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Mammal (37)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Say (984)  |  Shift (44)  |  Successfully (5)  |  Summarize (10)

One of the main purposes of scientific inference is to justify beliefs which we entertain already; but as a rule they are justified with a difference. Our pre-scientific general beliefs are hardly ever without exceptions; in science, a law with exceptions can only be tolerated as a makeshift. Scientific laws, when we have reason to think them accurate, are different in form from the common-sense rules which have exceptions: they are always, at least in physics, either differential equations, or statistical averages. It might be thought that a statistical average is not very different from a rule with exceptions, but this would be a mistake. Statistics, ideally, are accurate laws about large groups; they differ from other laws only in being about groups, not about individuals. Statistical laws are inferred by induction from particular statistics, just as other laws are inferred from particular single occurrences.
The Analysis of Matter (1927), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Already (222)  |  Average (82)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Exception (73)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Group (78)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inference (45)  |  Justification (48)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pre-Scientific (5)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Single (353)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Toleration (6)

One of the memorable moments of my life was when Willard Libby came to Princeton with a little jar full of crystals of barium xenate. A stable compound, looking like common salt, but much heavier. This was the magic of chemistry, to see xenon trapped into a crystal.
Letter to Oliver Sacks. Quoted in Oliver Sacks, Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood (2001), footnote, 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Barium (4)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Jar (9)  |  Willard Frank Libby (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magic (86)  |  Memorable (4)  |  Moment (253)  |  Noble Gas (4)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Salt (46)  |  See (1081)  |  Stable (30)  |  Trap (6)  |  Visit (26)  |  Xenon (5)

Our natural way of thinking about these coarser emotions is that the mental perception of some fact excites the mental affection called the emotion, and that this latter state of mind gives rise to the bodily expression. My theory, on the contrary, is that the bodily changes follow directly the perception of the exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur IS the emotion. Common-sense says, we lose our fortune, are sorry and weep; we meet a bear, are frightened and run; we are insulted by a rival, are angry and strike. The hypothesis here to be defended says that this order of sequence is incorrect, that the one mental state is not immediately induced by the other, that the bodily manifestations must first be interposed between, and that the more rational statement is that we feel sorry because we cry, angry because we strike, afraid because we tremble, and not that we cry, strike, or tremble, because we are sorry, angry, or fearful, as the case may be. Without the bodily states following on the perception, the latter would be purely cognitive in form, pale, colorless, destitute of emotional warmth. We might then see the bear, and judge it best to run, receive the insult and deem it right to strike, but we should not actually feel afraid or