Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday


Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Naturally

Naturally Quotes (11 quotes)

Ax: 100 Every thing doth naturally persevere in yt state in wch it is unlesse it bee interrupted by some externall cause, hence… [a] body once moved will always keepe ye same celerity, quantity & determination of its motion.
Newton’s 'Waste Book' (1665). Quoted in Richard Westfall, Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton (1980), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (40)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (542)  |  Determination (78)  |  External (57)  |  Interrupt (6)  |  Law Of Motion (14)  |  Motion (312)  |  Persevere (5)  |  Quantity (132)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2354)

But the nature of our civilized minds is so detached from the senses, even in the vulgar, by abstractions corresponding to all the abstract terms our languages abound in, and so refined by the art of writing, and as it were spiritualized by the use of numbers, because even the vulgar know how to count and reckon, that it is naturally beyond our power to form the vast image of this mistress called ‘Sympathetic Nature.’
The New Science, bk. 2, para. 378 (1744, trans. 1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (126)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  All (4107)  |  Art (657)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Count (105)  |  Detach (5)  |  Form (960)  |  Image (96)  |  Know (1519)  |  Language (293)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Number (701)  |  Power (747)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Refine (8)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (178)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Write (231)  |  Writing (189)

I have just received copies of “To-day” containing criticisms of my letter. I am in no way surprised to find that these criticisms are not only unfair and misleading in the extreme. They are misleading in so far that anyone reading them would be led to believe the exact opposite of the truth. It is quite possible that I, an old and trained engineer and chronic experimenter, should put an undue value upon truth; but it is common to all scientific men. As nothing but the truth is of any value to them, they naturally dislike things that are not true. ... While my training has, perhaps, warped my mind so that I put an undue value upon truth, their training has been such as to cause them to abhor exact truth and logic.
[Replying to criticism by Colonel Acklom and other religious parties attacking Maxim's earlier contribution to the controversy about the modern position of Christianity.]
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  All (4107)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (542)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Common (436)  |  Content (70)  |  Contribution (88)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Copy (33)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Engineer (123)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Find (999)  |  Leading (17)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Old (480)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (554)  |  Reading (133)  |  Receive (114)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Undue (4)  |  Unfair (8)  |  Value (368)  |  Way (1216)

I must … explain how I was led to concern myself with the pathogenic protozoa. … I was sent to Algeria and put in charge of a department of the hospital at Bone. A large number of my patients had malarial fevers and I was naturally led to study these fevers of which I had only seen rare and benign forms in France.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1907), 'Protozoa as Causes of Diseases', collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967, 1999), 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Benign (2)  |  Bone (96)  |  Charge (60)  |  Concern (228)  |  Department (92)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fever (29)  |  Form (960)  |  France (27)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Large (394)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Number (701)  |  Pathogen (5)  |  Patient (199)  |  Protozoa (5)  |  Rare (89)  |  Study (656)

If a teacher is full of his subject, and can induce enthusiasm in his pupils; if his facts are concrete and naturally connected, the amount of material that an average child can assimilate without injury is as astonishing as is the little that will fag him if it is a trifle above or below or remote from him, or taught dully or incoherently.
In The North American Review (Mar 1883), No. 316, 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Above (6)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Average (82)  |  Below (24)  |  Child (309)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Connect (125)  |  Dull (54)  |  Education (379)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Induce (23)  |  Injury (36)  |  Little (708)  |  Material (353)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Remote (83)  |  Subject (522)  |  Teach (278)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tire (7)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Will (2354)

Inspiration plays no less a role in science than it does in the realm of art. It is a childish notion to think that a mathematician attains any scientifically valuable results by sitting at his desk with a ruler, calculating machines or other mechanical means. The mathematical imagination of a Weierstrass is naturally quite differently oriented in meaning and result than is the imagination of an artist, and differs basically in quality. But the psychological processes do not differ. Both are frenzy (in the sense of Plato’s “mania”) and “inspiration.”
Max Weber
From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufsδtze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. As given in H.H. Gerth and C. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Attain (125)  |  Basic (139)  |  Both (494)  |  Calculating Machine (3)  |  Childish (20)  |  Desk (13)  |  Differ (85)  |  Differently (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspiration (76)  |  Machine (259)  |  Mania (3)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (235)  |  Means (580)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Notion (113)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plato (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Quality (134)  |  Realm (85)  |  Result (678)  |  Role (85)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Art (186)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Think (1086)  |  Value (368)  |  Karl Weierstrass (10)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4107)  |  Alone (312)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conceive (99)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (207)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (305)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (423)  |  Fear (199)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1284)  |  Follow (379)  |  Former (137)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1575)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1519)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (609)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (789)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (510)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (468)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (304)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rise (166)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (954)  |  True (214)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (607)  |  Understanding (514)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Vary (27)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1216)  |  Whereby (2)  |  Why (491)

The average English author [of mathematical texts] leaves one under the impression that he has made a bargain with his reader to put before him the truth, the greater part of the truth, and nothing but the truth; and that if he has put the facts of his subject into his book, however difficult it may be to unearth them, he has fulfilled his contract with his reader. This is a very much mistaken view, because effective teaching requires a great deal more than a bare recitation of facts, even if these are duly set forth in logical order—as in English books they often are not. The probable difficulties which will occur to the student, the objections which the intelligent student will naturally and necessarily raise to some statement of fact or theory—these things our authors seldom or never notice, and yet a recognition and anticipation of them by the author would be often of priceless value to the student. Again, a touch of humour (strange as the contention may seem) in mathematical works is not only possible with perfect propriety, but very helpful; and I could give instances of this even from the pure mathematics of Salmon and the physics of Clerk Maxwell.
In Perry, Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 59-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Author (168)  |  Average (82)  |  Bare (33)  |  Bargain (5)  |  Book (394)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Contention (14)  |  Contract (11)  |  Deal (188)  |  Difficult (247)  |  Difficulty (198)  |  Effective (59)  |  English (35)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Forth (13)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Great (1575)  |  Greater (288)  |  Helpful (16)  |  Humour (116)  |  Impression (114)  |  Instance (33)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Leave (130)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mistake (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Notice (77)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Part (222)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physic (516)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (554)  |  Priceless (7)  |  Probable (21)  |  Propriety (6)  |  Pure (292)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reader (41)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Require (219)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Seem (145)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Set (394)  |  Statement (142)  |  Strange (157)  |  Student (301)  |  Subject (522)  |  Teach (278)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Text (14)  |  Theory (972)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (142)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Unearth (2)  |  Value (368)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2354)  |  Work (1351)

The present rate of progress [in X-ray crystallography] is determined, not so much by the lack of problems to investigate or the limited power of X-ray analysis, as by the restricted number of investigators who have had a training in the technique of the new science, and by the time it naturally takes for its scientific and technical importance to become widely appreciated.
Concluding remark in Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Crystal Physics', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (234)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Become (815)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Determine (144)  |  Importance (287)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Lack (119)  |  Limit (281)  |  Limited (102)  |  New (1217)  |  Number (701)  |  Power (747)  |  Present (620)  |  Problem (679)  |  Progress (468)  |  Rate (29)  |  Ray (114)  |  Restricted (2)  |  Science (3880)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Take (10)  |  Technical (43)  |  Technique (80)  |  Time (1877)  |  Training (80)  |  Widely (9)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

There’s a new science out called orthomolecular medicine. You correct the chemical imbalance with amino acids and vitamins and minerals that are naturally in the body.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Correct (87)  |  Imbalance (2)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mineral (59)  |  New (1217)  |  Science (3880)  |  Vitamin (13)

We divide the world…
Into chemical and natural,
Into fictional and factual.
Into science and supernatural
. But it’s actually naturally not that white and black.
From song, 'The Fence' (2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Black (42)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Divide (76)  |  Factual (8)  |  Natural (796)  |  Science (3880)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  White (127)  |  World (1778)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.